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Biography

Dr. Cristina Salinas is an assistant professor of Mexican American history and a core faculty member of the Center for Mexican American Studies. She received her Bachelor's, Master's, and PhD in history from the University of Texas at Austin.

Her research interests include Mexican American history, border studies, immigration history, agricultural history, labor history, and Texas history.

Professional Preparation

    • 2011 PhD in History (Doctoral Portfolio in Mexican American Studies; Dissertation: "Contesting Mobility: Growers, Farm Workers, and U.S.-Mexico Border Enforcement During the Twentieth Century."),  University of Texas at Austin
    • 2008 Comprehensive Exams, passed with distiction. in Examiners: James Sidbury, Laurie Green, and Emilio ZamoraUniversity of Texas at Austin
    • 2005 Master's Degree in HistoryUniversity of Texas at Austin
    • 1997 Bachelor of Arts in History (High Honors),  University of Texas at Austin

Appointments

    • 2012 to Present Assitant Professor, Department of History
      University of Texas at Arlingtn
    • 2012 to 2012 Lecturer, Department of History
      University of Texas at Austin
    • 2006 to 2008 Assistant Instructor
      UT Austin Center for Mexican American Studies

Memberships

  • Member
    • 2016 to Present Labor and Working-Class History Association
    • Past to Present Organization of American Historians
  • Member,
    • Past to Present American Historical Association

Awards and Honors

    • Dec  2010 Center for Mexican American Studies Dissertation Fellowship sponsored by University of Texas at Austin
    • Dec  2009 Burleson Texas History Prize, Honorable Mention sponsored by Burleson Texas
      Description:

      Cash Prize

    • Dec  2009 Eugene and Dora Bonham Memorial Fund sponsored by University of Texas at Austin
    • Dec  2008 Clara Driscoll Fellowship sponsored by University of Texas at Austin
    • Dec  2008 Texas State Summer Predoctoral Fellowship sponsored by Texas State
    • Dec  2006 Labor and Working Class History Travel Grant sponsored by Labor and Working-Class History Association
    • Dec  2006 Outstanding Masters Report, Graduate School sponsored by University of Texas at Austin
    • Dec  2006 Jan Carleton Perry Prize for Best Masters Report, Department of History sponsored by University of Texas at Austin

Research and Expertise

  • U.S. History, Mexican-American History and Cultural Studies, Labor History, Border History and Theory, Immigration History, and History of the State

    Laguages: Spanish, reading, writing, and speaking; Italian, reading

Publications

      Journal Article Forthcoming
      • Article; "Selling the 'Magic Valley': Desire and Deception in Early Twentieth Century South Texas," submitted to Westren Historical Quarterly, in development.

        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      Forthcoming
      • "Communist Anxieties and the U.S.-Mexico Border: International Labor Politics During the Cold War," in progress.

        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Forthcoming
      • Book Project: Managed Migration: Growers, Farm Workers, and U.S.-Mexico Border Enforcement, 1917-1955." Currently under Review with UT Press

        {Book} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      Forthcoming
      • Book Project: Las Politiqueras: Gender and Political Organizing in South Texas, in early development.

        {Book} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2015
      • Miriam Pawel, The Crusades of Cesar Chavez: A Biography in Agricultural History.

        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2010
      • Michelle Hall Kells, Hector P. Garcia: Everday Rhetoric and Mexican American Civil Rights in Joural of American Ethnic History.

        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2002
      •  Richard Flores, Remembering the Alamo: Memory, Modernity, and the Master Symbol in E3W Review of Books.

        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Presentations

    • March  2016
      "Agricultural Labor Politics in Bracer-Era South Texas"

      Labor Relations

    • October  2015
      "What Was the Price? Mexican American Civil Rights, Organized Labor, and Immigration Politics in the 1950s"

      Confluence of politics affecting migrant workers.

    • February  2015
      "Political Progressives and Immigration in the 1950s"

      Paper Presented

    • April  2014
      "The High Cost of Immigration Politics: 1950s Mexican American Civil Rights Activism, Organized Labor, and their Tortured Stance on Immigration"

      Paper Presentation

    • February  2014
      "The Social Space of Agriculture"

      Book Chapter

    • February  2013
      "Selling the Magic Valley"

      Prsentation of Article/Faculty Writing Workshop

    • May  2011
      "Border Cadences: Race, Power, and Labor Mobility at the U.S.-Mexico Border during the mid-Twentieth Century"

      Doctoral Portfolio Presentation

    • April  2011
      "'The Swarming of the Wetbacks' and other Tales: Growers' Writings about Mexican Agricultural Workers in South Texas"

      Anaysis of writings by growers regarding migrant workers.

    • March  2011
      "Race and State Formation at the U.S.-Mexico Border: Considering Labor During the Mid-Twentieth Century"

      Paper Presentation

    • June  2010
      "El Paso/The Passage: The El Paso Incident and the Politics of Mobility at the U.S.-Mexico Border, 1948"

      Paper Presentation

    • March  2008
      "Community-Based History Projects: A Look from the Field"

      Panel Organizer and Chair

    • February  2008
      "Gender in the Archives: An Interdisciplinary Discussion of Primary Source Research"

      Gender Symposium

    • March  2007
      "A Border in the Making: the INS and Agricultural Relations in South Texas During the Mid-Twentieth Century"

      Paper Presentation

    • May  2006
      "A Border in the Making: the INS and Agricultural Relations in South Texas"

      The ebb and flow of border restriction.

    • March  2004
      "The Making of the Magic Valley: Race, Labor, and Citizenship in South Texas, 1944-1951"

      New residents from the Midwest try to alter political system.

    • February  2004
      "The Masking of the Magic Valley: Race, Labor, and Citizenship in South Texas, 1944-1951"

      Redefing Borderland Cultures

    • February  2003
      "Education Beyond the Classroom Walls: A Case Study of the Llano Grande Center for Research Development"

      Panel Presentation

  • Past
    •  
      "Selling the Magic Valley"

      Presentation of article.

Courses

      • HIST 1312-002 The United States, 1865-Present

        This course offers an introduction to the history of the United States from 1865 to the present day. Never fixed categories, ideas about nation and belonging have always been contested and defined (and re-defined), through wrenching struggle and moments of affirmation. We will examine the growth of the state in American society as well as the ways in which people themselves helped define a nation. While this course is focused on the events and broad currents that fashioned daily life in the United States, we will also consider American history from an international perspective, exploring the ways in which the United States both shaped, and was shaped by, global flows of migration, ideas, and capital. The power to shape society, while unequal, has always been multidirectional and multidimensional.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5340-001 Issues and Interpretations in U.S. History

        This course introduces graduate students to key themes and chronological eras in U.S. history, exploring how historians have approached the study of the past and how debates about historical questions have been shaped and changed over the years. This course will consist of recent research and more established books paired with essays considering the state of selected fields in U.S. history. Though not an exhaustive study of all eras of U.S. history, several methodological approaches to U.S. history will be considered (social, economic, political, cultural) as well as modes of analysis (gender, race, class, state formation).

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3368-001 MEXICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

        This course will provide an introduction to the history of ethnic Mexicans in the United States, beginning with the Spanish Conquest of the Americas in the 16th century, until the present. Through this course of study, we will explore important currents that have shaped the experiences of the Mexican community in the U.S., including ideas of race and class, processes of cultural adaptation, community formation, and migration, just to name a few. In addition, we will consider how the writing of history has always been a political process, how the production of stories of the past have served the political aims of the present.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAS 3368-001 MEXICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

        This course will provide an introduction to the history of ethnic Mexicans in the United States, beginning with the Spanish Conquest of the Americas in the 16th century, until the present. Through this course of study, we will explore important currents that have shaped the experiences of the Mexican community in the U.S., including ideas of race and class, processes of cultural adaptation, community formation, and migration, just to name a few. In addition, we will consider how the writing of history has always been a political process, how the production of stories of the past have served the political aims of the present.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-005 HIST 1312, The United States, 1865-Present

        This course offers an introduction to the history of the United States from 1865 to the present day. Never fixed categories, ideas about nation and belonging have always been contested and defined (and re-defined), through wrenching struggle and moments of affirmation. We will examine the growth of the state in American society as well as the ways in which people themselves helped define a nation. While this course is focused on the events and broad currents that fashioned daily life in the United States, we will also consider American history from an international perspective, exploring the ways in which the United States both shaped, and was shaped by, global flows of migration, ideas, and capital. The power to shape society, while unequal, has always been multidirectional and multidimensional.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5340-001 Issues and Interpretations in U.S. History

        Thiis course introduces graduate students to key themes and chronological eras in U.S. history, exploring how historians have approached the study of the past and how debates about historical questions have been shaped and changed over the years. This course will consist of recent research and more established books paired with essays considering the state of selected fields in U.S. history. Though not an exhaustive study of all eras of U.S. history, several methodological approaches to U.S. history will be considered (social, economic, political, cultural) as well as modes of analysis (gender, race, class, state formation). 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-003 HIST 1312, The United States, 1865-Present

        This course offers an introduction to the history of the United States from 1865 to the present day. Never fixed categories, ideas about nation and belonging have always been contested and defined (and re-defined), through wrenching struggle and moments of affirmation. We will examine the growth of the state in American society as well as the ways in which people themselves helped define a nation. While this course is focused on the events and broad currents that fashioned daily life in the United States, we will also consider American history from an international perspective, exploring the ways in which the United States both shaped, and was shaped by, global flows of migration, ideas, and capital. The power to shape society, while unequal, has always been multidirectional and multidimensional.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-005 HIST 1312, The United States, 1865-Present

        This course offers an introduction to the history of the United States from 1865 to the present day. Never fixed categories, ideas about nation and belonging have always been contested and defined (and re-defined), through wrenching struggle and moments of affirmation. We will examine the growth of the state in American society as well as the ways in which people themselves helped define a nation. While this course is focused on the events and broad currents that fashioned daily life in the United States, we will also consider American history from an international perspective, exploring the ways in which the United States both shaped, and was shaped by, global flows of migration, ideas, and capital. The power to shape society, while unequal, has always been multidirectional and multidimensional.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAS 2300-002 INTRODUCTION TO MEXICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

        This course will provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Mexican American Studies. This course is organized chronologically and thematically, blending the study of history with the study of music, art, and poetry. In addition to exploring various types of cultural expression and historical analysis, this course will also cover key concepts in Mexican American Studies, such as identity formation, race, cultural change, resistance, and politics. By the end of the course, students will gain an understanding of important moments in Mexican American history, key concepts in Mexican American cultural studies, and the issues confronting Latino/as in the present day.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 4388-002 SELECTED TOPICS IN HISTORY

        After decades of struggle for inclusion, recognition, dignity, and equality for marginalized and excluded populations in the United States, what forces came together in the mid-twentieth century to support dynamic and sustained movements for civil rights? How did the civil rights struggles of one group overlap with and influence the momentum of another? This course will examine the diverse origins of civil rights struggles for various populations within the United States, recognizing that many groups had been organizing and struggling against inequality for many years. However, this class will focus on the Civil Rights Movement era, spanning between the 1940s and 1970s, in which various struggles—African American civil rights, the Chicano Movement, the American Indian Movement, the disability rights movement, the women’s liberation movement, and the gay rights movement—gained visibility and occupied center stage in U.S. social and cultural politics.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • HIST 1312-007 HIST 1312, The United States, 1865-Present

        This course offers an introduction to the history of the United States from 1865 to the present day. Never fixed categories, ideas about nation and belonging have always been contested and defined (and re-defined), through wrenching struggle and moments of affirmation. We will examine the growth of the state in American society as well as the ways in which people themselves helped define a nation. While this course is focused on the events and broad currents that fashioned daily life in the United States, we will also consider American history from an international perspective, exploring the ways in which the United States both shaped, and was shaped by, global flows of migration, ideas, and capital. The power to shape society, while unequal, has always been multidirectional and multidimensional.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • HIST 3368-001 Mexican American History

        This course will provide an introduction to the history of ethnic Mexicans in the United States, beginning with Spanish colonization, until the present. Through this course of study, we will explore important currents that have shaped the experiences of the Mexican community in the U.S., including ideas of race and class, processes of cultural adaptation, community formation, and migration, just to name a few. In addition to exploring the experiences of Mexican-origin people in the United States, we will also consider how the close, often-antagonistic relationship between the countries of the U.S. and Mexico has shaped the formation of both nations.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5302-001 Reading Colloquium in 20th Century U.S. History- History of the U.S.-Mexico Border

        To invoke one of the greatest clichés about the study of the U.S.-Mexico border, the border is far more than a political line between two nations. That declarative statement is a given. For one who is from the area, or travels to the region of the border, it is palpably true. However, if the border is more than just a political boundary, what is it? The border is simultaneously a place, a space, a process, and an idea. This reading seminar will consider how the border has transformed over time, but also how it has imprinted itself on Mexican and American identities. Focusing on the border and its relation to U.S. history, this course will explore the border as a local place, as well as space of nation-state formation. In this course we will read monographs about the border, discuss the historiography of the U.S.-Mexico border, and consider the centrality of the peripheral space of the border to U.S. history.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAS 2300-001 Mexican American Studies
        This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Mexican American Studies. Some of the approaches we will use include history, anthropology, literary analysis, and sociology to explore important current that have shaped the Mexican American experience. Course concepts are presented through lectures, films, readings, and class discussions.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus

Other Teaching Activities

  • 2014
    • HIST 4388
      • Aug 2014 Comparative U.S. Civil Rights History

        After decades of struggle for inclusion, recognition, dignity, and equality for marginalized and excluded populations in the United States, what forces came together in the mid-twentieth century to support dynamic and sustained movements for civil rights? How did the civil rights struggles of one group overlap with and influence the momentum of another? This course will examine the diverse origins of civil rights struggles for various populations within the United States, recognizing that many groups had been organizing and struggling against inequality for many years. However, this class will focus on the Civil Rights Movement era, spanning between the 1940s and 1970s, in which various struggles—African American civil rights, the Chicano Movement, the disability rights movement, and the women’s liberation movement—gained visibility and occupied center stage in U.S. social and cultural politics.

Service to the Community

  • Volunteered
    • June 2014 to  June 2014 History Day Judge

      Adjudicate history projects presented in different media.

  • Elected
    • Jan 2011 to  Jan 2012 Llano Grande Center

      Board of Directors for Llano Grande Cenetr for Research and Development; Co-Chair of the Board

Service to the University

  • Volunteered
    • Feb 2012 to  Present Unit Effectiveness Process Committee

      Departmental Service

    • Jan 2015 to  Present Scheduling Committee

      Departmental Service

    • Jan 2014 to  Dec 2014 Newsletter Committee

      Departmental Service

  • Elected
    • Feb 2013 to  Present Scholarships and Awards Committee

      Departmental Service

    • Feb 2013 to  Present Curriculum Committee

      Center for Mexican American Studies

    • Feb 2013 to  Present Strategic Planning Committee

      Center for Mexican American Studies

    • Feb 2013 to  Present Scholarship Committee

      Ceneter for Mexican American Studies

    • Jan 2013 to  Dec 2013 HSI Task Force

      UTA

  • Appointed
    • Feb 2012 to  Feb 2013 Latin American History Search Committee Member

      Departmental Service

    • Feb 2012 to  Present Core Faculty

      Center for Mexican American Studies