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Amy L Tigner

Name

[Tigner, Amy L]

Biography

Amy L. Tigner received her Ph.D. from Stanford University and is currently an Associate Professor of English, specializing in 16th and 17th Century Studies.  She is the founding editor of Early Modern Studies Journal (formerly Early English Studies) and author of Literature and the Renaissance Garden from Elizabeth I to Charles II: England's Paradise (Ashgate, 2012).  She has also published in ELR, Modern Drama, Milton Quarterly, Drama Criticism, Gastronomica and Early Theatre Journal. Most recently, the essay collection   that she co-edited with David Goldstein, Culinary Shakespeare, has been published. And Literature and Food Studies co-authored with Allison Carruth is due to come out in 2017 from Routledge.

Professional Preparation

    • 2004 Ph.D in English LiteratureStanford University
    • 1999 MA in English LiteratureStanford University

Appointments

    • Aug 2014 to Present Graduate Adivsor
      University of Texas at Arlington   Office of the President   Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs   College of Liberal Arts   English Department
    • Mar 2013 to Present Associate Professor
      Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas, Arlington

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Aug 2014 to Present MLA  RSA  SAA  scsc

Awards and Honors

    • Jan  2014 Early Theatre Journal Essay Award 2013 sponsored by Early Theatre Journal

Research and Expertise

  • Editor-in-Chief

    Early Modern Studies Journal

    http://www.earlymodernstudiesjournal.org

    Early Modern Studies Journal (EMSJ) formerly Early English Studies (EES) is an online journal under the auspices of the University of Texas, Arlington English Department and is devoted to literary and cultural topics of study in early modern period. EMSJ is published annually, peer-reviewed, and open to general submission.

    Most recent volume:

    Volume 6 : Women’s Writing | Women’s Work in Early Modernity | 2014

Publications

      Book Forthcoming
      • Literature and Food Studies.  Co-written with Allison Carruth. Literature and Contemporary Thought Series  New York: Routledge 

        {Book} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book 2016
      • David Goldstein and Amy L Tigner, Eds. Culinary Shakespeare: Staging Food and Drink in Early Modern England, Duquesne University Press, 2016

        {Book} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2015
      • Amy L. Tigner, "The Ecology of Eating in Jonson’s "To Penshurst'" in Eco-Approaches to Teaching Early Modern English Texts: 1580-1680. Eds. Lynne Bruckner, Dan Brayton and Jennifer Munroe. Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing, 2015

        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2013
      • Dish up these Greens,” a review essay of A Mess of Greens: Southern Gender & Southern Food by Elizabeth S. D. Engelhardt, Forthcoming, Parallax. Vol. 66, January 2013.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Renaissance Food from Rabelais to Shakespeare: Culinary Readings and Culinary Histories edited by Joan Fitzpatrick. Forthcoming. Early Modern Studies Journal. Vol. 5, 2012.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book 2012
      •  Literature and the Renaissance Garden from Elizabeth I to Charles II: England's Paradise. Ashgate Publishing, May 2012.
        {Book} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2012
      • “The Spanish Actress’s Art: Improvisation, Transvestism, and Disruption in Tirso’s El vergonzoso en palacio.” Early Theatre Journal, 15.1, June 2012, p.169-92.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2012
      • Tradescants’ Culinary Treasures.” Gastronomica 12.4. 2012. P. 74-83.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Chapter 2011
      • "Preserving Nature in Hannah Woolley's The Queen-Like Closet; or Rich Cabinet." Ecofeminist Approaches to Early Modernity. Ed. Rebecca Laroche and Jennifer Munroe. Palgrave, 2012.
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2011
      • Shakespeare in Transition: Political Appropriations in the Postcommunist Czech Republic by Marcela Kostihová, Early English Studies. Vol. 4, 2011
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Encyclopedia Entry 2011
      • "Jinner, Sarah." The Encyclopedia of English Renaissance Literature, edited by Alan Stwerart, Rebecca Lemon, and Garrett Sullivan, Blackwell Publishing, 2011.
        {Encyclopedia Entry} [Refereed/Juried]
      2011
      •  "Russell, Lucy, Countess of Bedford." The Encyclopedia of English Renaissance Literature, edited by Alan Stewart, Rebecca Lemon, and Garrett Sullivan, Blackwell Publishing, 2011.
        {Encyclopedia Entry} [Refereed/Juried]
      2011
      • "Wolley, Hannah." The Encyclopedia of English Renaissance Literature, edited by alan Stweart, Rebecca Lemon, and Garrett Sullivan, Blackwell Publishing, 2011.
        {Encyclopedia Entry} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2010
      • Food in Shakespeare: Early Modern Dietaries and the Plays, by Joan Fitzpatrick, Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England.  Vol. 23, January 2010, 185-87
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2010
      • Of Books and Botany in Early Modern England: Sixteenth-Century Plants and Print Culture by   Leah Knight History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences. Vol. 32.4, 2010, 523-25.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2010
      • Tigner, Amy L. "Eating With Eve." Milton Quarterly (2010).
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2008
      •  "The Flowers of Paradise: Botanical Trade in Sixteenth and Seventeenth-Century England." Global Traffic: Discourses and Practices of Trade in English Literature and Culture from 1550 to 1700. Ed. Barbara Sebeck and Stephen Deng. Palgrave, 2008.
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2006
      • "The Winter's Tale: Gardens and the Marvels of Transformation." English Literary Renaissance (2006).
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2005
      • "The Laramie Project: Western Pastoral." Drama Criticism 26 (2005): 177-87.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2003
      • "The Laramie Project: Western Pastoral." Modern Drama 45.1 (2003).
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

Courses

      • ENGL 6335-001 Early Modern Women and Literary Production

        In this course, we will be reading early modern women’s texts, in manuscript form, to consider the cultural and political nodal points of gendered writing in a highly patriarchal society.  Most women’s writing courses have been primarily concerned with tradition literature: poetry, non-fiction prose, plays, and novels written by women who have formed the canon in this period, as established by feminist scholars in the 1980s and 90s. Instead we will be exploring other kinds of writing, particularly letters and, receipt books (what the early moderns called cook books), to investigate a larger sense of literacy, writing and the concerns of women in this period. This class will participate in two related digital humanities projects:  Early Modern Recipes Online Collective (EMROC) run by a group of international scholars interested in recipes and with Early Modern Manuscripts Online (EMMO) which is the project of the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC.  In both of these cases, students will be transcribing and coding the manuscripts to create accessible databases.  Students will also study 16th and 17th century handwriting (paleography) so that they will have the skill set to work in the digital archives.  

