Skip to content. Skip to main navigation.

avatar

David Narrett

Name

[Narrett, David]
  • Professor, History
  • Professor of History

Biography

Dr. David Narrett is professor of history at the University of Texas at Arlington, where he has taught since 1984.  He received his B.A. at Columbia University in 1973—and his Ph.D. at Cornell in 1981.  Dr. Narrett is a specialist in the American colonial, revolutionary, and early national eras.  He has published on a wide variety of subjects, especially North American frontier history.  His articles have appeared in The William and Mary Quarterly, the Western Historical Quarterly, the Southwestern Historical Quarterly and Vermont History. [Dr. Narrett’s first book, Inheritance and Family Life in Colonial New York City was published by Cornell University Press in 1992.] David Narrett has most recently published Adventurism and Empire: The Struggle for Mastery in the Louisiana-Florida Borderlands, 1763-1803, which was published by the University of North Carolina Press in March 2015.  Adventurism and Empire examines imperial rivalries in the Gulf Coast-Mississippi Valley–and Florida regions from the close of the Seven Years War to the Louisiana Purchase.  The book offers a new perspective on how individual colonial adventurers and schemers shaped history through cross-border trade, settlement projects, and military incursions into Spanish and Indian territories. 

Professional Preparation

    • 1981 Ph.D. in HistoryCornell University
    • 1976 M.A. in HistoryCornell University
    • 1973 B.A. in HistoryColumbia University

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Aug 1995 to Present Texas State Historical Association
    • Aug 1995 to Present Society for the History of the Early American Republic
    • Aug 1990 to Present Organization of American History
    • Aug 1990 to Present Institute of Early American History and Culture
    • Aug 1990 to Present American Historical Association

Awards and Honors

    • Oct  2016 COLA (College of Liberal Arts) Dean's Award for Research Travel sponsored by College of Liberal ArtsMinor in Disability Studies
      Achievements:

      Award given in light of research accomplishments, especialy publication of book,

      Adevnturism and Empire: The Struggle for Mastery in the Louisiana-Florida Borderlands, 1762-1803."

      Published by University of North Carolina Press, 2015.

    • Jun  2014 Fellowship at the Filson Historical Society sponsored by Filson Historical Society, Louisville Kentucky
      Achievements:

      The Filson reseraahch fellowship is awarded to historians who have a significant purpose in utilizing the society's collections in Kentucky, Ohio Valley, and early American history.

    • Apr  2012 Historic Research Award, National Society, Daughters of Colonial Wars sponsored by National Society, Daughters of Colonial Wars
    • Apr  2008 Bill and Rita Clements Research Fellowship, Southern Methodist University sponsored by William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University
      Achievements:

      Award was received in 2008 for the entire 2008-09 academic year.

    • Mar  2003 Bolton-Kinnaird Prize of the Western History Association sponsored by Western History Association
    • Apr  1999 Ben Lane Award, Vermont Historical Society sponsored by Vermont Historical Society

News Articles

    • May 2016 THE VALUE OF HISTORICAL WHAT-IFS?

      The case of the British Floridas helps demonstrate the importance of historical contingencies in our understanding of the past—and the future.  BY DAVID NARRETT, PROFESSOR OF HISTORY

Research and Expertise

  • Teaching/Research Fields
    U.S. History:
    American Colonial and Revloutionary Eras
    Transatlantic History
    North American Borderlands and Frontiers

Publications

      Journal Article 2016
      • “Journeys to Louisiana and the Natchez Country,” Reviews in American History, 44 (June 2016), 226-34.

        {Journal Article }
      2016
      • "Kentucky and the Union at the Crossroads: George Rogers Clark, James Wilkinson, and the Danville Copmmittee, 1786-1787," Ohio Valley History 16 (Spring 2016): 3-23.

        {Journal Article }

      Book 2015
      • David Narrett, Adventurism and Empire: The Struggle for Mastery in the Louisiana-Florida Borderlands, 1762-1803 (Chapel Hill:University of North Carolina Press, 2015).

        {Book }

      Book Review 2013
      • Gilbert C. Din, War on the Gulf Coast: The Spanish Fight Against William Augustus Bowles (Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 2012), in Journal of Southern History, 79 (May, 2013), 462-63.

        {Book Review }
      2013
      • Eliga H. Gould, Among the Powers of the Earth: The American Revolution and the Making of a New World Empire (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2012), in Law and History Review (May, 2013), 482-82

        {Book Review }

      Essay 2013
      • Integrating Jewish Experiences into Early America/US Survey Courses,” Perspectives on History (The Newsmagazine of the American Historical Association), 51 (May, 2013), 35-36.

        {Review essay }

      Journal Article 2012
      • David E. Narrett, "Geopolitics and Intrigue: James Wilkinson, the Spanish Borderlands, and Mexican Independence," The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, 69, no. 1 (Jan., 2012).

        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 2010
      • Review of Borderlines in the Borderlands: James Madison and the Spanish-American Frontier, 1776-1821, by J.C.A. Stagg.Southwestern Historical Quarterly 113, no 3, January, 2010: 409-11.
        {Book Review }
      2010
      • Review of Manifesting America: The Imperial Construction of U.S. National Space, by Mark Rifkin.Southwestern Historical Quarterly 2, no 114, October, 2010: 204-05.
        {Book Review }
      2010
      • Mark Rikin, Manifesting America: The Imperial Construction of U.S. National Space (New York: Oxford University Press, 2009), in Southwestern Historical Quarterly, 114 (Oct., 2010), 204-05.

        {Book Review }

      Book Review 2006
      • Narrett, David E. "Almonte's Texas: Juan N. Almonte's 1834 Inspection, Secret Report and Role in the 1836 Campaign." , by Jack Jackson and John Wheat.Journal of Southern History 71, 2006: 681-82.
        {Book Review }

      Book Review 2004
      • Narrett, David E. "The Best and Worst Country in the World: Perspectives on the Early Virginia Landscape." , by Stephen Adams.Terrae Incognitae 39, 2004: 97-99.
        {Book Review }

      Book Review 2003
      • Narrett, David E. "Conquest and Catastrophe: Changing Rio Grande Pueblo Settlement Patterns in the 16th and 17th Centurie." , by Elinore M. Barrett.West Texas Historical Association Annual Yearbook, 2003.
        {Book Review }

      Popular Press Article 2002
      • Narrett, D. E. "Secrets of September 11." Letter Dec. 2002.
        {Popular Press Article }

      Journal Article 2002
      • Narrett, David E. "Jose Bernardo Gutierrez de Lara: Cuadillo of the Mexican Republic in Texas." Southwestern Historical Quarterly 105 (2002): 194-228.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 2001
      • "The Anti-Rent Era in New York Law and Politics." .American Journal of Legal History 45, 2001: 225-26.
        {Book Review }
      2001
      • Narrett, David E. "Frontier Swashbuckler: The Life and Legend of John Smith T." , by Dick Steward.Southwestern Historical Quarterly, 2001: 485-86.
        {Book Review }

      Book Review 2000
      • Narrett, David E. "Historical Memoir of the War in West Florida and Louisiana in 1814-15. By Arsene LaCarriere Latour." , by Gene A. Smith.Southwestern Historical Quarterly 104, 2000: 310-11.
        {Book Review }

      Book Review 1999
      • Narrett, David E. "In the Midst of Perpetual Fetes: The Making of American Nationalism, 1776-1820." , by David Waldstreicher.Vermont History, 1999: 122-23.
        {Book Review }
      1999
      • Narrett, David E. "Courts and Commerce: Gender, Law, and the Market Economy in Colonial New York." , by Deborah A. Rosen.William and Mary Quarterly 55, 1999: 448-50.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1998
      • Narrett, David E. Vermont History 66 (1998): 69-101.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 1997
      • Narrett, David E. "Bennington and the Green Mountain Boys." , by Robert E. Shalhope.Journal of American History 84, 1997: 638-39.
        {Book Review }
      1997
      • Narrett, David E. "Hopeful Journeys: German Immigration, Settlement, and Political Culture in Colonial America, 1717-1775." , by Aaron Spencer Fogelman.Journal of American Ethnic History 16, 1997: 145.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1997
      • Narrett, David E. "A Choice of Destiny: Immigration Policy, Slavery, and the Annexation of Texas." Southwestern Historical Quarterly 100 (1997): 270-302.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 1996
      • Narrett, David E. "William Cooper's Town: Power and Persuasion on the Frontier of the Early American Republic." , by Alan Taylor.William and Mary Quarterly 53, 1996: 639-41.
        {Book Review }

      Book Review 1994
      • Narrett, David E. "To Sow One More Acre: Childbearing and Farm Productivity in the Antebellum North." , by Lee A. Craig.Pennsylvania History 61, 1994: 243-45.
        {Book Review }
      1994
      • Narrett, David E. "The Republican Synthesis Revisited: Essays in Honor of George Athan Billias." , by Milton M. Klein, Richard D. Brown, and John B. Hench.New York History 75, 1994: 327-29.
        {Book Review }
      1994
      • Narrett, D. E. "George Clinton." Review of Yeoman Politican of the New Republic.New York History 75, April, 1994: 213-15.
        {Book Review }

      Book 1994
      • Francaviglia, Richard V. and David E. Narrett, eds. Essays on Changing Images of the Southwest. College Station, TX: Texas A&M Press, 1994.
        {Book }
      1994
      • Cawthon, Elisabeth A. and David E. Narrett, eds. Essays on English Law and the American Experience. 1994.
        {Book }

      Encyclopedia Entry 1993
      • "The Legal Profession in New Netherland." Encyclopedia of the North American Colonies, 428-30. Scribner's, 1993.
        {Encyclopedia Entry }

      Book 1992
      • Narrett, David E. Inheritance and Family Life in Colonial New York City. Cornell University Press, 1992.
        {Book }

      Book Review 1990
      • Narrett, David E. "The Constitution and the States: The Role of the Original Thirteen in the Framing and Adoption of the Federal Constitution,." , by Patrick T. Conley and John P. Kaminski.New York History 71, 1990: 334-36.
        {Book Review }

      Book Review 1989
      • Narrett, David E. "The Politics of Progress: The Origins and Development of the Commercial Republic, 1600-1835." , by Hiram Caton.Business History Review 63, 1989: 662-64.
        {Book Review }

