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Alan P Bowling

Name

[Bowling, Alan P]
  • Associate Professor, Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering
  • Associate Professor

Biography

Prof. Alan Bowling is from Austin, Texas and obtained his Bachelor's degree in Aerospace engineering from the University of Texas at Austin in 1988.  After graduating he worked for McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Company in Houston, Texas for two years before going to graduate school at Stanford University and obtaining a Masters degree as well as a Ph. D. in Mechanical engineering in 1998.  After graduation he pursued entrepenuerial activities in California for about three years.  He joined the faculty at the University of Notre Dame in 2001 and moved to The University of Texas at Arlington in 2008.  Prof. Bowling's interests lie in the areas of multibody dynamics, design, and control with a focus in robotic legged locomotion, as well as biomechanics at different time scales.

Professional Preparation

    • 1988 B.S. in Aerospace EngineeringThe University of Texas at Austin
    • 1993 M.S. in Mechanical EngineeringStanford University
    • 1998 Ph.D. in Mechanical EngineeringStanford University

Appointments

    • Sept 2014 to Present Associate Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • July 2008 to Sept 2014 Assist Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • July 2001 to July 2008 Assist Professor
      University of Notre Dame
    • Jan 1998 to May 2003 Founder
      Aqualan
    • Jan 1992 to Jan 1998 Graduate Research Assistant
      Stanford University
    • Jan 1992 to Mar 1992 Teaching Assistant
      Stanford University
    • Sept 1990 to May 1992 Course Assistant
      Stanford University
    • Aug 1988 to Sept 1990 Engineer
      McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Company
    • May 1985 to June 1987 Applications EnginCooperative Education Student
      National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA)   Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Jan 2013 to Present American Physical Society
    • Sept 2001 to Present American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
    • Aug 1995 to Present Robotics and Automation Society (RAS)
    • Mar 1988 to Present Sigma Gamma Tau Aerospace Engineering Honor Society

Awards and Honors

    • May  2013 Best Presentation Award sponsored by Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Brown Bag Seminar Series
      Achievements:

      My Phd student, Mahdi Haghshenas Jaryani received this award for his presentation entitled "Optical Tweezers: A Numerical Simulation in the Ray-Optics Regime Using Multiscale Analysis"

    • Apr  2013 Honoree: Celebration of Faculty Creative Works sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
      Achievements:

      Several Journal and Conference articles accepted

    • Mar  2013 ASME Conference Paper Accepted with Honors sponsored by American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
      Achievements:

      Mahdi Haghshenas Jaryani is a PhD candidate in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering under my advisement.

    • Mar  2003 National Science Foundation Career Award sponsored by National Science Foundation (NSF)
    • Oct  2002 Invited Journal Paper Submission sponsored by Journal of Advanced Robotics
    • Sep  1994 Recipient of NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program Fellowship sponsored by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA)
    • Sep  1983 Recipient of Texas Achievement Award sponsored by University of Texas at Austin (UT)

Research and Expertise

  • Expertise
    Multibody Dynamics, Control, Robotics, and Biomechanics

Publications

      Journal Article Revised and Resubmitted
      • Abhishek Chatterjee, Adrian Rodriguez, and Alan Bowling, "Analytic solution for planar indeterminate multi-point impact problems with stick-slip friction," Multibody System Dynamics, in review.

        {Journal Article }
      In-press
      • Ashley Chase Guy and Alan Bowling, "Modification of Nose-Hoover thermostat to improve temperature response in molecular simulations."  Journal of Computational and Nonlinear Dynamics, Transactions of the ASME, in press.

        {Journal Article }
      In-progress
      • Abhishek Chatterjee, Adrian Rodriguez, and Alan Bowling, "Solution to three-dimensional indeterminate contact and impact with friction using rigid body constraints," Multibody System Dynamics, in revision.

        {Journal Article }
      Under Review
      • Abhishek Chatterjee and Alan Bowling, "Modeling Surface to Surface Contact and Impact with Friction using a Simultaneous Multipoint Analysis," Journal of Computational and Nonlinear Dynamics, Transactions of the ASME, in revision.

        {Journal Article }

      Conference Proceeding 2016
      • Alan Bowling, Ashley Guy, Frasier Jones, and Maria Adamuti-Trache, "Faculty-Coached, Team-Based, In-Class, Problem Solving in a Systematic Approach Toward Undergraduate Dynamics," In Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition (ASEE), June 26-29, 2016. New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

        {Conference Proceeding }

      Textbook 2016
      • Alan Bowling, "Vector Mechanics: A Systematic Approach," Second Edition, Aqualan Press, LLC, June 2016.

        {Textbook }

      Journal Article 2015
      • Mahdi Haghshenas-Jaryani and Alan Bowling. "Modeling flexibility in Myosin V using a multiscale articulated multi-rigid body approach," ASME Journal of Computational and Nonlinear Dynamics, vol. 10, no. 1, pages 011015 (11 pages), January 2015.

        {Journal Article }
      2015
      • Anudeep Palanki and Alan Bowling, "Dynamic model of estrogen docking using multiscale analysis," Nonlinear Dynamics, vol. 79, no. 2, pages 1519-1534, January 2015.

        {Journal Article }
      2015
      • Adrian Rodriguez and Alan Bowling, "Study of Newton's cradle using a new discrete approach," Multibody System Dynamics, vol. 33, no. 1, pages 61-92, January 2015.

        {Journal Article }
      2015
      • Alan Bowling and Mahdi Haghshena-Jaryani, "A multiscale modeling approach for biomolecular systems," Multibody System Dynamics, vol. 33, no. 4, pages 333-365, April 2015.

        {Journal Article }

      Textbook 2015
      • Alan Bowling. "Vector Mechanics: A Systematic Approach," First Edition, Aqualan Press, LLC, 430 pages, August 2015.

        {Textbook }

      Conference Proceeding 2015
      • Ashley Guy, Alan Bowling, and Panayiotis Shiakolas, "Mechatronics experiential learning for broadening participation in engineering," In Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition (ASEE), June 14-17, 2015. Seattle, Washington, USA.

        {Conference Proceeding }
      2015
      • Nachiket Kansara, Rohit Katti, Kourosh Nemati, Alan Bowling, and Bahgat Sammakia, "Neural network modeling in model-based control of a data center," In Proceedings of the International Technical Conference and Exhibition on Packaging and Integration of Electronic and Photonic Microsystems (InterPACK), July 6-9, 2015. San Francisco, California, USA.

        {Conference Proceeding }
      2015
      • Adrian Rodriguez, Abhishek Chatterjee, and Alan Bowling, "Solution to three-dimensional indeterminate contact and impact with friction using rigid body constraints," In Proceedings of the ASME 2015 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference (IDETC/CIE), August 2-5, 2015. Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

        {Conference Proceeding }

      Book 2015
      • Alan Bowling. "Vector Mechanics: A Systematic Approach. First Edition, Aqualan Press, LLC, 430 pages, August 2015.

        {Book }

      Journal Article 2014
      • Mahdi Haghshenas-Jaryani, Bryan Black, James Drake, Sarvenaz Gharrari, Alan Bowling, and Samarendra Mohanty, "Dynamics of microscopic objects in optical tweezers: experimental determination of underdamped regime and numerical simulation using multiscale analysis," Nonlinear Dynamics, vol. 76, no. 2, pages 1013-1030, April 2014.

        {Journal Article }

      Conference Proceeding 2014
      • Adrian Rodriguez and Alan Bowling. Analytic solution for planar indeterminate multiple point impact problems with Coulomb friction, In Proceedings of the ASME 2014 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference (IDETC/CIE), August 17-20, 2014. Buffalo, New York, USA.

        {Conference Proceeding }

      Journal Article 2013
      • Mahdi Haghshenas-Jaryani and Alan Bowling, "A New Switching Strategy for Addressing Euler Parameters in Rigid Multibody Systems," Multibody System Dynamics, vol. 30, no. 2, pages 185-197, August 2013.

        {Journal Article }

      Conference Proceeding 2013
      • Zachary Brush, Alan Bowling, Michael Tadros, and Michael Russell, "Design and control of a smart bed for pressure ulcer prevention," In Proceedings of the IEEE/ASME International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics (AIM), July 9-12, 2013. Wollongong, Australia.

        {Conference Proceeding }
      2013
      • Adrian Rodriguez and Alan Bowling, "Study of the stick-slip transition of Newton’s cradle with friction," In Proceedings of the ASME 2013 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference (IDETC/CIE), August 4-7, 2013. Portland, Oregon, USA.

        {Conference Proceeding }
      2013
      • Mahdi Haghshenas-Jaryani and Alan Bowling, "Multiscale dynamic modeling of flexibility in Myosin V," In Proceedings of the ASME 2013 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference (IDETC/CIE), August 4-7, 2013. Portland, Oregon, USA.

        {Conference Proceeding }

      Conference Proceeding 2012
      • Daniel Montrallo Flickinger, Alan Bowling, and Kamesh Subbarao. "Analysis of an energy constraint in post impact velocity optimization," In Proceedings of the 2nd Joint International Conference on Multibody System Dynamics (IMSD), May 29 - June 1, 2012. Stuttgart, Germany.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2012
      • Adrian Rodriguez and Alan Bowling. "Analytic solution to 3-dimensional, single point collision problems using Stronges hypothesis," In Proceedings of the 2nd Joint International Conference on Multibody System Dynamics (IMSD), May 29 - June 1, 2012. Stuttgart, Germany.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2012
      • Mahdi Haghshenas-Jaryani and Alan Bowling. "A new numerical strategy for handling quaternions in dynamic modeling and simulation of rigid multibody systems," In Proceedings of the 2nd Joint International Conference on Multibody System Dynamics (IMSD), May 29 - June 1, 2012. Stuttgart, Germany.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2012
      • Mahdi Haghshenas-Jaryani and Alan Bowling, "Multiscale dynamic modeling of flexibility in Myosin
        V using a planar mechanical model," In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics
        and Biomimetics (ROBIO), December 11 - 14, 2012. Guangzhou, China.

        {Conference Proceeding }

      Journal Article 2012
      • Alan Bowling and Fillia Makedon. "Cognitive Optimization in Assistive Living System Development," Journal of Applied Bionics and Biomechanics, vol. 17, no. 3, pages 1-14, March 2012.
        {Journal Article }
      2012
      • Adrian Rodriguez and Alan Bowling. "Solution to indeterminate impact with frictional contact using constraints," Multibody System Dynamics, vol. 28, no. 4, pages 313-330, November 2012.

        {Journal Article }

      Conference Proceeding 2011
      • Mahdi Haghshenas-Jaryani and Alan Bowling. "A new 3D flexible mechanical model of Myosin V," In Proceedings of the 27th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference (SBEC), April 29-May 1, 2011. University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas, USA.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2011
      • Mahdi Haghshenas-Jaryani and Alan Bowling. "Multiscale dynamic modeling of processive motor proteins," In Proceedings IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics (ROBIO), December 7-11, 2011. Phuket Island, Thailand.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2011
      • Adrian Rodriguez and Alan Bowling. "Indeterminate multi-point impact with friction of agile legged robots," In Proceedings IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics (ROBIO), December 7-11, 2011. Phuket Island, Thailand.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2011
      • Naveen Kannan, Niket Shah, Dereje Agonafer, and Alan Bowling. "Design, Optimization and Thermal Analysis of Micro-Controllers in a Quadruped Robot," In Proceedings of the ASME 2011 Pacific Rim Technical Conference and Exhibition on Packaging and Integration of Electronic and Photonic Systems, MEMS and NEMS(InterPACK), July 6-8, 2011. Portland, Oregon, USA.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2011
      • Adrian Rodriguez and Alan Bowling. "Simulation of Indeterminate Multi-Point Impact and Contact with friction," In Proceedings of Multibody Dynamics 2011, An ECCOMAS Thematic Conference, July 4-7, 2011. Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels Belgium.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2011
      • Mahdi Haghshenas Jaryani and Alan Bowling. "Spatial Multibody Dynamics of Motor Proteins,"  In Proceedings of Multibody Dynamics 2011, An ECCOMAS Thematic Conference, July 4-7, 2011. Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels Belgium.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2011
      • Daniel Flickinger and Alan Bowling. "Acceleration Capability with Varying Initial Configuration and its Impact on Stance Phase Duration of a Jumping Robot,"  In Proceedings of Multibody Dynamics 2011, An ECCOMAS Thematic Conference, July 4-7, 2011. Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels Belgium.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2011
      • Rasoul Yousefi, S. Ostadabbas, M. Faezipour, Mehrdad Nourani, V. Ng, Lakshman S. Tamil, Alan Bowling, Deborah Behan, and M. Pompeo. ``A Smart bed Platform for Monitoring \& Ulcer Prevention,'' In Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on BioMedical Engineering and Informatics (BMEI), October 15-17,2011. Donghua University, Shanghai, China.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Journal Article 2011
      • Alan Bowling. "Impact Forces and Agility in Legged Robot Locomotion," Journal of Vibration and Control, vol. 17, no. 3, March 2011.
        {Journal Article }

      Conference Proceeding 2010
      • Daniel Flickinger and Alan Bowling. "Improving the Jumping Performance of a Single Leg Robot Using Directional Dynamic Capability Equations," In Proceedings of the First Joint International Conference on Multibody System Dynamics (IMSD), May 25-27, 2010. Lapeenrenta Finland. (ISBN 978-952-214-778-3).
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2010
      • Alan Bowling. "Cognitive Optimization in the Development of Assistive Living Systems." In Proceedings of the 3rd InternationalConference on Pervasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments(PETRA), June 23-25, 2010. Samos, Greece.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2010
      • Ramya Lingam, Nikhil Lakhar, Parvati Aruna Kandala, Dereje Agonafer, and Alan Bowling. "Optimized Chasis Design and Thermal Analysis of Motor Controllers in a Quadruped Robot," In Proceedings of the International Heat Transfer Conference (IHTC), August 2010. Washington D.C., USA.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2010
      • Alan Bowling and Mahdi Haghshenas Jaryani. "Spatial Multibody Dynamics of Nano-Scale Motor Protein Locomotion," In Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Bionics and Biomechanics (ICABB), October 14-16, 2010. Venice, Italy.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Journal Article 2010
      • Alan Bowling and Sean Harmeyer. "Repeatable redundant manipulator control using nullspace quasi-velocities," ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control, vol. 132, no. 3, pp. 031007 (11 pages), May 2010.
        {Journal Article }
      2010
      • Daniel Montrallo Flickinger and Alan Bowling. "Simultaneous oblique impacts and contacts in multibody systems with friction," Multibody System Dynamics, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 249-261, March 2010.
        {Journal Article }

      Conference Proceeding 2009
      • Alan Bowling and Eric Olson. "Human-Robot Team Dynamic Performance in Assisted Living Environments," In Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Pervasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments (PETRA), article no. 11, June 2009. Corfu, Greece.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2009
      • Alan Bowling, Daniel Flickinger, and Sean Harmeyer. "Energetically Consistent Collisions in Simulation of Multibody Systems," In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages 1303-1308, May 2009. Kobe, Japan.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2009
      • Daniel Flickinger and Alan Bowling. "Coupling of the Coefficient of Restitution and Coulomb Rriction Under Rigid Body Impacts with Varying Incidence Angle and Tangential Velocity," In Proceedings of MultibodyDynamics 2009, An ECCOMAS Thematic Conference, June 29 - July 2, 2009. Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2009
      • Daniel Flickinger and Alan Bowling. "Impact Forces in the Simulation of of Simultaneous Impacts and Contacts in Multibody Systems with Friction," In Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), pages 3398-2403, October 2009. St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2009
      • Daniel Flickinger and Alan Bowling. "Simultaneous Oblique Impacts and Contacts in Multibody Systems with Friction," In Proceedings of the International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics (AIM), pages 1613-1618, July 2009. Singapore.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2009
      • Alan Bowling, Zhengyi Le, and Fillia Makedon. "SAL: A Simulation and Analysis Tool for Assistive Living Applications," In Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Pervasive Technologies Related to Assistive Living Environments (PETRA), article no. 4, June 2009. Corfu, Greece.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Journal Article 2009
      • Alan Bowling, Daniel Montrallo Flickinger, and Sean Harmeyer. "Energetically consistent simulation of simultaneous impacts and contacts in multibody systems with friction," Multibody System Dynamics, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 27-45, August 2009.
        {Journal Article }
      2009
      • Alan Bowling and Andre Palmer. "The small mass assumption applied to the multibody dynamics of motor proteins," Journal of Biomechanics, vol. 42, no. 9, pp. 27-45, June 2009.

        {Journal Article }
      2009
      • Alan Bowling, Andre Palmer, and Lauren Wilhelm. "Contact and impact in the multibody dynamics of motor protein locomotion," Langmuir, vol. 25, no. 22, pp. 12974-12981, November 2009.

