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Christopher Morris

Name

[Morris, Christopher]
  • Professor, History

Biography

Christopher Morris lives in Dallas, Texas, and is Professor of History at the University of Texas, Arlington. He is the author of two books, Becoming Southern: The Evolution of a Way of Life, Warren County and Vicksburg, Mississippi, 1770-1860, and The Big Muddy: An Environmental History of the Mississippi and Its Peoples from Hernando de Soto to Hurricane Katrina. In addition, he has authored more than a dozen articles, essays, and book chapters, and co-edited of three essay collections. He is best known for his work on the relationship between people and the natural environment in the American South, although his work has taken him around the world. For example, he has written on comparative river delta environments in North America, Senegal, India, and China. He is also part of an interdisciplinary team that is investigating the climate history of the Great Lakes as embedded in eighteenth and nineteenth century maps. Morris holds a doctorate from the University of Florida, where he studied with the eminent southern historian, Bertram Wyatt-Brown. He has received several awards, including a Pulitzer nomination and a senior fellowship at the Stanford Humanities Center. At present Morris is working on a book tentatively titled Nitrogen Networks. The study begins with Ned Cobb, an early twentieth century Alabama tenant farmer in need of nitrogen fertilizer, and situates him within a global trade in nitrogen and nitrogen compounds. Nitrogen networks connected Ned Cobb and his Tallapoosa County community to South America and Europe, and to the larger world of science, industrial capitalism, war, and environmental destruction, and back again.

Full CV is available for download at: https://www.dropbox.com/s/udlox1etrk04gbh/VITA%2C%2012-17-2015.doc?dl=0

Simply copy and paste this URL into your browser, or click on the live link at the bottom of this page.

Professional Preparation

    • 1981 BA (Honours) The University of Western Ontario
    • 1985 M.A. The University of Western Ontario, Canada
    • 1991 Ph.D. The University of Florida

Appointments

    • Aug 2013 to Present Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Sept 1996 to Aug 2013 Assoc Prof
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Sept 1992 to Aug 1996 Assist Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Sept 1991 to Aug 1992 Assistant Professor, Limited Term
      Simon Fraser University

Memberships

  • Membership
    • July 2013 to Present Southern Historical Association
    • July 2013 to Present American Society for Environmental History
    • July 2013 to Present Forum on European Expansion and Global Interaction
    • July 2013 to Present Vicksburg and Warren County Historical Society (Life Member)

Awards and Honors

    • Sep  2004 Stanford Humanities Center Senior Fellow sponsored by Stanford University
      Description:

      2004-2005

    • Mar  1996 Outstanding Research Achievement Award, sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • Oct  1995 Pulitzer Prize Nomination sponsored by Columbia University
    • Sep  1991 Phi Beta Kappa sponsored by University of Florida
    • Sep  1989 Departmental Fellowship sponsored by The University of Florida
    • Sep  1987 Doctoral Fellowship sponsored by Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
    • Sep  1985 Richard J. Milbauer Fellowship sponsored by The University of Florida
      Description:

      1985-1987

News Articles

    • July 2015 Media Interviews

      On Point with Tom Ashbrook, WBUR Boston, NPR, interview on the history of pioneer settlement in the Mississippi Delta. July 14, 2016.

      Fort Worth Star-Telegram interview on Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans ten years after. September 2, 2015.

      Fort Worth Star-Telegram interview on schools named for Confederate generals. July 17, 2015. http://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/community/fort-worth/article27529096.html

      KTVT/CBS TV 11 interview on the earth’s population, which reached 7 billion. October 31, 2011

      The Washington Post, interviewed for a story on race relations, politics, and Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, September, 20. 2005

      Gainesville (Fla) Sun, quoted, in article New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina, September 11, 2005

      Pacifica Radio, KPFA Berkeley/San Francisco affiliate, on "Against the Grain," interviewed about New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina, September 6, 2005

      Richmond Times-Dispatch, interviewed for story on the legacy of slavery, July 27, 2005

      Stockman Grass Farmer (Spring 2000) Story on my research on buffalo herds and habitat in the lower Mississippi Valley pre-17000.

      Star-Telegram, June 1999, worked with reporter on story on role of Catholic church and the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

      Star-Telegram, March? 1999, worked with reporter on history of ex-slave narratives.

      Channel ? News, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, March 1999, on historical impact of French colonization on the natural environment of the Lower Mississippi Valley

      Hattiesburg American, March 7, 1999, French Influence on the Gulf Coast

      KXAS/NBC TV 5 News at 11:00, April 1998, on history of Confederate Flag

      KXAS/NBC TV 5 News at 6:00, March 22, 1998, on hunting and violence in the South

      Glen Mitchell Show, KERA, February 26, 1996, on Becoming Southern, and southern culture

Research and Expertise

  • History and Environment

    U.S. South, Slavery, Environmental History of the U.S.; Mississippi River Valley; rivers, lakes, coastlines, water, fish

  • Current Research

    1.Nitrogen Networks. The study begins with Ned Cobb, an early twentieth century Alabama tenant farmer in need of nitrogen fertilizer, and situates him within a global trade in nitrogen and nitrogen compounds. Whereas studies of capitalism that often focus on commodities miss environmental connections and implications, my study will focus on a single element, nitrogen, and the ways people have extracted it from some natural environments (principally by harnessing plants, animals, and their ecologies), repackaged it as compounds placed into commodities, and shipped it to distant environments where they released it back into the environment. Each step in the process--extraction, repackaging, release--brought people into contested relations with each other and with non-human nature. Nitrogen Networks connects Ned Cobb and his Tallapoosa County community to South America and Europe, and to the larger arenas of science, industrial capitalism, world war, the Green Revolution, environmental degradation, global nitrogen cycles, and back again.

    2. Mapping the Great Lakes: Computational Visual Analysis, Historical Cartography, and Climate History, 1650-1850.” I am working as part of an interdisciplinary collaboration involving computer scientists and humanists that is digitizing over 400 maps and machine reading (at the supercomputing center at the University of Illinois) their variations in cartographic depictions of coastlines, islands, and water passages for evidence of short-term meteorological and long-term climatological change. My contribution includes research into the climatological and hydrological history of the Great Lakes based on published physical and biological data and archival records in Canadian and U. S. archives. The University of Pennsylvania Press has expressed interest in publication as part of a digital humanities series.

    Collaborators: Robert Markley, University of Illinois. Michael Simeone, Arizona State University

Publications

      Book Chapter Forthcoming
      • “The Rise and Fall of Uncle Sam Plantation,” Charting the Plantation Landscape: Natchez to New Orleans, ed. Laura Kilcer, Baton Rouge: LSU Press.

        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article Forthcoming
      • "Disturbing the Mississippi: The Language of Science, Engineering, and River Restoration," Open Rivers: Rethinking the Mississippi (Spring 2016).

        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2018
      • "The Canoe and the Superpixel: Image Analysis of the Changing Shorelines on Historical Maps of the Great Lakes," Journal18: A Journal of Eighteenth-Century Art and Culture, co-authored with Robert Markley, U. of Illinois, Kenton McHenry, National Center for Supercomputing Applications, and Michael Simeone, Arizona State U.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2017
      • "The American South in the French Empire: Les Étés Longs et Chauds," in  European Empires in the American South, edited by Joseph P. Ward. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, September 2017.

        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2017
      • Let Us Now Praise Famous Gullies: Providence Canyon and the Soils of the South. By Paul S. Sutter. Agricultural History, (Winter 2017): 120-122.

        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Encyclopedia Entry 2017
      Journal Article 2017
      • “The Intellectual Lives of Natchez and Concord, and the Legacies of Slavery,” Southern Quarterly (March 2017).

             [Peer Selected]

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2016
      • "Disturbing the Mississippi: The Language of Science, Engineering, and River Restoration," Open Rivers:Rethinking the Mississippi Second Issue (April, 2016), available online at http://editions.lib.umn.edu/openrivers/

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2015
      Encyclopedia Entry 2015
      • Christopher Morris, "River Systems," in The Princeton Companion to Atlantic History, edited by Joseph C. Miller. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2015, pp. 412-416.

        {Encyclopedia Entry} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2015
      • “Reckoning with ‘The Crookedest River in the World’: The Maps of Harold Norman Fisk," Southern Quarterly Special Issue on the Mississippi River as Twentieth-Century Southern Icon, 52 (Spring 2015): 30-44.

             [Peer Selected].

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2014
      • The Lost History of the New Madrid Earthquakes. By Conevery Bolton Valencius, The American Historical Review  119 (December, 2014): 1689-1690.

        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book 2012
      • Christopher Morris, The Big Muddy: An Environmental History of the Mississippi and Its Peoples, from Hernando de Soto to Hurricane Katrina (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012).

        {Book} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2011
      • "Strange Career of Gideon Gibson: An Early American Tragedy." In Southern Character: Essays in Honor of Bertram Wyatt-Brown, edited by Lisa Tendrich Frank and Daniel Kilbride, 25-40. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2011.
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]
      2011
      • "Wetland Colonies: Louisiana, Guangzhou, Pondicherry, and Senegal." In Cultivating the Colonies: Colonial States and Their Environmental Legacies, edited by Christina Folke Ax, Niels Brimnes, Niklas Thode Jensen, and Karen Oslund, 135-163. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press, 2011.
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Encyclopedia Entry 2010
      • "The Mississippi River." Encyclopedia of American Environmental History, edited by Kathleen Brosnan, New York: Facts on File, 2010.
        {Encyclopedia Entry} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book 2010
      • Garrigus, John and Christopher Morris, eds. Assumed Identities: The Meanings of Race in the Atlantic World. College Station, TX: Texas A & M University Press, 2010.
        {Book} [Refereed/Juried]

      Encyclopedia Entry 2009
      • "Mississippi River." The Old West History and Heritage, edited by Edward Countryman, 615-619. Tarrytown, New York: Marshall Cavendish, 2009.
        {Encyclopedia Entry} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2009
      • "A More Southern Environmental History." Journal of Southern History 75 (2009): 583-598.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Essay 2009
      • Morris, Christopher. "Only a River." Iowa Review 39, no 2 (2009): 149-165. Peer Selected.

        {Essay} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2007
      • "Planting a Capitalist South: Masters, Merchants, and Manufacturers in the Southern Interior, 1790-1860, By Tom Downey." .The American Historical Review 112, February, 2007.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2007
      • "The Sugar Masters: Planters and Slaves in Louisiana’s Cane World, 1820-1860, By Richard Follett." .Journal of Southern History 73, February, 2007: 177-179.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2006
      • "Laboring Women: Reproduction and Gender in New World Slavery, by Jennifer L. Morgan." .in Itinerario: The European Journal of Overseas History 30, 2006.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Popular Press Article 2005
      • "For poor blacks, was it ever so: Post-Civil War deals with the feds ensured a New Orleans society dominated by whites,." Newsday 18 Sep. 2005.
        {Popular Press Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2005
      • "“In New Orleans, Once Again, the Irony of Southern History,”." History News Network, http://hnn.us/articles/15163.html 4 Sep. 2005.
        {Popular Press Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Chapter 2005
      • Morris, Christopher. "How to Prepare Buffalo, and Other Things French Taught Indians about Nature." In French Colonial Louisiana and the Atlantic World, edited by Bradley G. Bond, 22-42. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2005.
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2004
      • "A Sphinx on the American Land: The Nineteenth-Century South in Comparative Perspective, by Peter Kolchin." .The American Historical Review, June, 2004: 864-865.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2004
      • "Free State of Jones: Mississippi’s Longest Civil War, by Victoria E. Bynum." .The Journal of Southern History 70, February, 2004: 176-177.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2004
      • Morris, Christopher. "Finding Louisiana: La Salle and the Mississippi River Delta." Terrae Incognitae (2004): 28-41.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2003
      • "Black Rice: The African Origins of Rice Cultivation in the Americas, by Judith A. Carney." .Itinerario: European Journal of Overseas History 27, no 3, 2003: 309.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2003
      • "The Old South Frontier, by Donald P. McNeilly." .The Georgia Historical Quarterly, 2003: 641-642.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2001
      • "Slavery, Secession, and Southern History, ed. Robert Louis Paquette and Louis A. Ferleger." .Journal of American History, December, 2001.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2001
      • Morris, Christopher. "Shopping for America in Mississippi: Or, How I Learned to Stop Complaining and Love the Pemberton Mall." . Reviews in American History March 2001: 103-110.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2000
      • "The Buzzel about Kentuck: Settling the Promised Land, ed. Craig Thompson Friend." .The Journal of Southern History, no 66, May, 2000: 393-395.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2000
      • "American Mobbing, 1828-1861: Toward Civil War, by David Grimsted, in." .The Journal of Interdisciplinary History 30, 2000: 706-707.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Chapter 2000
      • Morris, Christopher. "Impenetrable but Easy: The French Transformation of the Lower Mississippi Valley and the Founding of New Orleans." Centuries of Change: Human Transformation of the Lower Mississippi, edited by Craig E. Colten, 22-42. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2000.
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 1999
      • "Masters, Slaves and Subjects: The Culture of Power in the South Carolina Country, 1740-1790, by Robert Olwell." .Journal of American History 86, June, 1999: 217-218.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      1999
      • "Transforming the Cotton Frontier: Madison County, Alabama, 1800-1840, by Daniel S. Dupre." .for H-SHEAR, H-NET List of the Society for the History of the Early American Republic, H-SHEAR@H-NET.MSU.EDU, March, 1999: 6 pp.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Chapter 1999
      • Morris, Christopher. "Within Slave Households: Domestic Violence among Mississippi Slaves." Over the Threshold: Intimate Violence in Early America, 1640-1865, edited by Christine Daniels and Michael Kennedy, New York: Routledge, 1999.
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 1998
      • "A Way Through the Wilderness: The Natchez Trace and the Civilization of the Southern Frontier, by William C. Davis." .Journal of the Early Republic 18, 1998: 159-161.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1998
      • Morris, Christopher. "The Articulation of Two Worlds: The Master-Slave Relationship Reconsidered." Journal of American History 85 (1998): 982-1007.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 1998
      • Morris, Christopher. "What's So Funny?: Southern Humorists and the Market Revolution." Southern Writers and Their Worlds, edited by Christopher Morris and Steven G. Reinhardt, 9-26. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1998.
        {Book Chapter} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book 1998
      • Morris, Christopher and Steven G. Reinhardt, eds. Southern Writers and Their Worlds. Baton Rouge: Lousiana State University Press, 1998.
        {Book} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book 1997
      • Morris, Christopher and Sam W. Haynes, eds. Manifest Destiny and Empire: American Antebellum Expansion. College Station: Texas A & M University Press, 1997.
        {Book} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book 1995
      • Morris, Christopher. Becoming Southern: The Evolution of a Way of Life,Vicksburg and Warren County, Mississippi 1770-1860 (A History Book Club main selection; nominated for the Pulitzer Prize). New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.
        {Book} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 1994
      • Morris, Christopher. "Challenging the Masters: Recent Studies on Slavery and Freedom." .Florida Historical Quarterly 73, October, 1994: 218-224.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      1994
      • Morris, Christopher. "Reading Popular Culture in Early America." .Reviews in American History 22, June, 1994: 252-57.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1990
      • Morris, Christopher. "The Southern White Community in Life and Mind." Canadian Review of American Studies 21 (1990): 203-222.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 1988
      • Morris, Christopher. "An Event in Community Organization: The Mississippi Slave Insurrection Scare of 1835." Journal of Social History 22 (1988): 93-111.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

Presentations

    • November  2016
      The Mississippi River Flood of 1927
      Round Table Discussant on the cultural history of the Mississippi River flood of 1927
    • June  2016
      The Meaning of Restoration

      A brief presentation on the history of the meaning of restoration, as used by conservationists.

    • May  2016
      Water, Water, Everywhere: A Wet History of the Delta

      Presentation on the history of water, its use, development, and control in the Delta region of the state of Mississippi.

    • March  2016
      An American River? The Mississippi in Global Historical Perspective

      From the French colonial era to the present, the Mississippi River has existed within a global context, in some cases through imagined comparisons with other rivers around the world, in other cases through common approaches to engineering and flood control, for example, on the Po River in Italy and on the Mississippi, and in other contexts through competition for global markets among producers of commodities, such as fish and rice, produced in similar river delta environments from China to Africa to India to Louisiana.

    • February  2016
      “Nitrogen Networks: From Ned Cobb’s Alabama to the Early Twentieth-Century World and Back”

      On the nineteenth and early twentieth century global exchange in nitrogen, packaged as various nitrogen compounds used in fertilizers. Nitrogen compounds produced through natural and artificial processes moved nitrogen from the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans to fish off the coasts of the Americas to Peruvian birds and guano islands and Virginia  fertilizer factories to Alabama cotton fields and finally, in the form of runoff, back to the oceans.

    • February  2016
      "Legacies of Enlightenment and Darkness: The Burden of History in Natchez, Mississippi"

      Presentation on the exceptionally vibrant intellectual community in antebellum Natchez, a community comparable to that of the more famous contemporary community of intellects in Concord, Massachusetts. However, that community in Natchez was based on the labor and wealth produced by thousands of enslaved people. Just as the intellectual history of New England has distracted attention from the region's ties to slavery, the legacy of slavery and efforts to repress its memory have distracted attention from intellectual accomplishments in the South. In other words, Concord and Natchez, North and South, were not so very different, in that the very significant intellectual and artistic accomplishments of both regions were closely connected to the exploitation of enslaved men and women.

    • November  2015
      “Southern Environmental History, State of the Field: Round Table Discussion,” Southern Historical Association, Little Rock, November 12-15, 2015.

      Round Table Participant on “Southern Environmental History, State of the Field,” Southern Historical Association, Little Rock, November 12-15, 2015.

    • April  2015
      “Speaking of the Mississippi: America’s Great River In Words and Deeds"

      This presentation used original research to xamine crucial connections between the language of science, engineering, flood control, river restoration, and the Mississippi River over the twentieth century.

    • March  2015
      Comment

      Comment on two research papers on the history of Texas rivers.
       

    • November  2014
      “Mapping the Great Lakes: Historical Cartography and Climate History, 1650-1850"

      Seventeenth to nineteenth century French, British, and U.S. maps of the Great Lakes may hold evidence of the region’s environmental and climate history, provided that evidence is unlocked and revealed. Exactly what sort of climate evidence and where it may be found in the maps is the subject of this presentation.

      This presentation is based on approximately 400 historical maps of the Great Lakes drawn and printed between 1650 and 1850 that have been compiled and digitized as part of a Digging into Image Data Grant (DID) project jointly funded by the NSF/NEH/JISC. The DID research team, of which I am a collaborator, discovered within the maps potential evidence of short-term meteorological and long-term climatological data in the form of variation in cartographic depictions of coastlines, islands, and water passages. Subsequent research into the climatological and hydrological history of the Great Lakes, using textual evidence gathered from archives in Canada and the U. S. archives and data for the region’s physical and biological history, has strengthened our hypothesis, that the maps hold evidence of the region’s environmental history. The research strategy is to layer archival sources and biophysical data over our computer-assisted observations of our digitized collection of 400+ maps.

    • October  2011
      "Mapping the Mississippi for Science: Mapmakers as Hydrologists, from Delisle to Fisk.", October 8, 2011.
    • September  2011
      "The Big Muddy: Engineering the Lower Mississippi in the 19th Century," , September 7, 2011.
    • September  2011
      "Of Hogs and Men: Ecological (and Ideological) Invasions of Bermud and Other Desert Isles," , September 24, 2011
    • September  2011
      "Local Traditions, Global Markets, and Environmental Degradation: An Environmental History of New Orleans from the Perspective of Antoine's Restaurant," , September 30, 2011
    • March  2011
      "Land, Water, People, Fish: Life Along the Mississippi" March 2, 2011.
    • March  2011
      "Environmental and Sustainability Studies and Interdisciplinary Research," , March 23, 2011.
    • March  2010
      "The Implications of Sustainability for the Discipline of History and Vice Versa" , March 25, 2010.
    • October  2009
      "Footprints in the Closet: Talking About the 'Other' Gibson Family." , October 22-24, 2009.
    • August  2009
      "Learning to Live with Water: Post-Katrina New Orleans and the Lessons of the Past." , August 2009.

      ,

    • July  2009
      Panel Commenter, "Not a Nation But an Empire: Another View of the American West,", July 17, 2009.
    • March  2009
      "Floating Islands, Drifting Continents: Situating Bermuda in Britain's American Empire." , March 5, 2009.
    • March  2009
      "Living with Water: Environmental History and Present-Day Environmental Problems." , March 10, 2009.
    • February  2008
      Round Table Discussion of Spike Lee Film, "When the Levees Broke," , February 4, 2008.
    • February  2008
      "Cotton, Capitalism, and the Lower Mississippi Valley: A comment on Walter Johnson's Keynote Presentation," ,February 2008.
    • January  2008
      Panel Commenter, "Rivers in History," , January 3-6, 2008.
    • October  2006
      Discussion Moderator, "Imaging Environment: Maps, Models, and Metaphors,", November 9-10, 2006.
    • October  2006
      "Race, Reconstruction, and the Origins of Federal Flood Control in the Lower Mississippi Valley,"
    • October  2006
      "What If a River is Only a River?", October 28-30, 2006.
    • May  2006
      "Wetland Colonies: Louisiana, Guangzhou, Pondicherry, and Senegal," ,May 6, 2006.
    • March  2006
      "Catfish, Crawfish, Cotton, and Chemicals: Fishing, Farming, and Fish Farming along the Lower Mississippi River," , March 30, 2006.
    • October  2005
      "The Strange Career of Gideon Gibson,"
    • May  2005
      "Before They Went West: Engineers, Bureaucrats, and Developers in the Lower Mississippi Valley," , May 18, 2005.
    • October  2004
      "Eating the Land, Or, Finding Empire in the Soup de Jour."
    • October  2004
      "A Big Middy River Runs Through It."
    • October  2003
      "Finding Louisiana: La Salle and the Mississippi River Delta."
    • September  2001
      Round Table Participant.
    • October  1999
      Panel Chair.
    • October  1999
      Panel Chair
    • June  1999
      Panel Commentor.
    • June  1999
      Panel Commentor
    • March  1999
      "How to Prepare Buffalo, and Other Things French Taught Indians"
    • March  1999
      "How to Prepare Buffalo, and Other Things French Taught Indians"
    • October  1998
      "Between Field and Forest: The Ecology of the Slaves in the Lower Mississippi Valley"
    • October  1998
      "The Natural Worlds of Benjamin Wailes and His Slaves"
    • January  1997
      "Within the Slaves Household: Domestic Violence among Slaves in Mississippi"
    • January  1997
      "Within the Slaves Household: Domestic Violence among Slaves in Mississippi"
    • October  1996
      Panel Commentor.
    • February  1996
      "Creating a Southern Landscapre: Ecology and the Society in the Natchez District"
    • February  1996
      "Creating a Southern Landscapre: Ecology and the Society in the Natchez District"
    • January  1995
      Panel Chair
    • January  1995
      "Venturing Across the Border of Slavery: Cross-Sectional Travelers and the Coming of the Civil War"
    • January  1995
      "Venturing Across the Border of Slavery: Cross-Sectional Travelers and the Coming of the Civil War"
    • March  1991
      "South by Southwest: Homesteading and Cotton Planting in the Natchez District, 1770-1820s"
    • March  1991
      "South by Southwest: Homesteading and Cotton Planting in the Natchez District, 1770-1820s"
  • Past
    •  
      “Southern Environmental History, State of the Field: Round Table Discussion,” Southern Historical Association, Little Rock, November 12-15, 2015.

      Round Table Participant on “Southern Environmental History, State of the Field,” Southern Historical Association, Little Rock, November 12-15, 2015.

Projects

  • 2017
    • Feb 2017 to Present Nitrogen Networks.

      1. Nitrogen Networks. The study begins with Ned Cobb, an early twentieth century Alabama tenant farmer in need of nitrogen fertilizer, and situates him within a global trade in nitrogen and nitrogen compounds. Whereas studies of capitalism that often focus on commodities miss environmental connections and implications, my study will focus on a single element, nitrogen, and the ways it has been extracted from some natural environments, repackaged as compounds that were placed into commodities, and shipped to distant environments where it was released back into the environment. Each step in the process--extraction, repackaging, release--brought people into contested relations with each other and with non-human nature. Nitrogen Networks connects Ned Cobb and his Tallapoosa County community to South America and Europe, and to the larger arenas of science, industrial capitalism, world war, environmental degradation, and global nitrogen cycles, and back again.

