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Dr. Colleen M Fitzgerald

Name

[Fitzgerald, Dr. Colleen M]
  • Professor, Linguistics & TESOL

Biography

I'm currently on loan from UT Arlington, serving a detail as the Program Director for the Documenting Endangered Languages Program, in the Social, Behavioral and Economic Directorate at the National Science Foundation. While on assignment, I continue to be a Professor of Linguistics in the Department of Linguistics & TESOL at the University of Texas at Arlington. In 2014, I served as Director of the 2014 Institute on Collaborative Language Research (CoLang/InField), supported by the National Science Foundation (BCS grant#1263939). among others. I also served as Co-Director of the Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop, also supported by the NSF (BCS#1065068) from 2011-2014. From 2008-2012, I served as Department Head for Linguistics and TESOL within the College of Liberal Arts at UT Arlington.My research focuses on documenting and revitalizing Native American languages and studying their phonology, especially Tohono O'odham, Chickasaw, Choctaw and others in the Southwest. Collaborative work on with the Chickasaw Language Revitalization Program has been recently awarded nearly $100,000, with half of that the UT Arlington portion (NSF BCS grant #1263699). Overall, I have garnered external funding for these and other research activities in the amount of $340,311. I also teach language documentation and revitalization at summer institutes and short workshops, including AILDI (2013), InField/CoLang (2012, 2014), ONLA (since 2009) and CoLang/InField (since 2010). For more on my work and collaborations with Native American communities, click here.

Professional Preparation

    • 1997 PhD in LinguisticsUniversity of Arizona
    • 1994 MA in LinguisticsUniversity of Arizona
    • 1991 BA Loyola University New Orleans

Appointments

    • June 2013 to June 2013 Instructor, American Indian Language Development Institute, University of Arizona. Instructor for 'Creating Linguistic Products for Native American Languages'
      American Indian Language Development Institute   University of Arizona
    • Aug 2012 to Present Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington   Office of the President   Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs   College of Liberal Arts   Linguistics & TESOL
    • June 2012 to June 2012 Co-instructor for 'Orthographies' and 'Language Activism'
      CoLang (Institute on Collaborative Language Research, formerly InField). University of Kansas.
    • May 2012 to May 2012 Instructor for 'Phonetics' (Level 1).
      University of Oklahoma   Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop
    • Sept 2011 to June 2012 Professor & Chair
      University of Texas at Arlington   Office of the President   Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs   College of Liberal Arts   Linguistics & TESOL
    • June 2010 to June 2010 Co-instructor for 'Accessing archival materials for community-based language documentation and revitalization'
      University of Oregon   InField Institute on Field Linguistics and Language Documentation
    • May 2010 to May 2010 Instructor for 'Phonetics'
      University of Oklahoma   Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop
    • Aug 2008 to Aug 2011 Associate Professor and Chair
      University of Texas at Arlington   Office of the President   Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs   College of Liberal Arts   Linguistics & TESOL
    • Aug 2004 to July 2008 Associate Professor and Director of Linguistics
      Texas Tech University   Department of English
    • Aug 2001 to May 2004 Assistant Professor and Director of Linguistics
      Texas Tech University   Department of English
    • Aug 1998 to May 2002 Assist Professor
      State University of New York at Buffalo   College of Arts and Sciences   Linguistics
    • Aug 1997 to May 1998 Lecturer
      San José State University   Linguistics and English
    • Aug 1996 to May 1997 Visiting Assistant Professor
      University of Pittsburgh   Department of Linguistics

Memberships

  • Professional
    • Jan 2013 to Present CoLang (Institute on Collaborative Language Research, formerly InField), Onsite at UT Arlington
    • May 2013 to Present American Indian Language Development Institute
    • May 2013 to Present 'Orthographies' and 'Language Activism' Summer 2012, University of Kansas.
    • May 2013 to Present Native American Languages Lab
    • Jan 2012 to Jan 2012 "Activism." CoLang (formerly InField). University of Kansas
    • Jan 2005 to Jan 2005 "Accessing Archives." InField: Institute for Field Training and Language Documentation. University of Oregon

Awards and Honors

    • Sep  2015 Dean's Award for Graduate Student Mentorship sponsored by College of Liberal ArtsOffice of the Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsOffice of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
      Description:

      Awarded annually by the College of Liberal Arts for excellence in mentoring graduate students

    • Mar  2007 2007 – 8. Faculty Development Leave (Texas Tech University) sponsored by Texas Tech University
    • Mar  2004 2004. Teaching Academy. sponsored by Texas Tech University
    • Mar  1997 Honorary Faculty Member, Phi Eta Sigma Honor Society. sponsored by University of Pittsburgh

News Articles

    • Dec 2016 More Than Words

      From UT Arlington Magazine: The loss has been a long time coming. It goes back more than 180 years, when Native American communities in the United States were relocated, in many cases forcibly. With one edict from the United States government, tribes in the southeastern United States had lost their homes, any sense of stability, and even the cultural norms tied to their homelands. This had a major impact on the “Five Tribes”: Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole—all speakers of Muskogean languages—and the Cherokee, who speak an Iroquoian language.

      Now, these languages are teetering near the edge of extinction...

    • Mar 2016 Women’s History Month: Celebrating Women in the Social and Behavioral Sciences

      A bedrock principle of Women’s History Month — that achieving equal opportunities for women is important not only for the creation of a fairer society, but also for the unique perspectives and skills women bring to all fields of study and industry — is also a core value for the National Science Foundation

      Women are still underrepresented in science and engineering, but NSF is working to change that. We do so through programs that aim to create new opportunities for women, and by celebrating the stories of the women employed by NSF and supported by its grants. These researchers were able to follow paths set by the trailblazers who preceded them. And they, in turn, create new paths for future generations to follow. For Women’s History Month 2016, five of our Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences program officers told us, in their own words, about what drives them to advance the frontiers of research. Click to visit the full article, which includes a profile of endangered language research.

    • Nov 2012 Keeping Language Alive.

      An article in Diverse: Issues in Higher Education talks about the 2012 Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop.

      Claiming one’s ancestral tongue has its merits, Dr. Fitzgerald said, “There are studies that show there is significant, [positive] educational impact for underrepresented groups when their educational experience includes a component of their heritage language,” she said. “One of our goals — in a social justice context — is to … allow Native American children to express their traditions, their heritage in the same setting where there are other students.”

    • July 2012 Institute Aims to Keep Languages Alive

      An article in Lawrence Journal-World talks about the 2012 Institute on Collaborative Language Research (CoLang 2012) and the institute upcoming in the summer of 2014, CoLang 2014, to be hosted by UT Arlington under Fitzgerald's direction.

    • July 2012 National Native News Thursday 07-11-12

      National Native News carried a radio story by Susan Shannon (KGOU) about the 2012 OKBOL Breath of Life Workshop, a project co-directed by Fitzgerald. It aired June 7 and features one of the UT Arlington students, who mentored the Natchez attendees, in this clip.

    • May 2012 Workshop in Norman aids tribal members in language recovery

      Reports on the 2012 Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop, research and outreach activity with Oklahoma Native American tribes for which Fitzgerald is Co-Director.

    • Oct 1999 UTA helps Native Americans learn to save own languages

      This article was picked up by UPI and Associated Press and approximately 50 newspapers across the country ran it, as far west as Seattle, WA, as far east as Greenwich, Connecticut, as well as numerous other states and multiple news venues across the state of Texas.

Research and Expertise

  • NATIVE AMERICAN LANGUAGES, INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES, LANGUAGE REVITALIZATION AND DOCUMENTATION, FIELD LINGUISTICS, PHONOLOGY, SERVICE-LEARNING

    I am currently serving on detail at the National Science Foundation as Program Director for the Documenting Endangered Languages Program, on loan from the University of Texas at Arlington, where I am Professor of Linguistics in the Department of Linguistics & TESOL . Recent administrative activities include serving  as Director of the 2014 Institute on Collaborative Language Research (CoLang/InField), supported by the National Science Foundation (BCS grant#1263939). among others, serving from 2011-2015 as Co-Director of the Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop, also supported by the NSF (BCS#1065068), and serving as Head of the Department of Linguistics & TESOL (2008-2012).

    My research focuses on documenting and revitalizing Native American languages and studying their phonology, especially Tohono O'odham, Chickasaw, Choctaw and others in the Southwest. Overall, I have garnered external funding for these and other research activities in the amount of $282,312. I also teach language documentation and revitalization at summer institutes and short workshops, including AILDI (2013), InField/CoLang (2012, 2014) and ONLA (since 2009). For more on my work and collaborations with Native American communities, click here.

