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Bradley Folsom

Name

[Folsom, Bradley]
  • Lecturer

Awards and Honors

    • Jan  2018 Award sponsored by Awards
      Description:

      Presidio La Bahia Award for the Best Book on the Spanish Colonial Texas (2017)

      True West Magazine “Best of the West” Spain and Mexico in the West (2017)

      H. Bailey Carroll Award for the Best Article in the Southwestern Historical Quarterly (2016)

      C.K. Chamberlain Award for Best Article on East Texas History (2015)

      History Department Graduate Student of the Year (2014)

      History Department Textbook Selection Committee (2014)

      Member of Team TSHA in 200-mile Texas Independence Relay, which raised $60,000 for the Texas State Historical Association (2013-2014)

      Nominated UNT College of Arts and Sciences Teaching Fellow of the Year (2013)

      Donald Chipman Spanish Borderlands Scholarship (2009-2011)

      Graduate Assistant Tuition Scholarship (2011-2013—declined to receive Hazelwood Act)

      Navy College Fund (2003-2007)

      G.I. Bill/ Post 9-11 G.I. Bill (2003-2007)

      Hazelwood Act (2007-2014)

Research and Expertise

  • Research and Expertise

    Texas History

    Spanish Borderlands History

    Early United States History

    Latin American History

Publications

      Journal Article Forthcoming
      • Books:

        Arredondo: Last Spanish Ruler of Texas and Northeastern New Spain, University of Oklahoma Press, March 2017

        Articles:

        “Ignacio Sr. and Jr.: The Rise and Fall of the Most Powerful Family in Early Nineteenth Century Texas,” Southwestern Historical Quarterly, October 2018

        “An Interesting and Odd Present: Transporting American Bison across the Atlantic in the Eighteenth Century,” Southwestern Historical Quarterly, July 2016

        “Trinidad de Salcedo: A Forgotten Spanish Villa on New Spain’s Northern Frontier,” East Texas Historical Journal, September 2014

        Reviews:

        “Review General Alonso de León’s Expeditions into Texas, 1686-1690” Southwestern Historical Quarterly, January 2018

        “Review Juan Bautista de Anza: The King’s Governor in New MexicoSouthwestern Historical Quarterly, July 2016

        “Review Populating the Barrera: Spanish Immigration Efforts in Colonial LouisianaSouthwestern Historical Quarterly, July 2015

        “Review Knights of the Golden Circle,” East Texas Historical Journal, September 2014

        Online Publications:

        “Augustine Labuzan” The Handbook of Texas Online

        “La Junta de los Ríos” The Handbook of Texas Online

        “John R. Woodward” The Handbook of Texas Online

        “San Marcos de Neve” The Handbook of Texas Online

        “Sixteenth Texas Infantry” The Handbook of Texas Online

        “Third Texas Infantry” The Handbook of Texas Online

        “Trinidad de Salcedo” The Handbook of Texas Online

        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Presentations

  • Past
    •  
      Presentations
      “Interview” Texas Standard National Public Radio (April 2017) “Architecture in the Red and Black Caribbean” Panel Chair 17th Annual International Graduate Student Conference on Transatlantic History (October 2016) “A Unique Monarchy: Texas under Joaquín de Arredondo” Texas State Historical Association Annual Conference (March 2016) “When the Buffalo Fought the Bull: Animal Combat and Nationalism on the U.S.-Mexico Border” West Texas Historical Association Annual Conference (April 2014) “Latin American History” Panel Chair University of North Texas Phi Alpha Theta Conference (March 2014) “Joaquín de Arredondo in the Battle of Medina” Battle of Medina 200th Anniversary Meeting (August 2013) “Ignacio Pérez: Rancher, Soldier, Politician in Colonial Texas” West Texas Historical Association Annual Conference (April 2013) “Hypocrisy in History” Panel Chair University of North Texas Phi Alpha Theta Conference “Spanish Response to Foreign Threats in East Texas, 1810-1821” East Texas Historical Association Conference (September 2012) “The Siege of Soto la Marina” Phi Alpha Theta Regional Conference (April 2012) “The People of Trinidad de Salcedo: Settlers of a Forgotten Villa in Spanish Texas, 1806-1813” West Texas State Historical Association Annual Conference (March 2012) “Joaquín de Arredondo in the Aftermath of Medina” Texas State Historical Association Annual Conference (March 2012) “Violence in Texas in the Era of Mexican Independence” Phi Alpha Theta Regional Conference (April 2011)

Projects

  • 2018
    • Jan 2018 to Present Projects

      Lead Researcher: Slave Narratives in Spanish and Mexican Archives Project (2009-2011)

      Extensively searched Spanish and Mexican archives for slave testimonials

      Catalogued slave testimonials for translation from Spanish to English

      Assistant Researcher: Stephen F. Austin Digital Research Project (2009-2011)

      Developed methods of text-mining the Stephen F. Austin Papers

      Led research trip to Austin, TX to catalogue portions of the Stephen F. Austin Papers for text-mining

      Assisted in writing a successful grant application for the National Endowment for the Humanities

      Role: Coinvestigator PI:

Courses

      • HIST 1311-001 U.S. History to 1865

        This course covers early United States history from prehistory to 1865. Using narrative lectures in conjunction with reading and viewing assignments, this class will explore political, social, and cultural aspects of the colonial period and debate various scholarly interpretations of the United States’s formative years. Particular attention will be paid to American Indian history, the U.S. role in the changing world economy, the democratization of the U.S. political system, sectionalism, issues concerning gender and race, advancements in science and technology, international and military matters, and U.S. westward expansion.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-003 U.S. History to 1865

        This course covers early United States history from prehistory to 1865. Using narrative lectures in conjunction with reading and viewing assignments, this class will explore political, social, and cultural aspects of the colonial period and debate various scholarly interpretations of the United States’s formative years. Particular attention will be paid to American Indian history, the U.S. role in the changing world economy, the democratization of the U.S. political system, sectionalism, issues concerning gender and race, advancements in science and technology, international and military matters, and U.S. westward expansion.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-004 U.S. History from 1865

        This course covers the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the Civil War/Reconstruction era to the present. Using narrative lectures in conjunction with reading and viewing assignments, this course examines industrialization, immigration, the world wars, the Great Depression, and the Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Particular attention will be paid to changes in American culture, the Civil Rights Movement, technological and economic development, imperialism and colonialism, urbanization and suburbanization, and U.S. foreign policy.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3363-002 Texas to 1850

        This course covers four hundred years of Texas history from prehistory to 1850. Topics include pre-Columbian societies, Spanish exploration and colonization, Mexican Texas, the Texas Revolution, the Texas Republic, and statehood. The class uses narrative lectures and reading assignments to explain politics and social aspects of life in Texas and to emphasize the state's diverse cultural heritage. The course also discusses how popular culture has interpreted Texas history and how history has shaped Texas’s identity. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-001 U.S. History from 1865

        This course covers the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the Civil War/Reconstruction era to the present. Using narrative lectures in conjunction with reading and viewing assignments, this course examines industrialization, immigration, the world wars, the Great Depression, and the Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Particular attention will be paid to changes in American culture, the Civil Rights Movement, technological and economic development, imperialism and colonialism, urbanization and suburbanization, and U.S. foreign policy.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-001 History of the United States to 1865

        This course covers early United States history from prehistory to 1865. Using narrative lectures in conjunction with reading and viewing assignments, this class will explore political, social, and cultural aspects of the colonial period and debate various scholarly interpretations of the United States’s formative years. Particular attention will be paid to American Indian history, the U.S. role in the changing world economy, the democratization of the U.S. political system, sectionalism, issues concerning gender and race, advancements in science and technology, international and military matters, and U.S. westward expansion.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-002 History of the United States to 1865

        This course covers early United States history from prehistory to 1865. Using narrative lectures in conjunction with reading and viewing assignments, this class will explore political, social, and cultural aspects of the colonial period and debate various scholarly interpretations of the United States’s formative years. Particular attention will be paid to American Indian history, the U.S. role in the changing world economy, the democratization of the U.S. political system, sectionalism, issues concerning gender and race, advancements in science and technology, international and military matters, and U.S. westward expansion.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-003 History of the United States to 1865

        This course covers early United States history from prehistory to 1865. Using narrative lectures in conjunction with reading and viewing assignments, this class will explore political, social, and cultural aspects of the colonial period and debate various scholarly interpretations of the United States’s formative years. Particular attention will be paid to American Indian history, the U.S. role in the changing world economy, the democratization of the U.S. political system, sectionalism, issues concerning gender and race, advancements in science and technology, international and military matters, and U.S. westward expansion.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours