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Dr. Donald G Kyle

Name

[Kyle, Dr. Donald G]
  • Professor, History
  • Professor, Classical Studies

Biography

With a PhD in ancient history from McMaster University, Canada, I came to UTA and became an Assistant professor (1984-89), Assistant chair (1987- 94), Associate professor (1989-98), Department chair (1999-2006), and Full Professor (1998-present).

         My teaching honors include the Chancellor's Council Award for Excellence in Teaching at UTA (1990), and membership in the UTA Academy of Distinguished Teachers (1999). I also was twice an invited teaching professor at the International Olympic Academy in Greece. I also was the Invited Director of a week long Faculty Resource Seminar, “The Allure of Ancient Greek Sport,” New York University Classics Department (June 5-10, 2016).

         My strong publication record includes books such as Athletics in Ancient Athens, and Spectacles of Death in Ancient Rome. My award-winning Sport and Spectacle in the Ancient World of 2007 appeared in a second edition in 2015. I also have co-edited volumes including Sport History and Sport Mythology and a Companion to Ancient Sport and Spectacle (2014). I also have written numerous articles and book chapters on topics from Greek athletic prizes to Roman beast spectacles.

         As an internationally recognized expert on ancient sport and spectacles, I have delivered numerous invited lectures, e.g. at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Hood Museum at Dartmouth, the University of New Hampshire, the University of Kentucky, the Worcester Art Museum, the Nicholson Museum in Sydney, Australia, and at Karl-Franzens Universität, Graz, Austria. I also have often been interviewed by the media (e.g. New York Times, Washington Post, BBC Radio), and I have consulted on and appeared in History Channel shows on Roman gladiators and on the Ancient Olympics. I also have served on the editorial boards of three journals of sport history.

Professional Preparation

    • 1981 Ph.D. in HistoryMcMaster University
    • 1977 B.Ed. in History and Physical EducationUniversity of Toronto
    • 1974 M.A. in HistoryMcMaster University
    • 1973 Honors BA in History and HumanitiesYork University

Appointments

    • Jan 1998 to Present Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1999 to Jan 2006 Chair
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1989 to Jan 1998 Assoc Prof
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1987 to Jan 1994 Assistant Chair
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1993 to Dec 1993 Adjunct Professor
      History , Southern Methodist University
    • Jan 1984 to Jan 1989 Assist Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1981 to Jan 1984 Visiting Assistant Professor
      University of Saskatchewan
    • Jan 1980 to Jan 1981 Lecturer
      University of Winnipeg
    • Jan 1980 to Dec 1980 Sessional Lecturer
      History, McMaster University
    • Jan 1979 to Jan 1980 Teaching Assistantship Coordinator
      McMaster University
    • Jan 1974 to Jan 1979 Teaching Assistant
      McMaster University

Awards and Honors

    • Jan  2009 2009 R.D. Milns Visiting Professor, School of History, Philosophy, Religion and Classics, U. of Queensland, Australia, presentation of a series of lectures on ancient sport history at Brisbane and Sydney; travel and accommodation provided (May 2009). sponsored by U. of Queensland, Australia
    • Jan  2008 2008 Book Award sponsored by North American Society for Sport History.
      Description:

      2008 Book Award of the Nothrh American Society for Spoert History

    • Jan  2001 2001 UTA nominee for the Texas State Minnie Stevens Piper Professorship. sponsored by Texas State Minnie Stevens Piper
    • Jan  2000 2000 Golladay Award for Teaching in Liberal Arts, UTA sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan  1999 1999- Distinguished Teaching Professor, Academy of Distinguished Teachers, UTA. sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan  1998 1999, 98 Supervising Professor, Post-Graduate Seminar (Ancient Section) sponsored by International Olympic Academy, Olympia, Greece (summer).
    • Jan  1997 1998, 97 Liberal Arts Nominee for the Academy of Distinguished Teachers at UTA. sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • May  1993 1993 Visiting Humanities Fellowship (summer) sponsored by Humanities Research Group, U. of Windsor
    • Jan  1992 1992 Maxwell C. Howell Honorary Address sponsored by North American Society for Sport History.
    • Jan  1990 1990 Chancellor's Council Award for Excellence in Teaching at UTA sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington

Other Activities

    • Additional Information
      • Aug 2013 Biographical Listings
      • Additional Information
        • Aug 2013 Learned and Honor Societies

Research and Expertise

  • Teaching Fields
    Greek and Roman History and Civilization; Ancient Sport and Recreation; Greek and Roman Historians; History of Civilization

Publications

      Journal Article Forthcoming
      • Reprinting of two of my articles: “The Only Woman in All Greece”: Kyniska, Agesilaus, Alcibiades and Olympia,” J. Sport History 30 (2003) 183-203; and “Spectators and Crowds in Sport History: A Critical Analysis of Allen Guttmann’s Sports Spectators,” J. Sport History 30 (1987) 209-214, in W. Vamplew and M. Dyerson, ed., Sports History, Sage Publishing.

        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Chapter Forthcoming
      • Chapter: “Reading Ancient Greek and Roman Sport,“ Oxford Handbook of Sports History, W. Wilson and R. Edelman, eds. 7,000 words + Biblio. in press.

        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]
      Forthcoming
      • “Animal Events,” Oxford Handbook of Sport and Spectacle in the Ancient World, T. Scanlon and A. Futrell, eds., 5,000 words, in press.

        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2016
      • “Athletic Violence in Ancient Greek Boxing and Pankration,” Actual Archaeology Magazine (Turkey), Spring 2016, pp. 90-101.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2016
      • Book Review of J. Swaddling, The Ancient Olympic Games, 3rd. ed, Journal of Sport History, 43.1 (2016) 143-144.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2016
      • Book Review, S. Remijsen, The End of Greek Athletics in Late Antiquity, 2015, Classical Journal 5.2 (2016) 3 pp.

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]

      Monograph 2015
      • 2015 Second edition of my Sport and Spectacle in the Ancient World for Wiley-Blackwell. 359 pp.

        {Monograph} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2015
      • Review of S.P. Mattern, The Prince of Medicine: Galen in the Roman Empire (Oxford UP).  Journal of Sport History.

        Journal of Sport History, 42.1, 137-8, 750 words.

        {Book Review} [Refereed/Juried]

      Anthology Work/Essay 2014
      • Companion to Sport and Spectacle in Greek and Roman Antiquity for Wiley-Blackwell, Co-editor with P. Christesen, 45 6,000-word essays, 658 pp., 2014.

        Co-wrote "General Introduction, " 1-15, and wrote three entries:

        "Greek Athletic Competitions: The Ancient Olympics and More," 21-35.

        "Sport, Society, and Politics in Ancient Athens," 159-174,

        "Greek Female Sport: Rites, Running, and Racing," 258-274.

        {Anthology Work/Essay} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2014
      • Republication journal article "Watching and Winning the Greek Pentathlon,” with new postscript, in T.F. Scanlon, ed., Oxford Readings in Sport in the Greek and Roman Worlds (Oxford Readings in Classical Studies) 228-248.

        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2014
      • 2014 Republication of journal article "Animal Spectacles in Ancient Rome," with new postscript, in T.F. Scanlon, ed., Oxford Readings in Sport in the Greek and Roman Worlds (Oxford Readings in Classical Studies) 269-295.

        {new type} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2012
      • D. Potter, The Victor’s Crown: A History of Ancient Sport from Homer to Byzantium (Oxford, pp. 416)  Journal of Sport History, 559-63 words.

        {Book Review} [Refereed/Juried]
      2012
      • F. Meijer, Chariot Racing in the Roman Empire, for The Classical Journal, C-J Online 2012.01.02.

        {Book Review} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2010
      • Rev. of Greek Sport and Social Status, by M. Golden. Sport in History 2010: 331-334.
        {Book Review} [Refereed/Juried]
      2010
      • Review of Gladiators: History's Most Deadly Sport, by F. Meijer.The Historian 71, no 2, 2010: 423-4.
        {Book Review} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2010
      • Kyle, D. "Republication of "E. Norman Gardiner and the Decline of Greek Sport," from Essays on Sport History and Sport Mythology, Kyle and Stark eds. 1990; pp. 284-311, in J. König, Greek Athletics, Edinburgh Readings in the Ancient World, Edinburgh U. Press." (2010): 284-311.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2010
      • ""Origins"." Routledge Companion to Sport History. Ed. ed. S. Pope and J. McNaught. London: Routledge, 2010. 114-128.
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]
      2010
      • ""Panhellenism and Particularism: Herodotus on Sport, Greekness, and War"." Sport in the Cultures of the Ancient World. Ed. Z. Papaconstantinou. Routledge, 2010. 35-63.
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2009
      • Review:  F. Meijer, Gladiators: History’s Most Deadly Sport, The Historian 71.2, pp. 423-4.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2009
      • Review of S. Hornblower and C. Morgan, eds., Pindar’s Poetry, Patrons, and Festivals: From Archaic Greece to the Roman Empire (Oxford, 480 pp.) New England Classical Journal 36.3, pp. 195-8.
        {Book Review} [Refereed/Juried]

      Encyclopedia Entry 2009
      • "Invited entries, “Greek Games” (1,200 word), “Females and Athletics” (200 words), “Colosseum,” (1,000 words), “Ludus Magnus” (200 words)." Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome.. , 2009.
        {Encyclopedia Entry} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2008
      • Review: N. Crowther, Sport in Ancient Times, Sport History Review 39.2, pp. 201-203.
        {Book Review} [Refereed/Juried]
      2008
      • Review: “Dying with Honor: Cato, Seneca, and Noble Suicide,” on C. Edwards, Death in Ancient Rome    (Yale 2007), J. of Roman Archaeology 21, pp. 401-404.
        {Book Review} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2008
      • Kyle, Donald. "Herodotus on Ancient Athletics, Olympia, and Egypt. Antike Lebenswelten. Konstanz - Wandel - Wirkungsmacht. Festschrift für Ingomar Weiler (Ancient Life: Continuity, Change, and Effective Power)." Philippika, Marburger altertumskundliche Abhandlungen .25 (2008): 149-59.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book 2008
      • Kyle, Donald. Eds. Kyle, Donald and R. Fairbanks. Baseball in America and America in Baseball. Texas A&M, 2008.
        {Book} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2007
      • Review: N. Crowther, Sport in Ancient Times, Sport History Review 39.2, pp. 201-203.
        {Book Review} [Refereed/Juried]
      2007
      • Review Essay: “Greek Athletics in the Roman Empire: Literature, Art, Identity and Culture,” on Z. Newby, Greek Athletics in the Roman World (Oxford) and J. König, Athletics and Literature in the Roman Empire (Cambridge), The Classical Journal 103.1, pp. 107-113.
        {Book Review} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2007
      • Kyle, Donald. "Greek Athletics in the Roman Empire: Literature, Art, Identity and Culture on Z. Newby, Greek Athletics in the Roman World (Oxford) and J. König, Athletics and Literature in the Roman Empire (Cambridge)." The Classical Journal 103.1 (2007): 107-113.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2007
      • Kyle, Donald. "Fabulous Females and Ancient Olympia." Onward to the Olympics: Historical Perspectives on the Olympic Games (2007): 132-52.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book 2007
      • Book: Sport and Spectacle in the Ancient World, pp. 403, Wiley-Blackwell, 2007.

        Winner of the 2008 Book Award from the North American Society for Sport History.

        {Book} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2003
      • Kyle, Donald. "From the Battlefield to the Arena: Gladiators, Militarism, and the Roman Republic." War without Weapons: Militarism, Sport, Anti-Militarism (European Sport History Review V) (2003): 10-27.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book 2003
      • Kyle, Donald. Eds. History, Sport. The Only Woman in All Greece: Kyniska, Agesilaus, Alcibiades and Olympia. , 2003.
        {Book} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2000
      • Kyle, Donald. "Inside the Roman Arena." Archaeology Odyssey 3.1 (2000): 14-25.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1998
      • Kyle, Donald. "Games, Prizes and Athletes in Greek Sport: Patterns and Perspectives." Classical Bulletin 74.2 (1998): 103-127.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      1998
      • Kyle, Donald. "Games, Prizes and Athletes in Greek Sport: Patterns and Perspectives." Classical Bulletin 74.2 (1998): 103-127.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      1998
      • "Games, Prizes and Athletes in Greek Sport: Patterns and Perspectives." Classical Bulletin 74.2 (1998): 103-127.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book 1998
      • Kyle, Donald. Spectacles of Death in Ancient Rome. London: Routledge, 1998.
        {Book} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1996
      • Kyle, Donald. "Gifts and Glory: Panathenaic and Other Greek Athletic Prizes." Worshipping Athena: Panathenaia and Parthenon (1996): 106- 136.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      1996
      • Kyle, Donald. "Winning at Olympia." Archaeology 49.4 (1996): 26-37, 75.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1995
      • Kyle, Donald. "Philostratus, Repêchage, Running and Wrestling: The Greek Pentathlon Again." J. of Sport History 22.1 (1995): 60-65.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1994
      • Kyle, Donald. "Aetiology and Iconography: Reinterpreting Greek Festival Rituals." Journal of Sport History 21 (1994): 279-288.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      1994
      • Kyle, Donald. "Animal Spectacles in Ancient Rome: Meat and Meaning." Nikephoros (Zeitschrift für Sport und Kultur im Altertum) 7 (1994): 181-205.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1993
      • Kyle, Donald. "W. Decker on Sport in Pharaonic Egypt: Recreations and Rituals, Combats and Ceremonies, Agonism- and Athletics?." Canadian Journal of History of Sport 24.1 (1993): 75-83.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book 1993
      • Kyle, Donald. Athletics in Ancient Athens. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1993.
        {Book} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1992
      • Kyle, Donald. "The Panathenaic Games: Sacred and Civic Athletics." Goddess and Polis: The Panathenaic Festival in Ancient Athens (1992): 77-101, 203.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1991
      • Kyle, Donald. "Athletes and Archaeologists: Some Recent Works on the Sites and Significance of Ancient Greek Sport." International Journal of History of Sport 8 (1991): 270-283.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      1991
      • Kyle, Donald. "E. Norman Gardiner: Historian of Ancient Sport." International J. of the History of Sport 8.1 (1991): 28-55.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1990
      • Kyle, Donald. "Winning and Watching the Greek Pentathlon." J. of Sport History 17.3 (1990): 291-305.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1987
      • Kyle, Donald. "Athens- The Athletic." Canadian J. of History of Sport 18.2 (1987): 15-25.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      1987
      • Kyle, Donald. "Non-Competition in Homeric Sport: Spectatorship and Status." Stadion (Internationale Zeitschrift für Geschichte des Sports) 10 (1987): 1-19.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1984
      • Kyle, Donald. "Solon and Athletics." The Ancient World 9.3&4 (1984): 91-105.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1983
      • Kyle, Donald. "Directions in Ancient Sport History (1972-1982)." J. of Sport History 10.1 (1983): 7-34.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Presentations

    • March  2016
      “Roman Spectacular Blood Sports,”

      Invited Lecture, Master’s Series, Worcester Art Museum

    • February  2015
      “Searching for Female Athletes in Antiquity"

      Public Lecture to DFW chapter of the   Archaeological Institute of America,

    • November  2007

      2007 Endowed Lecture, Memphis Sesquicentennial Lecture Series, U. of Memphis, Nov.

    • April  2007

      'Revisiting the Ancient Olympics: Perspectives and History,'    

      2007 Invited paper for an international conference, a Greek-Chinese-U.S. collaboration, “From Athens to Beijing: West Meets East in the Olympic Games,” U. Missouri, St. Louis (Apr. 14).  

    • October  2006

      Victory and Virtue: Ancient Olympic Ideals and History'     

       

      2006 The Greene Settle Annual Lecture, Foundation for Hellenic Ideals, U. of Kentucky (Oct. 7).

    • January  2005

      "Ancient Olympics: Myth and History"   

      2005 Showcase Lecture, UT System Chancellor's Council Executive Meeting, Wyndam Hotel, Arlington, Jan. 29.

    • September  2004

      'Mother of Contests': Olympia, Athens, and Athletes'

      2004Invited Lecture, Cleveland Chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America, Cleveland Museum of Art (Sept.)

    • March  2004

      'Ancient Olympic History: By Flickering Torchlight?'    

      2004 Endowed Lecture,  John C. Rouman Lecture Series, U. of New Hampshire, Apr. 14.

    • March  2004

      'Revisiting the Ancient Olympic Games: Gods, Athletes, and Spectators'

      2004 Endowed Lecture, Estelle Shohet Brettman Memorial Lecture Series, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, March 21

    • October  2003

      'Fabulous Females and Ancient Olympia'

      2003 keynote Address, Canadian Academic Institute in Athens, Wilfred Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Oct. 3.

    • February  2003

      'The New Ancient Olympics and their Modern Relevance'

      2003 Keynote Address: American Foundation for Greek Language and Culture, Interdisciplinary Center for Hellenic Studies, U. of South Florida, Tampa, Feb. 27.

    • August  2002

      "Kyniska of Sparta: Engendering Olympic Victory?' 

      2002  North American Society for Sport History

    • February  2000

      'Prizes in the Ancient Greek Games'

      2000  Invited lecture: colloquium on “Athletic Contests in the Ancient World,” sponsored by the Calgary Society for Mediterranean Studies, U. of Calgary (Feb.)

    • September  1999

      "Deaths in the Roman Arena"    

      1999 invited paper, "Roman Nights" Lecture Series, Camden County College, N.J. (Sept.)

    • October  1998

      "The Other Side of the Ancient Olympics"

      1998 invited paper, New York Classics Society Lecture Series, New York (Oct.)

    • October  1997

      "The Pentathlon at the Ancient Greek Olympics"

      1997 invited presentation, The Anderson Sport Performance Lecture, 
      University of Texas at Arlington (October).

    • October  1996

      "The First Hundred Olympiads: A Process of Decline or Democratization?" 

      1996 invited paper, "Sport und Spektakel in Olympia" conference, 
      Karl-Franzens-Universität, Graz, Austria (October)

    • May  1995

      "Contests and Controversies in Greek Athletics"  

      1995  North American Society for Sport History (May).

    • December  1994

      "Games, Prizes and Athletes: Patterns and Perspectives" 

      1994 special joint session of the Archaeological Institute of America and the American Philological Association  (December).

    • October  1992

      "Gifts and Glory: Panathenaic and Other Greek Athletic Prizes"   

      1992  invited paper, international symposium, "Athens and Beyond," Dartmouth College (October).

  • Past
    •  
      "The Allure of Ancient Greek Sport: The Olympics and Much More"

      Invited Director of a week long Faculty Resource Seminar, “The Allure of Ancient Greek Sport,” NYU Classics Department (June 6-10, 2016).

  • Past
    •  
      “Searching for Female Athletes in Antiquity,”

      Presentation to DFW chapter of the  Archaeological Institute of America

  • Past
    •  
      “Roman Spectacular Blood Sports,”

      Master’s Series,    Worcester Art Museum, Worcester MA

  • Past
    •  
      “Roman Spectacular Blood Sports,”

      Invited Public Museum Lecture

  • Past
    •  
      Roman Spectacular Blood Sports

      Museum Lecture, Master's Series, Wocester Art Museum

Projects

  • 2015
    • Apr 2015 to Present Boxing and Homer in Early Greece

      Working out from the figure of Epeios, the victorious boxer in the Games of Patroklos in Homer's Iliad Bk. 23, this ancient sport historical study tackles the question of Homer's "world(s)" from the perspective of sport history. It examines boxing in Greek history before and after Homer (c. 725 BCE) in the historical context of Early Iron or Archaic Greece.

      Why did Homer include Funeral Games, especially boxing, in the Iliad, and also in non-funereal contests in the Odyssey? Why is Epeios depicted as a fearsome and victorious boxer, but also as an inferior warrior and a laughably poor competior in the weight-throw (solos)? How do Epeios and Odyyseus overlap as characters in terms of sport?

      Examining material evidence (e.g. vase paintings) as well as Homer (and Hesiod and other poets), and integrating major recent studies of Homer and Greek sport, the work will use the figure of Epeios as a window into a changing social and sporting world in early Greece.

      Where did Epeios, and other boxers, fit in society? Why was he eager to compete for the specific prizes offered in the boxing (a mule) and the weight-throw (a lump of iron)?

      Also, why did Homer include mention of Epeios as the builder of the "Trojan Horse" in the Odyssey, and how is the figure of Epeios received in later ancient literature and art?

      Role: Principal Investigator PI: Donald Kyle

Other Creative Activities

  • 2016
    • Museum Public Lecture
      • Mar 2016 “Roman Spectacular Blood Sports,”

        Invited Lecture: “Roman Spectacular Blood Sports,” Master’s Series,                                       Worcester Art Museum, Worcester MA (March 17, 2016).

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Courses

      • HIST 3374-001 Ancient Greece

        This course examines the origins, development, spread, problems and achievements of ancient Greek states and empires. Most emphasis will center on the political history of Early and Classical Greece, especially that of Athens. Topics include: Bronze Age and Homer, the Archaic Age and the city state, Spartan militarism, Athenian democracy and imperialism, etc.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-003 History of Civilization

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history and of human nature, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-001 History of Civilization

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history and of human nature, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3374-001 Ancient Greece

        This course examines the origins, development, spread, problems and achievements of ancient Greek states and empires. Most emphasis will center on the political history of Early and Classical Greece, especially that of Athens. Topics include: Bronze Age and Homer, the Archaic Age and the city state, Spartan militarism, Athenian democracy and imperialism, the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, etc.  By highlighting topics of interest and relevance, the course encourages students to discuss and to understand historical developments, themes and relationships in the history of the ancient Greeks.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • HIST 2301-003 HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history and of human nature, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • HIST 3374-001 Ancient Greece

        This course examines the origins, development, spread, problems and achievements of ancient Greek states and empires. Most emphasis will center on the political history of Early and Classical Greece, especially that of Athens. Topics include: Bronze Age and Homer, the Archaic Age and the city state, Spartan militarism, Athenian democracy and imperialism, the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, etc.  By highlighting topics of interest and relevance, the course encourages students to discuss and to understand historical developments, themes and relationships in the history of the ancient Greeks.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-002 History of Civilization before 1500

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history and of human nature, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-002 History of Civilization I

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history and of human nature, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-003 History of Civilization 2301 I

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history and of human nature, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-001 History of Civilization before 1500

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-003 HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history and of human nature, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3380-001 HISTORY OF ANCIENT SPORT

        This course provides an interdisciplinary examination of the nature, variety and role of sport- from casual leisure to serious athletics- in ancient history. How and why was sport an integral part of Greek and Roman life? Issues to be confronted include: the definition of sport and athletics, precursors of the phenomenon in the Ancient Near East; the origins and development of sport in Greece and Rome; the Olympic Games; Roman circuses and spectacles, religious and political implications; the nature of events and contests; intellectual and popular attitudes; and sport in culture (e.g. literature, art, architecture) and society. The primary focus will be on athletics in Greece and spectator sports in Rome, but consideration will be given to recreation, physical education, and leisure.

        The course will include lectures, media presentations, and class discussions. Students will be responsible for reading assigned documents, contributing to discussions, and taking all tests and exams.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-002 History of Civilization before 1500

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history and of human nature, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-003 HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history and of human nature, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3374-001 Ancient Greece

        This course examines the origins, development, spread, problems and achievements of ancient Greek states and empires. Most emphasis will center on the political history of Early and Classical Greece, especially that of Athens. Topics include: Bronze Age and Homer, the Archaic Age and the city state, Spartan militarism, Athenian democracy and imperialism, the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, etc.By highlighting topics of interest and relevance, the course encourages students to discuss and to understand historical developments, themes and relationships in the history of the ancient Greeks.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 2301-001 History of Civilization before 1500

         An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-002 History of Civilization before 1500

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history and of human nature, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3375-001 Ancient Rome

        This course will investigate and discuss historical developments, themes and relationships in Roman history.Lessons, including the use of ancient sources, will span the origin, development, expansion, problems, and achievements of the Republic and Empire. Topics to be discussed include: the emergence of the Roman state from an Italian and Etruscan backgrounds, developments within the Republic, the acquisition of an empire, the Roman Revolution, the Principate, Empire and emperors, the Roman Peace, and the Late Empire.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-002 History of Civilization before 1500

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history and of human nature, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3380-001 HISTORY OF ANCIENT SPORT

        This course provides an interdisciplinary examination of the nature, variety and role of sport- from casual leisure to serious athletics- in ancient history.How and why was sport an integral part of Greek and Roman life?Issues to be confronted include: the definition of sport and athletics, precursors of the phenomenon in the Ancient Near East; the origins and development of sport in Greece and Rome; the Olympic Games; Roman circuses and spectacles, religious and political implications; the nature of events and contests; intellectual and popular attitudes; and sport in culture (e.g. literature, art, architecture) and society.The primary focus will be on athletics in Greece and spectator sports in Rome, but consideration will be given to recreation, physical education, and leisure.

        The course will include lectures, media presentations, and class discussions.Students will be responsible for reading assigned documents, contributing to discussions, and taking all tests and exams.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-001 History of Civilization before 1500

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-002 History of Civilization before 1500

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history and of human nature, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-003 HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history and of human nature, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3374-001 Ancient Greece

          This course examines the origins, development, spread, problems and achievements of ancient Greek states and empires. Most emphasis will center on the political history of Early and Classical Greece, especially that of Athens. Topics include: Bronze Age and Homer, the Archaic Age and the city state, Spartan militarism, Athenian democracy and imperialism, the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, etc.By highlighting topics of interest and relevance, the course encourages students to discuss and to understand historical developments, themes and relationships in the history of the ancient Greeks.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-002 History of Civilization before 1500

        An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history and of human nature, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 2301-003 HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION

          COURSE DESCRIPTION An understanding of early civilizations contributes to our understanding of later history and of human nature, and early societies merit study in their own right. Therefore, this course examines the experiences, cultures, and accomplishments of various peoples through ancient and medieval times up to the sixteenth century as part of the development and achievements of (pre-modern) Western Civilization. The course emphasizes great civilizations, major historical figures and periods, important religions and ideas, and factors of change and continuity. Recurrent themes and issues (man, god(s), and state; war, empire and cultural advances, etc.) will be discussed, especially through the use of primary sources.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours

Other Teaching Activities

  • 2016
    • 2016
      • June 2016 "The Allure of Ancient Greek Athletics: The Ancient Olympics and Much More"

        Invited Director of a week long Faculty Resource Seminar, “The Allure of Ancient Greek Sport: The Olympics and Much More,” New York University Classics Department, June 6-10, 2016.

Service to the Community

  • Elected
    • Apr 2015 to  Present Miscellaneous consulting

      Professional Service:

      Evaluation of article, "The  Evolution of the Retiarius Fighting Technique," International Journal of the History of Sport, May

      2015                        Evaluation of article, ”Sport, Victory Commemoration and Elite Identities in Archaic Athens,” for Classica & Mediaevalia, April.

      2015                        Evaluation of article, “Sport and Physical Education in Mithraic Religion in the Context of the Roman-Persian Wars,” submitted to Sport History Review, March.

      2015                        Phone interview with Tiffany Hsieh, Community and Alumni Relations, York University, on ancient and modern sport facilities, Feb 27. Quoted in York U Magazine.

      2015                        Phone interview with reporter John Henry of the Star-Telegram comparing spectacular aspects of ancient games with the Super Bowl. Quoted in Star-Telegram, C6, Jan. 25, 2015.

      2015                        Consultation with J.A. Lobell, Executive Editor of Archaeology Magazine, on a story about horses, especially in chariot racing, in ancient history. Jan. 16-17.

      2014                        Evaluation of J. Toner’s manuscript, The Day Commodus Killed a Rhino: Understanding the Roman Games, for Johns Hopkins UP (Jan.).

Service to the Profession

  • Elected
    • Aug 2013 to  Present Related Experience

      1984-82 Administrator, Museum of Antiquities, University of Saskatchewan (responsible for budget, programs, liasion; produced promotional brochure)
      1980-79 McMaster President's Committee on Teaching and Learning
      1978 Area Supervisor, Canadian Excavation at Carthage; Museum and Site Research in Greece; Area Supervisor, McMaster Latium Field Survey (Summer)
      1977 Archaeological Assistant, McMaster Latium Field Survey (Summer)
      1976 Archaeological Assistant, Canadian Excavation at Carthage (Summer)

    • Apr 2015 to  Present Editing

      Editorial/Advisory Boards: Nikephoros (GDR) 2014-; Internat. J. of History of Sport (UK) 2010- ; J. of Sport History (USA) 2001- ; Stadion (GDR) 1987- .

Service to the University

  • Elected
    • Aug 2013 to  Present Synergistic Activities

      2011 Evaluation of book manuscript, The Victor’s Crown: Greek and Roman Sport from Homer to Byzantium (c. 350 pp., D. Potter), for Oxford UP (Jan.).

      As Chair (annually):
      2004-99 Southwest Center committees: Executive, Development, Nominating (Chair), Community Advisory
      2004-99 COLA: Council of Chairs
      2004-99 Associationg of Academic Directors and Chairs
      2001 Transatlantic PhD programs; evaluation, report, approved as permanent by THECB 
      2002-03 Periodic Program Review of History Department; internal self-study report, PR Team visit, favorable comments

      Departmental Committees:

      1999-98 Research Enhancement, Post Tenure Review, Grievance (Chair), Media, Graduate Studies 
      1998 Tenure and Promotion
      1998-97 Curriculum (Chair), Executive (preparation of dept. Post Tenure Review document), Grievance Review (Chair), Media, Graduate Studies
      1997-96 Executive (preparation of departmental Tenure & Promotion document), Curriculum, Grievance Review (Chair), Media, Graduate Studies
      1996-95 Tenure & Promotion, Phi Alpha Theta (Faculty Advisor), Grievance Review (Chair), Graduate Studies.
      1995-94 Phi Alpha Theta (Faculty Advisor), Research Enhancement, Grievance Review, Media, Graduate Studies.
      1994-93 Assistant Chair, Tenure and Promotion, Scheduling (Co-Chair), Grievance Review (Chair), Newsletter (Co-Chair), Research Enhancement (Chair), Scheduling (Co-Chair), Recruitment (African History), Executive, Graduate Studies, Newsletter, Phi Alpha Theta.
      1992-91 (on leave Fall 1991), Assistant Chair, Executive, Graduate Studies, Library, Newsletter, Scheduling (Co-Chair), Phi Alpha Theta.
      1991-90 Assistant Chair, Recruitment (Chair, History of Science), Scheduling (Co-Chair), Executive Graduate Studies, Faculty Forum.
      1990-89 Assistant Chair, Ad Hoc Committee on Advising (Chair) (revision of system of undergraduate advising), Tenure and Promotion, Scheduling (Co-Chair), Webb Lectures, Curriculum, Executive, Faculty Forum, Graduate Studies, Long-Range Planning, Recruitment (History of Science)
      1989 Sum II Acting Chair, Acting Graduate Advisor
      1989-88 Assistant Chair, Curriculum (Chair) (initiated ongoing review of History curriculum, Pre-Law option, etc.), Scheduling (Co-Chair), Webb Lecures, Executive, Long-Range Planning, Faculty Forum
      1988-87 Assistant Chair, Tenure and Promotion, Scheduling (Co-Chair)Long Range Planning (Chair) (revision of system of Peer Evaluation of Teaching Effectiveness), Webb Lectures, Executive Newsletter (Editor), Library
      1986-85 Organized Research, Newsletter, Long Range Planning
      1985-84 Newsletter, Long Range Planning, Library, Self-Study (Planning and Effectiveness)

      University:
      2005- UTA Intercollegiate Athletics Council and Compliance Committee
      2004-06 Member at Large, Advisory Council, Friends of the UTA Libraries.
      2004-03 Chair, Academy of Distinguised Teachers; Chair, Teaching Award Committee
      2004-99 Academy of Distinguished Teachers; Teaching Award Selection Committee
      2001- Teacher Education Council
      2000-01 K-16 Leadership Council
      2001 Academic Program Review Team: review of Electrical Engineering (April)
      1999-98 Academic Program Review Team: review of SUPA
      1999-98 President's Ad Hoc Committee on Student Housing: planning of new residence complex
      1998-07 University Research Committee
      1995-94 Reaccredidation Committee on Faculty (SACS)
      1994 Mentor for D. Quertemous' Fellowship in the McNair Scholars Program (summer).
      1988-87 Long Range Planning
      1988-86 Athletic Council
      1987-85 Faculty Senate

    • Jan 2015 to  Present COLA Dean's Search Committee

      COLA Dean's Search Committee: evaluation of vitae, interviews, campus visits, etc.

    • Sept 2014 to  Present Depatmental Sevice

      Department 2001-2015: Post Tenure Review Committee (Chair), Advisory, Grievance (Chair)

Administrative Appointment

  • 1999
    • Sept 1999 to May 2006 - Chairman of History, Chairman of History, UTA   University of Texas at Arlington