Skip to content. Skip to main navigation.

avatar

David M Arditi

Name

[Arditi, David M]
  • Assistant Professor, Sociology & Anthropology

Professional Preparation

    • 2012 PhD in Cultural StudiesGeorge Mason University
    • 2007 MA in Political Science (Alliance for Social, Political, Ethical and Cultural Thought),  Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University
    • 2005 BA in Political Science (Sociology),  Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University

Appointments

    • May 2016 to Present Director of the Center for Theory
      University of Texas-Arlington
    • Nov 2015 to Present Assistant Professor of Sociology
      University of Texas-Arlington
    • Aug 2012 to Nov 2015 Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies
      Univerity of Texas Arlington   University of Texas at Arlington   University of Texas-Arlington
    • Jan 2009 to July 2012 Graduate Lecturer
      George Mason University   Global Affairs   Cultural Studies

Awards and Honors

    • Aug  2013 Dissertation Completion Fellowship 2012 sponsored by College of Humanities and Social SciencesGeorge Mason University
    • Aug  2013 Dean's Challenge Scholarship 2011 sponsored by College of Humanities and Social SciencesGeorge Mason University
    • Aug  2013 Student Leadership Award, 2009-2010 sponsored by George Mason University
    • Aug  2013 Graduate Congressional Fellowship, 2006 sponsored by Virginia Tech University

News Articles

Research and Expertise

  • Area of Expertise

    Cultural Studies, Cultural Sociology, Music Industry, Critical Theory, Popular Music Studies, Political Theory, Internet Studies, New Media, Digital Music, Political Economy of the Media, Media Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies, Cultural Theory

Publications

      Journal Article 2017
      • Arditi, David. “Digital Subscriptions: The Unending Consumption of Music in the Digital Era.” Popular Music and Society ahead of print (January 18, 2017): 1–17. doi:10.1080/03007766.2016.1264101.

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]
      2017

      Book Review 2017
      • Arditi, David. “Review of Understanding Copyright: Intellectual Property in the Digital Age,” by Bethany Klein, Giles Moss, and Lee Edwards. New Media & Society 19.7 (2017): 1148–1150. SAGE Journals. Web.

        {Review essay} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2016
      • Arditi, David. 2016. “Disturbing Production: The Effects of Digital Music Production on Music Studios.” Pp. 25–40 in The Production and Consumption of Music in the Digital Age, edited by B. J. Hracs, M. Seman, and T. E. Virani. New York, NY: Routledge.

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]
      2016
      • Arditi, David. 2016. “Virtual Jam: A Critical Analysis of Virtual Music Game Environments.” Pp. 177–94 in Music Video Games: Performance, Politics, and Play, edited by M. Austin. New York: Bloomsbury Academic.

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2016
      Journal Article 2015
      • Arditi, David. “The New Distribution Oligopoly.” Media Fields Journal, no. 10 (November 14, 2015). http://mediafieldsjournal.squarespace.com/the-new-distribution-oligopoly/.

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2013
      • Arditi, David. 2014. “iTunes: Breaking Barriers and Building Walls.” Popular Music and Society 37 (4): 408–24.

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2011
      • Arditi, David. “Disciplining the Consumer: File-Sharers Under the Watchful Eye of the Music Industry.” Internet and Surveillance: The Challenges of Web 2.0 and Social Media. 1st ed. Ed. Christian Fuchs et al. Routledge, 2011. p.170-186. Print.

        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book 2007
      • Arditi, David. Criminalizing Independent Music: The Recording Industry Association of America’s Advancement of Dominant Ideology. VDM Verlag, 2007. Print.
        {Book} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Presentations

    • August  2017
      Music Everywhere: Setting a Digital Music Trap
      Paper presentation at the American Sociological Association conference
    • April  2017
      We’re Getting the Band Back Together: Social Cohesion and Solidarity in Bands
      Presentation at the Annual SSSA
    • August  2016
      Digital Subscriptions: The Unending Consumption of Music in the Digital Era

      Paper presentation

    • June  2016
      Policing Piracy: The Piracy Panic Narrative from Napster to Spotify
      Paper presentation at the Cultural Studies Association conference
    • August  2015
      "Interdisciplinary Research"

      “Interdisciplinarity In and Out of the Classroom” – Panel for All Faculty Orientation at University of Texas at Arlington

    • February  2015
      From Napster to Beats Music: The Appropriation of Oppositional Distribution Networks
      Paper presentation at the International Association for the Study of Popular Music conference
    • January  2015
      Video Games in the Digital Music Trap

      Conference presentation

    • October  2014
      What is Social Justice?

      Unbuntu Student Conference on Social Justice – University of Texas at Arlington

    • February  2014

      Digital Gatekeepers

    • May  2013
      'They Call it Downloading, I call it Downsizing': The Impact of Digitization on Labor in the Recording Process

      Cultural Studies Association Annual Conference

    • March  2013
      “Would Adorno Download Music? Piracy, the Recording Industry and Reproduction Reconsidered.”
      Center for Theory Presentation
    • April  2011
      Internet Media Policy and Hegemony
    • April  2010
      Disciplining the Consumer: File-Sharers Under the Watchful Eye of the Music Industry
    • April  2009

      Bush"s FCC: Favoring the Recording Industry over Musicians

  • Past
    •  
      Music Everywhere: Setting a Digital Music Trap
      Paper presentation at American Sociological Association

Projects

  • 2015
    • Dec 2015 to Present MusicDetour: The DFW Local Music Archive

      MusicDetour: DFW Music Archive will be a digital depository for music created and performed in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex. It will preserve all genres performed in the Metroplex and serve as a free public resource. Local musicians create music that often is not recorded or the recordings are not stored. This is a wealth of cultural creation that is never archived. By archiving this music, MusicDetour will serve as a permanent record of local music upon which new culture can be produced.

      Role: Principal Investigator PI: David Arditi

Courses

      • SOCI 3372-001 Sociological Theory

        The nature and function of sociological theory and the systematic organization of concepts and principles for the explanation of social phenomena as a guide for social research.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 3320-001 Sociological Theory

        The nature and function of sociological theory and the systematic organization of concepts and principles for the explanation of social phenomena as a guide for social research.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 5301-001 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY

        A comprehensive review, analysis, and evaluation of the dominant conceptual perspectives, and their proponents, in sociological theory.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 5341-002 Cultural Sociology

        Culture is the process through which people construct symbolic meaning out of everyday objects. The emphasis here is on process; it is not static; it is always changing. We do not place culture on a pedestal to be examined and revered. We create culture, and are deeply embedded in it. Part of being social (i.e. interacting with other people) involves using language, signs, symbols, art, etc. to be able to communicate with one another. Conflict arises when people misinterpret symbolic meaning; but it also occurs around the usage of signs that denigrate others. We form bonds around culture. We create culture together.

        We will discuss different bodies of theory around culture. Some of these areas agree, while others disagree. Most of what we will read and discuss will be oriented to theory, but we will also explore a variety of empirical approaches. The course will pay special attention to case studies about music.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 1310-001 Introduction to Popular Culture

        Culture is the process through which people make symbolic meaning out of the world. Popular culture is mass produced culture that everyone has access to. Whether it is the latest hit song that you hear everywhere from the grocery store to Pandora.com or it is a new video game that you and your friends are obsessed with (the popular song may even be in the video game that is based on a movie), popular culture pervades our everyday lives. Therefore, it is critically important to study popular culture in order to assess its social, political, cultural and economic impact on American society.

        This course will demonstrate to students the overall importance of popular culture in their lives. We will explore the ways that language is used (and the way that we use language) to construct the world around us through popular culture. It is important to remember that this is a scholarly approach to popular culture that will use a critical approach to understanding the uses and abuses of popular culture. The class will examine how ideas, values, and beliefs, are constructed through and are reflected by popular culture. Throughout the semester we will explore theoretical frames from cultural studies, semiotics, gender studies, race/ethnic studies and political economy.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 1301-001 Introduction to Popular Culture

        Culture is the process through which people make symbolic meaning out of the world. Popular culture is mass produced culture that everyone has access to. Whether it is the latest hit song that you hear everywhere from the grocery store to Pandora.com or it is a new video game that you and your friends are obsessed with (the popular song may even be in the video game that is based on a movie), popular culture pervades our everyday lives. Therefore, it is critically important to study popular culture in order to assess its social, political, cultural and economic impact on American society.

        This course will demonstrate to students the overall importance of popular culture in their lives. We will explore the ways that language is used (and the way that we use language) to construct the world around us through popular culture. It is important to remember that this is a scholarly approach to popular culture that will use a critical approach to understanding the uses and abuses of popular culture. The class will examine how ideas, values, and beliefs, are constructed through and are reflected by popular culture. Throughout the semester we will explore theoretical frames from cultural studies, semiotics, gender studies, race/ethnic studies and political economy.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 3360-003 Big Data & Social Media in Society

        This course will look at the hype versus the reality of social media and big data. Students will critically examine the rhetoric surrounding the so-called social media revolution occurring around the world. The course will explore historical moments of media revolution in terms of the material effects on society. Finally, students will analyze the relationship between big data and democracy.

        Winter - Intersession - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 3372-001 Sociological Theory

        The nature and function of sociological theory and the systematic organization of concepts and principles for the explanation of social phenomena as a guide for social research.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 3320-001 Sociological Theory

        The nature and function of sociological theory and the systematic organization of concepts and principles for the explanation of social phenomena as a guide for social research.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 5301-001 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY

        A comprehensive review, analysis, and evaluation of the dominant conceptual perspectives, and their proponents, in sociological theory.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 1310 INTRODUCTION TO POPULAR CULTURE

        This course will introduce students to the role of popular culture in American society. It examines culture as a process through which people make symbolic meaning out of the world. Since everyone has access to popular culture, it constructs the way that people think about the world around them. The course will explore the creation, production, dissemination, reception and consumption of popular culture.

      • INTS 1310-001 INTRODUCTION TO POPULAR CULTURE

        This course will introduce students to the role of popular culture in American society. It examines culture as a process through which people make symbolic meaning out of the world. Since everyone has access to popular culture, it constructs the way that people think about the world around them. The course will explore the creation, production, dissemination, reception and consumption of popular culture.

      • INTS 1310-001 INTRODUCTION TO POPULAR CULTURE

        This course will demonstrate to students the overall importance of popular culture in their lives. We will explore the ways that language is used (and the way that we use language) to construct the world around us through popular culture. It is important to remember that this is a scholarly approach to popular culture that will use a critical approach to understanding the uses and abuses of popular culture. The class will examine how ideas, values, and beliefs, are constructed through and are reflected by popular culture. Throughout the semester we will explore theoretical frames from cultural studies, semiotics, gender studies, race/ethnic studies and political economy.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 4365-003 SAcience & Technology in Society

        This course introduces students to the complex relationship between society, and science and technology. Students will learn historical perspectives on the production and deployment of scientific knowledge. The course will use a critical approach to examine the social, cultural, and ethical impact of scientific and technological developments. It will also discuss the role of democracy in the advancement of science and technology.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 4388-001 Social Media Revolution

        This course will look at the hype versus the reality of social media. Students will critically examine the rhetoric surrounding the so-called social media revolution occurring around the world. The course will explore historical moments of media revolution in terms of the material effects on society.

        Winter - Intersession - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 4388-001 Science and Technology in Society

        While we often discuss what technology and science do for people, we often forget to talk about the social relations that produce science and technology. Furthermore, we spend more time making scientific fact controversial than we spend discussing what seems to be the uncontroversial application of science and technology in everyday life. This course will explore the social relations that underpin the creation and deployment of science and technology. The construction of scientific knowledge can be analyzed as a social process and the products themselves as social entities.

        This course introduces students to the complex relationship between society, and science and technology. Students will learn historical perspectives on the production and deployment of scientific knowledge. The course will use a critical approach to examine the social, cultural, and ethical impact of scientific and technological developments. It will also discuss the role of democracy in the advancement of science and technology.

      • INTS 4301-001 Science and Technology in Society

        While we often discuss what technology and science do for people, we often forget to talk about the social relations that produce science and technology. Furthermore, we spend more time making scientific fact controversial than we spend discussing what seems to be the uncontroversial application of science and technology in everyday life. This course will explore the social relations that underpin the creation and deployment of science and technology. The construction of scientific knowledge can be analyzed as a social process and the products themselves as social entities.

        This course introduces students to the complex relationship between society, and science and technology. Students will learn historical perspectives on the production and deployment of scientific knowledge. The course will use a critical approach to examine the social, cultural, and ethical impact of scientific and technological developments. It will also discuss the role of democracy in the advancement of science and technology.

      • SOCI 4365-001 Science and Technology in Society

        While we often discuss what technology and science do for people, we often forget to talk about the social relations that produce science and technology. Furthermore, we spend more time making scientific fact controversial than we spend discussing what seems to be the uncontroversial application of science and technology in everyday life. This course will explore the social relations that underpin the creation and deployment of science and technology. The construction of scientific knowledge can be analyzed as a social process and the products themselves as social entities.

        This course introduces students to the complex relationship between society, and science and technology. Students will learn historical perspectives on the production and deployment of scientific knowledge. The course will use a critical approach to examine the social, cultural, and ethical impact of scientific and technological developments. It will also discuss the role of democracy in the advancement of science and technology.

      • SOCI 4365-001 Science and Technology in Society

        While we often discuss what technology and science do for people, we often forget to talk about the social relations that produce science and technology. Furthermore, we spend more time making scientific fact controversial than we spend discussing what seems to be the uncontroversial application of science and technology in everyday life. This course will explore the social relations that underpin the creation and deployment of science and technology. The construction of scientific knowledge can be analyzed as a social process and the products themselves as social entities.

        This course introduces students to the complex relationship between society, and science and technology. Students will learn historical perspectives on the production and deployment of scientific knowledge. The course will use a critical approach to examine the social, cultural, and ethical impact of scientific and technological developments. It will also discuss the role of democracy in the advancement of science and technology.

      • INTS 3320-002 Social Justice Theory

        You study social theory everyday as a member of society. You may not realize it, but every time you think about why people act a certain way or what the underlying cause of some social phenomenon is, you are theorizing. Furthermore, academic texts that you read for your classes are informed by the author’s theoretical foundation. By taking this class, you will begin to harness your capacity to theorize about the world around you.

        This course will explore an idea of social justice that views all research and learning as happening within a context of social relations. The ideas that surround us were constructed at a certain time under particular social relations and we will explore how the residue of previous ideas permeate the way we understand the world. As a result, power and privilege play an important part in the way that people construct the world. Important themes from this course will include power, class, capital, race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, nationality, and religion. We will think about the ways that these themes perpetuate inequality and theorize about ways to overcome them.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 3320-003 Social Justice Theory

        You study social theory everyday as a member of society. You may not realize it, but every time you think about why people act a certain way or what the underlying cause of some social phenomenon is, you are theorizing. Furthermore, academic texts that you read for your classes are informed by the author’s theoretical foundation. By taking this class, you will begin to harness your capacity to theorize about the world around you.

        This course will explore an idea of social justice that views all research and learning as happening within a context of social relations. The ideas that surround us were constructed at a certain time under particular social relations and we will explore how the residue of previous ideas permeate the way we understand the world. As a result, power and privilege play an important part in the way that people construct the world. Important themes from this course will include power, class, capital, race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, nationality, and religion. We will think about the ways that these themes perpetuate inequality and theorize about ways to overcome them.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 1310-001 INTRODUCTION TO POPULAR CULTURE

        Culture is the process through which people make symbolic meaning out of the world. Popular culture is mass produced culture that everyone has access to. Whether it is the latest hit song that you hear everywhere from the grocery store to Pandora.com or it is a new video game that you and your friends are obsessed with (the popular song may even be in the video game that is based on a movie), popular culture pervades our everyday lives. Therefore, it is critically important to study popular culture in order to assess its social, political, cultural and economic impact on American society.

        This course will demonstrate to students the overall importance of popular culture in their lives. We will explore the ways that language is used (and the way that we use language) to construct the world around us through popular culture. It is important to remember that this is a scholarly approach to popular culture that will use a critical approach to understanding the uses and abuses of popular culture. The class will examine how ideas, values, and beliefs, are constructed through and are reflected by popular culture. Throughout the semester we will explore theoretical frames from cultural studies, semiotics, gender studies, race/ethnic studies and political economy.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 4388-001 Social Media Revolution

        Google is omnipresent. Facebook connects friends. Twitter creates instant journalism. But how have social relations changed? Frequently, the new represents “the good,” progress and revolution, but in hindsight new media often do not change much, if anything, at all for the lives of most people. Worse yet, new media often become the tools of power.

        This course will look at the hype versus the reality of social media. Students will critically examine the rhetoric surrounding the so-called social media revolution occurring around the world. The course will explore historical moments of media revolution in terms of the material effects on society.

      • INTS 1310-001 Introduction to Popular Culture

        Culture is the process through which people make symbolic meaning out of the world. Popular culture is mass produced culture that everyone has access to. Whether it is the latest hit song that you hear everywhere from the grocery store to Pandora.com or it is a new video game that you and your friends are obsessed with (the popular song may even be in the video game that is based on a movie), popular culture pervades our everyday lives. Therefore, it is critically important to study popular culture in order to assess its social, political, cultural and economic impact on American society.

        This course will demonstrate to students the overall importance of popular culture in their lives. We will explore the ways that language is used (and the way that we use language) to construct the world around us through popular culture. It is important to remember that this is a scholarly approach to popular culture that will use a critical approach to understanding the uses and abuses of popular culture. The class will examine how ideas, values, and beliefs, are constructed through and are reflected by popular culture. Throughout the semester we will explore theoretical frames from cultural studies, semiotics, gender studies, race/ethnic studies and political economy.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 3320-001 Social Justice Theory

        You study social theory everyday as a member of society. You may not realize it, but every time you think about why people act a certain way or what the underlying cause of some social phenomenon is, you are theorizing. Furthermore, academic texts that you read for your classes are informed by the author’s theoretical foundation. By taking this class, you will begin to harness your capacity to theorize about the world around you.

        This course will explore an idea of social justice that views all research and learning as happening within a context of social relations. The ideas that surround us were constructed at a certain time under particular social relations and we will explore how the residue of previous ideas permeate the way we understand the world. As a result, power and privilege play an important part in the way that people construct the world. Important themes from this course will include power, class, capital, race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, nationality, and religion. We will think about the ways that these themes perpetuate inequality and theorize about ways to overcome them.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 4388-002 Introduction to Popular Culture

        Culture is the process through which people make symbolic meaning out of the world. Popular culture is mass produced culture that everyone has access to. Whether it is the latest hit song that you hear everywhere from the grocery store to Pandora.com or it is a new video game that you and your friends are obsessed with (the popular song may even be in the video game that is based on a movie), popular culture pervades our everyday lives. Therefore, it is critically important to study popular culture in order to assess its social, political, cultural and economic impact on American society.

        This course will demonstrate to students the overall importance of popular culture in their lives. We will explore the ways that language is used (and the way that we use language) to construct the world around us through popular culture. It is important to remember that this is a scholarly approach to popular culture that will use a critical approach to understanding the uses and abuses of popular culture. The class will examine how ideas, values, and beliefs, are constructed through and are reflected by popular culture. Throughout the semester we will explore theoretical frames from cultural studies, semiotics, gender studies, race/ethnic studies and political economy.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 3320-002 History of Interdisciplinary Ideas

        While the concept of “interdisciplinary” research is a mid-Twentieth century phenomenon, interdisciplinary thinking has a much longer theoretical grounding. From the Ancient Greeks through the Enlightenment, thought was not compartmentalized into disciplines. In fact, contemporary disciplines are the result of a process that did not begin until the late nineteenth century. This course will explore how knowledge production went from a holistic process to a bureaucratic factory model and back to a more holistic model. Along the way, students will be exposed to significant thinkers from different time periods.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 4388-001 Social Media Revolution

        This course will look at the hype versus the reality of social media. Students will critically examine the rhetoric surrounding the so-called social media revolution occurring around the world. The course will explore historical moments of media revolution in terms of the material effects on society.

        Winter - Intersession - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 4301-002 Ints 4301-002

        INTS 4301 INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH PROCESS (3-0) This intermediate course examines the theory of interdisciplinarity with special emphasis on the interdisciplinary research process. At the end of the course students will develop a formal research proposal for their senior capstone integrative essay. Prerequisite: INTS 2301 with a grade of C or better.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 3320-001 Ints 3320-001

        INTS 3320 History of Interdisciplinary Ideas (3-0) This course introduces students to the important ideas that form the foundation for interdisciplinary studies. These ideas are put into a historical context that not only covers the origins of the disciplines, but the ideas that have come to dominate the 21st century outlook on knowledge and the world. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of the instructor. For INTS majors, completion of INTS 2301 is strongly recommended.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 4388-001 Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Popular Music Studies

        No Description Provided.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INTS 4301-003 INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH PROCESS
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • INTS 4301-001 Interdisciplinary Research
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • INTS 4301-003 INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH PROCESS
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • INTS 4301-003 INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH PROCESS
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus

Service to the Profession

  • Volunteered
    • July 2013 to  Present Punctum Records Advisory Board

      From Punctum Records' about page: Punctum Records is an experiment in bringing together cultural theorists, musciologists, sound artists, and musicians as lovers and fighters in the ruins of the arts and humanities at a moment when information-noise overload meets a flattening out of channels and platforms for the sustainable dissemination of music, sonic art, and theory.

    • Nov 2015 to  Present Co-Editor - Fast Capitalism

      Co-Editor of online journal Fast Capitalism

Service to the University

  • Appointed
    • Sept 2012 to  Apr 2013 Search Committee for Interdisciplinary Studies Program Director, member

      School of Urban and Public Affairs, University of Texas at Arlington

    • July 2010 to  Aug 2011 Graduate Student Representative to the Board of Visitors at George Mason University

      In 2010, I was appointed to George Mason University's Board of Visitors (BOV) as the Graduate Student Representative. The BOV is GMU's governing board.

  • Volunteered
    • Aug 2012 to  July 2014 Committee on Undergraduate Curricula, Member

      University of Texas at Arlington

    • Sept 2012 to  Apr 2013 Faculty Annual Review Committee, Member

      School of Urband and Public Affairs, University of Texas at Arlington

    • Aug 2014 to  Present Undergraduate Assembly

      University of Texas at Arlington

Administrative Appointment

  • 2016
    • May 2016 to Present - Director of the Center for Theory, University of Texas at Arlington   Center for Theory