      Role: Principal Investigator PI: Dr. Christopher Morris
    • Feb 2017 to Present 2. Mapping the Great Lakes: Computational Visual Analysis, Historical Cartography, and Climate History, 1650-1850.” I am working as part of an interdisciplinary collaboration involving computer scientists and humanists that is digitizing over 400 maps and

      2. Mapping the Great Lakes: Computational Visual Analysis, Historical Cartography, and Climate History, 1650-1850.” I am working as part of an interdisciplinary collaboration involving computer scientists and humanists that is digitizing over 400 maps and machine reading (at the supercomputing center at the University of Illinois) their variations in cartographic depictions of coastlines, islands, and water passages for evidence of short-term meteorological and long-term climatological change. My contribution includes research into the climatological and hydrological history of the Great Lakes based on published physical and biological data and archival records in Canadian and U. S. archives. The University of Pennsylvania Press has expressed interest in publication as part of a digital humanities series.

      Collaborators: Robert Markley, University of Illinois. Michael Simeone, Arizona State University

      Collaborators: Robert Markley, University of Illinois. Michael Simeone, Arizona State University

      Role: Coinvestigator PI: Robert Markley, University of Illinois

Other Research Activities

  • 2013
    • Awards and Fellowships
      • July 2013 Departmental Fellowship

        University of Florida

  • 2004
    • Awards and Fellowships
      • Jan 2004 Stanford Humanities Center Senior Fellow

        2004-2005, Stanford University

  • 1996
    • Awards and Fellowships
      • Mar 1996 Outstanding Research Achievement Award

        The University of Texas at Arlington, April 1996

  • 1995
    • Awards and Fellowships
      • Jan 1995 Pulitzer Prize nominee

  • 1991
    • Awards and Fellowships
      • Jan 1991 Phi Beta Kappa

         University of Florida

  • 1987
    • Awards and Fellowships
      • Jan 1987 Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Doctoral Fellowship

  • 1985
    • Awards and Fellowships
      • Jan 1985 Richard J. Milbauer Fellowship, University of Florida

        1985-1987

Students Supervised

  • Doctoral
    • Present
      thumbnail

      Directing Comprehensive Exam Field in Transatlantic Slavery

    • Mar 2016
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      Dissertation Title: The Rise and Proliferation of the Mythic American Western Hero

    • Nov 2015
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      Dissertation Title: That Fiery Liquid: How Alcohol Became an Intoxicant in the Early Modern Atlantic World

    • May 2015
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      Dissertation Title: Organic Farmers, German Vintners, and the Atomic Monster of Seabrook: A Trans-Atlantic History of Social Activism and Nuclear Power from New England to West Germany

    • May 2014
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      Dissertation Title: Cord of Empire, Exotic Intoxicant: Hemp and Culture In The Atlantic World, 1600-1900

    • Aug 2013

      Dissertation Title: Entangled Knowledge, Expanding Nation: Science and the United States Empire in the Southeast Borderlands, 1783-1842

    • Apr 2013
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      Dissertation Title: Mapping Men: Towards a Material Theory of Masculinity

    • Apr 2011
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      Dissertation Title: From Paradise to Tropics: Landscape in the British West Indies to 1800

       

    • Apr 2010
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      Dissertation Title: 'There is Death in the Pot': Women, Consumption, and Free Produce in the Transatlantic World, 1791-1848

  • Master's
    • Present
    • Dec 2015
    • Dec 2015
    • Nov 2015
    • May 2015
    • May 2015
    • Dec 2014
    • May 2014
    • May 2014
    • May 2013
    • Dec 2012
    • May 2012
    • May 2011
    • May 2011
    • May 2011
    • May 2011
    • May 2011

Collaborators

    • thumbnail
      Duration : Oct 2013 to Present

      “Mapping the Great Lakes: Computational Visual Analysis, Historical Cartography, and Climate History, 1650-1850.” I am working as part of an interdisciplinary collaboration involving computer scientists and humanists that is digitizing over 400 maps and machine reading (at the supercomputing center at the University of Illinois) their variations in cartographic depictions of coastlines, islands, and water passages for evidence of short-term meteorological and long-term climatological change. My contribution includes research into the climatological and hydrological history of the Great Lakes based on published physical and biological data and archival records in Canadian and U. S. archives. The University of Pennsylvania Press has expressed interest in publication as part of a digital humanities series.

    • thumbnail
      Duration : Nov 2015 to Present

      Alaimo and Morris are the institutional collaborators for UTA in The Seed Box: Mistra-Formas Environmental Humanities Collaboratory, a four-year research hub hosted by Linköping University in Sweden. UTA is one of 7 international partner institutions. The goals of the collaboration are: To advance transdisciplinary environmental humanities (EH) scholarship, and to underwrite a systematic transnationalization and interdisciplining of Swedish EH research; To advance the field of EH in both established and emerging directions, focusing on top priority issues, and with an overarching commitment to methodological and conceptual innovation; To create a high-quality international research environment which is intellectually attractive, stimulating and challenging as well as mutually supportive for both senior and junior scholars. To further an applied (yet philosophically advanced) citizen dimension within environmental humanities.

Courses

      • HIST 3326-001 THE OLD SOUTH, 1607-1863

        This course has four primary goals: First, to understand the historical origins of what remains one of the most enduring regional cultures of the United States; second, to explore from within the context of the South as a historical place some of the major events and historical processes that shaped the history of the U.S., for example, the American Revolution, westward expansion, the spread of capitalism, secession and civil war; third, to consider southern history from the perspective of free and enslaved southerners. Finally, this course will help students to understand and participate knowledgably in present-day discussions about the legacy of the Old South and how it ought to be remembered and memorialized.

         

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-007 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865

        This course will emphasize the relationship between the idea and experience of living, creating economies, fashioning politics, working, fighting, cooperating, in what became the United States, as Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans interacted in the North American environment. By the end of the course students will be able to connect these sub-themes to explain the emergence of the United States as a capitalist democracy by the middle of the 19th century. In addition, this course is part of the UTA Core, and as such, it has additional objectives.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3357-001 Early Frontier

        This course begins with first encounters between Europeans and Native Americans and quickly moves to the subject of the fur trade, which though centered in the east, transformed the human and physical geography of the entire continent. The history of the fur trade created the West that Lewis and Clark “discovered.” We will also investigate the earlier explorers who inspired Lewis and Clark, and their mentor, Thomas Jefferson. In particular, we will examine Daniel Boone in life, fiction, memory, television, and film. We will end with Lewis and Clark, a new breed of “scientific” explorers who largely failed to capture the attention of their contemporaries, but who have since come to symbolize the westward expansion of the U.S.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3323-001 The New Nation

        This course examines the solidification and expansion of the young republic from the era of Revolution and the coming of the Civil War. We will examine the development of the two-party system, of capitalism and the market economy, of new forms of religious expression, and the parallel expansion westward of liberty and slavery.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-005 History of the U.S. to 1865

        This course will emphasize the relationship between the idea and experience of living, creating economies, fashioning politics, working, fighting, cooperating, in what became the United States, as Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans interacted in the North American environment. By the end of the course students will be able to connect these sub-themes to explain the emergence of the United States as a capitalist democracy by the middle of the 19th century. It is an additional objective of the course to develop student communication and analytical skills that will prove invaluable to them when they leave UTA.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5339-001 HISTORICAL THEORY AND METHODOLOGY

        This course is a basic introduction to the discipline of history and is required for all History M.A. and Ph.D. students.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 4388-001 Natural Disasters in History

        This course will examine four disasters that occurred about 100 years ago: the Galveston Hurricane of 1900, the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906, the Paris Flood of 1910, and the world-wide Influenza Epidemic of 1918. Students will be asked to consider the causes, responses, and consequences of these catastrophes (environmental, social, political, economic, and scientific understanding), and to compare them to present-day disasters by seeking to understand past and present in terms of policy, politics, and science of sustainability. Along the way, the class will interrogate the meaning of the word “sustainable,” (and related concepts) by considering how it has been used, by whom, with what reasons, to sustain what, with what effect.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • GEOG 4350-002 Natural Disasters in History

        This course will examine four disasters that occurred about 100 years ago: the Galveston Hurricane of 1900, the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906, the Paris Flood of 1910, and the world-wide Influenza Epidemic of 1918. Students will be asked to consider the causes, responses, and consequences of these catastrophes (environmental, social, political, economic, and scientific understanding), and to compare them to present-day disasters by seeking to understand past and present in terms of policy, politics, and science of sustainability. Along the way, the class will interrogate the meaning of the word “sustainable,” (and related concepts) by considering how it has been used, by whom, with what reasons, to sustain what, with what effect.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ESST 2300-001 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL & SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES

        This course will introduce students to basic concepts of sustainability by having them examine four disasters that occurred about 100 years ago: the Galveston Hurricane of 1900, the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906, the Paris Flood of 1910, and the world-wide Influenza Epidemic of 1918. Students will be asked to consider the causes, responses, and consequences of these catastrophes (environmental, social, political, economic, and scientific understanding), and to compare them to present-day disasters by seeking to understand past and present in terms of policy, politics, and science of sustainability. Along the way, the class will interrogate the meaning of the word “sustainable,” (and related concepts) by considering how it has been used, by whom, with what reasons, to sustain what, with what effect.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3355-001 Environmental History of the U.S.

        This course will introduce students to basic concepts necessary to understand and engage present-day debates over policy, politics, and science of sustainability and the relationship between people and the natural environment. This will be accomplished primarily be exploring the history of sustainability and the human-environmental relationship in the United States. The history of the United States has been shaped by a close relationship between people and the North American environment, relationships that have not always been sustainable. The land has altered human behavior and touched human consciousness as surely as people have transformed the land in ways both constructive and destructive. From the colonial period when nature mediated relations between Europeans and Native Americans to cattle ranching in the West to modern environmental engineering to conservation and environmentalist politics, this class will explore the largely unconsidered but crucial role non-human nature has played in the human history of America (and vice versa).

      • ESST 2300-001 Environmental History of the U.S.

        This course will introduce students to basic concepts necessary to understand and engage present-day debates over policy, politics, and science of sustainability and the relationship between people and the natural environment. This will be accomplished primarily be exploring the history of sustainability and the human-environmental relationship in the United States. The history of the United States has been shaped by a close relationship between people and the North American environment, relationships that have not always been sustainable. The land has altered human behavior and touched human consciousness as surely as people have transformed the land in ways both constructive and destructive. From the colonial period when nature mediated relations between Europeans and Native Americans to cattle ranching in the West to modern environmental engineering to conservation and environmentalist politics, this class will explore the largely unconsidered but crucial role non-human nature has played in the human history of America (and vice versa).

      • GEOG 3355-001 Environmental History of the U.S.

        This course will introduce students to basic concepts necessary to understand and engage present-day debates over policy, politics, and science of sustainability and the relationship between people and the natural environment. This will be accomplished primarily be exploring the history of sustainability and the human-environmental relationship in the United States. The history of the United States has been shaped by a close relationship between people and the North American environment, relationships that have not always been sustainable. The land has altered human behavior and touched human consciousness as surely as people have transformed the land in ways both constructive and destructive. From the colonial period when nature mediated relations between Europeans and Native Americans to cattle ranching in the West to modern environmental engineering to conservation and environmentalist politics, this class will explore the largely unconsidered but crucial role non-human nature has played in the human history of America (and vice versa).

      • HIST 3300-003 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL RESEARCH

        This course introduces students to ways in which historians 1) decide what questions are worth investigating 2) conduct research into those questions 3) write about what they have found and 4) critique each other’s research and writing. Students will write and present a research paper in the style of professional historians.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 6360-001 Early Transatlantic Research Seminar on Slavery

        The goal of this course is for each student to produce research a paper of publishable quality based on primary sources, on a topic of the student’s choice within the general history of slavery in the United States and/or the Transatlantic World. Students will be required to select a topic of historiographical relevance, to formulate a thesis or argument based on research into secondary and primary source materials, and to present the full argument in a 25-30 page essay that is free of spelling and grammatical errors, is clear and logical, and is in accord with the Chicago Manual of Style. The final product, the essay, will be the primary means for assessing the extent to which students have met the goals of this class.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5339-001 HISTORICAL THEORY AND METHODOLOGY

        This course is a basic introduction to the discipline of history and is required for all History M.A. and Ph.D. students. No prior knowledge of historiographical issues is expected or required, and the course therefore should be accessible to students regardless of their particular field of interest or concentration.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-005 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1865

        This course will emphasize the relationship between the idea and experience of living, creating economies, fashioning politics, working, fighting, cooperating, in what became the United States, as Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans interacted in the North American environment. By the end of the course students will be able to connect these sub-themes to explain the emergence of the United States as a capitalist democracy by the middle of the 19th century. It is an additional objective of the course to develop student communication and analytical skills that will prove invaluable to them when they leave UTA.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3355-001 ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES

        This course will introduce students to basic concepts necessary to understand and engage present-day debates over policy, politics, and science of sustainability and the relationship between people and the natural environment. This will be accomplished primarily be exploring the history of sustainability and the human-environmental relationship in the United States. The history of the United States has been shaped by a close relationship between people and the North American environment, relationships that have not always been sustainable. The land has altered human behavior and touched human consciousness as surely as people have transformed the land in ways both constructive and destructive. From the colonial period when nature mediated relations between Europeans and Native Americans to cattle ranching in the West to modern environmental engineering to conservation and environmentalist politics, this class will explore the largely unconsidered but crucial role non-human nature has played in the human history of America (and vice versa).

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • GEOG 3355-001 Environmental History of the United States

        This course will introduce students to basic concepts necessary to understand and engage present-day debates over policy, politics, and science of sustainability and the relationship between people and the natural environment. This will be accomplished primarily be exploring the history of sustainability and the human-environmental relationship in the United States. The history of the United States has been shaped by a close relationship between people and the North American environment, relationships that have not always been sustainable. The land has altered human behavior and touched human consciousness as surely as people have transformed the land in ways both constructive and destructive. From the colonial period when nature mediated relations between Europeans and Native Americans to cattle ranching in the West to modern environmental engineering to conservation and environmentalist politics, this class will explore the largely unconsidered but crucial role non-human nature has played in the human history of America (and vice versa).

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ESST 2300-001 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL & SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES

        This course will introduce students to basic concepts necessary to understand and engage present-day debates over policy, politics, and science of sustainability and the relationship between people and the natural environment. This will be accomplished primarily be exploring the history of sustainability and the human-environmental relationship in the United States. The history of the United States has been shaped by a close relationship between people and the North American environment, relationships that have not always been sustainable. The land has altered human behavior and touched human consciousness as surely as people have transformed the land in ways both constructive and destructive. From the colonial period when nature mediated relations between Europeans and Native Americans to cattle ranching in the West to modern environmental engineering to conservation and environmentalist politics, this class will explore the largely unconsidered but crucial role non-human nature has played in the human history of America (and vice versa).

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-001 History of the U. S. to 1865

        This course will emphasize the relationship between the idea and experience of living, creating economies, fashioning politics, working, fighting, cooperating, in what became the United States, as Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans interacted in the North American environment. By the end of the course students will be able to connect these sub-themes to explain the emergence of the United States as a capitalist democracy by the middle of the 19th century. It is an additional objective of the course to develop student communication and analytical skills that will prove invaluable to them when they leave UTA.

      • HIST 3372-001 U.S. BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC HISTORY TO 1865

        This course will trace the development of the United States from a colonial economy in the first British Empire to a growing industrial economy in its own right. Specific topics will include the role of the colonies in the British mercantile system, the economic origins of slavery and plantation agriculture, the economic causes and consequences of the Revolution, how to farm eighteenth-century style, early urbanization and industrialization, the cotton south, the economy of the slaves, the role of government and law in economic development, the economic causes of the Civil War. By the end of the course students will be able to connect these various topics to offer a general description of the emergence of the United States as an industrial capitalist market economy based on free wage labor. It is an additional objective of the course to develop student communication and analytical skills that will prove invaluable to them when they leave UTA.

      • HIST 5390-015 DIRECTED STUDIES FOR MASTERS STUDENTS

        This course will trace the development of capitalism, from its origins in England, its growth in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries with the Atlantic commodities and slave trade, and its emergence in the nineteenth century as a global system. We will also consider the scholarly debates over the definition and historical manifestations of capitalism, of its relationship to slavery and the slave trade, of its role in the American Revolution, and of its place in the emergence of the empires of the nineteenth century, specifically, in particular, those of Great Britain in India and the U.S. across the North American continent.