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4399-002 Early Modern Women and Literary Production

        In this course, we will be reading early modern women’s texts, in manuscript form, to consider the cultural and political nodal points of gendered writing in a highly patriarchal society.  Most women’s writing courses have been primarily concerned with tradition literature: poetry, non-fiction prose, plays, and novels written by women who have formed the canon in this period, as established by feminist scholars in the 1980s and 90s. Instead we will be exploring other kinds of writing, particularly letters and, receipt books (what the early moderns called cook books), to investigate a larger sense of literacy, writing and the concerns of women in this period. This class will participate in two related digital humanities projects:  Early Modern Recipes Online Collective (EMROC) run by a group of international scholars interested in recipes and with Early Modern Manuscripts Online (EMMO) which is the project of the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC.  In both of these cases, students will be transcribing and coding the manuscripts to create accessible databases.  Students will also study 16th and 17th century handwriting (paleography) so that they will have the skill set to work in the digital archives.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5308-001 Culinary Shakespeare

        In this course, we will investigate culinary and medicinal references and uses in the literature of Shakespeare and his contemporaries.  We will also be working with 16th and 17th century manuscript receipt (recipe) books. Students will gain the skills to do archival research for early modern manuscript texts and to participate in the burgeoning scholarly conversations about 16th and 17th century receipt books. We will begin with an intensive study of early modern paleography, or handwriting, enabling students to read manuscripts produced in the period. Students will participate in and contribute to the two related digital humanities initiatives, the Folger Shakespeare Library, Early Modern Manuscripts Online (EMMO), and Early Modern Recipes Online Collective (EMROC) by collectively transcribing and making an online edition of a seventeenth-century cookbook. Students will blog about their experiences and their knowledge both on the class blog site and on a public access blog site devoted to recipe research.  Throughout the course, we will investigate how to write about these texts, both as separate entities and in concert with literary production of the period.  We will be reading several of Shakespeare’s plays, including Merry Wives of Winsor, Macbeth, Titus Andronicus, Henry IV, parts 1 and II, Antony and Cleopatra, Twelfth Night, and The Tempest. Students will also read the most recent scholarly work in the field about food in the early modern period.  This course counts towards the Women and Gender Certificate and therefore we will be concerned with issues of gender and will read works (specifically manuscripts) written by women.

        The first two hours of class will be spent in discussion about the readings and the last hour of class will be spent learning paleography and transcribing early modern manuscript recipe books.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4326-001 CULINARY SHAKESPEARE

        In this course, we will investigate culinary and medicinal references and uses in the literature of Shakespeare and his contemporaries.  We will also be working with 16th and 17th century manuscript receipt (recipe) books. Students will gain the skills to do archival research for early modern manuscript texts and to participate in the burgeoning scholarly conversations about 16th and 17th century receipt books. We will begin with an intensive study of early modern paleography, or handwriting, enabling students to read manuscripts produced in the period. Students will participate in and contribute to the two related digital humanities initiatives, the Folger Shakespeare Library, Early Modern Manuscripts Online (EMMO), and Early Modern Recipes Online Collective (EMROC) by collectively transcribing and making an online edition of a seventeenth-century cookbook. Students will blog about their experiences and their knowledge both on the class blog site and on a public access blog site devoted to recipe research.  Throughout the course, we will investigate how to write about these texts, both as separate entities and in concert with literary production of the period.  We will be reading several of Shakespeare’s plays, including Merry Wives of Winsor, Macbeth, Titus Andronicus, Antony and Cleopatra, Twelfth Night, and The Tempest. Students will also read the most recent scholarly work in the field about food in the early modern period. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6330-001 Early Modern Paleography, Manuscripts, and the Archives

        This compressed 2 week + 2 days-long course (June 8-23: M-Th 1-5 p.m.) is designed to provide an intensive introduction to handwriting in early modern England, with a particular emphasis on the English secretary, italic, and mixed hand of the 16th- and 17th-centuries. The first part of the course will concentrate on learning the alphabets, common abbreviations, and numbers and learning transcription conventions.  Then we will work with manuscripts in the Welcome Library and the Folger Shakespeare Library collections.  We will be using both Textual Communities database, which is housed at the University of Saskatchewan,   and the Folger’s new transcription software program Dromio to transcribe receipt books (that is cookbooks and recipe books with both culinary and medicinal recipes).  The class will be part of the EMROC (Early Modern Recipe Online Collective) to transcribe and make early modern receipt books available to the public through open access software.  This class is also one of the first classes to liaise with the Folger library to contribute to Early Modern Manuscripts Online or EMMO.  The skills learned in this class will enable students to work in both real and virtual early modern archives.

      • ENGL 5370-001 SCHOLARLY ARGUMENT or How to Turn a Seminar Paper into a Publishable Article

        This course is designed to teach you the process of revising a seminar paper so that it becomes a publishable scholarly article.  Each student is required to come to the class with a seminar paper from a graduate class.  We will work on the nuts and bolts of producing a solid article length paper, including the discipline of scheduling work time, doing the necessary research on potential journals, revising the paper for research, content, and style.  We will also work on how to write abstracts and letters to the editor.  To facilitate the writing process, students will be working in writing groups.  Everyone will be required to find appropriate conference where they might present their paper.   At the end of the class, students will send their paper to a journal for consideration.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5308-001 Shakespeare and Early Modern Urban/Rural Nature

        This class will take an ecocritical approach to Shakespeare and his contemporaries, as we will study the notion of both urban and rural nature and its relationship to culture.  As our study will be historical we will also be reading supporting materials from the period, particularly chronicles and tracts that discuss the landscape of both city and country.  Our literary readings will include plays from Shakespeare: King Lear; Merry Wives of Windsor, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It, The Tempest; Eastward Ho! By Chapman, Jonson, and Marston; and The Shoemaker’s Holiday by Thomas Dekker. 

        A large part of this class will be our participation in a pedagogical partnership with The Map of Early Modern London (MoEML), a scholarly digital humanities project. Our major project will be a potential contribution to MoEML’s encyclopedia, concerning the Thames River, which runs through the heart of London. I have chosen the Thames as our subject in this project because it is both of nature and of culture; it runs through the countryside and the city; integral to London but also leading to the outside world. We will be following the contributor guidelines for sites and we will either write one long article and students would be in charge of individual parts or we may be doing several separate articles—all on the Thames. We will be searching for literary references for the Thames generally and for specific places (stairways, for example) on the river.  As the class has a focus on Nature, the articles should have an underlying eco-critical perspective, but we will be dealing with a number of topics, including but not limited to: river trade; the river’s association with the theatres; watermen; river traffic; water life; water pollution. Students may also contribute to the glossary as they run into unfamiliar terms. The work that we will be doing is both individual and collaborative. I will mentor you through the research and writing process, and will function as a Guest Editor for MoEML.  The work that you produce will be refereed by me and by the team at the University of Victoria, as it must meet the standard for publication. The MoEML team in Victoria will then encode and publish it (although those students interested in coding could also get involved in this process).  The opportunity to work on a burgeoning digital humanities project and to publish a refereed article in the database will help build your skills and your CV

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4326-001 SHAKESPEARE

        Shakespeare and Nature

        This class will take an ecocritical approach to Shakespeare, as we will study the notion of both urban and rural nature and its relationship to culture.  Our study will be historical and we will discuss the landscape and environmental issues of both city and country—both in the plays and in Shakespeare’s world.  The plays that we will be reading includes: Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Winter’s Tale, King Lear, As You Like It, and The Tempest. We will also be reading contemporary ecocriticism to contextualize the environmental problems of the early modern period. Students will participate by presenting group projects and contributing to the class blog.  At the end of the semester, students will have the option of doing a creative project that is oriented to environmental issues and Shakespeare, along with a short paper, or they can write a longer, more traditional, literary criticism paper.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-052 Rhetoric and Composition I
        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument. ENGL 1301 Expected Learning Outcomes. By the end of ENGL 1301, students should be able to: Rhetorical Knowledge • Use knowledge of the rhetorical situation—author, audience, exigence, constraints—to analyze and construct texts • Compose texts in a variety of genres, expanding their repertoire beyond predictable forms • Adjust voice, tone, diction, syntax, level of formality, and structure to meet the demands of different rhetorical situations Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing • Use writing, reading, and discussion for inquiry, learning, communicating, and examining assumptions • Employ critical reading strategies to identify an author’s position, main ideas, genre conventions, and rhetorical strategies • Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts • Find, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate sources to inform, support, and situate their own claims • Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts Processes • Practice flexible strategies for generating, revising, and editing texts • Practice writing as a recursive process that can lead to substantive changes in ideas, structure, and supporting evidence through multiple revisions • Use the collaborative and social aspects of writing to critique their own and others’ texts Conventions • Apply knowledge of genre conventions ranging from structure and paragraphing to tone and mechanics • Summarize, paraphrase, and quote from sources using appropriate documentation style • Control such surface features as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling • Employ technologies to format texts according to appropriate stylistic conventions
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 6330-001 GENRE STUDIES IN BRITISH LITERATURE
        This course is designed for students to gain the skills to do archival research for early modern manuscript texts and to participate in the burgeoning scholarly conversations about 16th and 17th century receipt books, primarily written by women. We will begin with an intensive study of early modern paleography, or handwriting, enabling students to read manuscripts produced in the period. Students will participate in and contribute to the two related digital humanities initiatives, Textual Communities and Early Modern Recipes Online Collective (EMROC) by collectively transcribing and making an online edition of a seventeenth-century cookbook. Each student will then choose another receipt book manuscript, about which s/he will become an expert. Students will blog about their experiences and their knowledge both on the class blog site and on a public access blog site devoted to recipe research. Throughout the course, we will investigate how to write about these texts, both as separate entities and in concert with literary production of the period.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 1301-052 Rhetoric and Composition I
        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument. ENGL 1301 Expected Learning Outcomes. By the end of ENGL 1301, students should be able to: Rhetorical Knowledge • Use knowledge of the rhetorical situation—author, audience, exigence, constraints—to analyze and construct texts • Compose texts in a variety of genres, expanding their repertoire beyond predictable forms • Adjust voice, tone, diction, syntax, level of formality, and structure to meet the demands of different rhetorical situations Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing • Use writing, reading, and discussion for inquiry, learning, communicating, and examining assumptions • Employ critical reading strategies to identify an author’s position, main ideas, genre conventions, and rhetorical strategies • Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts • Find, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate sources to inform, support, and situate their own claims • Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts Processes • Practice flexible strategies for generating, revising, and editing texts • Practice writing as a recursive process that can lead to substantive changes in ideas, structure, and supporting evidence through multiple revisions • Use the collaborative and social aspects of writing to critique their own and others’ texts Conventions • Apply knowledge of genre conventions ranging from structure and paragraphing to tone and mechanics • Summarize, paraphrase, and quote from sources using appropriate documentation style • Control such surface features as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling • Employ technologies to format texts according to appropriate stylistic conventions
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4326-001 SHAKESPEARE
        In this class, we will be studying Shakespeare’s depiction of the War of the Roses, reading five of the eight plays that have to do with the subject: Richard II, Henry VI, Parts 1, 2, and 3, and Richard III. The course will consider the question of history and Shakespeare’s staging of these plays, the place of power and politics, and the game of thrones that underpinned this war between two related monarchal families: the Yorks and the Lancasters. To have a better understanding of the historical figures, their motives and actions, their politics and positions, we will take a rather unconventional tactic throughout the semester by playing an online game: Preservation of the Realm (aka Assassination), in which students will enact key players in the political arena until only one side is left standing (metaphorically, of course). Students will participate in faction presentations, in which the particular political party (Yorks or Lancasters) as a group will lead the class creatively through one of the assigned readings. We will also consider how to compress the three Henry VI plays into a playable 2-hour performance. And students will investigate how history has treaded the two Richards (the second and the third) of this story. This course has a heavy reading component, requires that students be creatively involved in the process, and be able to write articulately, but it will not involve any quizzes, tests, or exams. Let the game of thrones begin!
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • ENGL 4399-006 Recipes for Literature/Literature of Recipes
        With the recent proliferation of both cookbooks and books about cooking, this course will consider primary texts that exhibit literary, lyrical, and aesthetic sensibilities about recipe-writing and recipe-execution and that mark particular cultural shifts in food praxis and politics. We will pay particular attention to culturally situated ideas of nutrition, diet, and ethical eating in each of the texts we examine. We begin with the idea that a recipe functions to transmit, while also often translating, cultural knowledge from one generation to another or from one community to another. Presenting recipes as both an exchange of knowledge and medium for conveying a politics of food, the class will examine the ever-widening social circle that recipes represent from the early modern period to the present day. This course will consider our topic from two methodological angles: classes on Tuesdays will be devoted to looking at cookbooks/recipes as literature and literature that contains recipes or that function in some manner as cookbooks or rich culinary descriptions; class on Thursday will be a kind of practicum in which students will participating in and contributing to the digital humanities initiative, Early Modern Recipes Online Collective (EMROC) by collectively transcribing and making an online edition of a seventeenth-century cookbook. Along with the primary texts, students will also be reading critical secondary material to help us consider the theoretical aspects of food, cooking and eating.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 6335-001 TOPICS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
        In this course, we will be reading early modern texts written by women to consider the cultural and political nodal points of gendered writing in a highly patriarchal society. Most women’s writing courses have been primarily concerned with tradition literature: poetry, non-fiction prose, plays, and novels written by women who have formed the canon in this period, as established by feminist scholars in the 1980s and 90s. These writers include: Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Cary, Mary Sidney Herbert, Mary Sidney Wroth, Elizabeth Cary, Aemelia Lanyer, Margaret Cavendish, and Aphra Behn. These genres and authors we will be reading, but also next to this canonical view of women’s literature we will also be exploring other kinds of writing, such as receipt books (what the early moderns called cook books), books of midwifery, astrology, and polemical tracts to investigate a larger sense of literacy, writing and the concerns of women in this period. We will therefore be considering writers such as Rachel Speght, Hannah Woolley, Sara Jinner, Jane Sharp, Elizabeth Grey, and Althea Talbot. As we are examining these works by women, we will also be studying the readers who read the texts, how they were read, and how specifically women were using texts written by other women.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 6335-001 TOPICS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
        In this course, we will be reading early modern texts written by women to consider the cultural and political nodal points of gendered writing in a highly patriarchal society. Most women’s writing courses have been primarily concerned with tradition literature: poetry, non-fiction prose, plays, and novels written by women who have formed the canon in this period, as established by feminist scholars in the 1980s and 90s. These writers include: Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Cary, Mary Sidney Herbert, Mary Sidney Wroth, Elizabeth Cary, Aemelia Lanyer, Margaret Cavendish, and Aphra Behn. These genres and authors we will be reading, but also next to this canonical view of women’s literature we will also be exploring other kinds of writing, such as receipt books (what the early moderns called cook books), books of midwifery, astrology, and polemical tracts to investigate a larger sense of literacy, writing and the concerns of women in this period. We will therefore be considering writers such as Rachel Speght, Hannah Woolley, Sara Jinner, Jane Sharp, Elizabeth Grey, and Althea Talbot. As we are examining these works by women, we will also be studying the readers who read the texts, how they were read, and how specifically women were using texts written by other women.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2303-004 TOPICS IN LITERATURE
        Shakespeare at the Cinema All the world is a stage, and all the men and women merely players†Jacques, As You Like It In the last decade or two, Shakespeare in the movies has burgeoned; the adaptations of Shakespeare as film subject are as diverse as they are popular. What makes Shakespeare so appealing to modern film audiences and how do actors, writers, and directors interpret these sixteenth and seventeenth-century texts to make them alive for us today? In this course, we will address exactly these kinds of questions. Beginning by studying Shakespeare's plays through textual analysis, we will then films from several different versions of each play. Throughout the course, we will discover the kinds of performance choices actors make and why and how adaptations function for us as an audience
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4326-001 SHAKESPEARE
        Why have so many film-makers around the world chosen to adapt Shakespeare for contemporary audiences and what have they sought to do with his works? In this seminar we will begin to explore the complexities of Shakespearean adaptation by reading some of his best known plays and considering them in relation to a selection of film adaptations that engage the originals from a range of cultural and political perspectives. We will pay special attention to the cultural politics of producing Shakespeare in the twentieth (and twenty-first) century with respect to questions of race, gender, class, language, and colonialism. To what extent are Shakespeare’s plays or what some critics have called “the Shakespeare effect†problematic for these writers, and to what extent has “Shakespeare†provided a common language or meeting ground for larger cultural or political conversations?
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2303-004 TOPICS IN LITERATURE
        Shakespeare at the Cinema All the world is a stage, and all the men and women merely players†Jacques, As You Like It In the last decade or two, Shakespeare in the movies has burgeoned; the adaptations of Shakespeare as film subject are as diverse as they are popular. What makes Shakespeare so appealing to modern film audiences and how do actors, writers, and directors interpret these sixteenth and seventeenth-century texts to make them alive for us today? In this course, we will address exactly these kinds of questions. Beginning by studying Shakespeare's plays through textual analysis, we will then films from several different versions of each play. Throughout the course, we will discover the kinds of performance choices actors make and why and how adaptations function for us as an audience
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4326-001 SHAKESPEARE
        Why have so many film-makers around the world chosen to adapt Shakespeare for contemporary audiences and what have they sought to do with his works? In this seminar we will begin to explore the complexities of Shakespearean adaptation by reading some of his best known plays and considering them in relation to a selection of film adaptations that engage the originals from a range of cultural and political perspectives. We will pay special attention to the cultural politics of producing Shakespeare in the twentieth (and twenty-first) century with respect to questions of race, gender, class, language, and colonialism. To what extent are Shakespeare’s plays or what some critics have called “the Shakespeare effect†problematic for these writers, and to what extent has “Shakespeare†provided a common language or meeting ground for larger cultural or political conversations?
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2303-004 TOPICS IN LITERATURE
        Shakespeare at the Cinema All the world is a stage, and all the men and women merely players†Jacques, As You Like It In the last decade or two, Shakespeare in the movies has burgeoned; the adaptations of Shakespeare as film subject are as diverse as they are popular. What makes Shakespeare so appealing to modern film audiences and how do actors, writers, and directors interpret these sixteenth and seventeenth-century texts to make them alive for us today? In this course, we will address exactly these kinds of questions. Beginning by studying Shakespeare's plays through textual analysis, we will then films from several different versions of each play. Throughout the course, we will discover the kinds of performance choices actors make and why and how adaptations function for us as an audience
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2303-004 TOPICS IN LITERATURE
        Shakespeare at the Cinema All the world is a stage, and all the men and women merely players†Jacques, As You Like It In the last decade or two, Shakespeare in the movies has burgeoned; the adaptations of Shakespeare as film subject are as diverse as they are popular. What makes Shakespeare so appealing to modern film audiences and how do actors, writers, and directors interpret these sixteenth and seventeenth-century texts to make them alive for us today? In this course, we will address exactly these kinds of questions. Beginning by studying Shakespeare's plays through textual analysis, we will then films from several different versions of each play. Throughout the course, we will discover the kinds of performance choices actors make and why and how adaptations function for us as an audience
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2303-004 TOPICS IN LITERATURE
        Shakespeare at the Cinema All the world is a stage, and all the men and women merely players†Jacques, As You Like It In the last decade or two, Shakespeare in the movies has burgeoned; the adaptations of Shakespeare as film subject are as diverse as they are popular. What makes Shakespeare so appealing to modern film audiences and how do actors, writers, and directors interpret these sixteenth and seventeenth-century texts to make them alive for us today? In this course, we will address exactly these kinds of questions. Beginning by studying Shakespeare's plays through textual analysis, we will then films from several different versions of each play. Throughout the course, we will discover the kinds of performance choices actors make and why and how adaptations function for us as an audience
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2303-004 TOPICS IN LITERATURE
        Shakespeare at the Cinema All the world is a stage, and all the men and women merely players†Jacques, As You Like It In the last decade or two, Shakespeare in the movies has burgeoned; the adaptations of Shakespeare as film subject are as diverse as they are popular. What makes Shakespeare so appealing to modern film audiences and how do actors, writers, and directors interpret these sixteenth and seventeenth-century texts to make them alive for us today? In this course, we will address exactly these kinds of questions. Beginning by studying Shakespeare's plays through textual analysis, we will then films from several different versions of each play. Throughout the course, we will discover the kinds of performance choices actors make and why and how adaptations function for us as an audience
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4326-001 SHAKESPEARE
        Why have so many film-makers around the world chosen to adapt Shakespeare for contemporary audiences and what have they sought to do with his works? In this seminar we will begin to explore the complexities of Shakespearean adaptation by reading some of his best known plays and considering them in relation to a selection of film adaptations that engage the originals from a range of cultural and political perspectives. We will pay special attention to the cultural politics of producing Shakespeare in the twentieth (and twenty-first) century with respect to questions of race, gender, class, language, and colonialism. To what extent are Shakespeare’s plays or what some critics have called “the Shakespeare effect†problematic for these writers, and to what extent has “Shakespeare†provided a common language or meeting ground for larger cultural or political conversations?
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 6335-001 TOPICS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
        1611 was a watershed year in the number and the lasting importance of works published or performed. Most significantly, the King James Bible, the new protestant translation collaboratively produced by some of the finest scholars of the era appeared in 1611 and has remained the most consistently cited biblical text. Praised both for its scholarship and for the beauty of its poetry, the King James Bible has been continuously read from its publication to the present day. Other important works were also produced this same year, Shakespeare’s two great romances, The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest were both performed by the King’s Men at Blackfriars for James’ court in 1611, as were notable masques by Ben Jonson. Other playwrights also had theatrical hits: Beaumont and Fletcher wrote A King and No King, and Dekker and Middleton, The Roaring Girl. One of the few female poets of the era, Aemelia Lanyer penned her Salve Deus Rex Judaeroum, while John Donne and Ben Jonson also conceived of some of their famous poetic works in that same year. This class will be investigating the particular political, social, historical and aesthetic aspects of this important year to consider why 1611 produced so many significant works of literature that we still treasure in the 21st century. Students will also read secondary scholarship and to learn the current debates about these texts in order to situation their own discoveries within the larger academic conversation.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4399-001 Mad Men, Possessed Women
        1611 was a watershed year in the number and the lasting importance of works published or performed. Most significantly, the King James Bible, the new protestant translation collaboratively produced by some of the finest scholars of the era appeared in 1611 and has remained the most consistently cited biblical text. Praised both for its scholarship and for the beauty of its poetry, the King James Bible has been continuously read from its publication to the present day. Other important works were also produced this same year, Shakespeare’s two great romances, The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest were both performed by the King’s Men at Blackfriars for James’ court in 1611, as were notable masques by Ben Jonson. Other playwrights also had theatrical hits: Beaumont and Fletcher wrote A King and No King, and Dekker and Middleton, The Roaring Girl. One of the few female poets of the era, Aemelia Lanyer penned her Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum, while John Donne and Ben Jonson also conceived of some of their famous poetic works in that same year. This class will be investigating the particular political, social, historical and aesthetic aspects of this important year to consider why 1611 produced so many significant works of literature that we still treasure in the 21st century. Students will also read secondary scholarship and to learn the current debates about these texts in order to situation their own discoveries within the larger academic conversation.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 1300-001 First Year Seminar: Food, Culture, and Writing
        This course will explore the culture of food through both experiential and reflective modes of critical thinking. In the first section, students will investigate food sources, from conventional and industrial to organic and local foodways. From food sources, we then examine the aesthetics of food by reading short essays on food, then model both the experiences of these diverse writers and try their own hands at food writing essays. In the final section of the course, students will read literary works that concern food and will produce literary criticism, informed by the body of knowledge we have built throughout the course.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 6335-001 TOPICS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
        1611 was a watershed year in the number and the lasting importance of works published or performed. Most significantly, the King James Bible, the new protestant translation collaboratively produced by some of the finest scholars of the era appeared in 1611 and has remained the most consistently cited biblical text. Praised both for its scholarship and for the beauty of its poetry, the King James Bible has been continuously read from its publication to the present day. Other important works were also produced this same year, Shakespeare’s two great romances, The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest were both performed by the King’s Men at Blackfriars for James’ court in 1611, as were notable masques by Ben Jonson. Other playwrights also had theatrical hits: Beaumont and Fletcher wrote A King and No King, and Dekker and Middleton, The Roaring Girl. One of the few female poets of the era, Aemelia Lanyer penned her Salve Deus Rex Judaeroum, while John Donne and Ben Jonson also conceived of some of their famous poetic works in that same year. This class will be investigating the particular political, social, historical and aesthetic aspects of this important year to consider why 1611 produced so many significant works of literature that we still treasure in the 21st century. Students will also read secondary scholarship and to learn the current debates about these texts in order to situation their own discoveries within the larger academic conversation.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 6335-001 TOPICS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
        1611 was a watershed year in the number and the lasting importance of works published or performed. Most significantly, the King James Bible, the new protestant translation collaboratively produced by some of the finest scholars of the era appeared in 1611 and has remained the most consistently cited biblical text. Praised both for its scholarship and for the beauty of its poetry, the King James Bible has been continuously read from its publication to the present day. Other important works were also produced this same year, Shakespeare’s two great romances, The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest were both performed by the King’s Men at Blackfriars for James’ court in 1611, as were notable masques by Ben Jonson. Other playwrights also had theatrical hits: Beaumont and Fletcher wrote A King and No King, and Dekker and Middleton, The Roaring Girl. One of the few female poets of the era, Aemelia Lanyer penned her Salve Deus Rex Judaeroum, while John Donne and Ben Jonson also conceived of some of their famous poetic works in that same year. This class will be investigating the particular political, social, historical and aesthetic aspects of this important year to consider why 1611 produced so many significant works of literature that we still treasure in the 21st century. Students will also read secondary scholarship and to learn the current debates about these texts in order to situation their own discoveries within the larger academic conversation.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 6335-001 TOPICS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
        1611 was a watershed year in the number and the lasting importance of works published or performed. Most significantly, the King James Bible, the new protestant translation collaboratively produced by some of the finest scholars of the era appeared in 1611 and has remained the most consistently cited biblical text. Praised both for its scholarship and for the beauty of its poetry, the King James Bible has been continuously read from its publication to the present day. Other important works were also produced this same year, Shakespeare’s two great romances, The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest were both performed by the King’s Men at Blackfriars for James’ court in 1611, as were notable masques by Ben Jonson. Other playwrights also had theatrical hits: Beaumont and Fletcher wrote A King and No King, and Dekker and Middleton, The Roaring Girl. One of the few female poets of the era, Aemelia Lanyer penned her Salve Deus Rex Judaeroum, while John Donne and Ben Jonson also conceived of some of their famous poetic works in that same year. This class will be investigating the particular political, social, historical and aesthetic aspects of this important year to consider why 1611 produced so many significant works of literature that we still treasure in the 21st century. Students will also read secondary scholarship and to learn the current debates about these texts in order to situation their own discoveries within the larger academic conversation.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 6335-001 TOPICS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
        1611 was a watershed year in the number and the lasting importance of works published or performed. Most significantly, the King James Bible, the new protestant translation collaboratively produced by some of the finest scholars of the era appeared in 1611 and has remained the most consistently cited biblical text. Praised both for its scholarship and for the beauty of its poetry, the King James Bible has been continuously read from its publication to the present day. Other important works were also produced this same year, Shakespeare’s two great romances, The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest were both performed by the King’s Men at Blackfriars for James’ court in 1611, as were notable masques by Ben Jonson. Other playwrights also had theatrical hits: Beaumont and Fletcher wrote A King and No King, and Dekker and Middleton, The Roaring Girl. One of the few female poets of the era, Aemelia Lanyer penned her Salve Deus Rex Judaeroum, while John Donne and Ben Jonson also conceived of some of their famous poetic works in that same year. This class will be investigating the particular political, social, historical and aesthetic aspects of this important year to consider why 1611 produced so many significant works of literature that we still treasure in the 21st century. Students will also read secondary scholarship and to learn the current debates about these texts in order to situation their own discoveries within the larger academic conversation.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4399-001 Mad Men, Possessed Women
        1611 was a watershed year in the number and the lasting importance of works published or performed. Most significantly, the King James Bible, the new protestant translation collaboratively produced by some of the finest scholars of the era appeared in 1611 and has remained the most consistently cited biblical text. Praised both for its scholarship and for the beauty of its poetry, the King James Bible has been continuously read from its publication to the present day. Other important works were also produced this same year, Shakespeare’s two great romances, The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest were both performed by the King’s Men at Blackfriars for James’ court in 1611, as were notable masques by Ben Jonson. Other playwrights also had theatrical hits: Beaumont and Fletcher wrote A King and No King, and Dekker and Middleton, The Roaring Girl. One of the few female poets of the era, Aemelia Lanyer penned her Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum, while John Donne and Ben Jonson also conceived of some of their famous poetic works in that same year. This class will be investigating the particular political, social, historical and aesthetic aspects of this important year to consider why 1611 produced so many significant works of literature that we still treasure in the 21st century. Students will also read secondary scholarship and to learn the current debates about these texts in order to situation their own discoveries within the larger academic conversation.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 1300-001 First Year Seminar: Food, Culture, and Writing
        This course will explore the culture of food through both experiential and reflective modes of critical thinking. In the first section, students will investigate food sources, from conventional and industrial to organic and local foodways. From food sources, we then examine the aesthetics of food by reading short essays on food, then model both the experiences of these diverse writers and try their own hands at food writing essays. In the final section of the course, students will read literary works that concern food and will produce literary criticism, informed by the body of knowledge we have built throughout the course.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 6335-001 TOPICS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
        1611 was a watershed year in the number and the lasting importance of works published or performed. Most significantly, the King James Bible, the new protestant translation collaboratively produced by some of the finest scholars of the era appeared in 1611 and has remained the most consistently cited biblical text. Praised both for its scholarship and for the beauty of its poetry, the King James Bible has been continuously read from its publication to the present day. Other important works were also produced this same year, Shakespeare’s two great romances, The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest were both performed by the King’s Men at Blackfriars for James’ court in 1611, as were notable masques by Ben Jonson. Other playwrights also had theatrical hits: Beaumont and Fletcher wrote A King and No King, and Dekker and Middleton, The Roaring Girl. One of the few female poets of the era, Aemelia Lanyer penned her Salve Deus Rex Judaeroum, while John Donne and Ben Jonson also conceived of some of their famous poetic works in that same year. This class will be investigating the particular political, social, historical and aesthetic aspects of this important year to consider why 1611 produced so many significant works of literature that we still treasure in the 21st century. Students will also read secondary scholarship and to learn the current debates about these texts in order to situation their own discoveries within the larger academic conversation.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4399-001 Mad Men, Possessed Women
        1611 was a watershed year in the number and the lasting importance of works published or performed. Most significantly, the King James Bible, the new protestant translation collaboratively produced by some of the finest scholars of the era appeared in 1611 and has remained the most consistently cited biblical text. Praised both for its scholarship and for the beauty of its poetry, the King James Bible has been continuously read from its publication to the present day. Other important works were also produced this same year, Shakespeare’s two great romances, The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest were both performed by the King’s Men at Blackfriars for James’ court in 1611, as were notable masques by Ben Jonson. Other playwrights also had theatrical hits: Beaumont and Fletcher wrote A King and No King, and Dekker and Middleton, The Roaring Girl. One of the few female poets of the era, Aemelia Lanyer penned her Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum, while John Donne and Ben Jonson also conceived of some of their famous poetic works in that same year. This class will be investigating the particular political, social, historical and aesthetic aspects of this important year to consider why 1611 produced so many significant works of literature that we still treasure in the 21st century. Students will also read secondary scholarship and to learn the current debates about these texts in order to situation their own discoveries within the larger academic conversation.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4399-001 Mad Men, Possessed Women
        1611 was a watershed year in the number and the lasting importance of works published or performed. Most significantly, the King James Bible, the new protestant translation collaboratively produced by some of the finest scholars of the era appeared in 1611 and has remained the most consistently cited biblical text. Praised both for its scholarship and for the beauty of its poetry, the King James Bible has been continuously read from its publication to the present day. Other important works were also produced this same year, Shakespeare’s two great romances, The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest were both performed by the King’s Men at Blackfriars for James’ court in 1611, as were notable masques by Ben Jonson. Other playwrights also had theatrical hits: Beaumont and Fletcher wrote A King and No King, and Dekker and Middleton, The Roaring Girl. One of the few female poets of the era, Aemelia Lanyer penned her Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum, while John Donne and Ben Jonson also conceived of some of their famous poetic works in that same year. This class will be investigating the particular political, social, historical and aesthetic aspects of this important year to consider why 1611 produced so many significant works of literature that we still treasure in the 21st century. Students will also read secondary scholarship and to learn the current debates about these texts in order to situation their own discoveries within the larger academic conversation.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 6335-001 TOPICS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
        1611 was a watershed year in the number and the lasting importance of works published or performed. Most significantly, the King James Bible, the new protestant translation collaboratively produced by some of the finest scholars of the era appeared in 1611 and has remained the most consistently cited biblical text. Praised both for its scholarship and for the beauty of its poetry, the King James Bible has been continuously read from its publication to the present day. Other important works were also produced this same year, Shakespeare’s two great romances, The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest were both performed by the King’s Men at Blackfriars for James’ court in 1611, as were notable masques by Ben Jonson. Other playwrights also had theatrical hits: Beaumont and Fletcher wrote A King and No King, and Dekker and Middleton, The Roaring Girl. One of the few female poets of the era, Aemelia Lanyer penned her Salve Deus Rex Judaeroum, while John Donne and Ben Jonson also conceived of some of their famous poetic works in that same year. This class will be investigating the particular political, social, historical and aesthetic aspects of this important year to consider why 1611 produced so many significant works of literature that we still treasure in the 21st century. Students will also read secondary scholarship and to learn the current debates about these texts in order to situation their own discoveries within the larger academic conversation.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 5308-001 Histories in the Summer: Shakespeare’s Henriad, the Second Tetralogy
        In this class, we will study Shakespeare’s second Henriad: Richard II, Henry IV, part I, Henry IV, part II, and Henry V; recent criticism concerning these plays, and contemporary film adaptations of the second Tetralogy. We will also look to the source materials to discuss the Elizabethan political landscape in which these plays were written.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 5308-001 Histories in the Summer: Shakespeare’s Henriad, the Second Tetralogy
        In this class, we will study Shakespeare’s second Henriad: Richard II, Henry IV, part I, Henry IV, part II, and Henry V; recent criticism concerning these plays, and contemporary film adaptations of the second Tetralogy. We will also look to the source materials to discuss the Elizabethan political landscape in which these plays were written.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 5308-001 Histories in the Summer: Shakespeare’s Henriad, the Second Tetralogy
        In this class, we will study Shakespeare’s second Henriad: Richard II, Henry IV, part I, Henry IV, part II, and Henry V; recent criticism concerning these plays, and contemporary film adaptations of the second Tetralogy. We will also look to the source materials to discuss the Elizabethan political landscape in which these plays were written.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 5308-001 Histories in the Summer: Shakespeare’s Henriad, the Second Tetralogy
        In this class, we will study Shakespeare’s second Henriad: Richard II, Henry IV, part I, Henry IV, part II, and Henry V; recent criticism concerning these plays, and contemporary film adaptations of the second Tetralogy. We will also look to the source materials to discuss the Elizabethan political landscape in which these plays were written.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4326-001 SHAKESPEARE
        Why have so many film-makers around the world chosen to adapt Shakespeare for contemporary audiences and what have they sought to do with his works? In this seminar we will begin to explore the complexities of Shakespearean adaptation by reading some of his best known plays and considering them in relation to a selection of film adaptations that engage the originals from a range of cultural and political perspectives. We will pay special attention to the cultural politics of producing Shakespeare in the twentieth (and twenty-first) century with respect to questions of race, gender, class, language, and colonialism. To what extent are Shakespeare’s plays or what some critics have called “the Shakespeare effect†problematic for these writers, and to what extent has “Shakespeare†provided a common language or meeting ground for larger cultural or political conversations?
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 2303-007 TOPICS IN LITERATURE
        speare at the Cinema “All the world is a stage, and all the men and women merely players†Jaques, As You Like It In the last decade or two, Shakespeare in the movies has burgeoned; the adaptations of Shakespeare as film subject are as diverse as they are popular. What makes Shakespeare so appealing to modern film audiences and how do actors, writers, and directors interpret these sixteenth and seventeenth-century texts to make them alive for us today? In this course, we will address exactly these kinds of questions. Beginning by studying Shakespeare's plays through textual analysis, we will then view clips from several different versions of each play.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGR 3351-003 History of British Literature I
        English 3351 is a course about history. Our primary goal is to become acquainted with British literary history: working in roughly chronological order, we will trace a fairly standard narrative that includes many of the major figures (Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope) and forms (romance, fabliau, tragedy, lyric, epic) of literature written in England from the Middle Ages to the beginning of the eighteenth century. A secondary concern is with what it means to read and write about literature historically. Many of the works on the syllabus are deliberately backward-looking, the assumption being that knowledge of the past (whether personal, religious, political, or mythic) is key to understanding the present and perhaps even shaping the future. As we examine different versions and uses of history in medieval and early modern literature, we will also explore how and why these works continue to figure in the present-day project of writing history—of what we seek in the past, how we seek it, and why.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGR 3351-003 History of British Literature I
        English 3351 is a course about history. Our primary goal is to become acquainted with British literary history: working in roughly chronological order, we will trace a fairly standard narrative that includes many of the major figures (Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope) and forms (romance, fabliau, tragedy, lyric, epic) of literature written in England from the Middle Ages to the beginning of the eighteenth century. A secondary concern is with what it means to read and write about literature historically. Many of the works on the syllabus are deliberately backward-looking, the assumption being that knowledge of the past (whether personal, religious, political, or mythic) is key to understanding the present and perhaps even shaping the future. As we examine different versions and uses of history in medieval and early modern literature, we will also explore how and why these works continue to figure in the present-day project of writing history—of what we seek in the past, how we seek it, and why.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGR 3351-003 History of British Literature I
        English 3351 is a course about history. Our primary goal is to become acquainted with British literary history: working in roughly chronological order, we will trace a fairly standard narrative that includes many of the major figures (Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope) and forms (romance, fabliau, tragedy, lyric, epic) of literature written in England from the Middle Ages to the beginning of the eighteenth century. A secondary concern is with what it means to read and write about literature historically. Many of the works on the syllabus are deliberately backward-looking, the assumption being that knowledge of the past (whether personal, religious, political, or mythic) is key to understanding the present and perhaps even shaping the future. As we examine different versions and uses of history in medieval and early modern literature, we will also explore how and why these works continue to figure in the present-day project of writing history—of what we seek in the past, how we seek it, and why.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGR 3351-003 History of British Literature I
        English 3351 is a course about history. Our primary goal is to become acquainted with British literary history: working in roughly chronological order, we will trace a fairly standard narrative that includes many of the major figures (Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope) and forms (romance, fabliau, tragedy, lyric, epic) of literature written in England from the Middle Ages to the beginning of the eighteenth century. A secondary concern is with what it means to read and write about literature historically. Many of the works on the syllabus are deliberately backward-looking, the assumption being that knowledge of the past (whether personal, religious, political, or mythic) is key to understanding the present and perhaps even shaping the future. As we examine different versions and uses of history in medieval and early modern literature, we will also explore how and why these works continue to figure in the present-day project of writing history—of what we seek in the past, how we seek it, and why.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 6329-001 The 1890
        Normal 0 0 1 109 634 University of Texas, Arlington 8 1 765 11.1287 0 0 0 <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"Times New Roman"; panose-1:0 2 2 6 3 5 4 5 2 3; mso-font-alt:"Times New Roman"; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:50331648 0 0 0 1 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-parent:""; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-parent:""; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} -->