        {Journal Article }

      Conference Proceeding 2008
      • Jeremy Newkirk, Alan Bowling, and John Renaud. "Workspace Characterization of a Robotic System Using Reliability-Based Design Optimization," In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages 3958-3963, May 2008. Pasadena, California, USA.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Journal Article 2008
      • Alan Bowling and Oussama Khatib. "Dynamic performance in the modular design of redundant macro/mini manipulators," ASME Journal of Mechanical Design, vol. 130, no. 9, pp. 092301, September 2008.
        {Journal Article }

      Conference Proceeding 2007
      • Alan Bowling. "Impact Forces and Mobility in Legged Robot Locomotion," In Proceedings of the IEEE/ASME International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics (AIM), paper no. 4412406, September 2007. Zurich, Switzerland.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Journal Article 2007
      • Alan Bowling, John Renaud, Jeremy Newkirk, Neal M. Patel, and Harish Agarwal. "Reliability-based design optimization of robotic system dynamic performance," ASME Journal of Mechanical Design, vol. 129, no. 4, pp. 449-454, April 2007.
        {Journal Article }
      2007
      • Alan Bowling. "Mass distribution effects on cable-driven hexapod dynamic performance," ASME Journal of Mechanical Design, vol. 129, no. 8, pp. 887-890, August 2007.
        {Journal Article }

      Conference Proceeding 2006
      • Alan Bowling, John Renaud, Neal M. Patel, Jeremy Newkirk, and Harish Agarwal. "Reliability-Based Design Optimization of Robotic System Dynamic Performance," In Proceedings of the Society of AutomotiveEngineers World Congress: Forum on Reliability and Robust Design in Automotive Engineering, April 2006. Detroit, Michigan, USA.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2006
      • Alan Bowling, John Renaud, Jeremy Newkirk, Neal M. Patel, and Harish Agarwal.  "Reliability-Based Design Optimization of Robot Dynamic Performance," In Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), pages 3611-3617, October 2006. Beijing, China.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2006
      • Pedro Berges and Alan Bowling. "Compliance Requirements for Non-Rebounding Impact in Legged Locomotion," In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages 4049-4056, May 2006. Orlando, Florida, USA.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Journal Article 2006
      • Xiaolei Yin and Alan Bowling. "Dynamic performance limitations due to yielding in cable-driven robotic manipulators," ASME Journal of Mechanical Design, vol. 128, no. 1, pp. 311-318, January 2006.
        {Journal Article }
      2006
      • Yanto Go, Xiaolei Yin, and Alan Bowling. "Navigability of multi-legged robots," IEEE-ASME Transactions on Mechatronics, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 1-8, February 2006.
        {Journal Article }
      2006
      • Alan Bowling and Chang-Hwan Kim. "Velocity effects on robotic manipulator dynamic performance," ASME Journal of Mechanical Design, vol. 128, no. 6, pp. 1236-1245, November 2006.
        {Journal Article }
      2006
      • Alan Bowling. "Dynamic performance, mobility, and agility of multi-legged robots," ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control, vol. 128, no. 4, pp. 765-777, December 2006.
        {Journal Article }
      2006
      • Pedro Berges and Alan Bowling. "Rebound, slip, and compliance in the modeling and analysis of discrete impacts," Journal of Vibration and Control, vol. 12, no. 12, pp. 1407-1430, December 2006.
        {Journal Article }

      Popular Press Article 2006
      • Alan Bowling, "Agility in legged locomotion," Universarios magazine, La Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, Mexico, February 16, 2006.

        {Popular Press Article }

      Conference Proceeding 2005
      • Sean Harmeyer and Alan Bowling. "Autonomous Gait Generation using Acceleration Capability Analysis," In Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), vol. 3, pages 2127-2133, August 2005.  Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2005
      • Yanto Go and Alan Bowling. "A Design Study of a Cable-Driven Hexapod," In Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), vol. 3, pages 2593-2600, August, 2005.Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2005
      • Pedro Berges and Alan Bowling. "Impact forces in legged robot locomotion," In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), vol. 3, pages 3756-3762, April 2005. Barcelona, Spain.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2005
      • Alan Bowling. "Mobility and Fynamic Performance of Legged Robots," In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), vol. 4, pages 4111-4118, April 2005. Barcelona, Spain.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Journal Article 2005
      • Alan Bowling and Oussama Khatib. "The dynamic capability equations: A new tool for analyzing manipulator dynamic performance," IEEE Transactions on Robotics, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 115-123, February 2005.
        {Journal Article }
      2005
      • Alan Bowling and Oussama Khatib. "The actuation efficiency, a measure of acceleration capability for non-redundant robotic manipulators," Journal of Robotic Systems, vol. 22, no. 12, pp. 759-766, December 2005.
        {Journal Article }

      Conference Proceeding 2004
      • Sean Harmeyer and Alan Bowling. "Dynamic Performance as a Criterion for Redundant Manipulator Control," In Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), vol. 3, pages 3601-3606, October 2004. Sendai, Japan.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2004
      • Yanto Go, Xiaolei Yin, and Alan Bowling. "A Navigable Six-Legged Robot Platform," In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), vol. 5, pages 5105-5110, May 2004.  New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2004
      • Xiaolei Yin and Alan Bowling. "Study of effect of cable yielding in cable-driven robotic systems," In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), vol. 3, pages 3234-3239, May 2004.  New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Conference Proceeding 2003
      • Alan Bowling and Oussama Khatib. "Non-redundant robotic manipulator acceleration capability and the actuation efficiency measure," In Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), vol. 4, pages 3325-3330, October 2003. Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2003
      • Alan Bowling and ChangHwan Kim. "Dynamic Performance Analysis for Non-Redundant Manipulators in Contact.} In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), vol. 4,pages 4048-4053, September 2003.  Taipei, Taiwan.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2003
      • ChangHwan Kim and Alan Bowling. "Influence of End-Effector Velocities on Robotic Manipulator Dynamic Performance: An Analytical Approach," In Proceedings of the 2003 ASME Design Engineering Technical Conferences & Computers and Information in Engineering Conference (DETC), v. 2B, pages 1231-1237, September 2003.  Chicago, Illinois, USA.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      2003
      • ChangHwan Kim and Alan Bowling. "End-Effector Velocity Effects on Robotic Manipulator Dynamic Performance: An Analytical Approach," In Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Advanced Robotics, vol. 2, pages 770-775, June 2003. Choimbra, Portugal.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Journal Article 2003
      • Alan Bowling and Oussama Khatib. "The dynamic loading criteria in actuator selection for desired dynamic performance," Advanced Robotics, vol. 17, no. 7, pp. 641-656, November 2003.
        {Journal Article }

      Conference Proceeding 2002
      • Alan Bowling and Oussama Khatib. "Actuator selection for desired dynamic performance,"  In Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), vol. 2, pages 1966-1973, October 2002.  Lausanne, Switzerland.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Conference Proceeding 2000
      • Alan Bowling and Oussama Khatib. "Robot Acceleration Capability: The Actuation Efficiency Measure," In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), vol. 4, pages 3970-3975, April 2000.  San Francisco, California, USA.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Conference Proceeding 1998
      • Alan Bowling and Oussama Khatib. Modular redundant manipulator design for dynamic performance. In Proceedings of the Thirteenth CISM-IFToMM Symposium on Theory and Practice of Robots and Manipulators, July 1998. Paris, France.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      1998
      • Alan Bowling and Oussama Khatib. The motion isotropy hypersurface: A characterization of acceleration capability. In Proceedings IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, vol. 2, pages 965-971, October 1998. Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Conference Proceeding 1997
      • Alan Bowling and Oussama Khatib. Design of macro/mini manipulators for optimal dynamic performance. In Proceedings IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, vol. 1, pages 449-454, April 1997. Albuquerque, New Mexico.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      1997
      • Alan Bowling and Oussama Khatib. Design of non-redundant manipulators for optimal dynamic performance. In Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Advanced Robotics, pages 865-872, July 1997. Monterey, CA.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Conference Proceeding 1996
      • Oussama Khatib and Alan Bowling. Optimization of the inertial and acceleration characteristics of manipulators. In Proceedings IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, vol. 4, pages 2883-2889. Kluwer Academic Publishers, August 1996. Minneapolis, Minnesota.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      1996
      • Alan Bowling and Oussama Khatib. Modular decomposition for optimal dynamic design of redundant macro/mini manipulators. In Proceedings of the Fifth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Robot Kinematics, pages 29-38, 1996.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Conference Proceeding 1995
      • Alan Bowling and Oussama Khatib. Analysis of the acceleration characteristics of non-redundant manipulators. In Proceedings IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, vol. 2, pages 323-328, August 1995. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
        {Conference Proceeding }
      1995
      • Alan Bowling and Oussama Khatib. Analysis of the acceleration characteristics of manipulators. In Proceedings Tenth CISM-IFToMM Symposium on Theory and Practice of Robots and Manipulators, pages 59-64, September 1995. Gdansk, Poland.
        {Conference Proceeding }

Presentations

    • April  2015
      A Modified Nose-Hoover Thermostat for Improving Temperature Response in Simulations of Molecular Interactions

      In Proceedings of the ASME 2015 4th Global Congress on Nanoengineering for Medicine and Biology (NEMB), April 19-22, 2015. Minneapolis, Minesotta, USA.

    • October  2014
      Design and Control of a Smart Bed for Pressure Ulcer Prevention

      Biorobotics Workshop at the ASME Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, San Antonio, TX, October 22, 2014.

    • April  2014
      Analytical Solution for Planar Indeterminate Impact Problems with Friction

      Texas Systems Day, Texas A & M, April 28, 2014.

    • April  2013
      Modeling and Simulation: An Approach to Scientific Discovery in Engineering

      ASME UTA student Section Meeting, April 8, 2013.

    • March  2013
      Dynamic simulation of trapping and controlled rotation of a microscale rod driven by line optical tweezers

      In Proceedings of the American Physical Society (APS) March Meeting 2013, March 18-22, 2013, Baltimore, Maryland.

    • February  2013
      Multiscale modeling and simulation of a microbead in an optical trapping process

      In Proceedings of the ASME 2013 2nd Global Congress on Nanoengineering for Medicine and Biology (NEMB), February 4-6, 2013. Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

    • April  2012
      Contact and Impact Analysis in Multibody Dynamics

      Southern Methodist University, Mechanical Engineering Departmental Seminar Series, April 27, 2012.

    • March  2012
      Investigation of flexibility in Myosin V using a new 3D mechanical model

      In Proceedings of the American Physical Society (APS) March Meeting 2012, vol. 57, no. 1, February 27 - March 2, 2012, Boston, Massachusetts.

    • July  2011
      Simulation of indeterminate multi-point impact and contact with friction.

      In Proceedings of Multibody Dynamics 2011, An ECCOMAS Thematic Conference, July 4-7, 2011. Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels Belgium.

    • April  2011
      Cognitive Optimization in the Development of Assistive Living Systems

      The University of Texas at Arlington, Cognitive Neuroscience Workshop, April 20, 2011.

    • March  2011
      A New Dynamic Model for Processive Motor Proteins

      The University of Texas at Arlington, Physics Departmental Seminar, March 2011.

    • February  2010
      Agile Legged Locomotion in Robots and Biology

      The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, February 26, 2010.

    • September  2009
      Performance measures of agility for mobile robots

      In Proceedings of the Performance Metrics for Intelligent Systems Workshop (PerMIS), September 21-13, 2009. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland.

    • July  2009
      Coupling of the coefficient of restitution and coulomb friction under rigid body impacts with varying incidence angle and tangential velocity

      In Proceedings of Multibody Dynamics 2009, An ECCOMAS Thematic Conference, June 29 - July 2, 2009. Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland.

    • October  2007
      Agility and dynamic performance of multi-legged robots

      Jet Propulsion Laboratory, October 29, 2007.

    • February  2001
      Analysis of robot dynamic performance

      University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana, USA, February 2001.

Patents

    • Mar 1999 5881753  Passive Fluid Level Controller

      A fluid level controller which replaces fluid lost from a container thus maintaining the fluid level in the container. It is comprised of the following major pieces: an airtight reservoir (10) with cap (14), fill stem (12), feed lube (16), and tube attachment fittings (18a and 18b); several lengths of fluid conduit, (22a,b) and a u-bend (26) which form a siphon such that one end reaches into the bottom of reservoir (10) and the other reaches into the container below the desired fluid level; a length of conduit, (22c) which forms an air return line allowing air into reservoir (10); a stand (8) atop which sits the reservoir; a tubing clip (24); and a shut-off valve (20). The u-bend (26) allows the controller to preserve the initial prime of the system so that it only needs to be primed once. The shut-off valve (20) allows easy refilling of the controller once the fluid reservoir empties. These two features make the controller extremely easy to use. When set up correctly this system uses air pressure to replace fluid lost from a container. Fluid is replaced at any rate up to a specified upper limit, in effect controlling the fluid level in the container. In operation the controller has no moving parts and uses no electricity, thus the mechanism has an extremely low risk of failure. This device has been shown to be an effective, safe, reliable, and efficient means for relieving some of the maintenance associated with owning an aquarium.

Courses

      • ME 5338-001 Analytical and Computational Dynamics

        The goal of this course is to provide students with the analytical and computational skills required to model and simulate simple and complex dynamic systems consisting of interconnected rigid bodies. The primary goal is to teach students how to model and generate the equations of motion for any system of rigid bodies. The secondary goal is to teach students how to use simulation and animation to check the correctness of the model. The approach to dynamics followed in this course is not a rehash or simple extension of what was taught in earlier undergraduate dynamics courses. It is a highly effective approach which makes complex problems, which would be difficult to model using methods commonly taught to undergraduates, quite simple to analyze. The course is based on one of the most powerful methods for modeling dynamic systems currently available. Knowledge of dynamic modeling, especially the approach taught in this course, is a highly valuable skill sought both by industry and academia. Thus the course is suitable for students seeking industry employment or considering graduate school after graduation. The course also makes extensive use of software tools which make it easier and less tedious to model complex systems. This software facilitates the generation of animations that allow the student to visualize the behavior predicted by the model. These animations are always interesting and fun to examine.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • AE 5338-002 Analytical and Computational Dynamics

        The goal of this course is to provide students with the analytical and computational skills required to model and simulate simple and complex dynamic systems consisting of interconnected rigid bodies. The primary goal is to teach students how to model and generate the equations of motion for any system of rigid bodies. The secondary goal is to teach students how to use simulation and animation to check the correctness of the model. The approach to dynamics followed in this course is not a rehash or simple extension of what was taught in earlier undergraduate dynamics courses. It is a highly effective approach which makes complex problems, which would be difficult to model using methods commonly taught to undergraduates, quite simple to analyze. The course is based on one of the most powerful methods for modeling dynamic systems currently available. Knowledge of dynamic modeling, especially the approach taught in this course, is a highly valuable skill sought both by industry and academia. Thus the course is suitable for students seeking industry employment or considering graduate school after graduation. The course also makes extensive use of software tools which make it easier and less tedious to model complex systems. This software facilitates the generation of animations that allow the student to visualize the behavior predicted by the model. These animations are always interesting and fun to examine.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • AE 5338-001 Analytical and Computational Dynamics

        The goal of this course is to provide students with the analytical and computational skills required to model and simulate simple and complex dynamic systems consisting of interconnected rigid bodies. The primary goal is to teach students how to model and generate the equations of motion for any system of rigid bodies. The secondary goal is to teach students how to use simulation and animation to check the correctness of the model. The approach to dynamics followed in this course is not a rehash or simple extension of what was taught in earlier undergraduate dynamics courses. It is a highly effective approach which makes complex problems, which would be difficult to model using methods commonly taught to undergraduates, quite simple to analyze. The course is based on one of the most powerful methods for modeling dynamic systems currently available. Knowledge of dynamic modeling, especially the approach taught in this course, is a highly valuable skill sought both by industry and academia. Thus the course is suitable for students seeking industry employment or considering graduate school after graduation. The course also makes extensive use of software tools which make it easier and less tedious to model complex systems. This software facilitates the generation of animations that allow the student to visualize the behavior predicted by the model. These animations are always interesting and fun to examine.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ME 5338-002 Analytical and Computational Dynamics

        The goal of this course is to provide students with the analytical and computational skills required to model and simulate simple and complex dynamic systems consisting of interconnected rigid bodies. The primary goal is to teach students how to model and generate the equations of motion for any system of rigid bodies. The secondary goal is to teach students how to use simulation and animation to check the correctness of the model. The approach to dynamics followed in this course is not a rehash or simple extension of what was taught in earlier undergraduate dynamics courses. It is a highly effective approach which makes complex problems, which would be difficult to model using methods commonly taught to undergraduates, quite simple to analyze. The course is based on one of the most powerful methods for modeling dynamic systems currently available. Knowledge of dynamic modeling, especially the approach taught in this course, is a highly valuable skill sought both by industry and academia. Thus the course is suitable for students seeking industry employment or considering graduate school after graduation. The course also makes extensive use of software tools which make it easier and less tedious to model complex systems. This software facilitates the generation of animations that allow the student to visualize the behavior predicted by the model. These animations are always interesting and fun to examine.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAE 4301-003 Analytical and Computational Dynamics

        The goal of this course is to provide students with the analytical and computational skills required to model and simulate simple and complex dynamic systems consisting of interconnected rigid bodies. The primary goal is to teach students how to model and generate the equations of motion for any system of rigid bodies. The secondary goal is to teach students how to use simulation and animation to check the correctness of the model. The approach to dynamics followed in this course is not a rehash or simple extension of what was taught in earlier undergraduate dynamics courses. It is a highly effective approach which makes complex problems, which would be difficult to model using methods commonly taught to undergraduates, quite simple to analyze. The course is based on one of the most powerful methods for modeling dynamic systems currently available. Knowledge of dynamic modeling, especially the approach taught in this course, is a highly valuable skill sought both by industry and academia. Thus the course is suitable for students seeking industry employment or considering graduate school after graduation. The course also makes extensive use of software tools which make it easier and less tedious to model complex systems. This software facilitates the generation of animations that allow the student to visualize the behavior predicted by the model. These animations are always interesting and fun to examine.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAE 2323-003 Dynamics

        Mathematically modeling the planar motion of rigid bodies.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ME 5338-001 Analytical and Compuational Dynamics

        The goal of this course is to provide students with the analytical and computational skills required to model and simulate simple and complex dynamic systems consisting of interconnected rigid bodies. The primary goal is to teach students how to model and generate the equations of motion for any system of rigid bodies. The secondary goal is to teach students how to use simulation and animation to check the correctness of the model. The approach to dynamics followed in this course is not a rehash or simple extension of whatwas taught in earlier undergraduate dynamics courses. It is a highly effective approachwhich makes complex problems, which would be difficult to model using methods commonly taught to undergraduates, quite simple to analyze. The course is based on one of the most powerful methods for modeling dynamic systems currently available. Knowledge of dynamic modeling, especially the approach taught in this course, is a highly valuable skill sought both by industry and academia. Thus the course is suitable for students seeking industry employment or considering graduate school after graduation. The course also makes extensive use of software tools which make it easier and less tedious to model complex systems. This software facilitates the generation of animations that allow the student to visualize the behavior predicted by the model. These animations are always interesting and fun to examine.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAE 2323-001 Dynamics

        Mathematically modeling the planar motion of rigid bodies.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • AE 5338-002 Analytical and Computational Dynamics

        The goal of this course is to provide students with the analytical and computational skills required to model and simulate simple and complex dynamic systems consisting of interconnected rigid bodies. The primary goal is to teach students how to model and generate the equations of motion for any system of rigid bodies. The secondary goal is to teach students how to use simulation and animation to check the correctness of the model. The approach to dynamics followed in this course is not a rehash or simple extension of whatwas taught in earlier undergraduate dynamics courses. It is a highly effective approachwhich makes complex problems, which would be difficult to model using methods commonly taught to undergraduates, quite simple to analyze. The course is based on one of the most powerful methods for modeling dynamic systems currently available. Knowledge of dynamic modeling, especially the approach taught in this course, is a highly valuable skill sought both by industry and academia. Thus the course is suitable for students seeking industry employment or considering graduate school after graduation. The course also makes extensive use of software tools which make it easier and less tedious to model complex systems. This software facilitates the generation of animations that allow the student to visualize the behavior predicted by the model. These animations are always interesting and fun to examine.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAE 4301-003 Analytical and Computational Dynamics

        The goal of this course is to provide students with the analytical and computational skills required to model and simulate simple and complex dynamic systems consisting of interconnected rigid bodies. The primary goal is to teach students how to model and generate the equations of motion for any system of rigid bodies. The secondary goal is to teach students how to use simulation and animation to check the correctness of the model. The approach to dynamics followed in this course is not a rehash or simple extension of whatwas taught in earlier undergraduate dynamics courses. It is a highly effective approachwhich makes complex problems, which would be difficult to model using methods commonly taught to undergraduates, quite simple to analyze. The course is based on one of the most powerful methods for modeling dynamic systems currently available. Knowledge of dynamic modeling, especially the approach taught in this course, is a highly valuable skill sought both by industry and academia. Thus the course is suitable for students seeking industry employment or considering graduate school after graduation. The course also makes extensive use of software tools which make it easier and less tedious to model complex systems. This software facilitates the generation of animations that allow the student to visualize the behavior predicted by the model. These animations are always interesting and fun to examine.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ME 5338-002 Analytical and Computational Dynamics

        The goal of this course is to provide students with the analytical and computational skills required to model and simulate simple and complex dynamic systems consisting of interconnected rigid bodies. The primary goal is to teach students how to model and generate the equations of motion for any system of rigid bodies. The secondary goal is to teach students how to use simulation and animation to check the correctness of the model. The approach to dynamics followed in this course is not a rehash or simple extension of whatwas taught in earlier undergraduate dynamics courses. It is a highly effective approachwhich makes complex problems, which would be difficult to model using methods commonly taught to undergraduates, quite simple to analyze. The course is based on one of the most powerful methods for modeling dynamic systems currently available. Knowledge of dynamic modeling, especially the approach taught in this course, is a highly valuable skill sought both by industry and academia. Thus the course is suitable for students seeking industry employment or considering graduate school after graduation. The course also makes extensive use of software tools which make it easier and less tedious to model complex systems. This software facilitates the generation of animations that allow the student to visualize the behavior predicted by the model. These animations are always interesting and fun to examine.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • AE 5338-001 Analytical and Computational Dynamics

        The goal of this course is to provide students with the analytical and computational skills required to model and simulate simple and complex dynamic systems consisting of interconnected rigid bodies. The primary goal is to teach students how to model and generate the equations of motion for any system of rigid bodies. The secondary goal is to teach students how to use simulation and animation to check the correctness of the model. The approach to dynamics followed in this course is not a rehash or simple extension of whatwas taught in earlier undergraduate dynamics courses. It is a highly effective approachwhich makes complex problems, which would be difficult to model using methods commonly taught to undergraduates, quite simple to analyze. The course is based on one of the most powerful methods for modeling dynamic systems currently available. Knowledge of dynamic modeling, especially the approach taught in this course, is a highly valuable skill sought both by industry and academia. Thus the course is suitable for students seeking industry employment or considering graduate school after graduation. The course also makes extensive use of software tools which make it easier and less tedious to model complex systems. This software facilitates the generation of animations that allow the student to visualize the behavior predicted by the model. These animations are always interesting and fun to examine.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ME 5338-001 Analytical and Computational Dynamics

        The goal of this course is to provide students with the analytical and computational skills required to model and simulate simple and complex dynamic systems consisting of interconnected rigid bodies. The primary goal is to teach students how to model and generate the equations of motion for any system of rigid bodies. The secondary goal is to teach students how to use simulation and animation to check the correctness of the model. The approach to dynamics followed in this course is not a rehash or simple extension of whatwas taught in earlier undergraduate dynamics courses. It is a highly effective approachwhich makes complex problems, which would be difficult to model using methods commonly taught to undergraduates, quite simple to analyze. The course is based on one of the most powerful methods for modeling dynamic systems currently available. Knowledge of dynamic modeling, especially the approach taught in this course, is a highly valuable skill sought both by industry and academia. Thus the course is suitable for students seeking industry employment or considering graduate school after graduation. The course also makes extensive use of software tools which make it easier and less tedious to model complex systems. This software facilitates the generation of animations that allow the student to visualize the behavior predicted by the model. These animations are always interesting and fun to examine.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAE 4345-001 Introduction to Robotics

        Kinematics, dynamics, design, and control of serial robotic manipulators

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAE 2323-002 Dynamics

        Mathematically modeling the planar motion of rigid bodies.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ME 5338-001 Analytical and Compuational Dynamics

        The goal of this course is to provide students with the analytical and computational skills required to model and simulate simple and complex dynamic systems consisting of interconnected rigid bodies. The primary goal is to teach students how to model and generate the equations of motion for any system of rigid bodies. The secondary goal is to teach students how to use simulation and animation to check the correctness of the model. The approach to dynamics followed in this course is not a rehash or simple extension of whatwas taught in earlier undergraduate dynamics courses. It is a highly effective approachwhich makes complex problems, which would be difficult to model using methods commonly taught to undergraduates, quite simple to analyze. The course is based on one of the most powerful methods for modeling dynamic systems currently available. Knowledge of dynamic modeling, especially the approach taught in this course, is a highly valuable skill sought both by industry and academia. Thus the course is suitable for students seeking industry employment or considering graduate school after graduation. The course also makes extensive use of software tools which make it easier and less tedious to model complex systems. This software facilitates the generation of animations that allow the student to visualize the behavior predicted by the model. These animations are always interesting and fun to examine.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ME 5338-001 Me 5338-001

        The goal of this course is to provide students with the analytical and computational skills required to model and simulate simple and complex dynamic systems consisting of interconnected rigid bodies. The primary goal is to teach students how to model and generate the equations of motion for any system of rigid bodies. The secondary goal is to teach students how to use simulation and animation to check the correctness of the model. The approach to dynamics followed in this course is not a rehash or simple extension of whatwas taught in earlier undergraduate dynamics courses. It is a highly effective approachwhich makes complex problems, which would be difficult to model using methods commonly taught to undergraduates, quite simple to analyze. The course is based on one of the most powerful methods for modeling dynamic systems currently available. Knowledge of dynamic modeling, especially the approach taught in this course, is a highly valuable skill sought both by industry and academia. Thus the course is suitable for students seeking industry employment or considering graduate school after graduation. The course also makes extensive use of software tools which make it easier and less tedious to model complex systems. This software facilitates the generation of animations that allow the student to visualize the behavior predicted by the model. These animations are always interesting and fun to examine.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAE 3304-001 Astronautics-I

        Newton's second law, particle dynamics, reference frames and points, spatial rotations, linear and angular velocity, linear and angular momentum, energy, three-dimensional dynamics, two-body problem, orbit types, orbital elements, orbital transfers, interplanetary trajectories, fuel and mass calculations, mission planning, projectile motion, attitude dynamics and control

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAE 2323-001 Dynamics

        Two-dimensional dynamics of particles and rigid bodies

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAE 1312-002 Engineering Statics
        Statics is the study of the balance between forces acting on bodies such that no movement is created.  This course is intended to give students a clear understanding of how to use units of measurement, scalars, vectors, reference points, reference frames, and vector operations to analyze the balance of forces acting on a system.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • ME 5338-001 Analytical and Compuational Dynamics
        Three dimensional, rigid, multibody kinematics and dynamics, Newton's second law, Euler's equations, Lagrange's equations, D'Alembert's Principle, Kane's Method, Work-Energy Theorem, Virtual work, Impulse-Momentum theory, Collisions, Discrete event systems, Numerical simulation and visualization, Model validity checking functions.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • MAE 4301-003 Analytical and Computational Dynamics

        Three dimensional, rigid, multibody kinematics and dynamics, Newton's second law, Euler's equations, Lagrange's equations, D'Alembert's Principle, Kane's Method, Work-Energy Theorem, Virtual work, Impulse-Momentum theory, Collisions, Discrete event systems, Numerical simulation and visualization, Model validity checking functions.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAE 4345-001 Introduction to Robotics
        Kinematics, dynamics, design, and control of serial robotic manipulators
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012

Other Service Activities

  • Uncategorized
    • Dec  Member
      • American Society of Mechanical Engineers
      • IEEE Robotics and Automation Society