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Connor Stratman

Name

[Stratman, Connor]
  • Enhanced GTA

Biography

A Graduate Teaching Assistant in the English department, Connor previously taught ESL  at Richland College in Richardson, TX. He is currently a PhD candidate in English, and received his MA and BA in English from Loyola University Chicago. His research interests include 20th and 21st century American literature, critical theory, and posthumanism.

Professional Preparation

    • 2012 M.A. in EnglishLoyola University Chicago
    • 2011 B.A. in English (Comparative Religion),  Loyola University Chicago

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Aug 2013 to Present Modern Language Association

Presentations

    • March  2012
      “A disturbance of words within words”: Dictation, Transmission, and Subjective Dissolution in the Poetry of Jack Spicer and Robert Duncan

      A paper given at the 2012 ACLA conference at Brown University.

Other Creative Activities

  • 2011
    • Book publication
      • Oct 2011 Volcano (Writing Knights Press, 2011)

        A short chapbook of interrelated texts that explore the relationship of language to politics, gender, and being.

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      • Aug 2011 Some Were Awake (Plumberries Press, 2011, Out-of-print)

        Out-of-print. A short chapbook containing a single poem, broken into discrete parts, revolving around themes of sleep, dreaming, wakefulness, experience, and the thin, cracking borderlines between them.

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 2010
    • Book publication
      • Oct 2010 An Early Scratch (Erbacce Press, 2010)

        A debut collection of poems which won the Erbacce Press Prize (UK) in 2010.

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Courses

      • ENGL 2329-015 American Literature

        If America is currently in crisis mode, it is largely a crisis of relationships. Whether it is race, class, gender, sexuality, national origin, species, or something simply personal and intimate, American culture, it is increasingly apparent, is full of barriers and boundaries. And yet, ironically, these barriers and boundaries are porous, full of holes and cracks. It is in these holes that both conflict and (non)resolution occur, because it is in these cracks and barriers that people and the world come into contact. One of these cracks is literature. Literature, particularly American literature, explores and sometimes shrinks the boundaries between people and places. I want us to examine through literary texts how multiple forms of identity clash and coalesce, form and reform, forcing us to reexamine the relationships we have with each other, our environment, and ourselves. Throughout the semester we will be exploring literature that spans the early twentieth century to today. By doing so, we can think through questions of how it is that humans relate to each other, perhaps leading to some ideas of how we can do so better in this time of crisis.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-004 AMERICAN LITERATURE

        Concentration on works of American literature with focus on how cultural, geographic, and political issues shape and reflect literature in a particular culture.  Examines at least three genres and six authors. Emphasis on critical thinking, reading, and writing. This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirements in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. The required objectives of these core courses are the development of students’ critical thinking, communication skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-010 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-001 Reading, Writing, and Critical Thinking II

        A course that builds on the skills learned in English 1301 by providing a more extensive introduction to rhetorical and argument theories. Students learn to identify a controversial issue independently, research that issue by navigating library databases, compile a bibliography of relevant sources, map the conversation surrounding the issue, and advocate their own position by developing claims supported by good reasons and evidence.  Students continue to practice recursive reading and writing processes and develop a more sophisticated awareness of context and audience.

      • ENGL 1302-019 Rhetoric and Composition II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-026 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-005 Rhetoric and Composition II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-008 Rhetoric and Composition II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-005 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-006 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours