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Ashanti Johnson

Name

[Johnson, Ashanti]
  • Assistant Vice Provost for Faculty Recruitment
  • Associate Professor, Earth & Environmental Sciences

Biography

Dr. Ashanti Johnson is the Assistant Vice Provost for Faculty Recruitment and an Associate Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Texas at Arlington (UT Arlington). Dr. Johnson received her B.S. (1993) in Marine Science from Texas A&M University-Galveston and her Ph.D. (1999) in Oceanography from Texas A&M University. Her areas of research include: 1) environmental aquatic radiogeochemistry, 2) professional development of students and early career scientists, and 3) science and engineering diversity-focused initiatives.  Dr. Johnson’s radiogeochemistry research activities focus on the utilization of various biogeochemical indicators to interpret past events that have impacted the marine, estuarine and freshwater environments in the Arctic, as well as in coastal regions of Georgia, Florida and Puerto Rico.  Her professional development and diversity-focused activities are designed to facilitate the advancement of students representing diverse socioeconomic, cultural, gender, racial and academic backgrounds. She is the director of the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative Broker-Facilitator for Predominately White Institutions and Predominately Black Institutions, the NASA and NSF-funded MS PHD’S in Earth System Science Professional Development Initiative and the NSF-funded Pathways to Ocean Science Project. She was PI and director of a NSF-funded LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate Graduate Fellowship Program and an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation's Minority Ph.D. Program, co-director of an NSF-funded GK-12 Graduate Fellowship Program, and coordinator of an NSF Alliance for Graduate Education to the Professoriate Program. Dr, Johnson has served on several boards, including the National Academies Gulf Research Advisory Group, the NSF Advisory Committee on Environmental Research and Education, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources and Subcommittee on Diversity, International Safe Water Conference Steering Committee, Savannah River Environmental Sciences Field Station Advisory Board, and the University of Maine’s ADVANCE Advisory Board.  She has received numerous honors and awards and has published in both scientific and education journals. She received a Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring at the White House, was recognized by TheGrio.com, an NBC product, as one of 100 History Makers in The Making and profiled in the Black Enterprise Magazine March 2011 Issue’s “Women In STEM” Feature Story.

Professional Preparation

    • 1999 Ph.D. in OceanographyTexas A&M University System (TAMU)  Texas A&M University
    • 1993 B.S. in Marine Science (Chemistry),  Texas A&M University at Galveston

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Oct 1997 to Present National Assoc. of Black Geoscientists
    • May 1997 to Present Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society
    • Nov 1996 to Present American Geophysical Union (AGU)
    • May 1995 to Present ASLO

Publications

      Journal Article Accepted
      • Johnson, A., Huggans, M., Siegfried, D., and Braxton, L. (2016) Strategies for Increasing Diversity in the Ocean Science Workforce through Mentoring. Oceanography, accepted (Invited Contribution)

        {Journal Article }
      Accepted
      • Ricciardi, L., Williamson Whitney, V. and Johnson, A. (2016) MS PHD’S: By and for Minorities to Diversify the Earth System Science Community. Oceanography, accepted (Invited Contribution)

        {Journal Article }
      Under Review
      • Siegfried, D., Detrick, L., Ricciardi, L., and Johnson, A.  (2016) In Support of STEM Diversity: Technology Tools Worth Learning. Oceanography, submitted (Invited Contribution)

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2016
      • Johnson, A. and Harrison Okoro, M. D. (2016) How to Recruit and Retain Underrepresented Minorities in the Marine Sciences: From kindergarten through fulltime positions, what works to engage aspiring minority researchers in studying ocean science? American Scientist, Volume 104, March–April Issue, p. 76-81 (Invited Contribution)

        {Journal Article }
      2016
      • Johnson, A., Detrick, L. and Siegfried, D. (2016) High School and Undergraduate Research Experiences: Crucial Components of STEM Student Pathways.  SEEN Magazine. Southeast Education Network, Knight Communications. Volume 17.3, Winter Issue, p. 56-57 (Invited Contribution)

