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Ashley Lemke

Name

[Lemke, Ashley]
  • Assistant Professor

Biography

Ashley Lemke is an assistant professor in the department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Texas at Arlington. Her primary research interests include the anthropology of hunting and archaeology of hunter-gatherers, specifically prehistoric subsistence and diversity of foraging strategies. These research questions have led her to work in North America and Europe on both terrestrial and underwater archaeological projects from the Lower Paleolithic to 19th-century Nunamiut archaeological sites in the high arctic.

As a prehistoric underwater archaeologist, Lemke’s current research seeks to understand the social and economic organization of caribou hunters 9,000 years ago through the systematic survey and excavation of ancient hunting sites submerged beneath the Great Lakes.

Lemke is also active in archaeological research in Texas.  

Lemke serves on the Advisory Council on Underwater Archaeology (ACUA) Board of Directors. Covering nearly 3/4 of the Earth’s surface, water is the source of all life on our planet. Beneath the surface of our oceans, lakes, rivers, and wetlands lies a physical record of humankind preserved in prehistoric and historic shorelines, shipwrecks, inundated cities, harbors, and other traces of our past. The ACUA serves as an international advisory body on issues relating to underwater archaeology, conservation, and submerged cultural resources management.  It is working to educate scholars, governments, sport divers, and the general public about underwater archaeology and the preservation of underwater resources.

Professional Preparation

    • 2016 Doctor of Philosophy in AnthropologyUniversity of Michigan
    • 2010 Masters of Arts in AnthropologyUniversity of Michigan
    • 2008 Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology (Classical Civilization),  University of Texas

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Dec 2014 to Present Society for Historical Archaeology
    • Dec 2008 to Present Society for American Archaeology

Research and Expertise

Publications

Courses

      • ANTH 2339-001 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY

        Archaeology is the study of the human past through physical evidence and material remains. This evidence ranges from entire landscapes to small objects. Students learn how archaeological sites are discovered, investigated, and interpreted, and how this knowledge contributes to our understanding of human society.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4358-001 TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY: UNDERWATER ARCHAEOLOGY

        This course will introduce students to archaeology underwater, including methods, research questions, great discoveries, and the history of investigation. It will cover vast stretches of time and space, from historic shipwrecks in the Mediterranean to >10,000 year old prehistoric sites in North and South America. Underwater archaeology is an emerging field in anthropology more generally – and this course will explore its important role in the future of archaeology.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2339-001 Introduction to Archaeology

        Archaeology is the study of the human past through physical evidence and material remains. This evidence ranges from entire landscapes to small objects. Students learn how archaeological sites are discovered, investigated, and interpreted, and how this knowledge contributes to our understanding of human society.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4322-001 Problems in Anthropology: Anthropology of Hunting

        What role did hunting play in human evolution? How do archaeologists investigate hunting in the past? Why did Mark Zuckerberg pledge to only eat meat he killed himself? To answer these and many other questions, this course covers a broad range of topics exploring hunting through time, from the prehistoric to the present. Topics include cross-cultural issues of meat and diet, hunter-gatherer subsistence behavior, overkill and animal extinction, and sport hunting. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2339-001 Introduction to Archaeology

        Archaeology is the study of the human past through physical evidence and material remains. This evidence ranges from entire landscapes to small objects. Students learn how archaeological sites are discovered, investigated, and interpreted, and how this knowledge contributes to our understanding of human society.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours