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A.C. Sahoo

Name

[Sahoo, A.C.]
  • Adjunct Professor

Biography

A.C. Sahoo is an adjunct professor at computer science department, currently  teaching a special topics on Software Evolution and Re-engineering  at University of Texas at Arlington. A member of Industry Advisory Board to the CSE department  and currently manages the core R&D software development department  at Train Dynamics  System  of  New York Air Brake, a wholly owned subsidiary of Knorr-Bremse Group with head office in Munich, Mr. Sahoo has over 25 years of Industry experience  has served various technical, management, and leadership positions at AT&T Bell Labs, Tell Labs, Alcatel, Lucent,  Cisco, various telecommunications startups, and Defence Research and Development Organization(DRDO)since 1986. He has designed, developped,and managed the R&D activities of various telecommunication and networking equipments, energy management,  train automation,  and surface to air missile systems currently being commissioned and deployed in the field all over the globe. 

Professional Preparation

    • 2009 Executive MBA in International Business University of Texas Dallas
    • 1994 Masters in Engineering in Compter Science and AutomationIndian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore, India,
    • In Progress PhD in Software EngineeringUniversity of Texas at Arlington

Appointments

    • Jan 2015 to Present Adjunct Professor
      CSE Department, UTA ArlingtonUTA
    • Aug 2015 to Dec 2015 Adjunct Professor
      University of Texas Arling
    • Aug 2013 to Present Member of Industry advisory board
      CSE Department, UTA ArlingtonUTA
    • Aug 2011 to Present Manager Embedded Core Dept.
      Train Dyamic Systems Business unit of NYAB, A wholly owned subsiudary of Knorr-bremse Group
    • Mar 2008 to Aug 2011 New Venture Analyst
      Alcatel Lucent
    • Aug 1995 to Aug 2011 AT&T Bell Labs
      AT&T Bellabs/Lucent Techologies/Alcatel-Lucent
    • Aug 2005 to Aug 2009 Manager
      Tellabs
    • Aug 1986 to Aug 1995 Defense R&D Scientist
      Defense R&D Organization

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Jan 2015 to Present member IEEE

Courses

      • CSE 6329-001 Special Topics in Advanced Software Engineering

        In an IEEE article "Frequently Forgotten Fundamental Facts about Software Engineering," Robert L. Glass talks about maintenance typically consuming an average of 60% of software costs, and enhancements are responsible for more than 75% of software maintenance costs requiring software re-engineering in some forms. Many times, students are not fully aware of these real-life industry challenges when they complete their degrees and join software and system development companies.

        This course examines existing forward engineering processes (such as the V-model for quality assurance) and the issues and challenges of applying it to the legacy code in maintenance and enhancement situations. The class will further introduce a new re-engineering framework and methodologies necessary for agile planning, and an innovative N-Model for reverse engineering and re-engineering software products over their life cycles.

        As the course teaches various principles of software reuse, reverse engineering (design recovery, design pattern identification and reorganization, architecture recovery, requirements recovery), and re-engineering techniques that are found through industry practices and research work, students will be required to do additional scholarly article searches, read and present papers, and gain hands on experience in completing team projects regarding this challenging subject material. Paper reading/critiquing is individualized work and projects will be team activities.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 6329-001 Special Topics in Advanced Software Engineering

        In an IEEE article "Frequently Forgotten Fundamental Facts about Software Engineering," Robert L. Glass talks about maintenance typically consuming an average of 60% of software costs, and enhancements are responsible for more than 75% of software maintenance costs requiring software re-engineering in some forms. Many times, students are not fully aware of these real-life industry challenges when they complete their degrees and join software and system development companies.

        This course examines existing forward engineering processes (such as the V-model for quality assurance) and the issues and challenges of applying it to the legacy code in maintenance and enhancement situations. The class will further introduce a new re-engineering framework and methodologies necessary for agile planning, and an innovative N-Model for reverse engineering and re-engineering software products over their life cycles.

        As the course teaches various principles of software reuse, reverse engineering (design recovery, design pattern identification and reorganization, architecture recovery, requirements recovery), and re-engineering techniques that are found through industry practices and research work, students will be required to do additional scholarly article searches, read and present papers, and gain hands on experience in completing team projects regarding this challenging subject material. Paper reading/critiquing is individualized work and projects will be team activities.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 6329-001 Special Topics in Advanced Software Engineering

        In an IEEE article "Frequently Forgotten Fundamental Facts about Software Engineering," Robert L. Glass talks about maintenance typically consuming an average of 60% of software costs, and enhancements are responsible for more than 75% of software maintenance costs requiring software re-engineering in some forms. Many times, students are not fully aware of these real-life industry challenges when they complete their degrees and join software and system development companies.

        This course examines existing forward engineering processes (such as the V-model for quality assurance) and the issues and challenges of applying it to the legacy code in maintenance and enhancement situations. The class will further introduce a new re-engineering framework and methodologies necessary for agile planning, and an innovative N-Model for reverse engineering and re-engineering software products over their life cycles.

        As the course teaches various principles of software reuse, reverse engineering (design recovery, design pattern identification and reorganization, architecture recovery, requirements recovery), and re-engineering techniques that are found through industry practices and research work, students will be required to do additional scholarly article searches, read and present papers, and gain hands on experience in completing team projects regarding this challenging subject material. Paper reading/critiquing is individualized work and projects will be team activities.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 6329-001 Special Topics in Advanced Software Engineering

        In an IEEE article "Frequently Forgotten Fundamental Facts about Software Engineering," Robert L. Glass talks about maintenance typically consuming an average of 60% of software costs, and enhancements are responsible for more than 75% of software maintenance costs requiring software re-engineering in some forms. Many times, students are not fully aware of these real-life industry challenges when they complete their degrees and join software and system development companies.

        This course examines existing forward engineering processes (such as the V-model for quality assurance) and the issues and challenges of applying it to the legacy code in maintenance and enhancement situations. The class will further introduce a new re-engineering framework and methodologies necessary for agile planning, and an innovative N-Model for reverse engineering and re-engineering software products over their life cycles.

        As the course teaches various principles of software reuse, reverse engineering (design recovery, design pattern identification and reorganization, architecture recovery, requirements recovery), and re-engineering techniques that are found through industry practices and research work, students will be required to do additional scholarly article searches, read and present papers, and gain hands on experience in completing team projects regarding this challenging subject material. Paper reading/critiquing is individualized work and projects will be team activities.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours