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Christian D Worlow

Name

[Worlow, Christian D]
  • Senior Lecturer, English

Biography

Christian D. Worlow received his Ph.D. in English at the University of North Texas. His academic and teaching interests include Shakespeare and Early Modern Literature, British literature, literary theory and criticism, gender and sexuality, technical and professional writing, drama, and composition and rhetoric.

Dr. Worlow serves as the Internship Coordinator and Social Media Coordinator for the Department of English and serves as the Department's High-Impact Activity contact.

Curriculum Vitae

Professional Preparation

    • 2013 Doctor of Philosophy in EnglishUniversity of North Texas, Denton
    • 2007 Master of Arts in EnglishUniversity of North Texas, Denton
    • 2003 Bachelor of Arts in EnglishUniversity of North Texas, Denton

Appointments

    • Aug 2014 to Present Senior Lecturer in English
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2006 to Dec 2013 Teaching Fellow/Graduate Assistant
      University of North Texas, Denton

Memberships

  • Professional
    • Aug 2016 to Present Association of Texas Professional Educators
  • Membership
    • Aug 2015 to Present Shakespeare Association of America

News Articles

Other Activities

    • RA Program
      • Apr 2017 Shakespeare in America

Presentations

    • October  2009
      Shakespearean Potentiality

      “Shakespearean Potentiality,” Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies 2009 Conference, 25 October 2009, Dallas, TX

    • October  2009
      Panel Chair, “Shakespeare: Figuring and Disfiguring"

      Panel Chair, “Shakespeare: Figuring and Disfiguring,” Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies 2009 Conference, Dallas, TX, 25 October 2009, Dallas, TX

    • March  2008
      Claudius’s Great Matter

      “Claudius’s Great Matter,” Shakespeare Association of America 2008 Conference, 15 March 2008, Dallas, TX

    • March  2008
      Claudius's Great Matter

      “Claudius’s Great Matter,” GSEA 2008 Conference, 29 March 2008, Denton, TX

    • April  2007
      Co-Chair of Conference Committee, GSEA 2007 Conference

      Co-Chair of Conference Committee, “Decadence, Deviance, and Discontent: A Celebration of Difference,” GSEA 2007 Conference, 28 April 2007, Denton, TX

    • March  2006
      “The Physic of Orlando,” GSEA 2006 Conference, Denton, TX

      “The Physic of Orlando,” GSEA 2006 Conference, 8 April 2006, Denton, TX

Other Research Activities

  • 2013
    • Doctoral Dissertation
      • Dec 2013 Shakespeare and Modeling Political Subjectivity

        This dissertation examines the role of aesthetic activity in the pursuit of political agency in readings of several of Shakespeare’s plays, including Hamlet (1600), A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1595), The Tempest (1610), the history plays of the second tetralogy (1595-9), Julius Caesar (1599), and Coriolanus (1605). I demonstrate how Shakespeare models political subjectivity—the capacity for individuals to participate meaningfully in the political realm—as necessitating active aesthetic agency. This aesthetic agency entails the fashioning of artistically conceived public personae that potential political subjects enact in the public sphere and the critical engagement of the aesthetic and political discourses of the subjects’ culture in a self-reflective and appropriative manner. Furthermore, these subjects should be wary auditors of the texts and personae they encounter within the public sphere in order to avoid internalizing constraining ideologies that reify their identities into forms less conducive to the pursuit of liberty and social mobility. Early modern audiences could discover several models for doing so in Shakespeare’s works. For example, Hamlet posits a model of Machiavellian theatricality that masks the Prince's interiority as he resists the biopolitical force and disciplinary discourses of Claudius's Denmark. Julius Caesar and Coriolanus advance a model of citizenship through the plays’ nameless plebeians in which rhetoric offers the means to participate in Rome’s political culture, and Shakespeare’s England for audiences, while authorities manipulate citizen opinion by molding the popularity of public figures. Public, artistic ability affords potential political subjects ways of not only framing their participation in their culture but also ways of conceiving of their identities and relationships to society that may defy normative notions of membership in the community.

Other Creative Activities

  • 2015
    • Publications/Creative Works
      • Oct 2015 Poem

        “Response to Amergin” (poem), A Beautiful Resistance: Everything We Already Are, October 2015, ISBN 978099687707

        [Refereed/Juried]
  • 2004
    • Publications/Creative Works
      • Apr 2004 Poem

        “Neo-Khristos” (poem), Muse Squared, Spring 2004, ISSN 1547-2868

        [Refereed/Juried]

Students Supervised

  • Undergraduate
    • May 2016

      Honors College Course Credit--ENGL 2338

    • Apr 2016

      Mentored student for ACES 2016

    • Dec 2015

      Honors College Course Credit for ENGL 2338

    • Aug 2015

      Honors Course Credit Student--Project: Textbook Comparison for ENGL 2338

Peers Mentored

  • thumbnail
    Duration : Sept 2015 to Dec 2015

    Helped mentor colleague in regards to technical writing

Courses

      • ENGL 3333-004 DYNAMIC TRADITIONS IN LITERATURE

        Drama is one of humanity’s oldest artforms, and it has been entan-gled with religious and other forms of ritual. In this course, we will consider drama in its literary modes and in terms of its adaptation from other forms of art. At the same time, I want the class to con-sider drama’s pervasiveness in our lives, from the rituals of our lives—marriage, graduation, asking someone on a date, getting a job—to how drama figures into social and political participation. For much of the course, we will read and discuss dramas from ancient Greece to the recent past in order to get a sense of the form’s trans-formations and what dramatists have conserved over the centuries. Along the way, you will also get a crash course in academic writing conventions, literary genres, and common literary terms.
        ENGL 3333. DYNAMIC TRADITIONS IN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.
        An introduction to literary study that focuses primarily on changes over time to a movement, genre, or motif, such as Romanticism, detective fiction, or animals. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3372-001 COMPUTERS AND WRITING

        ENGL 3372: Computers and Writing:

        An advanced writing course, conducted in a computerized classroom. An emphasis on rhetorical analyses of electronic discourse and writing in electronic environments. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302

        In this technical writing course, students will begin with a re-fresher/crash course in effective writing style that emphasizes concision and clarity and in document and graphic design princi-ples. From there, we will investigate several examples of profes-sional design, and students will prepare formal case studies in which they analyze and critique documents or websites in terms of how they deploy design and to what ends, including a brief presentation version of their case studies they will present to the class. Students will design several genres of documents them-selves, including resumes, cover letters, and brochures, culminat-ing in the final project. This final project will entail students working in teams to develop a functional website, with an emphasis on dig-ital humanities or similar contexts, depending on the teams’ ma-jors and career interests.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4390-002 INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH

        This course represents an internship program through the De-partment of English at the University of Texas at Arlington. Where possible and when students can take advantage of such opportunities, student interns will work with businesses in the community.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4391-005 LITERATURE CONFERENCE COURSE

        This course offers a deep engagement with four of Shakespeare’s plays: Macbeth, The Tempest, Hamlet, and Othello. In particular, we will consider these plays from within the broader context of Shakespeare and Magic, including Renaissance hermeticism, the-ories of art and imagination, the cosmology of early modern Europe, and more. Course readings will include more nuanced explorations of Machiavelli’s The Prince, selected essays by Michele de Mon-taigne, Philip Sidney, Plato, Aristotle, Mircea Eliade, Ioan Coulianu, and others. Assignments include two pearls, an abstract for the term paper, and term paper.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-006 TECHNICAL WRITING

        ENGL 2338: Technical Writing (Honors Section)

        This course covers the processes of researching, drafting, designing, editing, and revising technical reports, proposals, instructions, resumes, and professional correspondence for specific audiences. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3372-001 COMPUTERS AND WRITING

        ENGL 3372: Computers and Writing: An advanced writing course, conducted in a computerized classroom. An emphasis on rhetorical analyses of electronic discourse and writing in electronic environments. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302

        In this technical writing course, students will begin with a refresher/crash course in effective writing style that emphasizes concision and clarity and in document and graphic design principles. From there, we will investigate several examples of professional design, and students will prepare formal case studies in which they analyze and critique documents or websites in terms of how they deploy design and to what ends, including a brief presentation version of their case studies they will present to the class. Students will design several genres of documents themselves, including resumes, cover letters, and brochures, culminating in the final project. This final project will entail students working in teams to develop a functional website, with an emphasis on digital humanities or similar contexts, depending on the teams’ majors and career interests.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3373-001 TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

        ENGL 3373. TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION. An advanced writing class that prepares students for writing about technical, scientific, and professional subject matters. Students study the concepts and techniques of technical communication and learn to create a variety of documents, such as instructions, visual aids, proposals, reports, and professional correspondence. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

        In this technical writing course, students will begin this course with a refresher/crash course in effective writing style that emphasizes concision and clarity and in document and graphic design principles. From there, students will build on these principles to develop a web project. This project will be a result of multiple teams developing components for a website, as we will move from the initial design phases through iterative drafts towards a final draft being ready to go live at the end of the term. I want to orient the focus of the project around subject areas pertinent to the class’s disciplinary interests, so the project may entail digital humanities, an online journal on particular subjects, or a similar undertaking. Assignments will include a style exam, routine progress reports, and iterative drafts.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4390-001 INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH

        This course represents an internship program through the Department of English at the University of Texas at Arlington. Where possible and when students can take advantage of such opportunities, student interns will work with businesses in the community.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4390-001 INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH

        ENGL 4390 Internship in English (3-9) Provides the student with an opportunity to apply academic skills learned in English classes to practical situations by working in a business related to the discipline.

      • ENGL 4326-001 SHAKESPEARE

        In this course, I intend to provide you with an introduction to Shakespeare, his works, and his contexts. Towards these ends, you will learn about Tudor and Jacobean Britain and their theatrical and cultural contexts. Before we get to Shakespeare, we will also encounter Niccolò Machiavelli’s The Prince and work to connect this text to Shakespeare over the course. We will work to contextualize these works in terms of gender constructions, politics and power, theatricality, art and imagination, and more. Our purpose is not only to understand Shakespeare in his historical context but also to develop the skills to understand him within modern contexts.

      • ENGL 2338-007 Technical Writing

        What is technical writing? You can think of technical writing as including technical and professional writing and communications, and in this class, you will learn how to prepare several kinds of these documents. You will work on

        Resumes and cover letters

        Brochures

        Instructional materials

        Proposals

        Furthermore, you will work on creating a 3-dimensional “document” that requires you to use all of the skills you will learn in this class as you help prepare a physical object at the UTA FabLab and write an accompanying reflection in memo format. Before you begin working on these projects, you will also experience a crash course in writing style that emphasizes concision and clarity. I will also give you some basic graphic design principles.

        In all cases, you should focus on creating documents that keep their readers’ goals and needs in mind even as you try to fulfill your purposes in these documents. If First Year Writing (1301 and 1302) taught you to prepare persuasive documents for community and academic audiences, then this course teaches you to prepare persuasive documents for most any other audience.

        Please note that this syllabus includes a FAQ just before the Tentative Schedule. You will also find a Syllabus Contract and a form for Permission to Use Student Writing on the last page.

        ENGL 2338: Technical Writing

        This course covers the processes of researching, drafting, designing, editing, and revising technical reports, proposals, instructions, resumes, and professional correspondence for specific audiences. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-005 TECHNICAL WRITING

        What is technical writing? You can think of technical writing as including technical and professional writing and communications, and in this class, you will learn how to prepare several kinds of these documents. You will work on

        Resumes and cover letters

        Brochures

        Instructional materials

        Proposals

        Furthermore, you will work on creating a booklet as a service learning project for the Arlington Public Library that requires you to use all of the skills you will learn in this class as you create a document providing information on resources for the homeless. Before you begin working on these projects, you will also experience a crash course in writing style that emphasizes concision and clarity. I will also give you some basic graphic design principles.

        In all cases, you should focus on creating documents that keep their readers’ goals and needs in mind even as you try to fulfill your purposes in these documents. If First Year Writing (1301 and 1302) taught you to prepare persuasive documents for community and academic audiences, then this course teaches you to prepare persuasive documents for most any other audience.

        Please note that this syllabus includes a FAQ just before the Tentative Schedule. You will also find a Syllabus Contract and a form for Permission to Use Student Writing on the last page.

        ENGL 2338: Technical Writing

        This course covers the processes of researching, drafting, designing, editing, and revising technical reports, proposals, instructions, resumes, and professional correspondence for specific audiences. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4390-002 Internship in English

        This course represents an internship program through the Department of English at the University of Texas at Arlington. Where possible and when students can take advantage of such opportunities, student interns will work with businesses in the community. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4391-005 LITERATURE CONFERENCE COURSE

        Directed study practicum on social media

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4326-001 SHAKESPEARE

        In this course, I intend to provide you with an introduction to Shakespeare, his works, and his contexts. Towards these ends, you will learn about Tudor and Jacobean Britain and their theatrical and cultural contexts. Before we get to Shakespeare, we will also encounter Niccolo Machiavelli’s The Prince and work to connect this text to Shakespeare over the course of the term. Otherwise, I will focus on the weaving together of Shakespeare and politics across several plays, ranging from romantic comedies to his most famous Roman play to history plays to the three great tragedies, Othello, Hamlet, and King Lear. We will work to contextualize these works in terms of gender constructions, politics and power, theatricality, art and imagination, and more. Our purpose is not only to understand Shakespeare in his historical context but also to develop the skills to understand him within modern contexts.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3372-001 COMPUTERS AND WRITING: TECHNICAL PROCEDURES AND MANUALS

        This course focuses on the use of computers and computerized equipment to produce a variety of documents. Technical writing and professional communication includes a diverse selection of writing types, and in this course, students will learn to produce clear and concise, user-oriented documents. In particular, students will focus on technical procedures and manuals in a variety of formats.

        After the first few weeks in which we focus on practicing using a clear and concise writing style for any audience, we move into developing several practical examples of instructional materials. Students will produce instructional/procedural documents as correspondence, brochures, booklets, and electronic/PDF formats.

        In addition, this course participates within the Maker Literacies initiative in order to incorporate experiential learning practices into the curriculum. Per the Library website:

        We believe that the competencies gained from hands-on, project based learning in the FabLab (for example, working in teams, time management and technical communication) will be vital skills for all UTA graduates. We seek to include courses from all programs of study, including the humanities, social sciences, fine arts, as well as traditional STEM fields.

        Students will work with the UTA FabLab to help develop documentation for the FabLab even as students have the opportunity to learn more about and to practice the kinds of maker-driven competencies this program encourages. (That means, you get to make stuff at the FabLab and write about it.) I am hoping that (1) students will produce great documentation for users of the FabLab that (2) students can then include in professional portfolios and point to in their job searches.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-006 TECHNICAL WRITING

        What is technical writing? You can think of technical writing as including technical and professional writing and communications, and in this class, you will learn how to prepare several kinds of these documents. You will work on resumes and cover letters, instructional materials, and proposals. Furthermore, you will work on revising and editing a document that requires you to use all of the skills you will learn in this class as you help prepare documentation for the UTA FabLab. Before you begin working on these projects, you will also experience a crash course in writing style that emphasizes concision and clarity and in basic graphic design.

        In all cases, you should focus on creating documents that keep their readers’ goals and needs in mind even as you try to fulfill your purposes in these documents. If First Year Writing (1301 and 1302) taught you to prepare persuasive documents for community and academic audiences, then this course teaches you to prepare persuasive documents for most any other audience.

        In addition, this course participates within the Maker Literacies initiative in order to incorporate experiential learning practices into the curriculum. Per the Library website:

        We believe that the competencies gained from hands-on, project based learning in the FabLab (for example, working in teams, time management and technical communication) will be vital skills for all UTA graduates. We seek to include courses from all programs of study, including the humanities, social sciences, fine arts, as well as traditional STEM fields.

        ENGL 2338: Technical Writing

        This course covers the processes of researching, drafting, designing, editing, and revising technical reports, proposals, instructions, resumes, and professional correspondence for specific audiences. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4390-001 INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH

        ENGL 4390 Internship in English (3-9) Provides the student with an opportunity to apply academic skills learned in English classes to practical situations by working in a business related to the discipline.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4391-005 Studies in Technical Communications (Independent Study)

        This course offers an advanced overview of the fundamentals of technical communications with a focus on preparing technical and professional documents for specific professional environments, as appropriate for individual students.

      • ENGL 4390-001 INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH

        ENGL 4390 Internship in English (3-9) Provides the student with an opportunity to apply academic skills learned in English classes to practical situations by working in a business related to the discipline.

      • ENGL 3351-001 HISTORY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I

        This course surveys early British Literature from its Anglo-Saxon origins (in translation) through the Restoration. Recurring course themes will include examining constructions of gender, courtly love and its later transformations, passion and its sublimation, medieval and Renaissance misogyny, race, and more. Student assignments include several response essays and a research-based argumentative term paper. This class can count towards the Gender & Sexuality concentration and the Medieval & Early Modern Studies minor.

      • ENGL 2338-005 TECHNICAL WRITING

        ENGL 2338: Technical Writing

        This course covers the processes of researching, drafting, designing, editing, and revising technical reports, proposals, instructions, resumes, and professional correspondence for specific audiences. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4326-002 Shakespeare

        ENGL 4326. SHAKESPEARE. 3 Hours.

        Selected plays by Shakespeare in their historical and literary context. May include his nondramatic works.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4390-002 Internship in English

        ENGL 4390 Internship in English (3-9) Provides the student with an opportunity to apply academic skills learned in English classes to practical situations by working in a business related to the discipline.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4391-005 LITERATURE CONFERENCE COURSE

        This course explores the intersection of poetry, song, narrative, and literary criticism and theory. Towards these ends, we will read a variety of critical and theoretical texts in association with poetry and other primary sources. We will meet on Thursday evenings in CARH 604 or at another place announced ahead of time to discuss your readings and course work.

        The premise of this course is to offer a thorough grounding in literary criticism & theory with a focus on poetry and song. Assignments include short papers in which the student engages in a critical reading of a poem using a specific theoretical approach. The student will also work on an extended annotated bib and research project. In all cases, I want to emphasize the use of theory and critical contexts in a manner that moves beyond merely jargon-based or cookie-cutter template readings: use the concepts, avoid the jargon.

        This course in its last weeks focuses on writing and rhetoric by focusing on how to apply literary criticism and theory in a research-based argumentative critical essay.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-006 TECHNICAL WRITING

        ENGL 2338: Technical Writing

        This course covers the processes of researching, drafting, designing, editing, and revising technical reports, proposals, instructions, resumes, and professional correspondence for specific audiences. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-009 TECHNICAL WRITING

        ENGL 2338: Technical Writing

        This course covers the processes of researching, drafting, designing, editing, and revising technical reports, proposals, instructions, resumes, and professional correspondence for specific audiences. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4390-001 INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH

        This course represents an internship program through the Department of English at the University of Texas at Arlington. Where possible and when students can take advantage of such opportunities, student interns will work with businesses in the community.

        ENGL 4390 Internship in English (3-9) Provides the student with an opportunity to apply academic skills learned in English classes to practical situations by working in a business related to the discipline.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4326-001 SHAKESPEARE

        In this course, I intend to provide you with an introduction to Shakespeare, his works, and his contexts. Towards these ends, you will learn about Tudor and Jacobean Britain and their theatrical and cultural contexts. Before we get to Shakespeare, we will also encounter Niccolo Machiavelli’s The Prince and work to connect this text to Shakespeare over the course of the term while also learning about Michel de Montaigne’s and Philip Sidney’s contributions. From there, we move into Shakespeare, beginning with his sonnets. After the sonnets, we move into the drama, moving from comedies to histories to tragedies: Much Ado about Nothing; Richard III; Othello; Macbeth; and King Lear. Along the way, we will work to situate these works in terms of gender constructions, politics and power, theatricality, art and imagination, and more. Our purpose is not only to understand Shakespeare in his historical context but also to understand him within modern contexts.

        ENGL 4326. SHAKESPEARE. 3 Hours.

        Selected plays by Shakespeare in their historical and literary context. May include his nondramatic works.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3351-001 HISTORY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I

        This course surveys early British Literature from its Anglo-Saxon origins (in translation) through the Restoration. Readings include Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, selections from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, selections from Marie de France’s Lais, Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus, Shakespeare’s Othello, and John Milton’s Paradise Lost. Recurring course themes will include examining constructions of gender, courtly love and its later transformations in the sonnet tradition, passion and its sublimation, medieval and Renaissance misogyny, race, and more. Student assignments include several response essays and a research-based argumentative term paper. This class can count towards the Gender & Sexuality concentration and the Medieval & Early Modern Studies minor.

      • ENGL 4390-001 INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH

        ENGL 4390 Internship in English (3-9) Provides the student with an opportunity to apply academic skills learned in English classes to practical situations by working in a business related to the discipline.

      • ENGL 4326-002 Shakespeare

        In this course, I intend to provide you with an introduction to Shakespeare, his works, and his contexts. Towards these ends, you will learn about Tudor and Jacobean Britain and their theatrical and cultural contexts. Before we get to Shakespeare, we will also encounter Niccolo Machiavelli’s The Prince and work to connect this text to Shakespeare over the course of the term while also learning about Michel de Montaigne’s and Philip Sidney’s contributions to helping us understand Shakespeare’s contexts. From there, we move into Shakespeare, beginning with his sonnets. After the sonnets, we move into the drama, moving from comedies to histories to tragedies: As You Like It; Henry IV, part 1; Othello; Macbeth; and Hamlet. Along the way, we will work to situate these works in terms of gender constructions, politics and power, theatricality, art and imagination, and more. Our purpose is not only to understand Shakespeare in his historical context but also to understand him within modern contexts.

        ENGL 4326. SHAKESPEARE. 3 Hours.

        Selected plays by Shakespeare in their historical and literary context. May include his nondramatic works.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3351-002 HISTORY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I

        This course surveys early British Literature from its Anglo-Saxon origins (in translation) through the late Renaissance. Readings will include Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, selections from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, selections from Marie de France’s Lais, Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus, Shakespeare’s Othello, and John Milton’s Paradise Lost. Recurring course themes will include examining constructions of gender, courtly love and its later transformations in the sonnet tradition, passion and its sublimation, medieval and Renaissance misogyny, and more. Student assignments include three brief “pearl” essays and a research-based argumentative term paper. This class can count towards the Gender & Sexuality concentration and the Medieval & Early Modern Studies minor.

        ENGL 3351. HISTORY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I. 3 Hours.

        British literature and language from their origins through the 18th century, as they relate to the development of British culture.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-007 Technical Writing

        What is technical writing? You can think of technical writing as including technical and professional writing and communications, and in this class, you will learn how to prepare several kinds of technical writing documents. These documents include brochures, resumes and cover letters, instructional materials, and formal reports. Furthermore, you will work on revising and editing a document that requires you to use all of the skills you will learn in this class as you help prepare documentation for Meals On Wheels, Inc. of Tarrant County (MOW). Before you begin working on these projects, you will also experience a crash course in writing style that emphasizes concision and clarity and in basic graphic design.

        In all cases, you should focus on creating documents that keep their readers’ goals and needs in mind even as you try to fulfill your purposes in these documents. If First Year Writing (1301 and 1302) taught you to prepare persuasive documents for community and academic audiences, then this course teaches you to prepare persuasive documents for most any other audience.

        ENGL 2338: Technical Writing

        This course covers the processes of researching, drafting, designing, editing, and revising technical reports, proposals, instructions, resumes, and professional correspondence for specific audiences. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-009 TECHNICAL WRITING

        What is technical writing? You can think of technical writing as including technical and professional writing and communications, and in this class, you will learn how to prepare several kinds of technical writing documents. These documents include brochures, resumes and cover letters, instructional materials, and formal reports. Furthermore, you will work on revising and editing a document that requires you to use all of the skills you will learn in this class as you help prepare documentation for Meals On Wheels, Inc. of Tarrant County (MOW). Before you begin working on these projects, you will also experience a crash course in writing style that emphasizes concision and clarity and in basic graphic design.

