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Christopher Kilgore

Name

[Kilgore, Christopher]
  • Coordinator III, Special Progr, School of Social Work
  • Writing Resource Coordinator, School of Social Work

Biography

Christopher D. Kilgore holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and an M.F.A. in Fiction from Saint Marys College of California.  For the past five years, he has run the Writing Resources office, an in-house Writing in the Disciplines - model writing center for the School of Social Work at the University of Texas at Arlington.  He also teaches courses in literature and composition for the English Department.

Professional Preparation

    • 2001 BA in English (Philosophy & Spanish),  Whitman College
    • 2003 MFA in Creative Writing(Fiction)Saint Mary's College of California
    • 2010 PhD in EnglishUniversity of Tennessee, Knoxville

Appointments

    • Sept 2011 to Present Lecturer of English
      University of Texas, Arlington
    • Sept 2011 to Present Writing Resource Coordinator
      University of Texas, Arlington

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Aug 2009 to Present ASAP: Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present
    • Apr 2000 to Present Phi Beta Kappa

Awards and Honors

    • Aug  2016 Faculty Sustainability Fellowship 2016-17 sponsored by Office of SustainabilityVP Administration and Campus OperationsOffice of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Sep  2012 Faculty Fellow, Center for Community Service Learning sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington

Other Activities

    • Discussion Panel
      • Mar 2015 The Relevance of the Graphic Novel in Culture and Education

Research and Expertise

  • Needs Assessment: Writing in the School of Social Work

    2012-Ongoing:  On the basis of pilot programs run during the 2011-12 AY, implement an assessment of current student and instructor perceptions of writing in the School of Social Work, and an assessment of current writing performance among new BSW and MSSW students.  Principle Investigator.  Co-Investigator:  Dr. Courtney Cronley.

  • Narrative Comprehension and Interpretation

    2010-Ongoing:  Develop an innovative conceptual model of how narrative texts encourage readers to create and modify conceptual "story" materials.  This project expands the model articulated in my dissertation, Ambiguous Recognition.  I consider narrative texts in prose, film, and graphic novels.  Elements from this ongoing project have been accepted as peer-reviewed journal articles and conference presentations.

Publications

      Journal Article 2017
      • Christopher Kilgore and Courtney Cronley.  “Student and Instructor Perspectives on the Writing Process:  Empirical Results to Inform Writing Support for the Social-Work Discipline.”  Across the Disciplines 14.2 (2017).  Available online at: https://wac.colostate.edu/atd/articles/kilgore_cronley2017.cfm

        {Journal Article }
      2017
      • “Bad Networks: From Virus to Cancer in Post-Cyberpunk Narrative.”  Journal of Modern Literature 40.2 (2017): 165-183.  Available online at: https://muse.jhu.edu/article/652070

        {Journal Article }
      2017
      • Cronley, Courtney, Christopher D. Kilgore, and Tracey Daniels Lerberg.  “ A Multivariate Analysis of Writing Skills in BSW Case Study Papers.”  Accepted at Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2016
      Journal Article 2015
      • Christopher Kilgore, Courtney Cronley, and Peter Lehmann.  “Social Construction of Intimate Partner Violence: A Brief Report on Quantitative Grammatical Analysis.'”  Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment, & Trauma 24.10 (2015): 1123-1133. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10926771.2015.1074136

        {Journal Article }
      2015
      • "Unnatural Graphic Narrative:  The Panel and the Sublime." JNT: Journal of Narrative Theory 45.1 (2015): 18-45.  Available online at: https://muse.jhu.edu/article/605827

        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 2014
      • “From Unnatural Narrative to Unnatural Reading: A Review of A Poetics of Unnatural Narrative.”  Style 48.4 (2014): 629-636.