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2015
      • Johnson, A. and Ricciardi, L. (2015) Broadening Participation in STEM: The Whole is Greater than the Sum of its Parts. SEEN Magazine. Southeast Education Network, Knight Communications. Volume 17.1, Spring Issue, p. 108-109 (Invited Contribution)

        {Journal Article }
      2015
      • Johnson, A. and Melanie D. Harrison (2015) Coastal Eutrophication: Causes and Consequences in Marine Ecosystems.  American Scientist. Volume 103, March–April Issue, p. 99-101 (Invited Contribution)

        {Journal Article }
      2015
      • Huggans, M.J. and Johnson, A. (2015) Supporting Pathways to Mathematics Careers. MAA Focus. Mathematical Association of America, 35(4). p. 16-17

        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2014
      • Nelson, S. A., Hain, E. F., Hartis, B. M. and Johnson, A. (2014) Changing the Game: Multidimensional Mentoring and Partnerships in the Recruitment of Underrepresented Students. In: Taylor, W.W., A. Lynch, and N. Leonard (Eds.) Future of Fisheries: Perspectives for Emerging Professionals. American Fisheries Society Press, Bethesda MD. (in press)

        {Book Chapter }

      Journal Article 2014
      • Johnson, A. and White, N. (2014) Ocean Acidification: The Other Climate Change Issue. American Scientist. Volume 102. p. 60-63

        {Journal Article }
      2014
      • Schwing, P.T., and Johnson, A. (2014) A Record of Anthropogenic Effects on Sedimentation in the Manatee River, FL. Journal of Environmental Science and Engineering B 3 (2014) 1-13.

        {Peer Reviewed }

      Conference Proceeding 2014
      • Nelson, S. A., and Johnson, A. (2014) Application of multidimensional recruitment and mentoring of underrepresented students.  UNM Mentoring Institute’s 7th Annual Mentoring Conference: Developmental Networks: Mentoring & Coaching at Work. Proceedings (R)

        {Peer Reviewed }

      Journal Article 2011
      • Williams, N. B., B. Dixon and A. Johnson. (2011) Estimating Soil Loss from Two Coastal Watersheds in Puerto Rico with RUSLE.  Interdisciplinary Environmental Review 12 (2): 108-127.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2010
      • Williams, N. B., B. Dixon and A. Johnson (2010) Developing a Conceptual Framework for Linking Soil Erosion to Sediment Deposition: Patterns in Coastal Ecosystems in the Caribbean.  IMPACT 20 (4):15-16

        {Journal Article }

      Conference Proceeding 2010
      • Williams, N.B, B. Dixon and A. Johnson (2010) Linking watersheds’ hydrologic response to sediment delivery: A conceptual framework. In Editor Pedro M. Garcia (Ed), 2010. International Specialty Conference and 8th Caribbean Islands Water Resources Congress on Tropical Hydrology and Sustainable Water Resources in a Changing Climate (Proceedings). American Water Resources Association, Middleburg, Virginia, TPS-10-2, CD-ROM.

        {Conference Proceeding }

      Book 2009
      • NSF Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education (including A. Johnson Pyrtle) (2009) Transitions and Tipping Points in Complex Environmental Systems. National Science Foundation.

        {Book }

      Journal Article 2008
      • Pyrtle A.J. and Whitney V.W. (2008) To Attract, Engage, and Mentor:  Outcomes from the MS PHD’S in Earth System Science Initiative’s® Pilot Project. The Journal of Geoscience Education. 56(1) p. 24-32

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2007
      • Pyrtle, A.J., Powell, J.M, Williamson Whitney, V.A. (2007). Virtual Community Building for Effective Engagement of Students of Color in Earth System Science:  Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science Case Studies. The Journal of Geoscience Education. 55(6) p.522-530

        {Journal Article }
      2007
      • Pyrtle A.J. and Williamson Whitney V.A. (2007) The Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD’S ®) In Earth System Science Professional Development Initiative: Enhancing Intellectual Merit and Broader Impact of Diversity Through Alignment of Vision, Goals and Objectives and Measurement. The Journal of Geoscience Education. 55(6) p. 514-521

        {Journal Article }

      Conference Proceeding 2006
      • S. Bhansali, A. Pyrtle, L. Martin-Vega, P. Betzer (2006) Integration of Interdisciplinary Graduate Research and Education through the Institutionalization of Diversity Initiatives,  2006 American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Final Conference Proceedings: Advancing Scholarship in Engineering Education. Chicago, Illinois, June 18-21, 2006.

        {Conference Proceeding }
      2006
      • S. Bhansali, A. Pyrtle, L. Martin-Vega, P. Betzer (2006) Integration of Interdisciplinary Graduate Research and Education through the Institutionalization of Diversity Initiatives,  2006 American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Final Conference Proceedings: Advancing Scholarship in Engineering Education. Chicago, Illinois, June 18-21, 2006.

        {Conference Proceeding }

      Book 2005 2005
      • Futrell, J. Gephart, R., Kabat-Lensch, E., McKnight, D., Pyrtle, A, Schimel, J., Smyth, R., Skole, D., and Wilson, J. (2005) Water: Challenges at the Intersection of Human and Natural Systems Workshop Report. Smyth, R. and Gephart J. Eds. PNWD-3597. http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm. 49pp.

        {Book }

      Journal Article 2004
      • Wilmore C. and Pyrtle A.J. (2004) Development and Management of Southwest Florida Water Resources: An Overview. Environmental Monitoring and Restoration. 3, p. 73-81

        {Journal Article }
      2004
      • Pyrtle A. J., Wilborn U.S., Ingall E.D., Grantham M.C., and Elliott W.C. (2004) Radionuclide Distribution and Geochemistry of the Savannah (Georgia) Aquatic Environment. Environmental Monitoring and Restoration. 3, p. 64-72

        {Journal Article }
      2004
      • Ithier-Guzmán W.R. and Pyrtle A.J. (2004) Sources and Fates of Anthropogenic Radionuclides in Puerto Rico: An Overview. Environmental Monitoring and Restoration. 3, p. 55-63

        {Journal Article }

      Encyclopedia Entry 2003
      • Johnson-Pyrtle A. (2003) Polar Oceans. In Water: Science and Issues, ed. E. Julius Dasch. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2003, p. 167-171 (Invited Contribution).

        {Encyclopedia Entry }
      2003
      • Johnson-Pyrtle A. (2003) Marginal Seas. In Water: Science and Issues, ed. E. Julius Dasch. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, p.54-57 (Invited Contribution).

        {Encyclopedia Entry }

      Journal Article 2001
      • Johnson-Pyrtle A., and Scott M. (2001) Distribution of Cs-137 in the Lena River Estuary-Laptev Sea System. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 42(10), p. 912-926

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2000
      • Weiler C., Beaulieu S., and other DIALOG III participants (including A. Pyrtle) (2000) Perspectives on Graduate Education Experiences in Aquatic Science. American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Bulletin, 9(1)

        {Journal Article }
      2000
      • Johnson-Pyrtle A., Scott M., Laing T. and Smol J. (2000) Cs-137 Distribution and Geochemistry of Lena River (Siberia) Drainage Basin Lake Sediments. The Science of the Total Environment, 255(1-3), p. 145-159

        {Journal Article }

      Book 1999
      • Gist G., Johnson-Pyrtle A., Bishop A., Pevear D., Ylagan R. and Longo J. (1999) Smectite Clay Characterization by Thermogravimetric Analysis. Exxon Production Research Co. Research Reports, EPR.6EX.99(January). 32pp.

        {Book }

Courses

      • EVSE 5100-001 Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Professional Development II

        This course is organized as a series of professional development modules and builds upon STEM Professional Development Selected Topics I. The course facilitates the enhancement academic success strategies and professional skills. The following topics will be addressed in this course, in direct response to results of a student needs assessment that was conducted during the final class period of the STEM Professional Development Selected Topics I:
          -Grant writing
          -Translating science for the public
          -Self-branding- developing a professional identity
          -Personal development (networking)
          -Conducting literature review for graduate research
          -Preparing for “Beyond the Ph.D”
          -Developing manuscripts.
        While discussing these topics in detail, additional topics listed below will also be covered: Page 2 of 6
          -Strategic planning for success in graduate studies
          -Time management
          -Finding and working effectively with mentors and colleagues
          -Participating in professional societies.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • GEOL 4305-002 Research Topics: Environmental Forensics III