Publications

      Book Chapter Forthcoming
      • Forthcoming in 2017. "Creating Sustainable Models of Language Documentation and Revitalization," in Perspectives on Language and Linguistics: Community-Based Research. Trends in Linguistics. Studies and Monographs series, Mouton De Gruyter. Shannon Bischoff and Carmen Jany, eds.

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article Forthcoming
      • 2016. "Morphology in the Muskogean Languages," Language and Linguistics Compass.

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]
      Forthcoming
      • Forthcoming in 2017.  "Motivating the Documentation of the Verbal Arts: Arguments from Theory and Practice." Language Documentation & Conservation.

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2016
      • 2016.  "Approaches to Collecting Texts:  The Chickasaw Narrative Bootcamp," Language Documentation & Conservation 10, 522-547. With Joshua D. Hinson. http://hdl.handle.net/10125/24717

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]
      2016
      • 2016. "Morphology in the Muskogean Languages," Language and Linguistics Compass 10, 681- 700.  DOI: 10.1111/lnc3.12227

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2013
      • Revisiting Tohono O'odham High Vowels.  The Persistence of Language: Constructing the Past and Confronting the Present in the Voices of Jane H. Hill. John Benjamins Press. Shannon Bischoff, Debbie Cole, Amy Fountain, and Mizuki Miyashita, editors. Pp. 128-151.

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Proceeding 2013
      • "'Ilittibaatoksali' 'We are working together': Perspectives on Our Chickasaw Tribal-Academic Collaboration," in Norris, Mary Jane, Erik Anonby, Marie-Odile Junker, Nicholas Ostler & Donna Patrick (eds.), FEL XVII (Ottawa, 2013) Endangered Languages Beyond Boundaries: Community Connections, Collaborative Approaches, and Cross-Disciplinary Research, 53-60. Bath, England: The Foundation for Endangered Languages. With Joshua D. Hinson.

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2013
      • "Training Communities, Training Graduate Students: The 2012 Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop," Language Documentation & Conservation.  7, 252-73. With Mary S. Linn. 

        {Peer Reviewed} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Chapter 2012
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M., Phillip Miguel and Stella Tucker. 2012. Contemporary Storytelling in Tohono O'odham. In David Kozak (ed.), Inside Dazzling Mountains: Contemporary Translations of Southwest Native Verbal Arts. Pp. 391-406. Lincoln, NE.: University of Nebraska Press.  http://www.nebraskapress.unl.edu/product/Inside-Dazzling-Mountains,674981.aspx  
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2012
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 2012. Prosodic Inconsistency in Tohono O'odham. International Journal of American Linguistics 78:4, 435-463.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2010
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 2010. Language Documentation in the Tohono O'odham Community. In Louanna Furbee and Lenore Grenoble (ed.), Language Documentation: Theory, Practice and Values, 231-240. Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2010
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 2010. Developing a Service-Learning Curriculum for Linguistics. Language and Linguistics Compass. 4:4, 204–218.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2009
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 2009. Language and Community: Using Service-Learning to Reconfigure the Multicultural Classroom. Language & Education 23(3). 217-231.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Proceeding 2007
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 2007. Developing Language Partnerships with the Tohono Oodham Nation. Working Together for Endangered Languages: Research Challenges and Social Impacts. FEL Proceedings XI ed. by Maya Khemlani David, Nicholas Ostler, and Caesar Dealwis, 39-46. Bath, England: The Foundation for Endangered Languages.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2007
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 2007. Indigenous Languages and Spanish in the U.S.: How Can/Do Linguists Serve Communities?. Southwest Journal of Linguistics 26(1). 1-14.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2007
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 2007. An Optimality Treatment of Syntactic Inversions in English Verse. Language Sciences 29(2-3). 203-217.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2006
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 2006. Iambic Meter in Somali. In Elan Dresher and Nila Friedberg (ed.), Formal Approaches to Poetry, 193-207. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Proceeding 2006
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 2006. More on Phonological Variation in Tigrinya. The XVth International Conference on Ethiopian Studies ed. by Siegbert Uhlig, 763-8. Wiesbaden, Germany: Harrassowitz Verlag.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Chapter 2003
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 2003. Word Order and Discourse Genre in Tohono O'odham. In A. Carnie, H. Harley, and M. Willie (ed.), Formal Approaches to Function in Grammar: In Honor of Eloise Jelinek, 179-189. Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Proceeding 2003
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 2003. How Prosodically Consistent is Tohono O'odham? Studies in Uto-Aztecan: Working Papers in Endangered and Less Familiar Languages. Studies in Uto-Aztecan: Working Papers in Endangered and Less Familiar Languages ed. by L. Barragan and J. Haugen, 55-74. Cambridge, Ma: MITWPL.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2002
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 2002. Tohono O'odham Stress in a Single Ranking. Phonology 19(2). 253-271.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2002
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 2002. Vowel Harmony in Buchan Scots English. English Language and Linguistics 6(1). 61-79.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2001
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 2001. The morpheme-to-stress principle in Tohono O'odham. Linguistics 39(5). 941-972.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2000
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 2000. Vowel Hiatus and Faithfulness in Tohono O'odham Reduplication. Linguistic Inquiry 31(4). 713-722.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Proceeding 1999
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 1999. A Reanalysis of Bidirectionality in Auca. Proceedings of Western Conference on Linguistics, 106-118.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1999
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 1999. Loanwords and Stress in Tohono O'odham. Anthropological Linguistics 41(2). 1-33.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Proceeding 1998
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 1998. Destressing in the Clitic Group. Proceedings of the Eastern States Conference on Linguistics '97, 46-57. Ithaca.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1998
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 1998. The Meter of Tohono O'odham Songs. International Journal of American Linguistics 64(1). 1-36.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Proceeding 1997
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 1997. Degenerate Feet and Morphology in Tohono O'odham. Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics ed. by , B. Agbayani and S.-W. Tang, 129-143. Stanford: CSLI.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Conference Proceeding 1995
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 1995. The Meter of Tohono O'odham Songs. Coyote Papers ed. by C. Fitzgerald and A. Heiberg, eds, 1-27. Tucson, Arizona: University of Arizona.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Conference Proceeding 1994
      • Fitzgerald, Colleen M. 1994. Prosody drives the Syntax. Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistic Society ed. by S. Gahl, A. Dolbey, and C. Johnson, 173-183. Berkeley: Berkeley Linguistics Society.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Presentations

    • February  2015
      "Designing pedagogy from Cherokee language and ecological documentation"

      4th International Conference on Language Documentation and Conservation, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, Hawai'i. (With R.Boney, V. Caña, S. Cornelius, D. Crawler and J. Ross)

    • January  2015
      "Using listening workshops to integrate phonology into language revitalization: Learner training in Chickasaw pronunciation"

      4th International Conference on Language Documentation and Conservation, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, Hawai'i. (With J. Hinson)

    • August  2015
      "Verbal Arts Documentation in Language Revitalization, Training Models and Linguistic Theories"

      Language in the Present Conference.  University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

    • December  2015
      "Documentation and Revitalization Strategies for Agglutinative Languages: Lessons from Chickasaw Inflectional Paradigms"

      Society for the Study of Indigenous Languages, Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America.  Washington, D.C.  (With J. Hinson)

    • December  2015
      "Collaborative Learning and Collaborative Mentoring in the Endangered Language Communities of Texas and Oklahoma"

      Invited panelist, Perspectives on Language and Linguistics: Community-Based Research (CBR), Panel at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America.  Washington, D.C.

    • January  2014

      "Expressing Potential and Ability in Chickasaw." Society for the Study of Indigenous Languages, Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America.  Minneapolis, MN.  With Joshua D. Hinson.

    • February  2014
      "'Best Practices' in Developing Tribal-Academic Partnerships"

      Conference on Language Revitalization: Sleeping and Awakening Languages of the Gulf South.  Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.  (With J. Hinson)

    • March  2014
      "The Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop: Language Renewal for Communities"

       Revitalizing Endangered Languages Conference. Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, Oklahoma.  (With M. Linn)

    • December  2014
      "Community-Based Language Projects for Alabama"

       Society for the Study of Indigenous Languages, Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America.  Portland, OR.  (With D. Amy, J. Battise, and H. Dardar)

    • December  2014
      "Narrative Genres and Language Documentation in Chickasaw"

       Society for the Study of Indigenous Languages, Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America.  Portland, OR.  (With J. Hinson)

    • June  2013
      2013. 'How to Work With Linguists.'Re-visiting the Status of Indigenous Languages, AILDI National Conference, June 17-18, 2013. University of Arizona. (With A. Flores and S. Penfield.)
    • June  2013
      2013. 'Creating Linguistic Products.' Re-visiting the Status of Indigenous Languages, AILDI National Conference, June 17-18, 2013. University of Arizona.
    • January  2013
      2013. "Giving Life to Languages and Data Via the 2012 Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop," Society for the Study of Indigenous Languages, Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America. Boston, MA (With M. Linn.)
    • January  2013
      2013. "501 Verbs of Chickasaw: Verb 1," Society for the Study of Indigenous Languages, Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America. Boston, MA. (With J. Hinson)
    • February  2013
      2013. "Training Communities, Training Graduate Students: The 2012 Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop," 3rd International Conference on Language Documentation and Conservation, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, Hawai'i. (With M. Linn.)
    • April  2013
      2013. "Prosodic Documentation in Native American Languages: Methodologies and Techniques," Oklahoma Workshop on Native American Languages. Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, Oklahoma.
    • October  2013
      2013. "'Ilittibaatoksali' 'We are working together': Perspectives on Our Chickasaw Tribal-Academic Collaboration." Endangered Languages Beyond Boundaries: Community Connections, Collaborative Approaches, and Cross-Disciplinary Research:
    • October  2013

      "'Ilittibaatoksali' 'We are working together': Perspectives on Our Chickasaw Tribal-Academic Collaboration."  Foundation for Endangered Languages  XVII Conference, Ottawa, Canada. Carleton University.  With Joshua D. Hinson.

  • Past
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      2012 "A Practical Guide to Using Mathiot's O'odham Dictionary," Culture Teacher Gathering 2012. Tohono O'odham Nation, Tucson Arizona. (With P. Miguel.)
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      2012 "Breathing new life into Tohono O'odham documentation: The Mathiot Dictionary Project," Invited panelist, Joint SSILA-LSA session, Beyond Documentation to Revitalization. Panel at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America. Portla
  • Past
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      2011 "First Steps for Designing Class Reflections," Panel on Helping Students Reflect on Service-Learning Experiences. (Invited panelist.) Conference on Service-Learning for Sustainability and Social Justice. Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX.
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      2011 "Revitalizing Native American Languages through Service-Learning," Conference on Service-Learning for Sustainability and Social Justice. Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX. (Invited talk.)
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      2011 "Pre-Planning Your Grant," Invited Panel on Grants. UTA Student Conference in Linguistics and TESOL. (Invited panelist.)
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      2010 Prosodic Documentation of Tohono O'odham. Keynote address, Oklahoma Workshop on Native American Languages. Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK.
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      2009 "Language Activism and Revitalization in the Tohono O'odham Community," Keynote address, UTA Student Conference in Linguistics.Arlington, Texas.
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      2007 "A Win Win Situation: University collaborations lead to reliable volunteers (with college students as ESL tutors." Texas Association of Adult Literacy Councils, Austin, Texas. With Carol Keeney.
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      2006 "Indigenous Languages and Spanish in the U.S.: How Can/Do Linguists Serve Communities?" Presidential Address, Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Association of the Southwest. Laredo, Texas.
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      2003 "Rhythmic Control in Tohono O'odham," From Representations to Constraints, CNRS and Université de Toulouse-Le Mirail.Toulouse, France.
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      2002 "Enforcer, Victim, or Ostrich: What role will you play in the online classroom?" Conference on Ethical Issues in the Electronic Classroom: Developing and Using Responsible Use Policies, Binghamton, New York.
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      2002 "When native speakers have no intuitions, can syllables exist? (Or: Are there syllables in Tigrinya?)" Montreal-Ottawa-Toronto Phonology Workshop, McGill University,Montreal, Canada.
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      2002 "Covert Quantity Sensitivity in Tohono O'odham," Texas Linguistic Society.
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      2002 " Syntactic Inversions in English Meter: Implications for Optimality Theory," 2002 Toulouse Conference on English Phonology, Toulouse, France.
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      2002 "Prosodic inconsistency in Tohono O'odham distributive reduplication," Western Conference on Linguistics.
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      2002 "Distributive Reduplication in Tohono O'odham," Thirty-first Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Association of the Southwest.
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      2002 "Metrical Consistency in Two Poetic Genres of Tohono O'odham," Organized Session on Diachronic Poetics, Annual Meeting of the Modern Language Association.
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      2003 "Rhythmic Control in Tohono O'odham," Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas.
  • Past
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      2003 "More on Phonological Variation in Tigrinya," 15th International Conference of Ethiopian Studies, Universität Hamburg, Germany.
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      2004 "How many reduplications are there in Tohono O'odham?"
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      2004 "Language change and Motion Verbs in Tohono O'odham," Thirty-third Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Association of the Southwest.
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      2005 "Documenting the Documentation: the Case of O'odham," First Annual Conference on Endangered Languages and Cultures of Native America, University of Utah.
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      2005 "Language Documentation in the Tohono O'odham Community," Conference on Language Documentation: Theory, Practice, and Values, 2005 LSA Linguistic Institute, MIT/Harvard.
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      2006 "The importance of legacy documentation to the Tohono O'odham, " Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas. With Daniel Lopez.
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      2006 "Student ESL Internships as a Model for Teaching Multiculturalism," 5th Annual Texas National Association for Multicultural Education Conference. With M. Crabtree, J. Hoover, N. Jahnke, K. Jones, J. Kelly and S. Sellers.
  • Past
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      2007 "Texas Talk: Regional and rural dialects as diversity tools in nondiverse classrooms," Panel presentation on Conflicts over Contemporary Language Issues: Pedagogical Approaches to Defusing the Undergraduate Linguistic Classroom.
      Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America.
  • Past
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      2007 "Learning and Unlearning Language Ideology in a Service-Learning Course," American Association for Applied Linguistics Conference. With F. Benavidez, K. Jones and C. Wong.
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      2007 "Anglo and Latino Language Attitudes in the Southwest: Evidence from Service-learning," With F. Benavidez, K. Jones and C. Wong. Conference on Hispanics in the Southwest, Texas Tech University.
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      2007 "Interdisciplinary Approaches to Teaching Language Revitalization," Third Annual Conference on Endangered Languages and Cultures of Native America, Center for American Indian Languages, University of Utah.
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      2007 "Orthography, Phonology, and Dialect Variation in an Endangered Language Community: Issues in Standardization among the Tohono O'odham," Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Association of the Southwest, Denver, Colorado.
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      2007 "Developing Language Partnerships with the Tohono O'odham Nation," Working Together for Endangered Languages: Research Challenges and Social Impacts, the Eleventh Conference of the Foundation for Endangered Languages. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
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      2008 "Language and Community: Using a Service-Learning Pedagogy," in the Organized Session on "Strategies for Undergraduate Linguistic Pedagogy. Linguistic Society of America Annual Meeting. Chicago,IL.
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      2008 "Prosodies in Tohono O'odham Reduplication," Friends of Uto-Aztecan Conference. University of Tucson and UNAM, Tucson, Arizona.
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      2009 "Pathways for Accessing Legacy Materials in Tohono O'odham," 1st International Conference on Language Documentation and Conservation, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, Hawai'i.
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      2009 "Finding and using legacy/archival materials for community projects," Oklahoma Workshop on Native American Languages. Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK.
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      2009 "Proliferating Prosodies in Tohono O'odham Reduplication(s)," Seventeenth Manchester Phonology Meeting, University of Manchester, England.
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      2010 "Developing Language Empowerment Projects with Diverse Communities," Invited Panel Talk, Cultivating Socially Minded Linguists: Service Learning and Engaged Scholarship in Linguistics and Education.
      Panel at the American Dialect Society Conference, Baltimore, MD. Organizers: Anne Charity Hudley and Christine Mallinson.
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      2010 "The Contrast System in Tohono O'odham Stops." With Cynthia Kilpatrick. Poster to be presented at the 12th Conference on Laboratory Phonology, University of New Mexico. July 8-10, 2010.
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      2010 "Legacy materials and the phonetic investigation of Tohono O'odham stops," Oklahoma Workshop on Native American Languages. Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, Oklahoma. With Cynthia Kilpatrick, Namrata Dubey, Nathan Eversole, and Stephen Georg
  • Past
    •  
      2010 "Service-Learning and Indigenous Languages - Theory and Practice in the Oklahoma Tribal Context," 4th International Indigenous Conference. University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Past
    •  
      2010 "Tapping the Potential: Service-Learning with Oklahoma Communities in a Language Revitalization Class," 17th Annual Stabilizing Indigenous Languages Symposium. University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon.
  • Past
    •  
      2011 "Tohono O'odham Prosodic Phrasing: A view from Narrative," Oklahoma Workshop on Native American Languages. Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, Oklahoma. (With L. McLain Pierce.)
  • Past
    •  
      2011 "Investigating Connected Speech from Tohono O'odham Digitized Legacy Data," Conference on Sustainable data from digital research: Humanities perspectives on digital scholarship. Paradisec Conference hosted by the University of Melbourne, Australia.
  • Past
    •  
      2011 "Service-Learning and Community-based Research with Indigenous Language Communities," Dialogue with Diversity: Linguistic fieldwork in Urban Settings Towards a Research Plan.
      Research Centre for Linguistic Typology Workshop, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
  • Past
    •  
      2012 "Narrative and Prosodic Phrasing in Tohono O'odham," Society for the Study of Indigenous Languages, Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America. Portland, OR. (With L. Pierce.)
  • Past
    •  
      2012 "Previewing FLEx Databases for the 2012 Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop," Oklahoma Workshop on Native American Languages. Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, Oklahoma.
  • Past
    •  
      2012 "Elicitation Techniques for Prosodic Documentation of Native American Languages," 2012 Workshop on American Indigenous Languages. University of California, Santa Barbara.
  • Past
    •  
      2012 'Ilittibatoksali 'We work together': Perspectives on Tribal-Academic Collaborations,' Oklahoma Native Language Association Conference. Tahlequah, OK. October, 30-31, 2012. (With J. Hinson)
  • Past
    •  
      2012 "The 2012 Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop: Projects and Progress," Oklahoma Native Language Association Conference. Tahlequah, OK. October, 30-31, 2012. (With M. Linn)
  • Past
    •  
      2013 "Giving Life to Languages and Data Via the 2012 Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop," Society for the Study of Indigenous Languages, Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America. Portland, OR. (With M. Linn.)
  • Past
    •  
      2013 "501 Verbs of Chickasaw: Verb 1," Society for the Study of Indigenous Languages, Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America. Portland, OR. (With J. Hinson)
  • Past
    •  
      2013 "Training Communities, Training Graduate Students: The 2012 Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop," 3rd International Conference on Language Documentation and Conservation, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, Hawai'i. (With M. Linn.)
  • Past
    •  
      2010 "The Contrast System in Tohono O'odham Stops,"
      12th Conference on Laboratory Phonology, University of New Mexico.  July 8-10, 2010. (With C. Kilpatrick and N. Dubey.)
  • Past
    •  
      2010 "Intensive Student Engagement: Service-Learning with Indigenous Language Communities,"
      Engaging Students: The Process & Product of Effective Active Learning, The University of Texas at Arlington, October 8, 2010.  (With A. Lober McKeever, L. McLain Pierce, S. Cooper.)
  • Past
    •  
      2011 "Community-Based Approaches to Student Training: Service-Learning in a Language Revitalization Course,"
      Poster presented at the 2nd International Conference on Language Documentation and Conservation, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, Hawai'i. 2011.
  • Past
    •  
      2011 Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America. Pittsburgh, PA. (With S. Penfield.)
  • Past
    •  
      2011 "Narrative and Prosodic Phrasing in Tohono O'odham,"
       Poster presented at the DFW Metroplex Conference.  Denton, TX.  (With L. McLain Pierce.)
  • Past
    •  
      2011 "The Science of Documenting Endangered Languages,"
      Poster presented as part of "Documenting Endangered Languages: NSF-NEH Del Projects in Honor of the20th Anniversary of the LSA Panel on Endangered Languages" Panel sponsored by the Committee on Endangered Languages and Their Preservation,
  • Past
    •  
      "The Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop: Language Renewal for Communities"

      Revitalizing Endangered Languages Conference. Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, Oklahoma.  (With M. Linn)

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • Sept 2013 to Present Collaborative Research: Documentation and Analysis of the Chickasaw Verb sponsored by  - $47999
    • Aug 2013 to May 2014 Traditional Ecological Knowledge, Sustainability and Indigenous Language Documentation sponsored by  - $4426
    • June 2013 to Present 2014 Institute on Collaborative Language Research (CoLang/InField) (BCS grant #1263939) sponsored by  - $169177
    • Sept 2010 to Nov 2014 "Collaborative Research: Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop and Documentation Project" sponsored by  - $57395
    • Jan 2009 to Jan 2010 I Engage Grant for LING 6390 Linguistics Seminar: Sustainability and Language Endangerment sponsored by  - $1500
    • Jan 2008 to Jan 2009 Workshop on Video as a Research Tool in the Humanities sponsored by  - $3500
    • Sept 2007 to Aug 2008 Tohono O'odham Morphology (declined, due to moving to UTA) sponsored by  - $50400
    • Sept 2006 to May 2007 Arts and Humanities Competition sponsored by  - $7500
    • Sept 2003 to Aug 2004 Research Enhancement Fund sponsored by  - $3084
    • June 2002 to June 2003 Library Resident Research Fellowship sponsored by  - $2000
    • June 2000 to July 2001 Faculty Development Grant, Educational Technology sponsored by  - $7561
    • May 2000 to June 2000 Phillips Fund for Native American Studies sponsored by  - $1740
    • May 1993 to June 1994 Phillips Fund for Native American Studies sponsored by  - $1600

Other Research Activities

  • 2016
    • Author.
      • Apr 2016 Language and earthquakes: Insights in disaster response

        In post-quake Nepal, language provides window into 'invisible damage'

        April 28, 2016

        The April 2015 Nepal earthquakes caused massive damage. Aid organizations responded to flattened villages, medical emergencies, and food and water shortages. But the 7.8 magnitude quake and aftershocks also traumatized and disrupted the country's cultures and communities. These elements are harder to see, but play an important role in disaster recovery.

        A team of linguists and anthropologists, supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Directorate, is collaborating with local researchers in three mountain districts in central Nepal to see how people from these areas understood the earthquakes, how they're rebuilding and how they relate to the lingering threat of extreme environmental disasters.

        "We are witnessing how and to what ends people are making choices about rebuilding, and we are also learning very important lessons about the different ways that health and wellbeing -- including mental health issues -- are articulated in the wake of such an event," said Geoff Childs....

        Read more.

      • Oct 2016 Breathing life back into language

        Researcher Daryl Baldwins work helps restore language as a vital cultural symbol

        October 26, 2016

        The last fluent speakers of the Myaamia -- or Miami -- language passed away during the mid-20th century, around the same time Native American linguist Daryl Baldwin was born.

        Today, thanks to the efforts of Baldwin, his family and other linguists and language preservationists, the Myaamia language is again taking its rightful place as a vibrant and visible symbol of identity and cultural pride for the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma...

  • 2015
  • 2014
    • Popular Press Writing
      • Sept 2014 The Indigenous Language Challenge

        By Colleen M. Fitzgerald for the Huffington Post

        People are posting videos where they take on dramatic challenges and tag others to join in. It's an energetic effort to raise awareness...to use Native American languages. The 2014 Indigenous Language Challenge is on. Comedian Tonia Jo Hall, a Lakota teacher in training, posted a video of her young daughter singing in Lakota. "Whatever your native language is, we challenge you to post a 10-15 sec video no matter what it is as long as you're speaking your language," Hall wrote. She's not the only Native American language activist, learner, or teacher to promote indigenous language use via social media video challenges...

      • Aug 2014 Saving Native American Languages

        By Colleen M. Fitzgerald for the Huffington Post

        Language and Native Americans are in the news as media outlets around the nation announce that they will no longer use the "R" word in conjunction with Washington's NFL franchise.

        They join a groundswell of public opinion against the current mascot, ranging from #NotYourMascot activism on Twitter to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office canceling the team's trademarks for being "disparaging to Native Americans."

        But this isn't the only fight out there with Native American languages at the forefront...

      • Nov 2014 7 Things to Know about Native American Languages

        By Colleen M. Fitzgerald for the Huffington Post

        The month of November is Native American Heritage Month. A recent editorial by Kevin Gover, director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of the American Indian, suggests that "the vast majority of Americans have a limited -- and often mistaken -- understanding of Native American history."

        That so? Native American languages can offer deep insights into our nation's history. Here's seven things to know about Native American languages...

      • Nov 2014 For Americans Fighting to Reclaim Their Culture, Thanksgiving Means More Than Food

        By Colleen M. Fitzgerald for Diverse Issues in Higher Education

        Every fourth Thursday in November, Americans find time for family, sharing food, traditions and language. Stories of that iconic first Thanksgiving evoke images of Pilgrims and Indians, but as is so often the case with history and popular culture, some details are missing. Two of the biggest ― those Indians were the Wampanoag, and within two centuries, their language ceased to be spoken.

        Today, the Wampanoag and other Native American tribes give thanks for those who fight to bring their languages home again....

      • Feb 2014 International Mother Language Day February 21

        By Colleen M. Fitzgerald for the Native American Times

        Superbowl XLVIII ignited a firestorm of controversy, but it wasn't for a referee call. It was for a commercial.  Coca Cola broadcast, "It's Beautiful,"  an ad featuring "America the Beautiful" as its soundtrack.  Where's the controversy?  In addition to English, the commercial included translations sung in Spanish, Tagalog, Hindi, Hebrew, Senegalese-French and Keres by young women from all over America. Social media broke out with complaints against using other languages, with hashtags like #SpeakAmerican or #speakenglish.

        Another tweet cropped up: #SpeakNativeAmerican.  Speaking American, some say, means speaking the first languages of America...

Students Supervised

Courses

      • LING 3330-001 PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGY

        Phonetics is the study of speech sounds from a physical perspective (such as articulatory or acoustic), while phonology focuses on the patterning of speech sounds in particular languages from a more abstract or cognitive perspective.  This course introduces both phonetics and phonology at the undergraduate level. Students will acquire the fundamentals of phonetic and phonological description and analysis.  To accompany this theoretical and practical grounding, there will be some introduction to the tools of recording and software for speech analysis, which will give students some preliminary skills in doing phonetic and phonological research on their own in a relatively controlled environment . 

        Students will emerge from the class with some amount of each the following:  the tools to do preliminary sound analysis; the conceptual background to take more advanced phonology classes like LING 4301; and familiarity with basic research skills. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 4360-001 NON-WESTERN LINGUISTIC STRUCTURES

        This course is on Non-Western Linguistic Structures.  We will focus on Native American languages, with most attention being paid to the indigenous languages of the United States and Canada.  These languages are grammatically rich, typically possessing extraordinarily characteristics of typological interest.  The first half of the semester will look at various structural properties, the second half will focus more on specific languages.  Topics in the second half of the semester may be adjusted based on student interests.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 5360-001 NON-WESTERN LINGUISTIC STRUCTURES

        This course is on Non-Western Linguistic Structures.  We will focus on Native American languages, with most attention being paid to the indigenous languages of the United States and Canada.  These languages are grammatically rich, typically possessing extraordinarily characteristics of typological interest.  The first half of the semester will look at various structural properties, the second half will focus more on specific languages.  Topics in the second half of the semester may be adjusted based on student interests.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 4301-001 Phonological Theory 1

        LING 4301 covers the study of the principles that govern sound systems in human languages.  Students will work with sound patterns from a wide variety of the world’s languages.  Course readings will introduce the fundamentals of the different areas of phonological phenomena, and course assignments will require hands-on application of the descriptive and theoretical tools in working with sound pattern data.  Lectures will further develop this approach of description, analysis, and argumentation for phonological data.  As the semester progresses, students will be expected to engage higher-level questions about what phonological models are expected to explain and to talk about data in an increasingly sophisticated and prose-based manner. Developing clear prose and argumentation to present descriptions, generalizations, and analyses are all necessities in this course.  Students will develop an original research project in phonological analysis, which will be presented as a poster in class sessions.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 5362-001 Language Documentation

        There is an urgent need worldwide to respond to the global crisis of endangered languages.  Experts estimate that as many as half of the world’s 6,000-7,000 languages may cease to have fluent speakers by the end of this century.  In response, many linguists and language communities are working vigorously to document threatened languages while fluent speakers still exist.  “Documenting” a language means to create a full set of all the language practices of a community. This means audio recording, video recording, cataloguing recording info in a manner that makes it useful to others, transcribing audio and video, and archiving collected materials.  Due to a unique opportunity at UTA this summer, students enrolling in this course will be able to participate in portions of CoLang 2014.  Weeks 2 and 3 of the summer course will involve participating in Data Management and Archiving and two other CoLang workshops (full list here: http://www.uta.edu/faculty/cmfitz/swnal/projects/CoLang/courses/ ), giving students the chance to sit in workshops taught by internationally known scholars and indigenous community members.  Students will also spend the time preceding CoLang learning key documentation software, FLEx and ELAN.  Course requirements will involve attendance; assisting at CoLang activities; working on a documentation project; and possibly a final presentation.  Depending on scheduling, some of our class meetings may allow us to invite guest lectures from instructors teaching at CoLang 2014.  In terms of the documentation project assignment, the professor has a number of existing projects that students can work on as their class project. These include projects working on materials for the following Native American languages:  Chickasaw, Cherokee, Tohono O’odham, Choctaw and possibly Sauk.  

        For students looking for fall 2014 options in further exploring these topics, we have a partnership with the Cherokee Language Program and just collected considerable materials relating Cherokee traditional ecological knowledge (ethnobotany — indigenous knowledge systems of plants and their uses).  We expect to do work with this Cherokee project in the fall.  

        Because CoLang as a training venue encourages people from all backgrounds: linguists, anthropologists, community members with no experience in language work, biologists, musicians, etc., this offering of LING 4362/5362 will waive the LING 3311/5300 requirement.  Courses at CoLang include ethnobotany, song documentation, introduction to linguistics, technology classes and much more, so there are a wide range of potential options, allowing students a valuable experience in the discipline when they enroll in this course. Full information about all the activities of CoLang 2014 are online at http://tinyurl.com/colang2014 .

        NOTE: This course will count for ESS (Minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies) credit if the student chooses the Ethnobotany 1 & 2 or the Ethnobiology 1&2 CoLang workshop sequences to attend, and if the student’s final project work is on a project that relates to traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) as approved by the instructor.  Note: instructor has several ongoing projects on TEK where students can contribute.

      • LING 3330-001 Ling 3330-001

        Phonetics is the study of speech sounds from a physical perspective (such as articulatory or acoustic), while phonology focuses on the patterning of speech sounds in particular languages from a more abstract or cognitive perspective.  This course introduces both phonetics and phonology at the undergraduate level. Students will acquire the fundamentals of phonetic and phonological description and analysis.  To accompany this theoretical and practical grounding, there will be some introduction to the tools of recording and software for speech analysis, which will give students some preliminary skills in doing phonetic and phonological research on their own.  We will center our instruction on English phonetics and phonology as a vehicle of instruction. However, because your instructor is an expert in the phonology of the Native languages of North America, some of the methods and topics we will use for phonological analysis will center on Native American languages and be incorporated into lectures, readings and assignments.

        Students will emerge from the class with some amount of each the following:  the tools to do preliminary sound analysis, the theoretical background to take more advanced phonology classes like LING 4320, and a possible research project.  This will be an exciting opportunity for students to learn more about phonetics and phonology via a unique part of the American heritage, the indigenous languages of the United States.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 6380-001 Ling 6380-001

        This course is a continuation of Ling 5380, an investigation into Cherokee.  We will continue to work to learn as much as possible about this language, but now our efforts will be concentrated on developing a set of original research questions into the language, which reflects and responds to both the published on the language (and its relatives in the Iroquoian family), as well as the data collected in work with speakers through the class.

        Building on skills developed and knowledge obtained in Ling 5380, students will undertake a substantial community-oriented service project and traditional ecological knowledge project, in conjunction with Cherokee Language Program needs this semester.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 5380-001 Ling 5380-001

        This course introduces students to linguistic field methods, via hands-on work with a speaker or speakers of a minority/underdocumented language unknown to the class participants. Simultaneously, students learn and employ best practices for field linguistics and language documentation in the 21st century. These include, but are not limited to: data management and archiving; developing rapport with speakers; working collaboratively and ethically with language communities, including 'giving back'; use of current technologies to annotate, analyze and manage data; becoming familiar with interdisciplinary approaches; and working in a team; collecting, describing and analyzing language data with strong theoretical underpinnings and ideally, potential to contribute back to community efforts in language maintenance and revitalization. Needless to say, we will only scratch the surface in our endeavors, but the overarching goal is to acquire an understanding for and an appreciation of the methods of field linguistics and to equip any student of linguistics interested in working with primary data other than their own native  speaker intuitions

         The language for AY 2013-14 will be the Oklahoma variety of Cherokee [chr], a highly endangered language in the Iroquoian family of North America. We will work to learn as much as possible about this language using a combination of approaches, including structuring elicitations, using texts and developing techniques for analyzing and presenting complex linguistic data. The goal is to learn, describe and document the language's grammar: its phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics.

        This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence, with enrollment in LING 6380 Field Methods Seminar continuing work on the same language in the spring; students cannot take LING 6380 without first completing LING 5380.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 3311-065 Ling 3311-065

        This course introduces students to the field of linguistics, the systematic study of human language. Drawing on data from a range of languages, it will examine the sound patterns of language (phonetics and phonology), words and word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics), and language in context (pragmatics). Emphasis will be placed on methods of linguistic analysis to solve problems in phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics.  Because your instructor is a field linguist, some of the methods we will use for linguistic analysis will draw from that area of the discipline.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 5321-001 Advanced Phonological Theory

        This course builds upon the skills of data description and analysis, argumentation,
        and the collection and use of data in the context of phonological theory from LING 5320 or its equivalent.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 6380-001 Field Methods Seminar

        This course is a continuation of Ling 5380, an investigation into Choctaw, a severely endangered language ofthe Muskogean family. We will continue to work to learn as much as possible about this language using a combination of approaches, including structuring elicitations, using texts and developing techniques for analyzing and presenting complex linguistic data. The goal is to continue learning, describing and documenting the language's grammar: its phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Current best practices in language documentation (data management and archiving, linguistic software, ethical considerations and use of appropriate technology) will once again be incorporated into the class. As with Ling 5380, the course will also necessitate additional time commitments (debriefings, individual/small group meetings with speakers, group meta-discussion of data and readings, etc.). Building on skills developed and knowledge obtained in Ling 5380, students will undertake a substantial community-oriented service project this semester.

        Note: Our work with Choctaw this year is possible due to discussions with the Choctaw Language Program. Our agreement with them requires the vetting and approval of Choctaw data by their Program prior to presenting or publishing anything from this class.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 3330-001 PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGY

        Phonetics is the study of speech sounds from a physical perspective (such as articulatory or acoustic), while phonology focuses on the patterning of speech sounds in particular languages from a more abstract or cognitive perspective.This course introduces both phonetics and phonology at the undergraduate level. Students will acquire the fundamentals of phonetic and phonological description and analysis.To accompany this theoretical and practical grounding, there will be some introduction to the tools of recording and software for speech analysis, which will give students some preliminary skills in doing phonetic and phonological research on their own.There will be a final project on the phonetics and phonology of Oklahoma Native American languages. Finally, this course has a service-learning requirement, and so it will serve to satisfy that requirement in the BA Linguistics degree. This will include different options for different students based on interest and skill levels: editing or annotating archival sound files from Native American languages, perhaps participating in a hands-on training session for Oklahoma Native Language teachers, or digitizing sound files for a tribal language project.Students will emerge from the class with some amount of each the following:the tools to do preliminary sound analysis, the theoretical background to take more advanced phonology classes like LING 4320, practical applications of phonetics and phonology for language teaching, and a possible research project.This will be an exciting opportunity for students to learn more about phonetics and phonology via a unique part of the American heritage, the indigenous languages of Oklahoma.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HONR 3304-004 Phonetics and Phonology

        Phonetics is the study of speech sounds from a physical perspective (such as articulatory or acoustic), while phonology focuses on the patterning of speech sounds in particular languages from a more abstract or cognitive perspective.This course introduces both phonetics and phonology at the undergraduate level. Students will acquire the fundamentals of phonetic and phonological description and analysis.To accompany this theoretical and practical grounding, there will be some introduction to the tools of recording and software for speech analysis, which will give students some preliminary skills in doing phonetic and phonological research on their own.There will be a final project on the phonetics and phonology of Oklahoma Native American languages. Finally, this course has a service-learning requirement, and so it will serve to satisfy that requirement in the BA Linguistics degree. This will include different options for different students based on interest and skill levels: editing or annotating archival sound files from Native American languages, perhaps participating in a hands-on training session for Oklahoma Native Language teachers, or digitizing sound files for a tribal language project.Students will emerge from the class with some amount of each the following:the tools to do preliminary sound analysis, the theoretical background to take more advanced phonology classes like LING 4320, practical applications of phonetics and phonology for language teaching, and a possible research project.This will be an exciting opportunity for students to learn more about phonetics and phonology via a unique part of the American heritage, the indigenous languages of Oklahoma.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 5380-001 Field Methods

        This course introduces students to linguistic field methods, via hands-on work with a speaker or speakers of a minority/underdocumented language unknown to the class participants. The language for AY 2011-12 will be Choctaw, a severely endangered language in the Muskogean family. We will work to learn as much as possible about this language using a combination of approaches, including structuring elicitations, using texts and developing techniques for analyzing and presenting complex linguistic data. The goal is to learn, describe and document the language's grammar: its phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Current best practices in language documentation (data management and archiving, linguistic software, ethical considerations and use of appropriate technology) will be incorporated into the class. As is the practice at most departments that offer rigorous training in language documentation and description, the course will also necessitate additional time commitments (individual/small group meetings with speakers, group meta-discussion of data and readings, etc.). The work with our Choctaw speakers this semester will provide enrolled students with sufficient understanding of the language to contribute a substantial service project in the spring semester with LING 6380.This course will thus lay the groundwork for a community-oriented project by the students.Debriefings are scheduled for Tuesdays at 3:30 pm until 4:50 pm in the Linguistics Lab (Trimble 004). Small group sessions will start at the beginning of November; the time slot is tentatively scheduled from 10 am to 11 am on Mondays (location TBA), but that may change in consultation with our speaker(s). This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence, with enrollment in LING 6380 Field Methods Seminar continuing work on the same language in the spring; students cannot take LING 6380 without first completing LING 5380.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 5321-001 Advanced Phonological Theory

        Note: this version of syllabus reflects course updates after weather cancellations.
        This course builds upon the skills of data description and analysis, argumentation, and the collection and use of data in the context of phonological theory from LING 5320 or its equivalent.Students will continue to solidify their ability to apply those skills in conference-style research presentations and papers.At this point, students will become familiar with contemporary models of phonological theory and demonstrate an ability to find phonological problems that have the potential to make empirical and theoretical contributions to the field.These types of contributions go beyond a mere confirmation of a particular model, and instead present data that enrich typological findings by filling a predicted gap, for example; that challenge assumptions of particular (sub-)theories, and that highlight unexpected consequences of data sets for a model's predictions (i.e., are phonologically "interesting" problems).

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 5310-001 Sociolinguistics

        In this course, we will study language in its social context, covering the key areas of sociolinguistic theory, as well as adding a significant component addressing multicultural issues of language use in the United States. Content includes basic concepts in sociolinguistics, as well as topics such as linguistic variation, code switching, language planning and standardization, and pidgins and creoles.

      • LING 4317-001 Sociolinguistics

        In this course, we will study language in its social context, covering the key areas of sociolinguistic theory, as well as adding a significant component addressing multicultural issues of language use in the United States. Content includes basic concepts in sociolinguistics, as well as topics such as linguistic variation, code switching, language planning and standardization, and pidgins and creoles.

      • LING 6390-001 Linguistics Seminar: Sustainability and Language Endangerment

        Current estimates are that more than half of the world's languages will become extinct during our lifetime. This course looks language endangerment, what it means for a language to become endangered, with a focus on the indigenous languages of North America. The course will also study language revitalization, examining cases where communities are seeking to maintain the number of speakers, or revive the language. This seminar looks the implications of language endangerment, and language revitalization, which is when communities seek to maintain the number of speakers, or revive the language.The students will be required to participate in at least two trips to work on language and linguistics projects in Oklahoma or other Native American contexts, in order to put their theoretical content into practice. Following best practices in engagement scholarship, students will engage in reflective activities before, during, and after these trips, both individually and as a class.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
      • LING 5320-001 Phonological Theory

        This course begins the study of the principles that govern sound systems in human languages.Students will work with sound patterns from a wide variety of the world’s languages.Course readings will introduce the fundamentals of the different areas of phonological phenomena, and course assignments will require hands-on application of the descriptive and theoretical tools in working with sound pattern data.Lectures will further develop this approach of description, analysis, and argumentation for phonological data.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2009 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 5110-001 TESOL PRACTICUM

        This course is for those students seeking the TESOL certification; it is a one credit practicum course designed for you to engage in teaching, observation, and reflection in a way that broadens your teaching experience and contributes community service.  Students will engage in focused observation of teachers of English to non-native speaking learners and students will themselves serve as volunteer teachers of English to non-native speaking learners.  This course is set up as an independent study; you will manage your activities and provide documentation of your teaching activities, as well as complete observations and organize materials. This course is graded pass/fail.

        During this semester, you must meet with me a total of three times, once at the beginning, and two additional times to assess your progress and get feedback on your materials.  These meetings should be set up via email and may be conducted via telephone or in person.  It is the responsibility of the student to initiate contact for these meetings.

      • LING 5393-001 TESOL TEACHING AND OBSERVATION

            This course is for those students seeking the MA TESOL degree; it is a three credit practicum course designed for you to engage in teaching, observation, and reflection in a way that broadens your teaching experience and contributes community service.  Students will engage in focused observation of teachers of English to non-native speaking learners and students will themselves serve as volunteer teachers of English to non-native speaking learners.  This course is set up as an independent study; you will manage your activities and provide documentation of your teaching activities, as well as complete observations and organize materials. This course is graded pass/fail.

      • LING 5321-001 Advanced Phonological Theory

        This course builds upon the skills of data description and analysis, argumentation, and the collection and use of data in the context of phonological theory from LING 5320 or its equivalent. Students will continue to solidify their ability to apply those skills in conference-style research presentations and papers. At this point, students will become familiar with contemporary models of phonological theory and demonstrate an ability to find phonological problems that have the potential to make empirical and theoretical contributions to the field. These types of contributions go beyond a mere confirmation of a particular model, and instead present data that enrich typological findings by filling a predicted gap, for example; that challenge assumptions of particular (sub-)theories, and that highlight unexpected consequences of data sets for a model's predictions (i.e., are phonologically "interesting" problems).

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2009 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 5370-001 Survey of Linguistic Theories

         A comparison and contrast of various linguistic theories, with attention to the evolution of generative grammar and Chomskyan syntax, the "linguistics wars" and generative semantics, and phonological theory.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2009 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LING 5320-001 Phonological Theory

          LING 4301/5320 begins the study of the principles that govern sound systems in human languages.  Students will work with sound patterns from a wide variety of the world’s languages.  Course readings will introduce the fundamentals of the different areas of phonological phenomena, and course assignments will require hands-on application of the descriptive and theoretical tools in working with sound pattern data.  Lectures will further develop this approach of description, analysis, and argumentation for phonological data.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2008 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
      • LING 4301-001 PHONOLOGICAL THEORY I

        LING 4301/5320 begins the study of the principles that govern sound systems in human languages.  Students will work with sound patterns from a wide variety of the world's languages.  Course readings will introduce the fundamentals of the different areas of phonological phenomena, and course assignments will require hands-on application of the descriptive and theoretical tools in working with sound pattern data.  Lectures will further develop this approach of description, analysis, and argumentation for phonological data.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2008 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link

Other Teaching Activities

    • Training and Community Teaching
      • Work with Native American Community Members

        2013

        "FLEx: Fieldworks Language Explorer Software." American Indian Language Development Institute, University of Arizona. (2 hour workshop and training)

        2013

        Keynote and presenter, "Immersion for Native Languages." Indigenous Language Documentation and Revitalization Seminar,  Symposium on the American Indian.  Northeastern State University.  April 11-12, 2013. Tahlequah, OK.

        2012

        "Demonstrating the FLEx Database," Oklahoma Native Language Association Conference.  Tahlequah, OK.  October, 30-31, 2012. (With L. McLain Pierce)

        2012

        Training for Chickasaw Apprentices and second language learners on Chickasaw phonology. Chickasaw Language Revitalization program. Ada, OK.

        2012

        FLEx database training for Choctaw Language Program's language teachers.  Durant, OK.

        2012

        Lead presenter, organizer and workshop facilitator, "The Grammar of Sound: Creating Sound Memories for Teaching Your Language."Language Revitalization Workshop, Symposium on the American Indian.  Northeastern State University.  April 12-13, 2012. Tahlequah, OK.

             -"Making Sound and Culture Work Together in Native American Language Teaching"

             -"Introduction to Phonetics for Native Languages"

             -"Hands-on development of a teaching product for pronunciation lessons"

        2012

        Training and evaluation for the Sauk Language Department Master-Apprentice program/ANA grant. Stroud, OK.

        2011

        Team leader, FLEx database Workshop for the Sauk, Chickasaw and Choctaw language programs. Ada, OK.

        2011

        Presenter, "How can Knowing About Vowels Help Teach Your Language?", "2012 Oklahoma Breath of Life," Oklahoma Native Language Association Conference. Ada, OK.

        2011

        Team leader and presenter, "Agreement in Tohono O'odham and Chickasaw." Language Revitalization Workshop, Symposium on the American Indian.  Northeastern State University.  April 15, 2011. Tahlequah, OK.

        2010

        "Making Phonetics Useful in Your Language Classroom," Oklahoma Native Language Association Conference.  Ada, OK.  October, 14-15, 2010.

        2010

        Instructor, 2010 Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop. University of Oklahoma. May 24-28, 2010.  Norman, OK.

        2010

        Team Leader, Language Revitalization Workshop, Symposium on the American Indian.  Northeastern State University.  April 15-16, 2010. Tahlequah, OK.

        2009

        Participant, Language Revitalization, Symposium on the American Indian.  Northeastern State University.  April 16-17, 2009. Tahlequah, OK.

        2007

        Guest lecture on "Language Endangerment," Tohono O'odham Community College, September 27 and October 2, 2007.

        2007

        Guest lecture on "Tohono O'odham Dialects," Tohono O'odham Community College, July 11, 2007

        2007

        Language Workshop, Tohono O'odham Community College, July 8-15, 2007.  (Co-organized with D. Lopez; brought 3 graduate students.)

Service to the Community

  • Elected
    • July 2013 to  Present Service and Outreach to the Community

      Community Service

      (See above section on Training and Community Teaching for language revitalization and tribal language work)

      Grant and other support and assistance for revitalization projects for various Oklahoma tribal groups

      Developing departmental partnerships with local service agencies (Catholic Charities of Fort Worth, AISD, LIFT ESL classes at Aldersgate United Methodist Church, World Relief)

      Undergraduate tutor internship supervisor, ESL program with Catholic Charities of Fort Worth.  Spring 2009.

      ESL/Literacy Service-Learning Initiative, providing approximately 30 ESL tutors (3-4 additional adult ESL classes) per semester to Literacy Lubbock from Spring 2006 to Spring 2008.

      Consultant, Media guide for the Lubbock Hawks, National Women's Basketball League franchise January 2005.

      "Rhythm in Non-Western Poetry," Lecture for International Month, Texas Tech University.  February 25, 2003.

      Consultant, Arizona Native American Online Dictionary Project.  March 2001 – current.  (University of Arizona)

      "American English and Its Varieties," July 6, 2001.  Lecture for Fulbright Scholars, International Students.  English Language Institute.  (University at Buffalo)

      Community Outreach Events Promoting ESL/Literacy Service-Learning Initiative

      Fiestas del Llano, Lubbock Texas.  September 2006

      Back to School Fiesta, Texas Tech University.  August 2006.

      Closing the Gaps Coalition Planning Meeting (June 2006) and Presentation (November 1, 2006)

Service to the Profession

  • Elected
    • July 2013 to  Present Professional Service

      2013

      Chair, Activism Subcommittee, Committee on Endangered Languages and Their Preservation, Linguistic Society of America

      2013 – 2015

      Member, Awards Committee, Linguistic Society of America

      2012 – 2014

      Member, Nominating Committee, Society for the Study of Indigenous Languages of the Americas

      2011 – 2016

      Member, Committee on Endangered Languages and Their Preservation, Linguistic Society of America

      2006

      President, Linguistic Association of the Southwest

      2005

      Vice-President/President-Elect and Program Chair, Linguistic Association of the Southwest

      2005–2007

      Executive Committee, Linguistic Association of the Southwest

      Boards

      Member of the Advisory Circle, Institute on Collaborative Language Research (CoLang/InField)

      Member of the Advisory Scientific Board, Phonologie de l'Anglais Contemporain (PAC)

      Advisory Committee, 3rd International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation
       

      Reviewing

      Presses:  University of California Press, De Gruyter Mouton, Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, John Benjamins Press

      Journals: Phonology, International Journal of American Linguistics, Linguistic Inquiry, Anthropological   Linguistics, Journal of Linguistics, Language Sciences, English Language and Linguistics, Language and Education, Southwest Journal of Linguistics, Language Documentation and Conservation

      Conferences: West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics, Western Conference on Linguistics,  Linguistic Society of America Annual Meeting, LabPhon, International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation, 18th International Conference of Korean Linguistics (ICKL 2012) and the Xuzhou Conference on Linguistic Sciences, Oklahoma Workshop on Native American Languages

      Proceedings: Papers of the Algonquian Conference

      Grant Proposals: National Science Foundation (Linguistics; Documenting Endangered Languages)

      Faculty Development Proposals (York University, PA; CUNY)

      Pre-tenure, tenure, and promotion candidates, external reviewer (various institutions)

Service to the University

  • Elected
    • July 2013 to  Present University Service

      Departmental Service

      2013

      Chair, Graduate Studies Committee (Department of Linguistics, The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2010 – 2011

      Department of Linguistics & TESOL Graduate Program Review Self-Study (The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2008 –  

      Department of Linguistics & TESOL Graduate Studies Committee (The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2008 – 2011

      Faculty Advisor for LINGUA (graduate student linguistics organization; The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2008 – 2010

      Undergraduate Advisor (The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2008 – 2009

      Co-Chair of Comprehensive/Diagnostic Exam Committee (The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2008 – 2010

      Departmental TA Orientation (The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2006 – 2007

      Member, Executive Committee (Texas Tech University)

      2005 – 2007

      Member, Merit Committee (Texas Tech University)

      2005 – 2007

      Member, Ad-hoc Diversity Committee (Texas Tech University)

      2005 – 2006

      Member, Tenure and Promotion Procedures Committee (Texas Tech University)

      2004 – 2005

      Chair, Linguistics Search Committee (Texas Tech University)

      2004 – 2005

      Member, Alumni and Friends Committee (Texas Tech University)

      2004 – 2008

      Member, Teaching Committee (Texas Tech University)

      2003 – 2008

      Director of Linguistics (Texas Tech University)

      2002 – 2005

      Member, Student Recruitment Committee (Texas Tech University)

      2001 – 2002

      Member, Chinese Linguist Search Committee (University at Buffalo)

      2000 – 2002

      Chair, Colloquium Committee (University at Buffalo)

      1998 – 2001

      Coordinator, Departmental TA Orientation (University at Buffalo)

      1998 – 2000

      Director of Supervised Teaching (University at Buffalo)

      1997

      LLDSA Scholarship Committee (San José State University)

      1997 – 1998

      M.A. Comprehensive Exam Grader (San José State University)

      1996 – 1997

      Undergraduate Advisor (University of Pittsburgh)

      1996 – 1997

      Coordinated Undergraduate Lunches for Linguistics Majors (University of Pittsburgh)

      1992 – 1993

      President, Linguistics Circle (University of Arizona)

      1992

      Graduate Student Faculty Representative (University of Arizona)

      College Service

      2009 – 2011

      Curriculum Committee, College of Liberal Arts (The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2009 – 10

      Steering Committee, Global Research Institute Festival of Ideas for the College of Liberal Arts (The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2009

      Federal Appropriations Request (2 proposals; The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2008

      Proposal team, McDowell Center for Critical Languages. (The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2005 - 2006

      Mentor, Women Faculty Mentoring Program; College of Arts and Sciences (Texas Tech University)

      2003 – 2006

      Arts and Sciences Scholarship Committee; College of Arts and Sciences (Texas Tech University)

      University Service

      2013 –

      Faculty Senate (The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2011, 2012

      Faculty Judge, Academic Celebration of Excellence (The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2010 –

      Co-Advisor, Native American Student Association (The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2010 – 12

      Vice Chair, Association of Directors and Chairs (The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2010

      Faculty Judge, Honors Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity (The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2009

      Faculty Senate (The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2008 – 2009

      Internal member, Program Review Team, Graduate Program review for Department of Computer Science and Engineering.  (The University of Texas at Arlington)

      2007

      Invited reviewer, President's Book Award (Texas Tech University)

      2005 – 2006

      Steering Committee, Annual Women's Studies Conference (Texas Tech University)

      2005 – 2007

      Faculty participant, Center for Diversity Leadership in Education; College of Education (Texas Tech University)

      2004

      Invited reviewer, President's Book Award; Texas Tech University

      2001 – 2002

      Member of the Steering Committee of the Institute for Research and Education on Women and Gender (IREWG); University at Buffalo

      2001 – 2002

      Software/Hardware Standards 2002 Committee; University at Buffalo

Other Service Activities

  • Uncategorized
    • May 2013 The ESL/Literacy Service-Learning Initiative (Lubbock, TX)
      Developed a community-wide partnership at Texas Tech University, the ESL/Literacy Service-Learning Initiative (http://english.ttu.edu/esl), that created an undergraduate service-learning course where university students earn credit for tutoring ESL in the community by partnering them in teams with graduate students. This contributes three additional ESL classes to the Lubbock area, with nearly 30 students and volunteers tutoring each semester.
  • Uncategorized
    • Jan 2012 Lead Presenter, Language Revitalization Workshop

      Lead Presenter, "The Grammar of Sound: Creating Sound Memories for Teaching Your Language." Language Revitalization Workshop, Symposium on the American Indian. Northeastern State University.  April 12-13, 2012. Tahlequah, OK.2

  • Uncategorized
    • Jan 2011 Team leader and Presenter, Language Revitalization Workshop

      2011, Team Leader and Presenter, "Agreement in Tohono O'odham and Chickasaw." Language Revitalization Workshop, Symposium on the American Indian. Northeastern State University.  April 15, 2011. Tahlequah, OK.

    • Jan 2011 Presenter, Oklahoma Native Language Association

      Titles TBA (one on phonetics and one on the 2012 Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop. Oklahoma Native Language Association Conference. Ada, OK

  • Uncategorized
    • Jan 2010 Team Leader, Language Revitalization Workshop

      2010 Team Leader, Language Revitalization Workshop, Symposium on the American Indian. Northeastern State University. April 15-16, 2010. Tahlequah, OK.

    • Jan 2010 Instructor, 2010 Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop

      2010 Instructor, 'Phonetics,' 2010 Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop. University of Oklahoma. May 24-28, 2010.

    • Jan 2010 Presenter, Oklahoma Native Language Association

      2010 Presenter, "Making Phonetics Useful in Your Language Classroom," Oklahoma Native Language Association Conference.

  • Uncategorized
    • Jan 2009 Participant, Language Revitalization Workshop

      2009 Participant, Language Revitalization, Symposium on the American Indian. Northeastern State University. April 16-17, 2009. Tahlequah, OK.

  • Uncategorized
    • Jul 2007 Tribal Language Technology Workshop

      Conducted a one-week Language Workshop on the reservation with Tohono O'odham community members during July 2007. I brought three graduate students to Tohono O'odham Community College and we spent the week helping to develop materials, to digitize audio and pictures, and to train teachers on using technology tools for their classroom.

Administrative Appointment

  • 2015
    • July 2015 to Present - Program Director, NSF BCS
  • 2012
    • July 2012 to Aug 2014 - Director, 2014 Institute on Collaborative Language Research (CoLang/InField)
  • 2011
    • June 2011 to Nov 2014 - Co-Director, Oklahoma Breath of Life, Silent No More Workshop
  • 2008
    • Aug 2008 to June 2012 - Department Chair, University of Texas at Arlington   Office of the President   Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs   College of Liberal Arts   Linguistics & TESOL
  • 2005
    • Jan 2005 to July 2008 - Director, Texas Tech University   ESL/Literacy Service-Learning Initiative
  • 2003
    • Jan 2003 to July 2008 - Director, College of Arts and Sciences, Texas Tech University   Department of English   Linguistics Program