      • HIST 3300-005 Introduction to Historical Research

        This course introduces students to ways in which historians 1) decide what questions are worth investigating 2) conduct research into those questions 3) write about what they have found and 4) critique each other’s research and writing. Students will write and present a research paper in the style of professional historians.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3327-001 U.S. South Since 1863

        This course covers the South’s tortured but fascinating journey from plantations and slavery to skyscrapers, high-tech industry, and racial integration. This is a course in U.S. regional history, and so we will discuss how the South remained a distinct region even after the end of slavery, what that meant for the South and the nation, and finally the extent to which the South today remains distinct in meaningful ways. Major topics will include: the promise and disappointment of emancipation, the Lost Cause, the Ku Klux Klan, Jim Crow segregation, the continued expansion and painful decline of cotton agriculture, single party politics and populist demagogues, the South in film, religion, literature, music, civil rights, and the rise of the Sunbelt South.

         

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-001 HIST 1312, The United States, 1865-Present

        HIST 1312 surveys broadly the history of the United States from the end of the Civil War in 1865 to the end of the twentieth century. This section specifically considers United States history in terms of the rise of the United States as an industrial capitalist superpower, a process that began during the Civil War and that culminated with the collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989. By the end of the course students will be able to connect this overall theme to related sub-themes of race relations, women’s rights, the westward and global expansions of the United States as a military and economic power, the rise and fall of big business, big labor, and big government, and the expressions of these historical moments in American popular culture, including film and music. It is an additional objective of the course to develop student communication and analytical skills that will prove invaluable to them when they leave UTA.

         

        Winter - Intersession - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5339-001 Historical Theory and Methodology

        This course is a basic introduction to the discipline of history and is required for all History M.A. and Ph.D. students. No prior knowledge of historiographical issues is expected or required, and the course therefore should be accessible to students regardless of their particular field of interest or concentration.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3326-001 The Old South

        This course has three primary goals: First, to understand the historical and environmental origins of what remains one of the most enduring regional cultures of the United States; second, to explore from within the context of the South as a historical and environmental place some of the major events and historical processes that shaped the history of the U.S., for example, the American Revolution, westward expansion, the spread of capitalism, secession and civil war; third, to consider southern history from the perspective of free and enslaved southerners.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 4388-007 UNSUSTAINABLE! DESTRUCTION, EXTINCTION, AND CATASTOPHIC FAILURE IN HISTORY

        This course will introduce students to basic concepts necessary to understand and engage present-day debates over policy, politics, and science of sustainability. This will be accomplished primarily by exploring past examples of communities and societies that have collapsed because their relationship with the natural environment was unsustainable, and by connecting these past examples to present-day problems and issues of sustainability. Along the way, the class will interrogate the meaning of the word “sustainable,” by considering how it has been used, by whom, with what reasons, to sustain what, with what effect.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ESST 2300-001 Introduction to Environmental and Sustainability Studies

        This course will introduce students to basic concepts necessary to understand and engage present-day debates over policy, politics, and science of sustainability. This will be accomplished primarily by exploring past examples of communities and societies that have collapsed because their relationship with the natural environment was unsustainable, and by connecting these past examples to present-day problems and issues of sustainability. Along the way, the class will interrogate the meaning of the word “sustainable,” by considering how it has been used, by whom, with what reasons, to sustain what, with what effect.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-001 History of the U.S. to 1865

        This course will emphasize the relationship between the idea and experience of living, creating economies, fashioning politics, working, fighting, cooperating, in what became the United States, as Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans interacted in the North American environment. By the end of the course students will be able to connect these sub-themes to explain the emergence of the United States as a capitalist democracy by the middle of the 19th century.

      • HIST 3300-002 Hist 3300-002

        This course introduces students to ways in which historians 1) decide what questions are worth investigating 2) conduct research into those questions 3) write about what they have found and 4) critique each other’s research and writing. Students will write and present a research paper in the style of professional historians.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 6302-001 Comparative Transatlantic Slavery

        This colloquium will survey the major issues, themes, books, and articles on the history of trans-Atlantic slavery. We will begin by examining the books that first established the field in general, and then quickly move to more recent studies and more specific subtopics, for example: West Africa and the slave trade; African cultures in America; work patterns and the demands of specific crops; colonial slavery versus slavery post independence; slave family and community life; gender and slavery; resistance, insurrection, and maroonage. All topics will be considered within a comparative perspective.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-001 Introduction to the Study of History

        This course introduces students to ways in which historians 1) decide what questions are worth investigating 2) conduct research into those questions 3) write about what they have found and 4) critique each other’s research and writing. By the end of the semester students will be expected to: explain the concept of historiography and to describe the historiography of a topic of their choice; identify and use professional historical  journals; distinguish primary from secondary sources; formulate historiographically valid as well as researchable questions; identify, locate, assess, and use primary sources to answer a question; write a research paper in the style of professional historians.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3355-001 The Environmental History of the United States

        This course will introduce students to basic concepts necessary to understand and engage present-day debates over policy, politics, and science of sustainability and the relationship between people and the natural environment. This will be accomplished primarily be exploring the history of sustainability and the human-environmental relationship in the United States. The history of the United States has been shaped by a close relationship between people and the North American environment, relationships that have not always been sustainable. The land has altered human behavior and touched human consciousness as surely as people have transformed the land in ways both constructive and destructive. From the colonial period when nature mediated relations between Europeans and Native Americans to cattle ranching in the West to modern environmental engineering to conservation and environmentalist politics, this class will explore the largely unconsidered but crucial role non-human nature has played in the human history of America (and vice versa).

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • GEOG 3355-001 The Environmental History of the United States

        This course will introduce students to basic concepts necessary to understand and engage present-day debates over policy, politics, and science of sustainability and the relationship between people and the natural environment. This will be accomplished primarily be exploring the history of sustainability and the human-environmental relationship in the United States. The history of the United States has been shaped by a close relationship between people and the North American environment, relationships that have not always been sustainable. The land has altered human behavior and touched human consciousness as surely as people have transformed the land in ways both constructive and destructive. From the colonial period when nature mediated relations between Europeans and Native Americans to cattle ranching in the West to modern environmental engineering to conservation and environmentalist politics, this class will explore the largely unconsidered but crucial role non-human nature has played in the human history of America (and vice versa).

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ESST 2300-001 Introduction to Environmental and Sustainability Studies

        This course will introduce students to basic concepts necessary to understand and engage present-day debates over policy, politics, and science of sustainability and the relationship between people and the natural environment. This will be accomplished primarily be exploring the history of sustainability and the human-environmental relationship in the United States. The history of the United States has been shaped by a close relationship between people and the North American environment, relationships that have not always been sustainable. The land has altered human behavior and touched human consciousness as surely as people have transformed the land in ways both constructive and destructive. From the colonial period when nature mediated relations between Europeans and Native Americans to cattle ranching in the West to modern environmental engineering to conservation and environmentalist politics, this class will explore the largely unconsidered but crucial role non-human nature has played in the human history of America (and vice versa).

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5339-001 History Theory and Methods

        This course is a basic introduction to the discipline of history and is required for all History M.A. and Ph.D. students. No prior knowledge of historiographical issues is expected or required, and the course therefore should be accessible to students regardless of their particular field of interest or concentration.

        History is not just a craft; it is a way of thinking. It is an intellectual endeavor. This class is designed to make students think, not about the past, but about how historians think about the past. This we will do by jumping into some of the ongoing debates among historians over what it is they do and how they ought to do whatever it is they do. We will consider broad philosophical problems, survey some of the social theories underlying (explicitly and implicitly) much of modern historical thought, and review recent trends in the discipline. We will discuss current literary theories that question the whole enterprise of historical research and writing as it has been practiced over the last century. As historians, you will not want to take any of this lying down, so to speak, but will want to engage these important matters of life and death (for the discipline of history) intelligently, well informed, and enthusiastically.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-001 HIST 1312, The United States, 1865-Present

        HIST 1312 surveys broadly the history of the United States from the end of the Civil War in 1865 to the end of the twentieth century. This section specifically considers United States history in terms of the rise of the United States as an industrial capitalist superpower, a process that began during the Civil War and that culminated with the collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989. By the end of the course students will be able to connect this overall theme to related sub-themes of race relations, women’s rights, the westward and global expansions of the United States as a military and economic power, the rise and fall of big business, big labor, and big government, and the expressions of these historical moments in American popular culture, including film and music. It is an additional objective of the course to develop student communication and analytical skills that will prove invaluable to them when they leave UTA.

      • HIST 4388-005 Rivers in American History

        This course explores some of the roles rivers have played in the history of the United States, including providing Europeans with access to the interior of North America, powering the initial phase of industrialization, serving as the nation’s first interstate highway system, and later, as the first interstate sewer system, irrigating western farms and golf courses, and offering playgrounds for sporting people of all sorts. America’s rivers have also played a central role within the natural environment that is home, not only to the nation’s people, but to all its non-human residents. Throughout much of U.S. history, the determination to make rivers serve the purposes of the nation and its peoples, to understand them scientifically, and to measure their value in those terms, has resulted in their being disconnected from the rest of the environment, often in ways that have worked against U.S. interests.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • GEOG 4350-001 Rivers in American History

        This course explores some of the roles rivers have played in the history of the United States, including providing Europeans with access to the interior of North America, powering the initial phase of industrialization, serving as the nation’s first interstate highway system, and later, as the first interstate sewer system, irrigating western farms and golf courses, and offering playgrounds for sporting people of all sorts. America’s rivers have also played a central role within the natural environment that is home, not only to the nation’s people, but to all its non-human residents. Throughout much of U.S. history, the determination to make rivers serve the purposes of the nation and its peoples, to understand them scientifically, and to measure their value in those terms, has resulted in their being disconnected from the rest of the environment, often in ways that have worked against U.S. interests.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5304-001 U.S. Environmental History

        SPRING 2013

        HIST 5304

        U.S. Environmental History

        Through a survey of key texts on topics ranging from the pre-colonial era to the present, this course will explore the field of environmental history as it is practiced in and applied to the United States. Along the way the class will consider theoretical and conceptual matters debated by historians: What is nature? What is wilderness? What is conservation? As well, the class will consider more practical concerns: What distinguishes environmental history from historical geography, historical ecology, or critical and cultural studies of nature writing? Should environmental historians be trained in ecology and biology? Finally, we will consider what environmental history has to offer “traditional” history: Do we need an environmental history of the Civil War? What does environmental history mean for the traditional temporal and national 
        boundaries of historical research? Does environmental history offer a new perspective on the past, or does it speak more to present-day concerns?

        TEXTS:

        Calvin Martin, Keepers of the Game:  Indian-Animal Relationships in the Fur Trade

        Andrew C. Isenberg, The Destruction of the Bison: An Environmental History 175-1920

        William Cronon, Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England

        Judith A. Carney, Black Rice: The African Origins of Rice Cultivation in the Americas

        Lisa M. Brady, War Upon the Land: Military Strategy and the Transformation of Southern Landscapes During the American Civil War

        Jim Downs, Sick from Freedom: African-American Illness and Suffering During the Civil War and Reconstruction

        Donald Worster, Dust Bowl: The Southern Plains in the 1930s

        Sarah T. Phillips, This Land, This Nation: Conservation, Rural America, and the New Deal

        Ellen Stroud, Nature Next Door: Cities and Trees in the American Northeast

        Adam Rome, The Bulldozer in the Countryside: Suburban Spawl and the Rise of American Environmentalism

        James Morton Turner, The Promise of Wilderness

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-001 HIST 1311-001 - History of the U.S. to 1865

        This course will emphasize the relationship between the idea and experience of living, creating economies, fashioning politics, working, fighting, cooperating, in what became the United States, as Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans interacted in the North American environment. By the end of the course students will be able to connect these sub-themes to explain the emergence of the United States as a capitalist democracy by the middle of the 19th century. It is an additional objective of the course to develop student communication and analytical skills that will prove invaluable to them when they leave UTA.

        Winter - Intersession - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3357-001 Early Frontier

        This course begins with first encounters between Europeans and Native Americans and quickly moves to the subject of the fur trade, which though centered in the east, transformed the human and physical geography of the entire continent. The history of the fur trade created the West that Lewis and Clark "discovered."We will also investigate the earlier explorers who inspired Lewis and Clark, and their mentor, Thomas Jefferson. In particular, we will examine Daniel Boone in life, fiction, memory, television, and film. We will end with Lewis and Clark, a new breed of "scientific" explorers who largely failed to capture the attention of their contemporaries, but who have since come to symbolize the westward expansion of the U.S.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3327-001 U.S. South Since 1863

        This course covers the South's tortured but fascinating journey from plantations and slavery to skyscrapers, high-tech industry, and racial integration. This is a course in U.S. regional history, and so we will discuss how the South remained a distinct region even after the end of slavery, what that meant for the South and the nation, and finally the extent to which the South today remains distinct in meaningful ways. In addition to race and region, the historical relationship between southerners and their, what some describe as unique, natural environment will be an important theme throughout this course.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3372-001 Business and Economic History of the U.S.
        This course will trace the development of the United States from a colonial economy in the first British Empire to a growing industrial economy in its own right. Specific topics will include the role of the colonies in the British mercantile system, the economic origins of slavery and plantation agriculture, the economic causes and consequences of the Revolution, how to farm eighteenth-century style, early urbanization and industrialization, the cotton south, the economy of the slaves, the role of government and law in economic development, the economic causes of the Civil War. By the end of the course students will be able to connect these various topics to offer a general description of the emergence of the United States as an industrial capitalist market economy based on free wage labor.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • HIST 3372-001 Business and Economic History of the U.S.
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • GEOG 3355-001 Environmental History of the U.S.
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • HIST 5339-001 HISTORICAL THEORY AND METHODOLOGY

        No Description Provided.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours

Other Teaching Activities

  • 2015
    • Doctoral Dissertations supervised
      • Apr 2015 Environmental Politics and the Antinuclear Power Movement in the Atlantic World
  • 2014
    • Doctoral Dissertations supervised
      • May 2014 Cord of Empire, Exotic Intoxicant: Hemp and Culture In The Atlantic World, 1600-1900
  • 2011
    • Doctoral dissertation committee member
      • Dec 2011 From Paradise to Tropics: Landscape in the British West Indies to 1800
  • 2010
    • Doctoral dissertation committee member
      • June 2010 'There is Death in the Pot': Women, Consumption, and Free Produce in the Transatlantic World, 1791-1848
  • 2002
    • Doctoral dissertation committee member
      • Dec 2002 Wellington and Lee: Anglo-American Images of the Victorian Hero
  • 2013
    • Doctoral dissertation committee member
      • Apr 2013 Mapping Men: Towards a Material Theory of Masculinity (English)
    • Doctoral dissertation committee member
      • Aug 2013 Entangled Knowledge, Expanding Nation: Science and the United States Empire in the Southeast Borderlands, 1783-1842 (UT-Austin)

Service to the Community

  • Volunteered
    • Aug 2014 to  Aug 2015 Historical Consultant and Researcher for Dallas Davis Cup, Fiftieth Anniversary Celebration, 2014-2015, Dallas Department of Parks and Recreation and Samuell Grand Tennis Center.

      Archival research, oral interviews, and write-ups on the tennis scene in 1960s Dallas, Civil Rights and Dallas Parks, and Arthur Ashe’s visit to Dallas in 1965. http://www.unfurrowedgroundfoundation.org/videos.html
       

Service to the Profession

  • Other
    • Sept 2014 to  Dec 2014 Manuscript review for the Journal of Southern History

      Peer review of a manuscript

  • Appointed
    • June 2015 to  Present Editorial Board

      The Southern Quarterly: A Journal of Arts & Letters in the South

    • Jan 2010 to  Dec 2015 Editorial Board

      Journal of the Civil War Era

Service to the University

  • Volunteered
    • Mar 2012 to  Mar 2016 Judge, Annual Celebration of Excellence by Students (ACES)

      Judged graduate and undergraduate research presentations for the Institute on Sustainability and Global Impact ACES Research Awards.

    • Apr 2007 to  Present Chair, Board of Advisors, Institute for Sustainability and Global Impact (formerly the Curriculum, Research, and Community Engagement Working Group for the University Sustainability Committee)

      Working to develop environmental and sustainability curriculum; organizing and judging faculty fellowships, travel grants, and speaker grants; helping to manage the Environmental and Sustainability Studies Minor; helping to advance the mission of the UTA Institute for Sustainability and Global Impact.

  • Appointed
    • July 2013 to  May 2015 History Department Tenure and Promotion Committee

      Review candidates for tenure and promotion, as well as annual reviews of untenured faculty.

    • Aug 2013 to  Present History Department Graduate Studies, Chair since 2014

      Working with graduate advisors and faculty to shape graduate programs, policies procedures; review applications for admission.

    • Aug 2012 to  May 2015 History Department Scheduling Committee

      Setting the teaching schedule.

    • Sept 2015 to  Present History Department Post Tenure Review

      Conducting comprehensive reviews of tenured faculty
       

  • Elected
    • Aug 2015 to  Present Faculty Senate

      Representing History Department and College of Liberal Arts on Faculty Senate

    • Sept 2015 to  Present Presidential Advisory Board

      A committee of the Faculty Senate that meets regularly with the President and Provost.

Other Service Activities

  • Uncategorized
    • Dec  College Service

      College of Liberal Arts Challenge Grant Committee, June 2004

      Liberal Arts Faculty Forum Steering Committee, 1995-1996

      Research Enhancement Program and Faculty Development Leave Review Committee, 1999-2001 (chair), 2003-2005, 2006 to present

      Tenure and Promotion, 1996-1998

    • Dec  University Service

      Community Service Learning Workshop, 2002, 2005

      Curriculum, Research, and Community Engagement Working Group on Sustainability, 2007 to present (Chair since August, 2011)

      Environmental Society, Lecture, March 23, 2009

      Faculty Development Leave proposal review committee, Spring 1998

      Hermanns Lecture, Round Table Discussion participant, October 17, 2009

      Honors College American Studies Review Committee, 2000-2001

      Provost’s Committee to Review the Dean of Liberal Arts, Spring 1998

      Sustainability Director Search Committee, Fall 2009

      Sustainability Teach-In Day, Panel Moderator, January 2009

      Symposium on Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity, Judge, April 1997

      Undergraduate Assembly, 2000-2002

      University Centennial Time Capsule Committee, Spring 1996

      University Sustainability Committee, 2007 to present

    • Dec  Community Service

      AISD History Fair, served as host and judge for event organized by AISD history teachers, March 2003

      AISD, Bebensee Elementary School, Arlington, TX, Presentation on the U.S. Civil War to Fifth Graders, 1993

      Dallas Area Social History Group, 1993-present, co-ordinator 1994-2002

      FWISD, Sewell Lexus of Fort Worth Chair for Teaching Excellence in Humanities committee, Fall 2009

      Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society Regional Conference, Panel Chair and Judge, Baylor University, April 2003

      Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society Regional Conference, Panel Chair and Judge, TCU, April 1997

      SMU, Seminar on slavery, for AP High School Teachers, June 2002

      SMU, Clements Center Fellow, 1997 to present

      SMU, Clements Center Seminar, April 1, 2000

      SMU, Clements Center Seminar commissioned participant and moderator, October 1998

      SMU, Clements Center Seminar commissioned participant, October 1997

      Twelve Hills Nature Center, Dallas, advisor and UTA Liason, 2003-2004

    • Dec  Museum Work
      "Mississippi 1500-1800," a permanent exhibit, Old Capitol Museum, Jackson Mississippi. Author of "Jacques Rapalje's Notebook," a flip book text attached to a story bar in an exhibit entitled "Colonial Refugees."
  • History Department (former, not current)
    • Sep 1992 not current

      Curriculum Committee, 1992-1993, 2003-2004

      Departmental Seminar, 1998-2002

      Education Committee, 2005-2007

      Executive Committee, 1993-1994

      Executive Graduate Committee, 2011 to present (Chair)

      Graduate Studies, 1995-present

      Grievance Committee, 2008-2009

      HIST 3300 Review Committee, 1999-2000

      History Graduate Student Union advisor, 1994-1996

      Library Committee, 1992-1995, 2007-2009 (chair), 2010

      Media, 2002-2004

      Mission Statement Committee, 2012 (chair)

      Ph.D. Review Committee, 2008-2010

      Phi Alpha Theta Student Honor Society, committee member 1994-2004, 2005-            2006, faculty advisor 1996-2004, 2007 PAT Best Chapter Award, 2004, UTA           Outstanding Student Organization Award, 2001

      Research Enhancement and Nominations, 1992-1998, 1999-2001 (chair), 2003-          2004 (chair), 2005-2012 (chair)

      Scheduling Committee, 2012-present

      Search Committee for African American History, 1995-1996, 1997-1998

      Search Committee for One-year Position in U.S. History, Spring 1995

      Tenure and Promotion, 1994-1995, 1996-1998, 2005-2006 (chair), 2013-present

      Trans-Atlantic History Student Organization Committee, 2007-2008

      THSO Panel Moderator, 2008, 2009

      Webb Lectures Committee, 1992-1997, 2010-2012

  • Uncategorized
    • Oct 2017 Professional

      Professional Committees:

      Carleton University, Tenure and Promotion Review, Ottawa, Canada, 2002

      Journal of the Civil War Era, Editorial Board, 2010 to 2015

      Journal of the Civil War Era, Best Article Prize Committee, 2011-2012

      Southern Association for Women Historians, Willie Lee Rose Book Award Committee, 1999

      Southern Historical Association, Membership Committee, 2001, 2009

      Southern Historical Association, Program Committee, 2000-2001, 2016-2017

      Southern Historical Association, Local Arrangements Committee, 1999

      Southern Quarterly, editorial Board, 2015 to present

      Text Book Consultation:

      Sage Press, text book on history theory and method, 2005

      Palgrave, college text on studying history and writing essays, 2004

      Prentice-Hall’s college survey text Making a Nation, 2000

      Addison Wesley Longman, Editorial Board, Longman’s American History atlas, published 1998

      McGraw-Hill’s college history text Nation of Nations

      D.C. Heath's college-level U.S. history survey text, 1995

      Manuscript Reviews, books:

      University of North Carolina Press (2011)

      University of California Press (2010)

      LSU Press (2002, 2003, 2006, 2007)

      Mississippi University Press (2003)

      Northern Illinois University Press (2008)

      Oxford University Press (2003)

      University of Virginia Press, (1999, 2005)

      Manuscript Reviews, Journals:

      Environmental History (2004)

      Journal of the Early Republic (2011, 2012)

      Journal of Mississippi History (2005)

      Journal of American History (1996, 2000, 2002)

      Journal of Southern History (1996, 2003, 2010)

      Social Science Quarterly (1994)

      Southwestern Historical Quarterly (2009, 2010)

  • Uncategorized
    • Jul 2015 Media Appearances

      WHYY Philadelphia, NPR, The Pusle, radio documentary on the Mississippi River, Sept. 29, 2017

      On Point with Tom Ashbrook, WBUR Boston, NPR, interview on the history of pioneer settlement in the Mississippi Delta. July 14, 2016

      Fort Worth Star-Telegram interview on Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans ten years after. September 2, 2015.

      Fort Worth Star-Telegram interview on schools named for Confederate generals. July 17, 2015. http://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/community/fort-worth/article27529096.html

      Landscape Architecture Magazine interviewed for an article on my research into the concept of “disturbance” as used by engineers, ecologists, and others working on river control and floodplain restoration projects, April 15, 2014.

      WKNO FM, Memphis, interview on “Counterpoint with Jonathan Judaken, broadcast May, 2013.

      KDHX FM, St. Louis, interview on “Earthworms, with Jean Ponzi,” May 2013.

      KTVT/CBS TV 11, Dallas-Fort Worth, interview on the earth’s population, which reached 7 billion. October 31, 2011.

      KTVT/CBS TV 11 interview on the earth’s population, which reached 7 billion. October 31, 2011

      The Washington Post, interviewed for a story on race relations, politics, and Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, September, 20. 2005

      Gainesville (Fla) Sun, quoted, in article New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina, September 11, 2005

      Pacifica Radio, KPFA Berkeley/San Francisco affiliate, on "Against the Grain," interviewed about New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina, September 6, 2005

      Richmond Times-Dispatch, interviewed for story on the legacy of slavery, July 27, 2005

      Stockman Grass Farmer (Spring 2000), story on my research on buffalo herds and habitat in the lower Mississippi Valley pre-17000.

      Star-Telegram, June 1999, worked with reporter on story on role of Catholic church and the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

      Star-Telegram, March? 1999, worked with reporter on history of ex-slave narratives.

      Channel ? News, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, March 1999, on historical impact of French colonization on the natural environment of the Lower Mississippi Valley

      Hattiesburg American, March 7, 1999, French Influence on the Gulf Coast

      KXAS/NBC TV 5 News at 11:00, April 1998, on history of Confederate Flag

      KXAS/NBC TV 5 News at 6:00, March 22, 1998, on hunting and violence in the South

      Glen Mitchell Show, KERA, February 26, 1996, on Becoming Southern, and southern culture