        This is an experimental course to assist in the development of inquiry based environmental science teaching modules. Products from this course may be utilized to teach freshmen introductory chemistry and biology concepts from an environmental science/engineering perspective. Modules in this course will focus on real world issues such unnoticed release of hazardous substances, their effects on humans, their movement in the environment as well as the pertinent laws governing it. Emphasis will be placed on substances of current concern (i.e. lead, mercury, and organic solvents). This course will also provide a general introduction to conducting relevant research with a focus on major environmental issues as students gain hands-on experience.

        The course will involve the application of principles from chemistry, biology, earth sciences, engineering, public health as well as policy. Covered topics in this course will build on previous experiences to enhance the student’s ability to:
          -Formulate a research project, develop a human subjects survey
          -Perform a literature review and IRB training
          -Apply current knowledge to identifying and mapping chemical contaminants, distribution and sources.
          -Actively engage with the community
          -Develop good field and laboratory practices and ethics
          -Overview of compliance laws and regulations.
        In addition, students will acquire an understanding of the methodology, utility and limitations or obstacles confronted when conducting environmental investigations. Students will examine case studies to better illustrate environmental forensic chemistry topics. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • GEOL 4305-002 Environmental Forensics II

        This is an experimental course to assist in the development of inquiry based environmental science 
        teaching modules. Products from this course may be utilized to teach freshmen introductory chemistry 
        and biology concepts. Modules in this course will focus on various hazardous substances, their effects 
        on humans, their movement in the environment as well as the pertinent laws governing it. Emphasis 
        will be placed on substances of current concern. This course will also provide a general introduction to 
        conducting relevant research with a focus on major environmental issues. 

        The course will involve the application of principles from chemistry, biology, earth sciences, 
        engineering, public health as well as policy. Covered topics in this course will include: 
        •  Formulating a research project
        •  Performing a literature review 
        •  Application of chemical and analytical  methods in identifying  chemical contaminants, 
        distribution and sources. 
        •  Evaluation of data 
        •  A through and developed foundation of Good Laboratory Practice Standards 
        •  Overview of compliance laws and regulations.

        In addition, students will acquire an understanding of the methodology, utility and limitations of 
        various chemical analytical methodsas applied to environmental investigations. 
        Students will examine case studies to better illustrate environmental forensic chemistry topics. Case 
        studies may include such topics as: adulteration of processed foods, source identification of 
        environmental pollutants, misrepresentation of geographic origin of foods, drugs of abuse and 
        petroleum oil spills source identification, and identification of natural or anthropogenic sources of 
        chemical pollutants.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • EVSE 5100-001 Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Professional Development

        This course is organized as a series of professional development modules presented/moderated by UT Arlington faculty and staff.  The course is focused on building and supporting fundamental academic and professional skills. Topics will include developing professional identity, strategic planning for success in graduate studies, time management, introduction to university teaching, finding and working effectively with mentors and colleagues, participating in professional societies, networking and making effective oral and poster presentations. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • GEOL 4305-600 Introduction to Environmental Studies

        This course serves as an introduction to and covers broad aspects of environmental studies. It is designed to foster an increased understanding of physical, chemical and biological systems of the terrestrial and aquatic environments, their complex connections and patterns, and human interactions. In this course emphasis is placed on a holistic approach to environmental studies using case studies, learning activities, and discussions to reinforce scientific principles.

      • GEOL 4305-045 Introduction to Environmental Studies

        This course serves as an introduction to and covers broad aspects of environmental studies. It is designed to foster an increased understanding of physical, chemical and biological systems of the terrestrial and aquatic environments, their complex connections and patterns, and human interactions. In this course emphasis is placed on a holistic approach to environmental studies using case studies, learning activities, and discussions to reinforce scientific principles.

      • GEOL 4305-046 Introduction to Environmental Studies

        This course serves as an introduction to and covers broad aspects of environmental studies. It is designed to foster an increased understanding of physical, chemical and biological systems of the terrestrial and aquatic environments, their complex connections and patterns, and human interactions. In this course emphasis is placed on a holistic approach to environmental studies using case studies, learning activities, and discussions to reinforce scientific principles.

      • GEOL 4289-012 Environmental Forensics

        This is an experimental course to assist in the development of inquiry based environmental science teaching modules. Products from this course may be utilized to teach first year students introductory chemistry and biology concepts.   Modules in this course will focus on various hazardous substances, their effects on humans, their movement in the environment as well as the pertinent laws governing it. Emphasis will be placed on substances of current concern.  This course will also provide a general introduction to conducting relevant research with a focus on major environmental issues.

        The activities in this course will involve the application of principles from chemistry, biology, earth sciences, engineering, public health as well as policy to public health and legal problems as related to environmental forensics.  Covered topics in this course will include:

        -Formulating a research project

        -Performing a literature review

        -Application of chemical and analytical methods in identifying chemical contaminants, distribution and sources.

        -Evaluation of data

        -A through and developed foundation of Good Laboratory Practice Standards

        -Overview of compliance laws and regulations.

        In addition, students will acquire an understanding of the methodology, utility and limitations of various chemical analytical methods as applied to environmental investigations.

        Students will examine case studies to better illustrate environmental forensic chemistry topics.  Case studies may include such topics as: adulteration of processed foods, source identification of environmental pollutants, misrepresentation of geographic origin of foods, drugs of abuse and petroleum oil spills source identification, and identification of natural or anthropogenic sources of chemical pollutants.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • GEOL 4189-012 Environmental Forensics

        This is an experimental course to assist in the development of inquiry based environmental science teaching modules. Products from this course may be utilized to teach first year students introductory chemistry and biology concepts.   Modules in this course will focus on various hazardous substances, their effects on humans, their movement in the environment as well as the pertinent laws governing it. Emphasis will be placed on substances of current concern.  This course will also provide a general introduction to conducting relevant research with a focus on major environmental issues.

        The activities in this course will involve the application of principles from chemistry, biology, earth sciences, engineering, public health as well as policy to public health and legal problems as related to environmental forensics.  Covered topics in this course will include:

        -Formulating a research project

        -Performing a literature review

        -Application of chemical and analytical methods in identifying chemical contaminants, distribution and sources.

        -Evaluation of data

        -A through and developed foundation of Good Laboratory Practice Standards

        -Overview of compliance laws and regulations.

        In addition, students will acquire an understanding of the methodology, utility and limitations of various chemical analytical methods as applied to environmental investigations.

        Students will examine case studies to better illustrate environmental forensic chemistry topics.  Case studies may include such topics as: adulteration of processed foods, source identification of environmental pollutants, misrepresentation of geographic origin of foods, drugs of abuse and petroleum oil spills source identification, and identification of natural or anthropogenic sources of chemical pollutants.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • GEOL 4189-012 Environmental Forensics

        This is an experimental course to assist in the development of inquiry based environmental science teaching modules. Products from this course may be utilized to teach first year students introductory chemistry and biology concepts.   Modules in this course will focus on various hazardous substances, their effects on humans, their movement in the environment as well as the pertinent laws governing it. Emphasis will be placed on substances of current concern.  This course will also provide a general introduction to conducting relevant research with a focus on major environmental issues.

        The activities in this course will involve the application of principles from chemistry, biology, earth sciences, engineering, public health as well as policy to public health and legal problems as related to environmental forensics.  Covered topics in this course will include:

        -Formulating a research project

        -Performing a literature review

        -Application of chemical and analytical methods in identifying chemical contaminants, distribution and sources.

        -Evaluation of data

        -A through and developed foundation of Good Laboratory Practice Standards

        -Overview of compliance laws and regulations.

        In addition, students will acquire an understanding of the methodology, utility and limitations of various chemical analytical methods as applied to environmental investigations.

        Students will examine case studies to better illustrate environmental forensic chemistry topics.  Case studies may include such topics as: adulteration of processed foods, source identification of environmental pollutants, misrepresentation of geographic origin of foods, drugs of abuse and petroleum oil spills source identification, and identification of natural or anthropogenic sources of chemical pollutants.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours