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Catherine Corder

Name

[Corder, Catherine E]
  • Lecturer

Biography

In the world of comic book heroes, every few decades or so, a character gets a "reboot." Superman, Batman, Robin, and others have been killed off and then resurrected. Some characters get new origin stories that are followed up with ret-con story lines (retroactive continuity), which work to reconcile the past/present/future lives. The narratology of these stories is rather complex. Academic reboots take a little while longer. While the focus of my doctoral work was popular literature in Elizabethan and Stuart England, over the past ten years I have been engaged more and more with literary disability studies, and also with contemporary popular literature, particularly with how theories of book history and print culture play out in nineteenth-century serialized fiction and in comics and graphic literature. I primarily teach first-year writing classes, and I am also interested in how thinking about visual/digital literacy impacts the teaching of composition classes.

I am currently working on an article that examines how English Catholics became "disabled" during the reign of Elizabeth I through the language of religious laws and the Protestant appropriation and revision of Catholic devotional texts. Another ongoing project examines the writings of Helen Keller through the lens of disability rhetoric. I teach in the Disability Studies program here at UTA (Disabilities in Literature and Disabilities in Comics), where my love of teaching literature goes hand in hand with my experience as a reading specialist who worked primarily with high school and college students with learning disabilities.

Professional Preparation

    • 2006 PhD in History/Early Modern StudiesClaremont Graduate University
    • 1981 MA in EnglishTexas Christian University (TCU)
    • 1977 BA in English/HistoryTexas Christian University (TCU)
    • 1993 MA in Education/Learning DisabilitiesGeorge Washington University

Appointments

    • Jan 2018 to Present Academic Advisor II
      UNT; UTA   university of texas at arlington   English
    • Jan 2011 to Present Lecturer
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2009 to June 2010 Lecturer
      University of New Orleans
    • July 2006 to June 2007 Visiting Assistant Professor
      Harvey Mudd College
    • Sept 2005 to June 2006 Lecturer
      Pomona College
    • Jan 2001 to June 2006 Instructor
      Harvey Mudd College

Memberships

  • Professional
    • Dec 2015 to Present MLA: Modern Language Association
    • Dec 2015 to Present Renaissance Society of America
    • Aug 2013 to Present Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and

Awards and Honors

    • Apr  2013 Recognized as “Favorite Faculty Member” by Freshman Leaders on Campus (FLOC) sponsored by The Freshman Leaders On Campus, The University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug  2012 Best Practice in Teaching Award, First-Year English sponsored by Freshman Writing Program, UTA English Department
    • Jul  2010 Invited participant sponsored by American Antiquarian Society
    • Aug  2005 Dissertation Grant sponsored by Claremont Graduate University
    • Jan  2005 Short-Term Fellowship sponsored by Huntington Library

Other Activities

    • Volunteer
      • Jan 2013 Ruling Elder, St. Stephen Presbyterian Church

Research and Expertise

  • Cathy Corder

    Early modern British studies

    19th- and 20th-century America popular literature and book history

    Literary disability studies

    Comics studies

    Composition studies, especially the teaching of multimodal first-year writing classes

Publications

      Book Review 2017
      • Book Review. Comics: A Global History, 1968 to the Present. Dan Mazur and Alexander Danner. London: Thames & Hudson, 2014. ImageText 9.3 (2018).

        {Book Review }
      2017
      • Transforming Anthony Trollope: Dispossession, Victorianism, and Nineteenth-Century Word and Image. Eds. Simon Grennan and Laurence Grove. Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2015. ImageTexT 9.2 (2017).

        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 2009
      • “Why We Need the [Digital] Humanities.” Louisiana Cultural Vistas (Winter 2009/10): 96.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 2008
      • Daniel Eppley. Defending Royal Supremacy and Discerning God's Will in Tudor England. Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing Company, 2007. Renaissance Quarterly 61, 4 (Winter 2008): 1363-4.

        {Book Review }

      Book Review 2006
      • Charles W. A. Prior. Defining the Jacobean Church: The Politics of Religious Controversy, 1603-1625. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Canadian Journal of History, 41 no. 3 (Winter 2006) p. 549-50.

        {Book Review }

      Book Review 2005
      • “Contemporary Scholarship in Book History/Print Culture on Women as Scribes, Authors, and Readers” in Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 34, 7 (2005): 611-615. Review of Alison I. Beach. Women as Scribes: Book Production and Monastic Reform in Twelfth-Century Bavaria. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004; Heidi Brayman Hackel. Reading Material in Early Modern England: Print, Gender, and Literacy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005; and Candy Gunther Brown. The Word in the World: Evangelical Writing, Publishing, and Reading in America, 1789-1880. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004.
        {Book Review }

      Book Review 2004
      • Christine Peters. Patterns of Piety: Women, Gender, and Religion in Late Medieval and Reformation England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003. In Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 33, 6 (2004): 855-58.
        {Book Review }

Presentations

    • April  2017
      "The Supercrip as Revolutionary in Alan Moore's V for Vendetta"
      Alan Moore’s graphic novel, V for Vendetta, plays out in a future, post-apocalyptic London where the superhero presents as a faceless individual wearing a Guy Fawkes mask, who names himself only as “V.” London is under the control of a fascist government that has morphed into a system of constant surveillance maintained by offices indicated by body parts: the Ear and the Eye (audio and video surveillance), the Nose (regular police), the Finger (secret police) and the Mouth (propaganda), who all answer to the Head. At the beginning of the story, the Head has had all undesirables (gays, minorities, etc.) exterminated—and V blows up the Houses of Parliament as a wake-up call to a society that is spiritless, demoralized, disembodied, and essentially disabled. The reader learns almost nothing about V as a person. The victim of a biochemical experiment that seems to have given him superhuman powers and prescient knowledge of government activities, he is, perhaps, also insane and disfigured—and he is waging a violent campaign against the totalitarian regime that is in power. Through a complex narrative that is laden with allusions to popular culture and contemporary events and dense with visual details, Moore offers V as a new supercrip typology, one in which the disabled individual works to reduce society to chaos. V, who always speaks in iambic pentameter (the meter of Shakespeare), thus inspires a fragmented people to re-incorporate their voices, their visions, and their actions, and to physically seize the revolutionary idea that he articulates.
    • November  2016
      “The Mysteries of Gotham: The Sensational City in Graphic Literature”

      In the nineteenth century, the genres of the “city mystery” and of sensational fiction were literary phenomena that grabbed readers’ attention through sensational events—such as bigamy, arson, murder, and insanity—plot twists, and suspense. The urban setting was an important feature of these stories, as dark alleys, dead ends, and hidden chambers enhanced both the convoluted story lines and the sense of moral ambiguity and degradation. Although the city mystery was a minor literary genre, examinations of the readership for these tales, which were published serially in newspapers and magazine together with graphic illustrations, have contributed to the study of narratology, of reader response, and of the multimodality of text and image.

      That same sensational setting pervades contemporary comics and graphic novels, which very much parallel the use of serialization and illustration of the earlier stories. Such fictional cities as Gotham and Metropolis serve as important settings for graphic literature, to the extent that they almost become significant characters in the narrative. This paper looks at images of the city in the tales of Batman and Superman, as well as in such graphic novel as Berlin: City of Stone, Sin City, and City of Glass, to investigate how we may read the “sensational city” with a greater awareness of graphic literature as a complex means of storytelling.
       

    • March  2009

      L’encyclopédie Louisiane: From Diderot to Wikipedia”

      Louisiana Historical Association annual conference, Monroe, LA, March 19-21, 2009

    • March  2007

      “Cultivating Hops in the Plain Style: Expertise and the Elizabethan Everyman”

      Pacific Coast Conference on British Studies annual conference, Tacoma, WA, March 30-April 1, 2007

    • March  2006

      “Agricultural Theology: Popular Religion and Sixteenth-Century English Farming Manuals”

      Pacific Coast Conference on British Studies annual conference, Irvine, CA, March 24-26, 2006

    • March  2005

      “Agricultural Theology: Popular Religion in English Farming Manuals”

      Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association national conference, Elizabethan/Renaissance section, San Diego, CA, March 23-26, 2005

    • May  2004

      Moderator/Commentator. “Coalition for Western Women’s History: The Politics of Food”

      Western Association of Women Historians, Santa Barbara, CA, May 21-23, 2004

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • July 2010 to July 2010 Seminar on American Book History sponsored by  - $400
    • Jan 2005 to Jan 2006 Dissertation research grant sponsored by  - $20000
    • Jan 2005 to Jan 2005 Research Fellowship sponsored by  - $5000

Courses

      • ENGL 4374-001 WRITING, RHETORIC, AND MULTIMODAL AUTHORING II

        This class will investigate the multimodal juxtaposition of image and text—a merger of two semiotic systems, the linguistic and the visual—to create various types of graphic nonfiction writings. We will read works of narrative medicine, graphic journalism and science, manga cookbooks, illustrated histories and biographies, and even diagrammatic military manuals. Our focus will primarily be on the rhetorical canons of dispositio (arrangement), elocutio (style), and pronuntiatio (delivery). We will also consider how authors, artists, inkers, colorists, letterers, etc., collaborate to structure and fashion effective and persuasive discourse for the public sphere.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3374-001 WRITING, RHETORIC, AND MULTIMEDIA AUTHORING

        This class will investigate the multimodal juxtaposition of image and text—a merger of two semiotic systems, the linguistic and the visual. In other words, for this class you will be reading, analyzing, and creating picture books, comics, graphic novels and memoirs, comic/concrete poetry, hypertext stories, graphic journalism, and more. We will look at some important works in comic studies, visual literacy, and even typography and graphic design, as we gain an understanding about how authors create and readers construct meaning through the marriage of image and text. Our focus will primarily be on the rhetorical canons of dispositio (arrangement) and elocutio (style), and on how authors, artists, inkers, colorists, letterers, etc., collaborate to structure and fashion vivid narratives. We will also explore whether image+text can be deployed to tell a broad range of different kinds of stories and speak to diverse audiences.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-010 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require you to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-014 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require you to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-020 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require you to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-030 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require you to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 100-002 Integrated Reading and Writing Workshop

        By the end of ENGL 0100,  students should be able to do the following things:

        College Level Writing: Develop long-term reading and writing strategies  for college level courses.

        Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing: Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts. Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts.

        Processes: Demonstrate knowledge of and ability to use the writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing— to write persuasively in multiple genres.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2382-003 Structure of Modern English

        The purpose of this class is not to teach you "proper" English. Rather, this class provides and Introduction to the grammatical structure of modern English at the level of the word, clause, and discourse, with applications for effective teaching of grammar, as well as for improvement in writing and literary analysis.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2384-004 STRUCTURE OF MODERN ENGLISH

        The purpose of this class is not to teach your "proper" English. Rather, this class provides and Introduction to the grammatical structure of modern English at the level of the word, clause, and discourse, with applications for effective teaching of grammar, as well as for improvement in writing and literary analysis.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 100-009 Integrated Reading and Writing Workshop

        By the end of ENGL 0100,  students should be able to do the following things:

        College Level Writing: Develop long-term reading and writing strategies  for college level courses.

        Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing: Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts. Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts.

        Processes: Demonstrate knowledge of and ability to use the writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing— to write persuasively in multiple genres.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-006 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course is an introduction to college reading and writing. It emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-007 Rhetoric and Composition II

        The class continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument and includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-016 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        The class continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument and includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-070 Rhetoric and Composition II

        The class continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument and includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2384-003 Structure of Modern English

        The purpose of this class is not to teach you "proper" English. Rather, this class provides an introduction to the grammatical structure of modern English at the level of the word, clause, and discourse, with applications for effective teaching of grammar, as well as for improvement in writing and literary analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2384-004 Structure of Modern English

        The purpose of this class is not to teach you "proper" English. Rather, this class provides an introduction to the grammatical structure of modern English at the level of the word, clause, and discourse, with applications for effective teaching of grammar, as well as for improvement in writing and literary analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-090 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require you to read and write rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. You must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-092 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require you to read and write rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. You must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 3321-001 TOPICS IN DISABILITY STUDIES: Disability in Comics

        Graphic literature (comics, graphic novels, manga, etc.) provides a format for vivid narratives that involve characters who exist outside the boundaries of the normal human. These characters may be mutants, monstrous, alien, deformed—or they may be subtly or secretly different in mind and body. This class will examine the use of disabled characters as stereotypes for social and moral disorder, the phenomenon of the “supercrip” comic hero, and the graphic novel as a disability memoir. Readings will include well-known and unfamiliar comic series, as well as critical works by Susan Sontag, Edward Said, and Donna Haraway and others as foundational theories for the critical analysis of disabilities in graphic literature.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2384-003 Structure of Modern English

        The purpose of this class is not to teach you “proper” English. Rather, this class provides and Introduction to the grammatical structure of modern English at the level of the word, clause, and discourse, with applications for effective teaching of grammar, as well as for improvement in writing and literary analysis.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2384-004 STRUCTURE OF MODERN ENGLISH