        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 2013
      • “Rhetoric of the Network: Toward a New Metaphor.” Mosaic: a journal for the interdisciplinary study of literature 46.4, 37-58.  Available online at: https://muse.jhu.edu/article/531061

        {Journal Article }
      2013
      • Christopher Kilgore, Courtney Cronley, & Beth Amey.  “Developing Grass-Roots Writing Resources:  A Novel Approach to Writing Within the Social Work Discipline.”  Teaching in Higher Education 18.8 (2013): 920-932.  doi: 10.1080/13562517.2013.827647

        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2012
      • “‘Allways our rush returning renewed’: Time, Narrative, and Conceptual Blending in Danielewski’s Only Revolutions.”  Blending and the Study of Narrative.  Eds. Ralf Schneider and Marcus Hartner.  Berlin: Walter de Gruyter (in press, October 2012).  42 pp typescript.
        {Book Chapter }

      Book Review 2008
      • Review of Galloway and Thacker’s The Exploit: A Theory of NetworksSoundings: An Interdisciplinary Journal 90.3-4 (Fall-Winter 2008): 299-304.
        {Book Review }

      Conference Proceeding 2008
      • “The Future of Interactivity:  What Do We Want?”  With Hilary Williams (U of Tennessee Department of Design).  Participation and Innovation: Proceedings of SIDeR 08. Eds. Ben Matthews and Jacob Buur.  Sonderborg, Denmark: Mads Clausen Institute, U of Southern Denmark, 2008. 124-129.

        {Conference Proceeding }

      Book Review 2005
      • Review of Jacques Derrida’s Acts of ReligionThe Iowa Journal of Cultural Studies 7 (Fall 2005): 106-8.
        {Book Review }

Presentations

    • November  2018
      Writing Support in Social Work: Preparation for Interprofessional Communication and Practice.
      Accepted for poster presentation at the Council of Social Work Education 2018 Conference, Orlando, FL, November 2018.  Forthcoming.
    • July  2018
      WID Support in the Social Work Discipline: A Usage Profile of Writing Resources.
      Council of Writing Program Administrators 2018 Conference, Sacramento, CA, July 2018.
    • October  2017
      Using Diffusion of Innovation Theory to Explain Student Help-Seeking for Writing Support.
      Council of Social Work Education 2017 Conference, Dallas, TX, October 2017.
    • March  2016
      Interdisciplinary Writing Support: Student and Instructor Perspectives on Process and Tasks in the Discipline of Social Work

      Conference of College Teachers of English, San Antonio, TX, March 2016.

    • January  2016
      Letters in Conflict: Analyzing the Construction of Discourse on Intimate Partner Violence

      Poster. Society for Social Work and Research Annual Conference, Washington DC, January 2016

    • September  2015
      Speculating in Public: The Ambivalent Films of Terry Gilliam

      ASAP/7, International Conference of the Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present.  Greenville, SC, September, 2015.

    • October  2014

      Measuring the Convergence of Perspectives on Student Writing Tasks and Processes

      CSWE Annual Conference, Tampa, FL, October 2014.

    • March  2014

      Empathy the Long Way ’Round: Unnatural Autographic Narration

      International Society for the Study of Narrative Annual Conference. Cambridge, MA, March 2014.

    • October  2013

      Bad Networks: From Virus to Cancer in Trans-Atlantic Cyberpunk Narrative.

      Presented at ASAP/5, International Conference of the Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present.  Detroit, October 2013.

    • November  2012

      Strengths-Based, Grass-Roots Writing within the Disciplines: A Multi-Modal, Multi-Level Writing Intervention.

      Council on Social Work Education Annual Program Meeting (International Conference).Washington, DC, November 2012.

    • March  2012

      Unnatural Graphic Narration: McKean and the Sublime.

      International Society for the Study of Narrative Annual Conference.Las Vegas, March 2012.