        In all cases, you should focus on creating documents that keep their readers’ goals and needs in mind even as you try to fulfill your purposes in these documents. If First Year Writing (1301 and 1302) taught you to prepare persuasive documents for community and academic audiences, then this course teaches you to prepare persuasive documents for most any other audience.

        ENGL 2338: Technical Writing

        This course covers the processes of researching, drafting, designing, editing, and revising technical reports, proposals, instructions, resumes, and professional correspondence for specific audiences. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4390-002 Internship in English

        This course represents an internship program through the Department of English at the University of Texas at Arlington. Where possible and when students can take advantage of such opportunities, student interns will work with businesses in the community.

        ENGL 4390 Internship in English (3-9) Provides the student with an opportunity to apply academic skills learned in English classes to practical situations by working in a business related to the discipline.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3352-001 History of British Literature II

        This course is a survey course covering a broad swath of British literature—we begin with Robert Burns and end with Jackie Kay, covering Romanticism, Victorian literature, the Decadents and Aesthetes, Modernism, and literature culminating in the 2000 novel Trumpet. In designing this course, I have opted for a roughly chronological approach while paying attention to the imperial (English) and post-colonial (Ireland and Scotland) divisions in these works. I have also tried to make gender a strong component of this course, with readings by Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Shelley, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Jackie Kay, Virginia Woolf, Lady Gregory, and Caryl Churchill. As we proceed, we shall work to situate these texts within their historical, social, and cultural contexts of industrialization, capitalism, World Wars, modernity, technology, suffrage, race, gender, empire, and what comes after empire.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4390-001 INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH

        This course represents an internship program through the Department of English at the University of Texas at Arlington. Where possible and when students can take advantage of such opportunities, student interns will work with businesses in the community. For the Fall 2015 semester, this course has students intern with Meals On Wheels, Inc. of Tarrant County.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-004 TECHNICAL WRITING

        This course offers an introduction to technical and professional communications. Students will learn and develop good writing style and graphic design while creating various technical writing documents, including a brochure, resume, cover letter, team instruction project, team feasibility study, and a formal project. This semester, we will be working with Meals On Wheels, Inc. of Tarrant County (MOW) on designing and revising brochures, instructional materials, and other documents for them.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-008 TECHNICAL WRITING

        This course offers an introduction to technical and professional communications. Students will learn and develop good writing style and graphic design while creating various technical writing documents, including a brochure, resume, cover letter, team instruction project, team feasibility study, and a formal project. This semester, we will be working with Meals On Wheels, Inc. of Tarrant County (MOW) on designing and revising brochures, instructional materials, and other documents for them.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-015 TECHNICAL WRITING

        This course offers an introduction to technical and professional communications. Students will learn and develop good writing style and graphic design while creating various technical writing documents, including a brochure, resume, cover letter, team instruction project, team feasibility study, and a formal project. This semester, we will be working with Meals On Wheels, Inc. of Tarrant County (MOW) on designing and revising brochures, instructional materials, and other documents for them.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-001 Introduction to Technical Writing

        Sophomore-level course focused on a process-oriented introduction to writing, especially for nursing, science, pre-engineering, and business students. This course includes understanding the writing situation and provides students the opportunity to practice writing in response to professional and technical situations. Students will learn improved writing style and be introduced to design concepts, business writing, and instruction writing. This course includes both individual and collaborative projects. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

      • ENGL 4326-001 SHAKESPEARE

        ENGL 4326. SHAKESPEARE (3-0) Selected plays by Shakespeare in their historical and literary context. May include his nondramatic works.

        This course approaches the topic of subversion and freedom—political freedom and agency, social mobility, personal and artistic freedom, and the intersection of these very related topics—in several of Shakespeare’s works. In particular, we will read and respond to Richard II, 1 Henry IV, As You Like It, Othello, Macbeth, and Hamlet. We will situate Shakespeare within the history of ideas for the early modern period, with secondary readings by Machiavelli, Michel de Montaigne, Philip Sidney, and others. Student assessment will include in-class discussions, participation, exams, and essays.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2309-013 WORLD LITERATURE

        ENGL 2309. WORLD LITERATURE (3-0). Significant works of world literature with emphasis on ideas and the ways in which they reflect cultural and aesthetic values; emphasis on critical methods of reading, writing, and thinking. Examines at least three genres and six authors.

        The Hero in the Epic, Romance, & Genre Fiction

        This course approaches the topic of the hero in the genres of epic poetry, medieval metrical romance, novels, short fiction, and others. We begin with the “first” hero, the god-king Gilgamesh, and conclude with recent works that draw on many of the same themes and conventions of heroism.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-005 TECHNICAL WRITING

        ENGL 2338 Introduction to Technical Writing

        Sophomore-level course focused on a process-oriented introduction to writing, especially for nursing, science, pre-engineering, and business students. This course includes understanding the writing situation and provides students the opportunity to practice writing in response to professional and technical situations. Students will learn improved writing style and be introduced to design concepts, business writing, and instruction writing. This course includes both individual and collaborative projects. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-006 TECHNICAL WRITING

        ENGL 2338 Introduction to Technical Writing

        Sophomore-level course focused on a process-oriented introduction to writing, especially for nursing, science, pre-engineering, and business students. This course includes understanding the writing situation and provides students the opportunity to practice writing in response to professional and technical situations. Students will learn improved writing style and be introduced to design concepts, business writing, and instruction writing. This course includes both individual and collaborative projects. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-006 Introduction to Technical Writing

        Sophomore-level course focused on a process-oriented introduction to writing, especially for nursing, science, pre-engineering, and business students. This course includes understanding the writing situation and provides students the opportunity to practice writing in response to professional and technical situations. Students will learn improved writing style and be introduced to design concepts, business writing, and instruction writing. This course includes both individual and collaborative projects. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-005 Introduction to Technical Writing

        Sophomore-level course focused on a process-oriented introduction to writing, especially for nursing, science, pre-engineering, and business students. This course includes understanding the writing situation and provides students the opportunity to practice writing in response to professional and technical situations. Students will learn improved writing style and be introduced to design concepts, business writing, and instruction writing. This course includes both individual and collaborative projects. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2319-006 British Literature

        In this course, we examine several works from medieval and Renaissance English literature in a variety of genres: drama, poetry, and prose. The theme of this course is "Passion and its Sublimation," and we shall look at how English literature has treated passion in various forms—romantic, sexual, spiritual—and sought to express or to sublimate that passion towards particular ends. We spend the first third of the term in the medieval period before moving to the Renaissance, and we shall read works by major authors such as Chaucer and Shakespeare as well as works by a variety of other writers.

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirements in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. The required objectives of these courses are the development of students’ critical thinking, communication skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility. Many elements of this course foster development of these objectives, which are explicitly addressed in the "Signature Assignment." The Departmental general guidelines for sophomore literature can be found by typing "sophomore literature" in the "Search UT Arlington" box on the University website: http://www.uta.edu/uta.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-025 Rhetoric & Composition II

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours

Other Teaching Activities

  • 2015
    • Internship Advisor/Supervisor
      • Aug 2015 Coordinator of Internship Program

        August 2015-Ongoing

        Coordinator for departmental internships via ENGL 4390: Internship in English

        Activities include coordinating internships with community organizations

Service to the Community

  • Volunteered
    • Mar 2016 to  Present Coordinating Service Learning for Students

      Coordinating service learning opportunities for technical writing students and interns to work on a variety of tasks with Arlington Public Library.

    • Aug 2015 to  June 2016 Coordinating Service Learning for Students

      Coordinated service learning opportunities for technical writing students to work on revising and redesigning documents for Meals On Wheels, Inc. of Tarrant County and their Volunteer Recruitment personnel.

    • Aug 2014 to  May 2015 Coordinating Experiential Learning for Students

      Helped coordinate with faculty colleagues experiential learning opportunities for technical writing students working on neurology reference materials for Dr. Christina Burch, M.D.

Service to the University