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Bethany K Shaffer

Name

[Shaffer, Bethany K]
  • Lecturer, English

Professional Preparation

    • 2004 MA in EnglishMercyhurst College
    • 2006 BA in EnglishYoungstown State Univ.

Appointments

    • Aug 2011 to Present Faculty
      University of Texas Arlington
    • Aug 2007 to Aug 2010 GTA
      University of Texas Arlington
    • Aug 2004 to May 2006 GTA
      Youngstown State Univ.

Memberships

  • Membership
    • May 2009 to Present MLA

Awards and Honors

    • May  2010 O'neill Award for Teaching Excellence sponsored by Mike and Pat O'Neill

Courses

      • ENGL 2303-005 TOPICS IN LITERATURE

        This course has two purposes: to help you develop an understanding of central debates about
        and themes in Women’s Literature and to help you develop your skills as a researcher of literature
        in general. To achieve these goals, you will read a number of texts, both literary and critical; discuss
        the ideas in the texts with your colleagues and your instructor; and create a presentation on one
        example of a Badass Woman in film. Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of
        understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and
        intellectual milieus. Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an
        academic format.
         

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • WOMS 2301-003 Badass Women

        This course has two purposes: to help you develop an understanding of central debates about
        and themes in Women’s Literature and to help you develop your skills as a researcher of literature
        in general. To achieve these goals, you will read a number of texts, both literary and critical; discuss
        the ideas in the texts with your colleagues and your instructor; and create a presentation on one
        example of a Badass Woman in film. Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of
        understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and
        intellectual milieus. Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an
        academic format.
         

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-009 Badass Women

        This course has two purposes: to help you develop an understanding of central debates about
        and themes in Women’s Literature and to help you develop your skills as a researcher of literature
        in general. To achieve these goals, you will read a number of texts, both literary and critical; discuss
        the ideas in the texts with your colleagues and your instructor; and create a presentation on one
        example of a Badass Woman in film. Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of
        understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and
        intellectual milieus. Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an
        academic format.
         

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • WOMS 2301-004 Badass Women

        This course has two purposes: to help you develop an understanding of central debates about
        and themes in Women’s Literature and to help you develop your skills as a researcher of literature
        in general. To achieve these goals, you will read a number of texts, both literary and critical; discuss
        the ideas in the texts with your colleagues and your instructor; and create a presentation on one
        example of a Badass Woman in film. Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of
        understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and
        intellectual milieus. Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an
        academic format.
         

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-005 Working Class Literature

        This course has two purposes: to help you develop an understanding of central debates about and themes in American Working Class literature and to help you develop your skills as a researcher of literature in general. To achieve these goals, you will read a number of texts, both literary and critical; discuss the ideas in the texts with your colleagues and your instructor; and pursue a group project exploring the work and developing a thorough presentation about one working-class writer. Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and intellectual milieus.  Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an academic format.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-082 Rhetoric and Composition I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-002 American Literature

        This course has two purposes: to help you develop an understanding of central debates about and themes in American Literature and to help you develop your skills as a researcher of literature in general. To achieve these goals, you will read a number of texts, both literary and critical; discuss the ideas in the texts with your colleagues and your instructor; and create a presentation on one example of a good and evil ambiguity in film. Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and intellectual milieus.  Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an academic format.This course has two purposes: to help you develop an understanding of central debates about and themes in American Literature and to help you develop your skills as a researcher of literature in general. To achieve these goals, you will read a number of texts, both literary and critical; discuss the ideas in the texts with your colleagues and your instructor; and create a presentation on one example of a good and evil ambiguity in film. Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and intellectual milieus.  Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an academic format.

      • ENGL 2329-021 AMERICAN LITERATURE

        This course considers significant American works with a focus on ideas and the ways in which they reflect cultural and aesthetic values; emphasis on critical methods of reading, writing, and thinking; at least three genres and six authors considered.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-009 Working Class Literature

        This course has two purposes: to help you develop an understanding of central debates about and themes in American Working Class literature and to help you develop your skills as a researcher of literature in general. To achieve these goals, you will read a number of texts, both literary and critical; discuss the ideas in the texts with your colleagues and your instructor; and pursue a group project exploring the work and developing a thorough presentation about one working-class writer. Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and intellectual milieus.  Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an academic format.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-005 Working Class Literature

        This course has two purposes: to help you develop an understanding of central debates about and themes in American Working Class literature and to help you develop your skills as a researcher of literature in general. To achieve these goals, you will read a number of texts, both literary and critical; discuss the ideas in the texts with your colleagues and your instructor; and pursue a group project exploring the work and developing a thorough presentation about one working-class writer. Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and intellectual milieus.  Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an academic format.

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirements in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. The required objectives of these courses are the development of students’ critical thinking, communication skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility. Many elements of this course foster development of these objectives, which are explicitly addressed in the “Signature Assignment” (see below). The Departmental general guidelines for sophomore literature can be found by typing “sophomore literature” in the “Search UT Arlington” box on the University website: http://www.uta.edu/uta.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-702 Rhetoric and Composition II

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301

      • ENGL 1302-703 English 1302: Reading, Writing, and Critical Thinking II

        English 1302: Reading, Writing, and Critical Thinking II

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

      • ENGL 2303-002 Badass Women

        ENGL 2303.002/WOMS 2301.001-Badass Women        Prof. Bethany Shaffer          Tues/Thurs @ 8:00am

        What does it mean to be a Badass?  What does it mean when we add Women to the end of that phrase?  How would we get anything done without them?

        This course will explore key texts that examine answers to all three questions above.  Students will read a variety of fiction, non-fiction and critical essays to develop their own thoughts on Badass Women.  Two exams, weekly quizzes, discussion forum posts, and one major paper make up the major assignments of the course.

        This course satisfies the Language, Philosophy, and Culture requirement in the UTA Core.

        This course satisfies three credits towards a Women’s and Gender Studies Minor.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-003 AMERICAN LITERATURE

        ENGL 2329.003- American Literature: Good and Evil         Prof. Bethany Shaffer      Tues/Thurs @ 9:30am

        “In real life, the hardest aspect of the battle between good and evil is determining which is which”

                                                                                                                                                        -George R.R. Martin

        Are people inherently good?  Evil?  Can we be both simultaneously?  What makes something good or evil?  How do we evaluate these ideas?

        This course will explore key texts that examine answers to all three questions above.  Students will read a variety of fiction, non-fiction and critical essays to develop their own thoughts on good and evil.  Two exams, weekly quizzes, discussion forum posts, and one major paper make up the major assignments of the course.

        This course satisfies the Language, Philosophy, and Culture requirement in the UTA Core.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • WOMS 2301-002 TOPICS IN WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES

        ENGL 2303.002/WOMS 2301.001-Badass Women        Prof. Bethany Shaffer          Tues/Thurs @ 8:00am

        What does it mean to be a Badass?  What does it mean when we add Women to the end of that phrase?  How would we get anything done without them?

        This course will explore key texts that examine answers to all three questions above.  Students will read a variety of fiction, non-fiction and critical essays to develop their own thoughts on Badass Women.  Two exams, weekly quizzes, discussion forum posts, and one major paper make up the major assignments of the course.

        This course satisfies the Language, Philosophy, and Culture requirement in the UTA Core.

        This course satisfies three credits towards a Women’s and Gender Studies Minor.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-072 Rhetoric and Composition I

        Rhetoric and Composition I

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-001 Working Class Literature

        This course has two purposes: to help you develop an understanding of central debates about and themes in American Working Class literature and to help you develop your skills as a researcher of literature in general. To achieve these goals, you will read a number of texts, both literary and critical; discuss the ideas in the texts with your colleagues and your instructor; and pursue a group project exploring the work and developing a thorough presentation about one working-class writer. Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and intellectual milieus.  Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an academic format.

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirements in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. The required objectives of these courses are the development of students’ critical thinking, communication skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility. Many elements of this course foster development of these objectives, which are explicitly addressed in the “Signature Assignment” (see below). The Departmental general guidelines for sophomore literature can be found by typing “sophomore literature” in the “Search UT Arlington” box on the University website: http://www.uta.edu/uta.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-002 Working Class Literature

        This course has two purposes: to help you develop an understanding of central debates about and themes in American Working Class literature and to help you develop your skills as a researcher of literature in general. To achieve these goals, you will read a number of texts, both literary and critical; discuss the ideas in the texts with your colleagues and your instructor; and pursue a group project exploring the work and developing a thorough presentation about one working-class writer. Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and intellectual milieus.  Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an academic format.