        The purpose of this class is not to teach you “proper” English. Rather, this class provides and Introduction to the grammatical structure of modern English at the level of the word, clause, and discourse, with applications for effective teaching of grammar, as well as for improvement in writing and literary analysis.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-002 Graphic Literature

        In this class, students will read comics (print and web), graphic novels, and manga--and they will examine these visual narratives as significant works of literature and learn to analyze them for plot development, characterization, style, and significant themes related to gender, ethnicity, and social and cultural values.  Students will consider how the juxtaposition of text and image works to tell rich and vivid stories, as well as how these narratives reveal elements of film making (wide, medium, and close-up shots) and graphic design (color, black/white, panels, and gutters). Possible readings may include early works by Lynn Ward and Will Eisner, Art Spiegelman’s Maus, and Alan Moore’s Batman: The Killing Joke, among others. In addition, students will have hands-on opportunities to draft graphic retellings of familiar fairy tales or urban myths and to experiment with such apps as Pixton and Comic Life as they create a short comic or storyboard (no artistic talent required!).

      • ENGL 3361-002 History of World Literature I

        This course introduces students to major texts in western literature from early oral and manuscript traditions through the first centuries of printing. Texts and authors studied may include the Homer, Greek drama, Virgil, lyrical poetry, Dante, Cervantes, and other works of the early Renaissance. Students will also investigate how modern authors have borrowed and re-interpreted themes and motifs from these texts by reading such works as "The Shield of Achilles" by W. H. Auden and "The Waste Land," by T. S. Eliot. In addition, throughout the semester we will be identifying and evaluating effective digital resources for the study of classical literature.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • ENGL 1302-005 Rhetoric and Composition II

        The class continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument and includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-014 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        The class continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument and includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-028 Rhetoric and Composition II

        The class continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument and includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-046 Rhetoric and Composition

        The class continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument and includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-012 Disabilities in Literature

        This section of topics in literature is cross-listed as DS 3321, a course offered to students interested in disability studies. Therefore, the purpose of our class is twofold. First, the course will introduce students to the process of close, thoughtful, and critical reading of a variety of literary genres: fiction, memoir, drama, poetry, and graphic novel. This process involves identifying the components of literary analysis--setting (time and place), characterization, plot structure, style, and theme--and interpreting the ways in which an author may use those elements to tell a story.

        The second goal is this class is to explore how contemporary texts represent disability (physical, mental, social, and cultural). We will consider the ways in which literature may demean and undermine people with disabilities by the use of stereotype or may reduce disability to mere metaphor. We will look at characters with different disabilities to determine if they are portrayed as victim, as superhero, or as a true-to-life person. Further, we will see how authors with disabilities give voice to their own experiences. We will also investigate the implications of these literary representations in terms of what we as individuals and as a society consider "normal" and how we recognize what it is to be fully human.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 3321-002 TOPICS IN DISABILITY STUDIES: Disabilities in Literature

        This section of Topics in Disability Studies is cross-listed as ENGL 2303, a course intended to be an "opportunity to help students of all majors become aware that literary studies are relevant to personal, social, and political life," and a way to "foster enjoyment of literature." Therefore, the purpose of our class is twofold. First, the course will introduce students to the process of close, thoughtful, and critical reading of a variety of literary genres: fiction, memoir, drama, poetry, and graphic novel. This process involves identifying the components of literary analysis--setting (time and place), characterization, plot structure, style, and theme--and interpreting the ways in which an author may use those elements to tell a story.

        The second goal is this class is to explore how contemporary texts represent disability (physical, mental, social, and cultural). We will use our knowledge of literary elements to consider the ways in which literature may demean and undermine people with disabilities by the use of stereotype or may reduce disability to mere metaphor. We will look at characters with different disabilities to determine if they are portrayed as victim, as superhero, or as a true-to-life person. Further, we will see how authors with disabilities give voice to their own experiences. We will also investigate the implications of these literary representations in terms of what we as individuals and as a society consider "normal" and how we recognize what it is to be fully human.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-030 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.  

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • ENGL 1301-053 Rhetoric and Composition I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.  

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-056 Rhetoric and Composition I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.  

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-087 Rhetoric and Composition 1

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.  

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-009 ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. The class continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument and includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-043 Rhetoric and Composition I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.  

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-002 Rhetoric and Composition II

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. The class continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument and includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-009 Rhetoric and Composition II

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. The class continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument and includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-002 American Literature

        The UTA Department of English describes sophomore literature as “an opportunity to help students in all majors become aware that literary studies are relevant to personal, social, and political life,” and a way to “foster enjoyment of literature.” This section of American literature will survey five genres of American popular fiction: the western, detective/mystery, horror, science fiction, and the graphic novel. We will also examine critical essays that analyze each of these genres.

        While many would argue that popular fiction is not “real” literature, these stories have much to tell us about our society, our culture, and our own human nature. We will examine various aspects of narrative (point of view, setting, plot, characterization, and theme) and other literary elements (tone, theme, figurative language, etc.) as we explore these different genres.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-003 American Literature

        The UTA Department of English describes sophomore literature as “an opportunity to help students in all majors become aware that literary studies are relevant to personal, social, and political life,” and a way to “foster enjoyment of literature.” This section of American literature will survey five genres of American popular fiction: the western, detective/mystery, horror, science fiction, and the graphic novel. We will also examine critical essays that analyze each of these genres.

        While many would argue that popular fiction is not “real” literature, these stories have much to tell us about our society, our culture, and our own human nature. We will examine various aspects of narrative (point of view, setting, plot, characterization, and theme) and other literary elements (tone, theme, figurative language, etc.) as we explore these different genres.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-032 Rhetoric and Composition II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-007 Special Topics in Literature

        American print culture is a fairly new academic field that pulls from literature, history, art, graphic design, and even business, for it was the Industrial Revolution that gave rise to inexpensive print technologies, which in turn had a tremendous impact on our national habits of publishing, of writing, and of reading itself. In this special topics class, we will examine several different forms of American literature, including poetry, short stories, excerpts from novels, and essays, written by such American authors as Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, and Walt Whitman.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-002 American Literature

        The UTA Department of English describes sophomore literature as “an opportunity to help students in all majors become aware that literary studies are relevant to personal, social, and political life,” and as a way to “foster enjoyment of literature.” In this section of American literature, we will examine several different forms of American literature, such as poetry, short stories, excerpts from novels, and essays. The readings for this class will not only comprise writings from different times and places in American society; the texts will also reflect various authors’ interest in the natural world and in how we interact with it. We will be reading works from a variety of authors, including Mark Twain, Emily Dickinson, Kate Chopin, and even John James Audubon.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-006 American Literature

        The UTA Department of English describes sophomore literature as “an opportunity to help students in all majors become aware that literary studies are relevant to personal, social, and political life,” and as a way to “foster enjoyment of literature.” In this section of American literature, we will examine several different forms of American literature, such as poetry, short stories, excerpts from novels, and essays. The readings for this class will not only comprise writings from different times and places in American society; the texts will also reflect various authors’ interest in the natural world and in how we interact with it. We will be reading works from a variety of authors, including Mark Twain, Emily Dickinson, Kate Chopin, and even John James Audubon.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-012 American Literature

        The UTA Department of English describes sophomore literature as “an opportunity to help students in all majors become aware that literary studies are relevant to personal, social, and political life,” and as a way to “foster enjoyment of literature.” In this section of American literature, we will examine several different forms of American literature, such as poetry, short stories, excerpts from novels, and essays. The readings for this class will not only comprise writings from different times and places in American society; the texts will also reflect various authors’ interest in the natural world and in how we interact with it. We will be reading works from a variety of authors, including Mark Twain, Emily Dickinson, Kate Chopin, and even John James Audubon.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-038 Rhetoric and Composition I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I is an introduction to college reading and writing, which emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-001 American Literature/Popular Fiction

        The UTA Department of English describes sophomore literature as “an opportunity to help students in all majors become aware that literary studies are relevant to personal, social, and political life,” and a way to “foster enjoyment of literature.” This section of American literature will survey six genres of American popular fiction: the western, detective/mystery, horror, young adult, science fiction, and the graphic novel. We will also examine storytelling through short animations, music videos, and poetry slams.