    • January  2011
      Beyond the Network: Toward a New Metaphor.
      ASAP/3, International Conference of the Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present.  Pittsburgh, October 2011.
    • January  2011
      Did That Really Happen? Cognitive Blending and the ‘Twist’ Ending in The Attic Expeditions.
      International Society for the Study of Narrative Annual Conference. Saint Louis, April 2011.
    • January  2010
      The Adasir Project
      The Adasir Project is an ongoing creative work, a hybrid HTML/Javascript "dieselpunk" novel and reading environment.
    • January  2009
      We Are ‘I’: Narrative Paradox and Identity in Shelley Jackson’s Half Life.
      International Society for the Study of Narrative panel, “Postmodern and Unnatural Narratives.” Modern Language Association Annual Convention.  Philadelphia, December 2009.
    • January  2008
      The Future of Interactivity: What Do We Want?
      An interdisciplinary collaborative paper with Hilary Williams (Graphic Design).  Student Interactive Design Research International Conference plenary session, “Design Visions.”  Mads Clausen Institute, University of Southern Denmark, May 2008.
    • January  2008
      To Astonish Eternity: Los and the Controversy of Blake’s Sublime.
      Southeastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference. Auburn U, February 2008.
    • January  2007
      A Reader Abs/Orbed: Blake’s Hyper-Textual Mythology.
      This project received the University of Tennessee’s John C. Hodges Award for Excellence in Scholarship. Specialized selections were presented at two international conferences:  International Society for the Study of Narrative Annual Conference. Washington DC, March 2007.  International Remediating Literature Conference. Utrecht University (Netherlands), July 2007. 
    • January  2007
      Excerpt from A Memory of Wind, a novel
      (Creative Reading).  Popular/American Culture Association National Conference.  Boston, April 2007.
    • January  2006
      What the Traverse Says: Tools for Narrative Innovation in Michael Joyce’s afternoon.
      Nominated for the Horst Frenz Prize for Best Graduate Student Presentation.  American Comparative Literature Association International Conference.  Princeton University, April 2006.

Other Creative Activities

  • 2011
    • Online Novel Series
      • 2011 The Adasir Project

        The Adasir Project is an ongoing series of linked multimedia fantasy novels.

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Collaborators

    • thumbnail
      Duration : Sept 2011 to Present

      Courtney and I collaborate in research on writing in the social work discipline.

    • thumbnail
      Duration : Sept 2012 to Present

      Peter and I have collaborated in research on discourse and intimate partner violence.

    • thumbnail
      Duration : Sept 2011 to Sept 2012

      Beth and I collaborated in research on writing in the social work discipline, culminating in an article published in Teaching in Higher Education.

Courses

      • ENGL 1302-045 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-CO10 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-042 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-018 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        SPECIAL SECTION REQUIREMENTS:  This is a unique pilot section exploring the general topic of sustainability, and featuring a special hands-on assignment, which will require some off-campus work, and some time commitments outside of the course hours.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-043 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-001 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
        The course is designed to introduce students to what is required of them as UTA English majors, and it’s a prerequisite for all upper-level English courses.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2303-004 TOPICS IN LITERATURE: Graphic Narrative as Trans-Cultural Documentary

        When Art Spiegelman published Maus in 1986, he stirred an old controversy over the “appropriateness” of graphical style to subject matter.Could drawings featuring anthropomorphic mice, cats, and other animals convey the horror of the Holocaust?Today the consensus is that Spiegelman’s cartoon-style drawings, embedded in a father-and-son family drama, can do just that.In this course we will examine graphic-novel narratives that present themselves as accounts of cultural, national, and historical identities, often through memoir or a “documentary” style.These stories raise ethical and aesthetic questions:As students in a US-American university in 2012, to what extent can we say we have learned from such texts?How can we decide whether a portrayal is “accurate,” or at least “adequate”?

        NOTE: This course includes a service-learning project that will involve giving an off-campus presentation.The project will provide useful oral-presentation experience for those interested in educational and communication-oriented careers.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-011 American Literature

        This course is not designed as a survey of American Literature, but rather an exploration of the tensions between individual identity and social identity across the history of American literature.  Beginning even before our nation’s independence, Americans have pondered the boundaries between self and other, and the obligations each of us owes—to ourselves, our families, and those we define as “others.”  Although the course’s readings are selective, they cover a variety of genres, geographical areas, and perspectives.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-015 American Literature
        This course is not designed as a survey of American Literature, but rather an exploration of the tensions between individual identity and social identity across the history of American literature.  Beginning even before our nation’s independence, Americans have pondered the boundaries between self and other, and the obligations each of us owes—to ourselves, our families, and those we define as “others.”  Although the course’s readings are selective, they cover a variety of genres, geographical areas, and perspectives.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2329-006 AMERICAN LITERATURE
        This course is not designed as a survey of American Literature (that would be English 3340), but rather an exploration of the tensions between individual identity and social identity across the history of American literature.Beginning even before our nation’s independence, Americans have pondered the boundaries between self and other, and the obligations each of us owes—to ourselves, our families, and those we define as “others.”Although the course’s readings are selective, they cover a variety of genres, geographical areas, and perspectives.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2350-001 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
        The course is designed to introduce students to what is required of them as UTA English majors, and it’s a prerequisite for all upper-level English courses.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2350-001 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        The course is designed to introduce students to what is required of them as UTA English majors, and it’s a prerequisite for all upper-level English courses.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2303-003 TOPICS IN LITERATURE: Graphic Narrative as Trans-Cultural Documentary

        When Art Spiegelman published Maus in 1986, he stirred an old controversy over the “appropriateness” of graphical style to subject matter.Could drawings featuring anthropomorphic mice, cats, and other animals convey the horror of the Holocaust?Today the consensus is that Spiegelman’s cartoon-style drawings, embedded in a father-and-son family drama, can do just that.In this course we will examine graphic-novel narratives that present themselves as accounts of cultural, national, and historical identities, often through memoir or a “documentary” style.These stories raise ethical and aesthetic questions:As students in a US-American university in 2012, to what extent can we say we have learned from such texts? How can we decide whether a portrayal is “accurate,” or at least “adequate”?

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-008 TOPICS IN LITERATURE: Graphic Narrative as Trans-Cultural Documentary

        When Art Spiegelman published Maus in 1986, he stirred an old controversy over the “appropriateness” of graphical style to subject matter.Could drawings featuring anthropomorphic mice, cats, and other animals convey the horror of the Holocaust?Today the consensus is that Spiegelman’s cartoon-style drawings, embedded in a father-and-son family drama, can do just that.In this course we will examine graphic-novel narratives that present themselves as accounts of cultural, national, and historical identities, often through memoir or a “documentary” style.These stories raise ethical and aesthetic questions:As students in a US-American university in 2012, to what extent can we say we have learned from such texts? How can we decide whether a portrayal is “accurate,” or at least “adequate”?

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-001 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
        The course is designed to introduce students to what is required of them as UTA English majors, and it’s a prerequisite for all upper-level English courses.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus

Other Teaching Activities

  • 2018
    • Student Success Services
      • Feb 2018 A Writing Guide for Social Work

        The Writing Guide for Social Work is a handbook for students taking social work courses.  It includes tips and suggestions for students, for all aspects of the writing process.  There is also an instructor edition, including advice for making the most of writing assignments at all levels.

        The guide is an work in progress, begun in 2011, and updated regularly.  The most recent update was in February 2018, and includes "Common Assignments in Social Work Education," an easy-access set of tips and strategies for a variety of social work assignments.

    • ENGR 1300-106
      • Jan 2018 Engineering Problem Solving: Writing Lab

        University of Texas at Arlington, spring 2018 semester.  This writing lab forms a component of the Engineering 1301 course content, and includes a writing assignment during every week of the course.  The engineering component of this course was taught by Dr. Kendra Wallis.

    • ENGR 1300-102
      • July 2018 Engineering Problem Solving: Writing Lab

        University of Texas at Arlington, summer 2018 11-week term.  This writing lab forms a component of the Engineering 1301 course content, and includes a writing assignment during every week of the course.  The engineering component of this course was taught by Dr. Kendra Wallis.
         

Service to the Profession

  • Other
    • June 2014 to  Present Reviewer, Studies in Higher Education

      Conduct peer review of articles for inclusion in Studies in Higher Education.
       

    • Jan 2016 to  Present Reviewer, International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship

      Conduct peer review of articles on writing instruction

Administrative Appointment

  • 2011
    • Sept 2011 to Present - Writing Resource Coordinator, University of Texas, Arlington   School of Social Work