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirements in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. The required objectives of these courses are the development of students’ critical thinking, communication skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility. Many elements of this course foster development of these objectives, which are explicitly addressed in the “Signature Assignment” (see below). The Departmental general guidelines for sophomore literature can be found by typing “sophomore literature” in the “Search UT Arlington” box on the University website: http://www.uta.edu/uta.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-001 Working Class Literature

        This course has two purposes: to help you develop an understanding of central debates about and themes in American Working Class literature and to help you develop your skills as a researcher of literature in general. To achieve these goals, you will read a number of texts, both literary and critical; discuss the ideas in the texts with your colleagues and your instructor; and pursue a group project exploring the work and developing a thorough presentation about one working-class writer. Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and intellectual milieus.  Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an academic format.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-094 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.  

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-001 Engl 2303-001

        This course has two purposes: to help you develop an understanding of central debates about and themes in American Working Class literature and to help you develop your skills as a researcher of literature in general. To achieve these goals, you will read a number of texts, both literary and critical; discuss the ideas in the texts with your colleagues and your instructor; and pursue a group project exploring the work and developing a thorough presentation about one working-class writer. Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and intellectual milieus.  Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an academic format.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-018 Engl 2329-018

        This course considers significant American works with a focus on ideas and the ways in which they reflect cultural and aesthetic values; emphasis on critical methods of reading, writing, and thinking; at least three genres and six authors considered.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-013 Engl 2303-013

        The Twilight Saga has taken most of this country by storm.  Both the novels and the films have infiltrated mainstream society for over a decade.  The Twilight franchise is worth more than $350 million dollars.  The protagonist of both the novels and films is Bella Swan.  My course, Better than Bella, will teach students about female protagonists who rely on skills like strength and intelligence, rather than clumsiness and arrogance, to thrive within their novels.  Each class will begin with some aspect of Twilight and then proceed into readings of novels and theoretical pieces to situate Bella within feminist theory and Young Adult Literature.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-018 American Literature

        This course considers significant American works with a focus on ideas and the ways in which they reflect cultural and aesthetic values; emphasis on methods of critical reading, writing and thinking; at least three genres and six authors considered.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-002 American Literature
        This course considers significant American works with a focus on ideas and the ways in which they reflect cultural and aesthetic values; emphasis on critical methods of reading, writing, and thinking; at least three genres and six authors considered.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2303-001 LIterature of the Gulf Wars
          This course has two purposes: to help you develop an understanding of central debates about and themes in American working-class literature and to help you develop your skills as a researcher of literature in general. To achieve these goals, you will read a number of texts, both literary and critical; discuss the ideas in the texts with your colleagues and your instructor; and pursue a group project exploring the work and developing a thorough presentation about one working-class writer.Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and intellectual milieus.Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an academic format.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2329-019 AMERICAN LITERATURE

        Consideration of significant American works with a focus on ideas and the ways in which they reflect cultural and aesthetic values; emphasis on critical methods of reading, writing, and thinking; at least three genres and six authors considered.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2303-003 TOPICS IN LITERATURE
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        This course has two purposes: to help you develop an understanding of central debates about and themes in American working-class literature and to help you develop your skills as a researcher of literature in general. To achieve these goals, you will read a number of texts, both literary and critical; discuss the ideas in the texts with your colleagues and your instructor; and pursue a group project exploring the work and developing a thorough presentation about one working-class writer.Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and intellectual milieus. Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an academic format.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2329-002 American Literature
        Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} This course is designed to introduce you to the wonderful world of American Literature.We will study a variety of time periods and writing styles.You will learn how to analyze literary works using proper literary techniques. Class lectures and discussions will focus on ways of understanding and interpreting the works and on locating them in their historical, cultural, and intellectual milieus. Also, one major essay will demonstrate your ability to discuss a text in an academic format.
        ** We will be reading American Young Adult Novels that have strong female protagonists.  Students enrolling in the course should have at least basic knowledge of the Twilight Saga.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 1302-034 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II
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        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • ENGL 1301-042 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 2329-001 American Literature
        No Description Provided.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2011