        In "Food, Literature, and Culture," we will be reading the works of the invited speakers of the 2010 Hermanns Lectures, which is also titled “Food, Literature, and Culture,†with the idea that grad students will be more prepared to engage with the speakers at high intellectual level.The course grapples with the various ideas about food, including sustainability, ethics, aesthetics, health, cooking as literature, literature about cooking and eating. “Food, Literature, and Culture†also contains a substantial historical component, providing a solid grounding in the ideas of food, cooking, and eating as they have developed through time and place. The literature will range from Shakespeare’s plays to contemporary articles in the food journal, Gastronomica.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • ENGL 6329-001 The 1890
        Normal 0 0 1 109 634 University of Texas, Arlington 8 1 765 11.1287 0 0 0 <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"Times New Roman"; panose-1:0 2 2 6 3 5 4 5 2 3; mso-font-alt:"Times New Roman"; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:50331648 0 0 0 1 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-parent:""; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-parent:""; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} -->

        In "Food, Literature, and Culture," we will be reading the works of the invited speakers of the 2010 Hermanns Lectures, which is also titled “Food, Literature, and Culture,†with the idea that grad students will be more prepared to engage with the speakers at high intellectual level.The course grapples with the various ideas about food, including sustainability, ethics, aesthetics, health, cooking as literature, literature about cooking and eating. “Food, Literature, and Culture†also contains a substantial historical component, providing a solid grounding in the ideas of food, cooking, and eating as they have developed through time and place. The literature will range from Shakespeare’s plays to contemporary articles in the food journal, Gastronomica.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • ENGL 4326-001 SHAKESPEARE
        For each of the plays that we will read this semester— Taming of the Shrew, Richard III, The Merchant of Venice, Hamlet, 12th Night, Othello, Macbeth, and The Winter’s Tale—students will have the opportunity to participate in formal debates in which they will research the argument and then present their evidence as a debater.  The object of the class is to dig deeply into the fundamental questions and cruxes of these 400-year-old texts that continue to fire intellectual curiosity and debate, while honing the students’ own rhetorical skills. 
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2009

Service to the University

  • Elected
    • Aug 2014 to  Present Graduate Advisor

      Graduate Advisor advises both Ph.D. and MA students on their academic careers, about the program and the profession.  The G.A. is the chair of the Graduate Studies Committee, which overseas the Graduate Program, heads the Admissions committee, makes Admission decisions on MA students and works to facilitte programtic matters between students and faculty. The G.A. also conducts programatic and professionalization workshops for graduate students, helps in registration for classes, and liases with Graduate Admissions and Records and Registration.  

Other Service Activities

  • Uncategorized
    • Dec  General Editor
      Early Modern Studies Journal