      Book Chapter 1989
      • Narrett, David E. "Men's Wills and Women's Property Rights in Colonial New York." Women in the Age of the American Revolution, edited by Ronald Hoffman and Peter J. Albert, 91-133. University Press of Virginia, 1989.
        {Book Chapter }

      Book Review 1988
      • Narrett, David E. "Beyond Confederation: Origins of the Constitution and American National Identity." , by Richard Beeman, Stephen Botein, and Edward C. Carter II.Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 112, 1988: 153-54.
        {Book Review }

      Book Chapter 1988
      • Narrett, David E. "Dutch Customs of Inheritance, Women, and the Law in Colonial New York City, 1664-1775." Authority and Resistance in Early New York, edited by William Pencak and Conrad Edick Wright, 48-87. 1988.
        {Book Chapter }

      Journal Article 1988
      • Narrett, D. E. "A Zeal for Liberty: The Antifederalist Case Against the Constitution in New York." New York History 49 (1988): 284-317.
        {Journal Article }

Presentations

    • January  2010
      David Narrett
      "Geopolitics and Intrigue: James Wilkinson, New Spain, and Mexican Independence," Annual Meeting of the Society for the History of the Early Republic, Rochester, NY
    • January  2010
      David Narrett
      "The West Florida Revolution: A Continental Perspective," Friends of Oakley Plantation, St. Francisville, Louisiana
    • January  2008
      David Narrett
      2008 “Luring French Creoles to the English Mississippi: British Intrigue and Louisiana, 1764-1779,” Southern Conference on British Studies, New Orleans
    • January  2007
      David Narrett
      2007 “Geographer of Intrigue: James Wilkinson and the Texas Borderlands,” Texas State Historical Association Annual Meeting, San Antonio
    • January  2007
      David Narrett
      2007 “Liberation and Conquest: John Hamilton Robinson and Anglo-American Adventurism toward Mexico,” SHEAR (Society for the History of the Early American Republic), Worcester, Mass.
    • January  2006
      David Narrett
      2006 Session Chair: “Anglo-Hispanic Interactions, Memory, and the U.S. Past,” Organization of American Historians, Annual Meeting, Washington D.C.
    • January  2005
      David Narrett
      2005 “William Shaler: Special Agent and Imperial Visionary on the Louisiana-Texas Frontier,” Louisiana Historical Association, Lafayette
    • January  2004
      David Narrett
      2004 ”Authority and Rebellion in the Natchez District, 1781-1797,” Gulf South Historical and Humanities Conference, Mobile
    • January  2003
      "Corridor to Wealth and Liberty: Anglo-American Perceptions of Texas in the Aftermath of the Louisiana Purchase"
      2003 Society for the History of Discoveries, New Orleans
    • January  2003
      "Filibusters and Rebels in the Louisiana-Texas Borderlands"

      2003 Symposium on the Louisiana Purchase, Rural Life Museum, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

    • January  2003
      David Narrett
      2003 "Sectionalism, Nationalism, and Filibustering Before the Civil War: A Roundtable on Recent Work," Southern Historical Association, Houston
    • January  2002
      "Samuel Kemper: Filibuster and Courier of Revolution in the Louisiana-Texas Boderlands"
      2002 Gulf South Historical Association, Galveston
    • January  2000
      "The First Constitution of Texas, 1813: A Mexican Revolutionary Document"
      2000 Conference Sponsored by Texas Christian University and the National Archives, Fort Worth
    • January  1999
      "For the Republican Cause: Anglo-American and Mexican Ambitions During the Gutierrez-Magee Expedition in Texas, 1812-1813"
      1999 Institute of Early American History and Culture Conference, Austin
    • January  1999
      "First Lone Star Rising: The West Florida Rebellion of 1810 and the Texas Revolution"
      1999 Texas State Historical Association Annual Meeting, Dallas
    • January  1996
      "A Tale of Two Republics"
      1996 Keynote Address before the 100th Annual Meeting of the Texas State Historical Association, Austin
    • January  1995
      "A Choice of Destiny for Texas: Immigration, Slavery, and Social Progress as Issues in the Debate Over U.S. Annexation"
      1995 The Challenge of Statehood:  A Sesquicentennial Symposium on Texas Annexation, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Past
    •  
      "Dynamic Counterpoise: Liberty and Authority in Michael Kammen's Exploration of the Early American Past”

      Talk honoring the late Michael Kammen, Pulitzer-Prize winning historian, at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Organization of American Historians, Atlanta

  • Past
    •  
      "Dynamic Counterpoise: Liberty and Authority in Michael Kammen's Exploration of the Early American Past”

      Talk in Panel Discussion honoring the late Michael Kammen, Pulitzer-Prize winning historian, at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Organization of American Historians (Atlanta)

Projects

  • 2016
    • May 2016 to Present From the Tennessee to the Gulf: Settlers and Southern Indian Nations in War and Peace, 1770-1815

      This book project breaks new ground by bringing diverse and conflicting Native and settler societies into a common historical and geographic framework—based on an original interpretation of eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century documents.  Although historians in recent decades have greatly enriched our understanding of American Indian peoples, few scholars have given attention to the pressures of political alliance-building, alongside factional discord, existing on both sides of the Native-settler divide.  My goal is to trace the ways that white settlers as well as Indian peoples, especially the Cherokees and the Creeks, struggled to maintain internal unity and tp forge interregional alliances during a period of intense conflict over land and trade reaching from the Trans-Appalachian region to the Gulf Coast. My book will offer a dramatic and thematically rich narrative of frontier diplomacy and warfare that will attract readership among the general educated public and college history students, and not only scholars. 

      Role: Principal Investigator PI: David Narrett

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • Jan 1992 to Jan 2013 Center for Greater Southwestern Studies sponsored by  - $250

Students Supervised

Courses

      • HIST 1311-008 HIST 1311, American and US History to 1865

        This course will examine the growth of American society from the beginning of European colonization to the end of the Civil War.  We will study colonial settlement and expansion, conflicts between settlers and Natives, and the simultaneous development of American freedom and slavery.  This course is intended to help students develop skills in critical reading and thinking by identifying and explaining the causes and consequences of major historical events.  Students are encouraged to think historically—to ask questions about the meaning of what they are reading in texts and visualizing through maps and other sources.  Why did events matter—and what is their relevance for understanding our society and our world?  How are history and geography so closely intertwined?  What impact did individuals have in shaping the past?  What were the dominant political, economic, and social trends characterizing certain eras?  Why did important controversies and conflicts develop in particular historical settings?  These questions are crucial for students to address throughout the semester.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • HIST 3321-002 COLONIAL AMERICA TO 1763

        The American colonial era is essential to understanding the origins of the United States and its relationship to other American regions and the wider world.  Our course will examine early American history within a broad continental and Atlantic perspective.  We will emphasize conflicts between colonists and Natives, the relationship between American freedom and slavery, and the growth of the British Empire in North America.  Special topics for study include religion and culture, immigration and ethnicity, and government and politics.  Students will study the past not only be reading modern historians but also by examining documents of the colonial era.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • HIST 3322-001 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND THE CONSTITUTION, 1763-1789

        This course will explore the character and meaning of the American Revolution.  We will consider the origins of the conflict, the struggles of war, and issues of social change affecting diverse groups and individuals.  We will address the role of leaders as well as the experiences of ordinary people.  The course’s final stage will focus upon the foundations of American government, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.  Students will examine primary sources written during the Revolutionary era, in addition to exploring the writings of recent historians.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-003 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL RESEARCH

        This course will introduce students to the methods that historians use to conduct research and to present their findings in written and oral form.  Each student will develop a research paper utilizing both primary and secondary sources.  (The essay is expected to be about 20 pages in text, including notes and bibliography.)  Students are to choose a research topic within early American/U.S. history, encompassing the period 1600-1865.  In addition to writing a paper, students will give a brief oral presentation of their work in class. The course will introduce students to the methodology and philosophy of historical research and writing.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-008 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865

        This course will examine the growth of American society from the beginning of European colonization to the end of the Civil War.  We will study colonial settlement and expansion, conflicts between settlers and natives, and the simultaneous development of American freedom and slavery.  This course is intended to help students develop their skills in critical reading and thinking.  A basic goal is for students to learn to identify and explain the causes and consequences of major historical events.  Students are also encouraged to think historically—to understand the historical significance of the individuals, events, concepts, and places being examined.  Why did events matter?  What impact did individuals have in shaping the past?  What were the dominant political, economic, and social trends characterizing certain historic eras?   Why did important controversies and conflicts develop in particular historical settings?  These questions are crucial for students to address throughout the semester.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3317-001 U.S. LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY, COLONIAL TO 1877

        This course examines the origins and development of American legal and constitutional thought, values, and practice from the colonial era through the period of Reconstruction following the Civil War. Major topics include the transmission of English law to the American colonies, the American Revolution as a constitutional crisis, and the enactment of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. The course considers crucial Supreme Court decisions from the presidency of George Washington through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Special attention is given to issues of liberty and authority, freedom and slavery, and the balance between national power and states’ rights.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • HIST 3321-001 American Colonial Era

        The American colonial era is essential to understanding the origins of the United States and its relationship to other American regions and the wider world.  Our course will examine early American history within a broad continental and Atlantic perspective.  We will emphasize conflicts between colonists and natives, the relationship between American freedom and slavery, and the growth of the British Empire in North America.  Special topics for study include religion and culture, immigration and ethnicity, and government and politics.  Students will study the past not only be reading modern historians but also by examining documents of the colonial era.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 6360-001 Early Transatlantic Research Seminar on the Seven Years' War in North America

        This seminar will focus on the Seven Years’ War (popularly known as “the French and Indian War”) and its transformative impact on North America and the Atlantic world during mid-to-late eighteenth century.  While gaining an overview of this broad subject, students will write a research paper based on an analysis of primary sources and a consideration of relevant secondary literature.  Students may select a research topic, with the instructor’s approval, on a broad range of subjects, though topics on purely military history are not advised. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 6360-001 Early Transatlantic Research Seminar on the Seven Years' War in North America

        This seminar will focus on the Seven Years’ War (popularly known as “the French and Indian War”) and its transformative impact on North America and the Atlantic world during mid-to-late eighteenth century.  While gaining an overview of this broad subject, students will write a research paper based on an analysis of primary sources and a consideration of relevant secondary literature.  Students may select a research topic, with the instructor’s approval, on a broad range of subjects, though topics on purely military history are not advised. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HISTORY 3322 American Revolution and the Constitution

        This course will explore the nature and meaning of the American Revolution. 

        We will consider the origins of the conflict, the struggles of war, and issues of social change and justice that affected groups and individuals.  We will devote attention to issues of liberty and authority, civic rights and obligations, and of law and constitutionalism. The final part of the course will focus upon the making of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.  Students will examine primary sources written during the Revolutionary era as well as historical works written in our own time.

      • HIST 1311-006 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1865

        This course will examine the growth of American society from the beginning of European colonization to the end of the Civil War.  We will study colonial settlement and expansion, conflicts between settlers and natives, and the simultaneous development of American freedom and slavery.  This course is intended to help students develop their skills in critical reading and thinking.  A basic goal is for students to learn to identify and explain the causes and consequences of major historical events.  Students are also encouraged to think historically—to understand the historical significance of the individuals, events, concepts, and places being examined.  Why did events matter?  What impact did individuals have in shaping the past?  What were the dominant political, economic, and social trends characterizing certain historic eras?   Why did important controversies and conflicts develop in particular historical settings?  These questions are crucial for students to address throughout the semester.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3322-001 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND THE CONSTITUTION, 1763-1789

        This course will explore the character and meaning of the American Revolution.  We will consider the origins of the conflict, the struggles of war, and issues of social change affecting diverse groups and individuals.  We will address the role of leaders as well as the experiences of ordinary people.  The course’s final stage will focus upon the foundations of American government, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.  Students will examine primary sources written during the Revolutionary era, in addition to exploring the writings of recent historians.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-003 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL RESEARCH

        This course will introduce students to the methods that historians use to conduct research and to present their findings in written and oral form.  Each student will develop a research paper utilizing both primary and secondary sources.  (The essay is expected to be about 20 pages in text, including notes and bibliography.)  Students are to choose a research topic within early American/U.S. history, encompassing the period 1600-1865.  In addition to writing a paper, students will give a brief oral presentation of their work in class. The course will introduce students to the methodology and philosophy of historical research and writing.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3321-002 COLONIAL AMERICA TO 1763

        Themes: The American colonial era is essential to understanding the origins of the United States and its relationship to other American regions and the wider world.  Our course will examine early American history within a broad continental and Atlantic perspective.  We will emphasize conflicts between colonists and natives, the relationship between American freedom and slavery, and the growth of the British Empire in North America.  Special topics for study include religion and culture, immigration and ethnicity, and government and politics.  Students will study the past not only be reading modern historians but also by examining documents of the colonial era.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • HIST 5364-001 Colloquium on North American Borderlands and Frontiers

        This colloquium examines major issues in recent historical literature on North American borderlands and frontiers from the 1600s through the War of 1812 and its aftermath.  “Borderlands” connote territories in which boundaries were fluid, uncertain, and commonly disputed between nationalities and empires.  Our reading and discussion will focus on imperial rivalries and colonial-native relations, frontier cultural interchange, and issues of individual and group identity and allegiance.  We will examine historical processes and geopolitical influences with intersecting local, continental, and transatlantic dimensions.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3322-001 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND THE CONSTITUTION, 1763-1789

        This course will explore the character and meaning of the American Revolution.  We will consider the origins of the conflict, the struggles of war, and issues of social change affecting diverse groups and individuals.  We will address the role of leaders as well as the experiences of ordinary people.  The course’s final stage will focus upon the foundations of American government, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.  Students will examine primary sources written during the Revolutionary era, in addition to exploring the writings of recent historians.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-006 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL RESEARCH

        This course will introduce students to the methods that historians use to conduct research and to present their findings in written and oral form.  Each student will develop a research paper utilizing both primary and secondary sources.  (The essay is expected to be about 20 pages in text, including notes and bibliography.)  Students are to choose a research topic within early American/U.S. history, encompassing the period 1600-1865.  In addition to writing a paper, students will give a brief oral presentation of their work in class. The course will introduce students to the methodology and philosophy of historical research and writing.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-002 The United States, 1607-1865

        This course will examine the growth of American society from the beginning of European colonization to the end of the Civil War.  We will focus on colonial settlement and expansion, conflicts between settlers and natives, and the simultaneous development of American freedom and slavery.  This course will help students develop their skills in critical reading and thinking.  Students are encouraged to think critically and historically—to understand the significance of the individuals, events, concepts, and places being examined.  What were the causes and consequences of major historical events?  What impact did individuals have in shaping the past?  What were the dominant political, economic, and social trends characterizing certain historic eras?   Why did important controversies and conflicts develop in particular historical settings?  These questions are crucial for students to address throughout the semester.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3321-002 COLONIAL AMERICA TO 1763

        The American colonial era is essential to understanding the origins of the United States and its relationship to other American regions and the wider world.  Our course will examine early American history within a broad continental and Atlantic perspective.  We will emphasize conflicts between colonists and natives, the relationship between American freedom and slavery, and the growth of the British Empire in North America.  Special topics for study include religion and culture, immigration and ethnicity, and government and politics.  Students will study the past not only be reading modern historians but also by examining documents of the colonial era.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-007 American United States Survey, I

        This course will examine the growth of American society from the beginning of European colonization to the end of the Civil War.  We will focus on colonial settlement and expansion, conflicts between settlers and natives, and the simultaneous development of American freedom and slavery.  This course is intended to help students develop their skills in critical reading and thinking.  A basic goal is for students to learn to identify and explain the causes and consequences of major historical events.  Students are also encouraged to think critically and historically—to understand the significance of the individuals, events, concepts, and places being examined. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-009 American, United States Survey, I

        This course will examine the growth of American society from the beginning of European colonization to the end of the Civil War.  We will focus on colonial settlement and expansion, conflicts between settlers and natives, and the simultaneous development of American freedom and slavery.  This course is intended to help students develop their skills in critical reading and thinking.  A basic goal is for students to learn to identify and explain the causes and consequences of major historical events.  Students are also encouraged to think critically and historically—to understand the significance of the individuals, events, concepts, and places being examined. 

        Spring - Intersession - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3322-001 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND THE CONSTITUTION, 1763-1789

        This course will explore the nature and meaning of the American Revolution.  We will consider the origins of the conflict, the struggles of war, and issues of social change and justice that affected particular groups and individuals.  We will devote attention to the role of leaders as well as the relationship between rulers and the ruled. The final part of the course will focus upon the making of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.  Students will examine primary sources written during the Revolutionary era as well as historical works written in our own time.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3321-002 The American Colonial Era

        The American colonial era is essential to understanding the origins of the United States and its relationship to other American regions and the wider world.  Our course will examine early American history within a broad continental and Atlantic perspective.  We will emphasize conflicts between colonists and natives, the relationship between American freedom and slavery, and the growth of the British Empire in North America.  Special topics for study include religion and culture, immigration and ethnicity, and government and politics. We will consider the role of individuals in shaping history as well as major social trends.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-008 The Study of History

        This course will introduce students to the methods that historians use to conduct research and to present their findings in written and oral form.  Each student will develop a research paper utilizing both primary and secondary sources.  (The essay is expected to be 15 to 20 pages in text, not including notes and bibliography.)  Students are to choose a research topic within early American/U.S. history, encompassing the period 1600-1865.  In addition to writing a paper, students will give a brief oral presentation of their work in class. The course will introduce students to the methodology and philosophy of historical research and writing.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3322-001 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND THE CONSTITUTION, 1763-1789
        No Description Provided.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 3322-001 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND THE CONSTITUTION, 1763-1789
        This course will explore the nature and meaning of the American Revolution. We will consider the origins of the conflict, the struggles of war, and issues of social change and justice that affected particular groups and individuals. We will devote attention to the role of leaders as well as the relationship between rulers and the ruled. The final part of the course will focus upon the making of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1311-006 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1865
        This course will examine the growth of American society from the beginning of European colonization to the end of the Civil War. We will be especially concerned with colonial settlement and expansion, conflicts between settlers and natives, and the simultaneous development of American freedom and slavery. This course is intended to help students develop their skills in critical reading and thinking.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1311-006 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1865
        This course will examine the growth of American society from the beginning of European colonization to the end of the Civil War. We will be especially concerned with colonial settlement and expansion, conflicts between settlers and natives, and the simultaneous development of American freedom and slavery. This course is intended to help students develop their skills in critical reading and thinking.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1311-013 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1865
        This course will examine the growth of American society from the beginning of European colonization to the end of the Civil War. We will be especially concerned with colonial settlement and expansion, conflicts between settlers and natives, and the simultaneous development of American freedom and slavery. This course is intended to help students develop their skills in critical reading and thinking.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • HIST 3321-001 American Colonial Era
        The American colonial era is essential to understanding the origins of the United States and its relationship to other American regions and the wider world. Our course will examine early American history within a broad perspective. We will emphasize the conflicts between colonists and natives, the relationship between American freedom and slavery, and the growth of the British Empire in North America.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 5304-501 North American Borderlands
        This colloquium will examine major issues in recent historical literature on North American borderlands and frontiers from the early 1600s through the mid-1800s. Our focus will include imperial rivalries and colonial-native relations, frontier cultural and social interchange, and questions of identity and allegiance. Geopolitical influences and broad historical processes will also command our attention.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1311-006 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1865
        This course will examine the growth of American society from the beginning of European colonization to the end of the Civil War. We will be especially concerned with colonial settlement and expansion, conflicts between settlers and natives, and the simultaneous development of American freedom and slavery. This course is intended to help students develop their skills in critical reading and thinking.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 3322-001 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND THE CONSTITUTION, 1763-1789
        This course will explore the nature and meaning of the American Revolution. We will consider the origins of the conflict, the struggles of war, and issues of social change and justice that affected particular groups and individuals. We will devote attention to the role of leaders as well as the relationship between rulers and the ruled. The final part of the course will focus upon the making of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1311-009 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865
        This course will examine the growth of American society from the beginning of European colonization to the end of the Civil War. We will be especially concerned with colonial settlement and expansion, conflicts between settlers and natives, and the simultaneous development of American freedom and slavery. This course is intended to help students develop their skills in critical reading and thinking.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 3321-001 American Colonial Era
        The American colonial era is essential to understanding the origins of the United States and its relationship to other American regions and the wider world. Our course will examine early American history within a broad perspective. We will emphasize the conflicts between colonists and natives, the relationship between American freedom and slavery, and the growth of the British Empire in North America. Special topics for study include religion and culture, immigration, politics and society. We will consider the role of individuals in shaping history as well as major social trends.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 3322-001 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND THE CONSTITUTION, 1763-1789
        No Description Provided.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 3322-001 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND THE CONSTITUTION, 1763-1789
        This course will explore the nature and meaning of the American Revolution. We will consider the origins of the conflict, the struggles of war, and issues of social change and justice that affected particular groups and individuals. We will devote attention to the role of leaders as well as the relationship between rulers and the ruled. The final part of the course will focus upon the making of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1311-008 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865
        This course will examine the growth of American society from the beginning of European colonization to the end of the Civil War. This course is intended to help students develop their skills in critical reading and thinking. A basic goal is for students to learn to identify and explain the causes and consequences of major historical events. Students are also encouraged to think historically—to understand the historical significance of the individuals, events, concepts, and places being examined.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1311-005 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1865
        This course will examine the growth of American society from the beginning of European colonization to the end of the Civil War. This course is intended to help students develop their skills in critical reading and thinking. A basic goal is for students to learn to identify and explain the causes and consequences of major historical events. Students are also encouraged to think historically—to understand the historical significance of the individuals, events, concepts, and places being examined.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 5324-001 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN REGIONAL/TOPICAL U.S. HISTORY
        This seminar will focus on the American Revolutionary era (1763-1791). While gaining an introduction to this broad subject, students will write a research paper based upon an analysis of primary sources and a consideration of relevant secondary literature. Students may select a research topic, with the instructor’s approval, on a broad range of subjects.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 3321-001 American Colonial Era
        The American colonial era is essential to understanding the origins of the United States and its relationship to other American regions and the wider world. We will emphasize the conflicts between colonists and natives, the relationship between American freedom and slavery, and the growth of the British Empire in North America. Special topics for study include religion and culture, immigration, politics and society. We will consider the role of individuals in shaping history as well as major social trends.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 3300-004 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL RESEARCH
        This course will introduce students to the methods that historians use to conduct research and to present their findings in written and oral form. Each student will develop a research paper utilizing both primary and secondary sources. (The essay is expected to be 15 to 20 pages in length.) The instructor encourages students to choose a research topic within the field of early American history, encompassing the period 1600-1865. In addition to writing a paper, students will give a brief oral presentation of their work in class.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • HIST 3300-004 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL RESEARCH
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 3321-001 American Colonial Era
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010

Other Teaching Activities

  • 2014
    • HIST 1311-007
      • Feb 2014 American/US Survey, I

        This course will examine the growth of American society from the beginning of European colonization to the end of the Civil War. We will be especially concerned with colonial settlement and expansion, conflicts between settlers and natives, and the simultaneous development of American freedom and slavery. This course is intended to help students develop their skills in critical reading and thinking. A basic goal is for students to learn to identify and explain the causes and consequences of major historical events. Students are also encouraged to think historically—to understand the historical significance of the individuals, events, concepts, and places being examined. Why did events matter? What impact did individuals have in shaping the past? What were the dominant political, economic, and social trends characterizing certain historic eras? Why did important controversies and conflicts develop in particular historical settings? These questions are crucial for students to address throughout the semester. 

    • Hist 1311-013
      • Feb 2014 American/US Survey I

        This course will examine the growth of American society from the beginning of European colonization to the end of the Civil War. We will be especially concerned with colonial settlement and expansion, conflicts between settlers and natives, and the simultaneous development of American freedom and slavery. This course is intended to help students develop their skills in critical reading and thinking. A basic goal is for students to learn to identify and explain the causes and consequences of major historical events. Students are also encouraged to think historically—to understand the historical significance of the individuals, events, concepts, and places being examined. Why did events matter? What impact did individuals have in shaping the past? What were the dominant political, economic, and social trends characterizing certain historic eras? Why did important controversies and conflicts develop in particular historical settings? These questions are crucial for students to address throughout the semester. 

    • HIST 3322-001
      • Feb 2014 American Revolution and the Constitution

        This course will explore the nature and meaning of the American Revolution. We will consider the origins of the conflict, the struggles of war, and issues of social change and justice that affected particular groups and individuals.  We will devote attention to the role of leaders as well as the relationship between rulers and the ruled. The final part of the course will focus upon the making of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.  Students will examine primary sources written during the Revolutionary era as well as historical works written in our own time.

    • HIST-3321-002
      • Aug 2014 American Colonial Era

        The American colonial era is essential to understanding the origins of the United States and its relationship to other American regions and the wider world.  Our course will examine early American history within a broad continental and Atlantic perspective.  We will emphasize conflicts between colonists and natives, the relationship between American freedom and slavery, and the growth of the British Empire in North America.  Special topics for study include religion and culture, immigration and ethnicity, and government and politics. We will consider the role of individuals in shaping history as well as major social trends.

    • HIST 5333-501
      • Aug 2014 The Seven Years’ War in North America

        This seminar will focus on the Seven Years’ War (popularly known as “the French and Indian War”) and its transformative impact on North America and the Atlantic world during mid-to-late eighteenth century.  While gaining an overview of this broad subject, students will write a research paper based on an analysis of primary sources and a consideration of relevant secondary literature.  Students may select a research topic, with the instructor’s approval, on a broad range of subjects, though topics on purely military history are not advised.  

Service to the University

  • Elected
    • Aug 2014 to  May 2015 Tenure and Promotion Committee, College of Liberal Arts

      Department representative to committee

    • Aug 2011 to  Jan 2012 Tenure and Promotion Committee, College of Liberal Arts

      Department representative

Other Service Activities

  • Uncategorized
    • Dec  Departmental Service
      Chair, Tenure and Promotion Committee (2010-2011); Tenure and Promotion (1999-2000, 2001-2002, 2003-04)
      Graduate Advisor (1995-97)
      Chair, Graduate Studies Committee (2000-03)
      Chair, Library Committee (1992-94, 1999-2006)
      Post-Tenure Review (Chair, 2005-06), 1999-2000, 2001-02, 2003-04)
      Executive Committee (1989-97, 1999-2000)
      Transatlantic Ph.D. Program Committee (1997-current)
      Graduate Studies (1990-current)
      Chair, Search Committee, Texas and Boderlands History (1992-93)
    • Dec  University Service
      College of Liberal Arts, Tenure and Promotion Committee (2011-2012) University Library Committee (2001-2003)
      Year One at UTA/First Year Experience Committee (1999-2000)
      Graduate Humanities Committee (1992-99)
    • Dec  Professional Service
      1996-2003 Referee: William and Mary Quarterly (three articles), Journal of American History (one article), Southwestern Historical Quarterly (two article), Reviewer of Four NEH grants
      1992-1995 Referee of two book manuscripts, Cornell University Press
      2000-2001 Texas State Historical Association, Member of Program Committee for 2001 Annual Meeting
      1996-2000 Organization of American Historians,  Steering Committee of Membership Commitee (Texas Representative, five-year term)
      1999 Panelist, Annual Meeting of the Organization of American Historians (Toronto, Canada), "Curriculum Vitae Workshop: What Do Institutions Want from Graduate Students?"
    • Dec  Ph. D.; M.A. Graduates-Supervised 1991-2005
      UTA Ph.D. Graduates—Supervised Jeffrey Dillard, 2011; Benjamin Mark Allen, 2008; Charles Brazell, 2007 UTA M.A. Graduates ��" Supervised 1991-2010 Mary Evelyn Pierce, Spring 2010 Jessica Ferguson, spring 2010 Kelly Kirkpatraick, spring 2010 Johnny Thompson, 2007 (chair) David Langston, Spring 2005 (chair) Melissa Canaday, spring 2004 Al Grotz, Spring 2004 Thomas Vanderburg, Summer 2003 Gayle Tennison, Fall 2003 Sandra Freeman, Fall 2003 Helen McLure, Spring 2002 Angela Cain, Spring 2002 Todd Holzaepfel, Summer 2001 (chair) David Johnson Spring 2001 (chair) Alison Efford (Supervisor, Honors College Thesis, 2001) Eric Park, Fall 2000 (chair) Scott Langston, Spring 2000 (chair) Lance List, Spring 1999 (chair) Heather Danamraj, Spring 1999 (chair) Norma Richey, Summer 1998 (chair) Mark Miner, Spring 1998 Ann Martens, Spring 1998 (chair) Angela Camara, Fall 1997 Martha Daniels, Fall 1997 (chair) June Dalrymple, Spring 1997 (chair) Gregory Scott, Dec. 1996 (chair) Amy Hart, May 1996 (chair) M.A. Graduates--supervised (continued) Terrie Hurt, Dec. 1995 (chair) Thomas Spring, Aug. 1995 Nolen Hodges, Aug. 1995 (chair) Alexandra Perkins, May 1995 Jack Burke, May 1995 (chair) Korin Schulz, Aug. 1994 (chair) Carole Slowey, Dec. 1993 (chair) Joseph Myers, May 1993 (chair) Cynthia Clark, Dec. 1992 (chair) David Kyle Wilson, Dec. 1991 (chair) Douglas Jones, Jan. 1991
    • Dec  Community Service
      2010 Speaker, "Debating the Constitution, 1787," Fort Worth Rotary Club 2001 Speaker, Daughters of the American Revolution program, Texas State Fair
      2001 Reference, Article on the Star-Spangled Banner, Fort Worth Star-Telegram
      1997 Speaker, "Huguenot Colonists of New Paltz," Huguenot Historical Society of Texas
      1995 Speaker, "The Green Mountain Boys," Sones of the American Revolution, Dallas
    • Dec  Delete Edit
  • Academic and Other Service: University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2015 Chair, Tenure and Promotion Committee, Department of History

      Chair of Tenure and Promotion Committee (Department of History)

      Academic Year 2015-2016