        While many would argue that popular fiction is not “real” literature, these stories have much to tell us about our society, our culture, and our own human nature. We will examine various aspects of narrative (point of view, setting, plot, characterization, and theme) and other literary elements (tone, theme, figurative language, etc.) as we explore these different genres.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-041 Rhetoric and Composition I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I is an introduction to college reading and writing, which emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-067 Rhetoric and Composition I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I is an introduction to college reading and writing, which emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-002 American Literature/Popular Fiction

        The UTA Department of English describes sophomore literature as “an opportunity to help students in all majors become aware that literary studies are relevant to personal, social, and political life,” and a way to “foster enjoyment of literature.” This section of American literature will survey six genres of American popular fiction: the western, detective/mystery, horror, young adult, science fiction, and the graphic novel. We will also examine storytelling through short animations, music videos, and poetry slams.

        While many would argue that popular fiction is not “real” literature, these stories have much to tell us about our society, our culture, and our own human nature. We will examine various aspects of narrative (point of view, setting, plot, characterization, and theme) and other literary elements (tone, theme, figurative language, etc.) as we explore these different genres.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-008 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II
        ENGL 1302 Rhetoric and Composition II continues ENGL 1301, but emphasizes advanced techniques of academic argument. Class assignments include issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students' own claims, reasons, and evidence.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2329-003 AMERICAN LITERATURE
        This section of American literature will survey six genres of American popular fiction: the western, detective/noir, horror, young adult, science fiction, and the graphic novel. We will also examine film, short animations, rap and poetry slams.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 1301-008 Reading, Writing, and Critical Thinking I
        ENGL 1301, Rhetoric and Composition I, is an introduction to college reading and writing. Class assignments emphasize recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2329-005 AMERICAN LITERATURE
        This section of American literature will survey six genres of American popular fiction: the western, detective/noir, horror, young adult, science fiction, and the graphic novel. We will also examine film, short animations, rap and poetry slams.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 1301-003 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        ENGL 1301, Rhetoric and Composition I, is an introduction to college reading and writing. Class assignments emphasize recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 1301-063 Rhetoric and Composition I

        ENGL 1301, Rhetoric and Composition I, is an introduction to college reading and writing. Class assignments emphasize recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 1302-010 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

         ENGL 1302 Rhetoric and Composition II continues ENGL 1301, but emphasizes advanced techniques of academic argument. Class assignments include issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students' own claims, reasons, and evidence.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-013 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II
        ENGL 1302 Rhetoric and Composition II continues ENGL 1301, but emphasizes advanced techniques of academic argument. Class assignments include issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 1302-026 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II
        ENGL 1302 Rhetoric and Composition II continues ENGL 1301, but emphasizes advanced techniques of academic argument. Class assignments include issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 1302-028 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II
        ENGL 1302 Rhetoric and Composition II continues ENGL 1301, but emphasizes advanced techniques of academic argument. Class assignments include issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus

Service to the Community

  • Elected
    • Dec 2010 to  Present Day Resource Center for the Homeless

      My church provides meals, shelter, and hospitality to clients of the Day Resource Center for the Homeless of Fort Worth during summer and winter months.

    • Sept 2010 to  Present Samaritan House

      My church provides monthly meals and fellowship to the inhabitants of Samaritan House, which offers housing and resources for persons living with HIV/AIDS and other special needs.

Service to the Profession

  • Volunteered
    • Mar 2016 to  Mar 2016 Session Chair, Renaissance Society of America 2016 Conference

      Session Chair for "Reading Pamphlets in Early Modern England"

Service to the University

  • Volunteered
    • Feb 2016 to  Feb 2016 Reviewer, ACES 2016

      The Annual Celebration of Excellence by Students (ACES) symposium is a university-wide, daylong event that occurs on Wednesday, March 23, 2016. ACES showcases the best of our students' research and creativity. Undergraduate and graduate students work with faculty mentors to write and submit abstracts for the competition. The approved abstracts are then turned into poster or oral presentations to be presented at the symposium.  

    • May 2016 to  Present Faculty Sponsor for New Student Organization

      Last spring I was invited to be the faculty sponsor for a new UTA organization of students who support the people of Syria. I have met with the young woman who initiated this group, and we will be meeting against early this fall 2016. The organization is so new that it does not yet have an official name!

    • July 2016 to  Aug 2016 Disability History/Archives Consortium

      I have volunteered to help out with this conference with duties commencing July 31 and ending on August 3. I do not yet know what my responsibilities will be, but I have and will be teaching for the UTA Disability Studies program, so I am eager to do what I can.

Other Administration Activities

  • 2006
    • Uncategorized
      • Sept 2006 Program Chair

        Louisiana Historical Society