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Dr. Michael R Roner

Name

[Roner, Dr. Michael R]
  • Assoc Prof, Department of Biology

Biography

Our research program is engaged in exploring the mechanisms viruses use to persist in a host.  This work involves developing new approaches to treating viral infections ranging from blocking attachment to host cells to interrupting viral and host macromolecular synthesis within the cell.  Natural, aqueous extracts of Quillaja Saponaria, the Chilean Soap Bark tree, contain a number of physiologically active treterpenoid saponins that exhibit strong adjuvant activity and have been exploited in both human and animal vaccines.  We are engaged in developing saponins to block viral infections in humans and animals, including herpes viruses, rotavirus and HIV. 

Viruses, for the most part, utilize cellular machinery to replicate the viral genome and produce new virus particles.  Conventional antiviral therapy, in an attempt to target viral replication, also undesirably impacts normal cellular processes in uninfected cells.  We are exploring the use of polymeric drugs that offer the opportunity to avoid some of these effects.  We are involved in the application of organotin and other metal-containing polymers as novel antiviral and antitumor drugs. 

At the molecular level, we are making strides in understanding the process of genome assortment using reovirus, a virus with a genome consisting of ten dsRNA segments.  Understanding this process will reveal new targets for antiviral therapy.  As an extension of this work, we are exploring the nature of interference that results when multiple virus infections occur.  Reovirus is an extremely unique oncolytic dsRNA virus.  Reovirus infection of normal human cells generally results in an abortive or persistent viral infection with progeny virus being released without a reduction of cell growth or apparent cytopathology.  In sharp contrast, when human tumor cells are infected with Reovirus, the transformed cells are completely lysed by 96 hours.  We have projects aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved and are testing engineered reoviruses alone and in combination with a number of antitumor polymers as oncolytic agents with emphasis on treating prostate and pancreatic cancers.

Professional Preparation

    • 1991 PostDoc in VirologyDuke University Medical Center
    • 1986 Ph.D. in MicrobiologyMiami University
    • 1996 Assistant Research Professor in VirologyDuke University Medical Center

Appointments

    • Jan 2008 to Present Assoc Prof
      The University of Texas Arlington
    • Jan 2011 to Aug 2015 Graduate Advisor for Perspective Students
      The University of Texas Arlington

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Jan 2004 to Present Institutional Biosafety Committee
  • University
    • Aug 2003 to Present IACUC
  • Membership
    • Aug 1985 to Present American Society for Virology

Awards and Honors

    • Aug  2015 Texas Medical Research Collaborative grant - Rapid and ultrasensitive diagnosis of rotavirus by thermoplasmonic amplification. sponsored by Texas Medical Research Collaborative grant
    • Aug  2014 Desert King International. Characterization of anti-rotavirus activity of “Supersap” a new highly purified saponin extract from Quillaja saponaria Molina. sponsored by Desert King International
    • Aug  2009 Texas Emerging Technology Fund. Development of a Multiple Simultaneous Immunologic/Reagent Testing System (M-SIRTS). sponsored by Chipotle Business Group, Inc.

News Articles

    • July 2013 HeLa at UTA

      Dr. Michael R. Roner is an associate professor of biology at the University of Texas at Arlington and frequently works with HeLa cells. Here he answers questions about his work for UTA’s OneBook.

    • Feb 2013 Science Fair at UTA draws more than 550 students

      By Jessamy Brown jessamybrown@star-telegram.com ARLINGTON -- Fatima Burney, 12, developed an interest in clean water after a trip to Pakistan, where she mistakenly drank unpurified tap water and ended up with tummy trouble. So as part of a recent science experiment, she investigated the most effective way to purify water and proved her hypothesis: Boiling is best. Fatima, a seventh-grader at Stripling Middle School in Fort Worth, joined about 550 middle and high school students from 10 counties Monday at a science fair at the University of Texas at Arlington's College Park Center. After the students presented their projects to judges, many stayed to participate in campus tours and activities sponsored by the College of Science, College of Engineering and RadioShack. The projects entered in the Fort Worth Regional Science and Engineering Fair included studying magnetic nanoparticles, microwave radiation and light pollution. Read more here: http://www.star-telegram.com/2013/02/25/4643478/science-fair-at-uta-draws-more.html#storylink=cpy

    • Nov 2011 61st Fort Worth Regional Science and Engineering Fair

      The Fort Worth Regional Fair is the longest running science and engineering fair in Texas. It draws students from 10 counties, including Tarrant, Parker, Wise and Johnson counties. Students in grades 6 through 12 compete for cash prizes and the chance to advance to national competitions.

      For questions about forming a scientific review committee, contact Michael Roner, a UT Arlington associate professor of biology, at roner@uta.edu.

    • June 2011 Chilean soapbark tree may hold key to reducing rotavirus deaths

      A natural additive used to make foam in soft drinks also may help prevent the sometimes-deadly rotavirus infection in children or reduce its severity, a University of Texas at Arlington biology professor says in a research paper to be published in June.

      News Release — 23 May 2011

    • May 2011 Pediatrics Researchers from University of Texas Detail Findings in Rotavirus Infections

      (NewsRx.com) -- A report, "Prevention of rotavirus infections in vitro with aqueous extracts of Quillaja Saponaria Molina," is newly published data in Future Medicinal Chemistry. According to recent research published in the journal Future Medicinal Chemistry, "Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea disease in newborns and young children worldwide, estimated to be responsible for over 300,000 childhood deaths every year, mostly in developing countries. Rotavirus-related deaths represent approximately 5% of all deaths in children younger than 5 years of age worldwide."

    • Jan 2010 President's Report 2010

      UT Arlington’s commitment to becoming a major national research institution is embodied in the state-of-the-art Engineering Research Building. The new $126 million, 234,000-square-foot facility supports science and engineering collaboration like that of electrical engineering Assistant Professor Samir Iqbal, right, and biology Associate Professor Michael Roner. They’re partnering on a project that uses nanotechnology to detect viruses.

Other Activities

    • Amazing Microbiology
      • Aug 2015 Amazing Microbiology

Research and Expertise

  • Viral persistence: How do viruses replicate, spread and evade host defenses

    Our research program is engaged in exploring the mechanisms viruses use to persist in a host.This work involves developing new approaches to treating viral infections ranging from blocking attachment to host cells to interrupting viral and host macromolecular synthesis within the cell.Natural, aqueous extracts of Quillaja Saponaria, the Chilean Soap Bark tree, contain a number of physiologically active treterpenoid saponins that exhibit strong adjuvant activity and have been exploited in both human and animal vaccines.We are engaged in developing saponins to block viral infections in humans and animals, including herpes viruses, rotavirus and HIV.

    Viruses, for the most part, utilize cellular machinery to replicate the viral genome and produce new virus particles.Conventional antiviral therapy, in an attempt to target viral replication, also undesirably impacts normal cellular processes in uninfected cells.We are exploring the use of polymeric drugs that offer the opportunity to avoid some of these effects.We are involved in the application of organotin and other metal-containing polymers as novel antiviral and antitumor drugs.

    At the molecular level, we are making strides in understanding the process of genome assortment using reovirus, a virus with a genome consisting of ten dsRNA segments.Understanding this process will reveal new targets for antiviral therapy.As an extension of this work, we are exploring the nature of interference that results when multiple virus infections occur.Reovirus is an extremely unique oncolytic dsRNA virus.Reovirus infection of normal human cells generally results in an abortive or persistent viral infection with progeny virus being released without a reduction of cell growth or apparent cytopathology.In sharp contrast, when human tumor cells are infected with Reovirus, the transformed cells are completely lysed by 96 hours.We have projects aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved and are testing engineered reoviruses alone and in combination with a number of antitumor polymers as oncolytic agents with emphasis on treating prostate and pancreatic cancers.

  • Antiviral activity of saponins

    With increased urgency for new approaches to treat old diseases, such as smallpox, and newly emerging threats, including SARS, pressures to develop antiviral treatments are mounting. Natural, aqueous extracts of Quillaja Saponaria, the Chilean Soap Bark Tree, contain a number of physiologically active treterpenoid saponins that exhibit strong adjuvant activity and have been exploited in both human and animal vaccines. We are engaged in developing saponins to block viral infections in humans, including herpes viruses, rotavirus and HIV.

  • New Antivirals

    Viruses, for the most part, utilize cellular machinery to replicate the viral genome and produce new virus particles.In an attempt to target viral replication, the cellular processes in uninfected cells are also undesirably affected.Polymeric drugs offer the opportunity to avoid some of these effects.We are involved in the application of organotin and other metal-containing polymers as novel antiviral and antitumor drugs.

Publications

      Journal Article Forthcoming
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Black, K..; Frank, J.;  Black, K.; Moric-Johnson, A.; Miller, L.; and Russell, F.  2017. Synthesis and Initial Anticancer Activity of Water and Dimethyl Sulfoxide Soluble Polyethers From Zironocene Dichloride and Poly(ethylene Glycols).  Journal of Macromolecular Science, Part A: Pure and Applied Chemistry. (Submitted).

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      Forthcoming
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Mosca, F., Roner, M.R.; Moric-Johnson, A.; Miller, L.; Einkajf, J.D. and Russell, F. 2017. Synthesis and Characterization, Including Cancer Cell line Inhibition, of Group VA-Containing Polyesters from Reaction with Camphoric Acid.  Journal of Polymer Science, Part A: Polymer Chemistry. (Submitted).

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      Forthcoming
      • Varsha Sanjay Godakhindi, Peiyuan Kang, Maud Serre, Naga Aravind Revuru, Jesse Zou, Michael Roner, Ruth Levitz, Jeffrey Kahn, Jaona Randrianalisoa and Zhenpeng Qin.  Tuning the gold nanoparticle colorimetric assay by nanoparticle size, concentration, and size combinations.  ACS Sensors.  Submitted 7.14.17

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      Forthcoming
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.;  Frank, J.;  Moric-Johnson, A.; Morgan, L.C.; Black, K.; Slawek, P.; Mosca, F. and Jeffery, E.  2017. Synthesis, Structural Characterization and Initial Anticancer Activity of Water Soluble Polyethers From Hafnocene Dichloride and Poly(ethylene Glycols).  Materials.  Submitted 8.6.17.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      Forthcoming
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.;  Islam, Z. and Moric-Johnson, A.; 2017. Repeat unit for the product of triphenylantimony dichloride and histamine.  International journal of Applied Pharmaceutical and Biological Research. Submitted 8.6.17.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      Forthcoming
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.;  Islam, Z. and Moric-Johnson, A.; 2017. Synthesis of Polyamines from Organotin dihalides and Histamine and Their Ability to Inhibit Cancer Cell Lines. International journal of Applied Pharmaceutical and Biological Research. Submitted 8.6.17.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      Forthcoming
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.;  Sookedo, N.; Moric-Johnson, A.;  Miller, L. and Johnson, J.D. 2017. Synthesis and Initial Cancer Cell Results of Organotin Polyethers Derived from the Anticoagulant Dicumarol. International journal of Applied Pharmaceutical and Biological Research. Submitted 8.6.17.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      Forthcoming
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Campbell, A.G.; Moric-Johnson, A.; Miller, L.; Slawek, P.; Mosca, Francesca; Einkauf, J.D. and Crichton, R.  2018.  Synthesis of Organotin Polyesters from Reaction of the Salt of D-Camphoric Acid and Organotin Dihalides and Initial Anticancer Activity.  J. Inorg. Organomet. Polym.  Submitted 9.19.17

        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2017
      •  Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Black, K..; Frank, J.; Moric-Johnson, A.; Miller, L.; Black, K.; Slawek, P.; Mosca, F.; Einkauf, J. and Russell, F.  2017. Synthesis of water soluble group IVB metallocene and organotin polyethers and their ability to inhibit cancer. MDPI- Polymers. (In press).

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2017
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Campbell, A.G.; Moric-Johnson, A.; Miller, L.; Slawek, P. and Mosca, F.  2017. Group IVB Metallocene Polyesters Containing Camphoric Acid and Preliminary Cancer Cell Activity.  International Journal of Polymeric Materials and Polymeric Biomaterials.  Published online 6.26.2017.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00914037.2017.1342254.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2017
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Black, K..; Frank, J.;  Moric-Johnson, A.; Miller, L.; and Russell, F2017. Polyesters from Reaction of 3,5-Pyridinedicarboxylic Acid and Group V-Containing Dihalides and their Preliminary and Comparative Ability to Inhibit Cancer Cell Growth.  International journal of Applied Pharmaceutical and Biological Research, 2017; 2(4): 1-17

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2017
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Mosca, F.; Moric-Johnson, A.; Miller, L.; Einkauf, J.D.; Russell, F. and Slawek, P.  2017. Synthesis and Characterization, Including Cancer Cell Line Inhibition, of Group VA (Group 15)-Containing Polyesters from Reaction with Camphoric Acid.  Journal of Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers and Materials.  Published online 7.12.17. doi:10.1007/s10904-017-0622-9

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2017
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Truong, T. T.C. and Roner, M.R2017. Synthesis of Metallocene Poly(ether Esters) from Reaction of Group IVB and VB Metallocene Dichlorides with Glycyrrhetinic Acid.  Journal of Polymeric Materials.  Vol. 34, No. 2, 435-454.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2017
      • 1)       Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Black, K..; Frank, J.;  Moric-Johnson, A.; Miller, L.; and Russell, F.  2017. Synthesis, Structural Characterization and Initial Anticancer Activity of Water Soluble Polyethers From Hafnocene Dichloride and Poly(ethylene Glycols).  Journal of the Chinese Advanced Materials Society. 2017.  5(4): 254-268. Published online 6.12.17. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/22243682.2017.1336113

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2016
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Reckleben, L.; Black, K.; Frank, J.; Crichton, R.; Russell, F.; Moric-Johnson, A. and Miller, L2016.  Synthesis, Structural Characterization and Preliminary Cancer Cell Line Results for Polymers Derived from Reaction of Titanocene Dichloride and Various Poly(ethylene Glycols).  Journal of Macromolecular Science, Part A: Pure and Applied Chemistry. Volume 53, 2016, Issue 7, 394-402.  Published online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10601325.2016.1176440.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2016
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Moric-Johnson, A.; Miller, L.; Barot, G., and Sookdeo, N.  2016.  Ability of Simple Organotin Polyethers to Inhibit Pancreatic Cancer.  Journal of Macromolecular Science, Part A, 53:2, 63-71, DOI:10.1080/10601325.2016.1120172.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2016
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Slawek, P.P.; Roner, M.R.; Moric-Johnson, A.; Miller, L.; Einkauf, J.D. and Russell, F.  2016.  Synthesis and Structural and Initial Cancer Cell Line Characterization of Organotin Polyesters from Dipicolinic Acid.  J. Inorg. Organomet. Polym.  26:1338-1350.  DOI: 10.1007/s10904-016-0424-5. 

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2016
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Chrichton, R.; Moric-Johnson, A.; Miller, L.; Black, K. and Russell, F.  2016.  Synthesis and Preliminary Cancer Cell Line Results for the Product of Organotim Dihalides and Alpha-Cyano-4-Hydroxycinnamic Acid.  J. Inorg. Organomet. Polym.  26:1351-1361.  DOI: 10.1007/s10904-016-0362-1. 

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2016
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Ayoub, M., Crichton, R. and Black, K.  2016.  Group IVB Metallocene Poly(ether Ester) Polymers Containing Alpha-Cyano-4-Hydroxycinnamic Acid That Act As  Self-Matrix Materials In MALDI MS.  Journal of Macromolecular Science, Part A, 53:6, 317-327, DOI: 10.1080/10601325.2016.1165992.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2016
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Ayoub, M., Crichton, R., Moric-Johnson, A., Miller, L. and Black, K.  2016.  Synthesis of Poly(ether Esters) from Reaction of Alpha-Cyano-4-Hydroxycinnamic Acid and Group IVB Metallocenes.  Journal of Macromolecular Science, Part A, 53:6, 328-334, DOI: 10.1080/10601325.2016.1165993.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2016
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Pham, N.; Roner, M.R.; Miller, L. C.; Black, K.; and Crichton, R.  2016. Synthesis and Preliminary Anticancer Results for Polymers from the Reaction of Organotin Dihalides and Thiodiglycolic Acid.  Journal of Macromolecular Science, PAC. 

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2015
      • Carraher, C., Roner, M.R., Shahi, K., Moric-Johnson, A., Miller, L., Barot, G., Battin, A., Trang, N., Alhuniti, M. 2015. Control of Prostate Cancer Using Organotin Polymers.  J. Inorg. Organometal. Polym. 2015; 25:386-399.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2015
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Ayoub, M.; Pham, N. and  Moric, A2015.  Synthesis and Preliminary Cancer Activity of Chelidonic Acid Polyesters Containing the Triphenylarsenic, Triphenylantimony, and Triphenylbismuth Moiety.  International Journal of Polymeric Materials and Polymeric Biomaterials.  64:311-319.  DOI: 10.1080/00914037.2014.945205.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2015
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Miller, L.; Shahi, K.; Trang, N. T.; Moric-Johnson, A.; Barot, G.; Battin, A.; and Alhuniti, M. H.  2015. Control of Colorectal Cancer Using Organotin Polymers.  Journal of the Chinese Advanced Materials Society. DOI: 10.1080/22243682.2014.966274.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2015
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Suresh, V.; and Roner, M.R.; 2015. Self Matrix Activity of Organotin Polyether Ester Polymers Containing Alpha-Cyano-4-Hydroxycinnamic Acid.  Journal of the Chinese Advanced Materials Society, 3:1, 32-44, DOI: 10.1080/22243682.2014.971134.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2015
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Suresh, V.; and Roner, M.R.; 2015. Graphite as a Matrix for Organotin Polymers.  Journal of Polymeric Materials. J. Polym. Mater. Vol. 32, No. 2, 2015, 151-168.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2015
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Morrison, A.; Roner, M.R.; Moric-Johnson, A.; Al-huniti, M. H; and Miller, L.  2015.  Metallocene-Containing Polyesters from Reaction of 3,5-Pyridinedicarboxylic Acid and Metallocene Dihalides and Their Preliminary Ability to Inhibit Cancer Cell Growth.   Journal of the Chinese Advanced Materials Society.  DOI: 10.1080/22243682.2015.1072732.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2015
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Shahi, K.; Moric-Johnson, A.; Miller, L.; Barot, G.; Battin, A.; Alhuniti, M. H.; Trang T. N.; Sookdeo, N. and Islam, Z.  2015. Control of Breast Cancer Using Organotin Polymers.  International Journal of Polymeric Materials and Polymeric Biomaterials, 64:15, 800-814, DOI: 10.1080/00914037.2015.1030650.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2015
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Lambert, R. E.; Arroyo, L. and Miller, L. C.  2015.  Synthesis of Organotin Polyamine Ethers Containing Thiamine (Vitamin B1) and Preliminary Ability to Inhibit Select Cancer Cell Lines.  J. Inorg. Organomet. Polym., 25:1414-1424.  DOI 10.1007/s10904-015-0254-x.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Paper 2015
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Suresh, V., Crichton, R. and Roner, M.R.  2015.  MALDI MS Results for Organotin Polyamines Synthesized from Reaction of 3-Amino-1,2,4-triazole and Organotin Dihalides.    Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  112(345), 1-3(2015).

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2015
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Crichton, R. and Roner, M.R.  2015.  Synthesis of Organotin Polyamines from Reaction of 3-Amino-1,2,4-triazole and Organotin Dihalides.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  112(346), 1-3(2015).

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2015
      • Roner, M.R , Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric-Johnson, A., Miller, L. and Sookedo, N.  2015.  Inhibition of Cancer Cell Lines by Organotin Polyesters Synthesized from Reaction of the Salt of D-Camphoric Acid and Organotin Dihalides.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  112(347), 1-4(2015).

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2015
      • Roner, M.R , Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric-Johnson, A., Miller, L. and Suresh, V.  2015.  Initial Study of the Ability of Organotin Polyethers Derived from the Anticoagulant Dicumarol to Inhibit Cancer Cell Lines.    Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  112(348), 1-4(2015).

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2015
      • Roner, M.R , Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric-Johnson, A., Miller, L. and Suresh, V.  2015.  Inhibition of Cancer Cell Lines by the Organotin Polyether Esters Synthesized from Reaction of the Salt of Alpha-Cyano-4-Hydroxycinnamic Acid and Organotin Dihalides.    Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  112(349), 1-4(2015).

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2015
      • Suresh, V., Carraher, C.E., Jr. and Roner, M.R.  2015.  Use of the Dioctyltin Polyether Ester Synthesized from Reaction of Alpha-Cyano-4-Hydroxycinnamic Acid and Dioctyltin Dichloride Itself Acting as the MALDI MS Matrix.    Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  112(350), 1-3(2015).

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Conference Paper 2014
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Ayoub, M., Pham, N. and Roner, M.R.  2014.  The Fragmentation MALDI TOF MS of Polyesters Formed From the Reaction of the Salts of Chelidonic Acid and Thiodiglycolic Acid with Group VA Dihalides.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  111(277), 1-4(2014).

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2014
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Siddiqui, S. and Roner, M.R.  2014.  Synthesis of Group VA Polyethers from the Reaction of Organometallic Group VA Dihalides with Isomannide (D-Mannitol).  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  111(276), 1-3(2014).

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2014
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Campbell, A. G. and Roner, M.R.  2014.  Synthesis of Organotin Polyesters from Reaction of the Salt of D-Camphoric Acid and Organotin Dihalides  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  111(278), 1-3(2014).

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2014
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Suresh, V. and Roner, M.R.  2014.  Synthesis of Organotin Polyether Esters from Reaction of the Salt of Alpha-Cyano-4-Hydroxycinnamic Acid and Organotin Dihalides.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  111(279), 1-4(2014).

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2014
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Suresh, V. and Roner, M.R.  2014.  Synthesis of Organotin Polyethers Derived from the Anticoagulant DicumarolPolymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  111(280), 1-3(2014).

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2014
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Ayoub, M., Pham, N. and Roner, M.R.  2014.  The Fragmentation MALDI TOF MS of Polyesters Formed From Reaction of the Salts of Chelidonic Acid and Thiodiglycolic Acid with Group IVB Metallocene Dichlorides.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  111(281), 1-6(2014).

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2014
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Sookdeo, N., Johnson, J.D. and Roner, M.R.  2014.   MALDI TOF MS of Organotin Polyethers Containing the Anticoagulant Dicumarol.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  110.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2014
      • Roner, M.R., Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric, A., and Pham, Ngoc.  2014.   Preliminary Cancer Cell Studies for the Group VA Polyesters Containing Thiodiglycolic Acid.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  110.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2014
      • Roner, M.R., Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric, A., and Thibodeau, R.  2014.   Preliminary Cancer Cell Line Results for the Polyester amines Derived From Reaction of Norfloxacin with Triphenylarsenic, Triphenylantimony, and Triphenylbismuth Dihalides.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  110.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2014
      • Roner, M.R., Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric, A., and Islam, D.  2014.   Ability to Inhibit a Group of Cancer Cell Lines by the Polyamine Derived by Reaction of Histamine with Group VA Dihalo Reactants.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  110.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2014
      • Roner, M.R., Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric, A., and Ayoub, M.  2014.   Control of Cancer Growth by Group VA Polyesters Containing Chelidonic Acid.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  110.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2014
      • Roner, M.R., Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric, A., and Dorestant, J.  2014.   Ability to Control Cancer Cell Growth by Ampicillin-Containing Group VA Polyester Amines.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  110.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2014
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Truong, N.T.C.; Roner, M.R.; Johnson-Moric, A.; Sookdeo, N. and Trang, Nancy, T.   2014.  Synthesis of Organotin Poly(ether Esters) From Reaction With Glycyrrhetinic Acid and Their Preliminary Activity Against Various Cancer Cell Lines  Inorganica Chimica Acta.  Online publication complete: 17-FEB-2014 DOI: 10.1016/j.ica.2014.01.016

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2014
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Pham, N. and Moric-Johnson, A.   2014.  Group VA Polyesters Containing Thiodiglycolic Acid-Synthesis and Preliminary Cancer Activity.  Journal of Macromolecular Science, Part A: Pure and Applied Chemistry. 51:7 DOI: 10.1080/10601325.2014.916175

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2014
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Dorestant, J.; Moric-Johnson, A. and Al-Huniti, M.H.   2014.  Group VA Poly(amine Esters)Containing the Antibacterial Ampicillin.  Journal of Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers and Materials.  June 2014.  DOI 10.1007/s10904-014-0050-z. (2015) 25:400–410.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2014
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Thibodeau, R. and Moric-Johnson, A.   2014.  Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Preliminary Cancer Cell Study Results for Poly(amine Esters) Derived from Triphenyl-Group VA Organometallics and Norfloxacin.  Inorga. Chim. Acta.  DOI: 10.1016/j.ica.2014.07.004. Volume 423, Part B, 1 November 2014, Pages 123–131.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2014
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Shahi, K.; Moric-Johnson, A.; Miller, L.; Barot, G.; Battin, A.; Trang, N.T.  and Al-Huniti, M.H.   2014.  Control of Prostate Cancer Using Organotin Polymers.  Journal of Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers and Materials.  June 2014.  DOI 10.1007/s10904-014-0048-6.  (2015) 25:386–399.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2014
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Shahi, K.; Battin, A.; Barot, G. and Sabir, T.   2014.  Organotin Polymers as Chemotherapeutic Agents in the Treatment of Cancer: General.  Journal of Polymer Materials.  Vol. 31(3):317-338.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2014
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Roner, M.R.; Shahi, K.; Battin, A.; Barot, G. and Arnold, T.   2014.  Synthesis Organotin Polymers As Chemotherapeutic Agents:Breast and Pancreatic Cancers. Journal of Polymer Materials.  Vol. 31(1):1-14.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2014
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Morrison, A., Roner, M.R., Moric, A. and Trang, N.T.  2014.  Synthesis and Characterization of Organotin Polyesters Derived from 3,5-Pyridinedicarboxylic Acid.  J. inorg. Organomet. Polym.  24:182-189.  DOI 10.1007/s10904-013-9929-3.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2013
      • Carraher Jr., C.E.; Battin, Amitabh., Roner, M.R.  2013. Effect of Bulk Doping on the Electrical Conductivity of Selected Metallocene Polyamines.  J. Inorg. Organomet. Poly. 23:61-73.  DOI 10.1007/s10904-012-9696-6.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2013
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Ayoub, M.; Roner, M.R.; Moric, A. and Trang, Nancy, T.  2013.   Synthesis, Structural Characterization and Ability to Inhibit the Growth of Pancreatic Cancer by Organotin Polymers Containing Chelidonic Acid” JCAMS. Vol. 1, No. 1, 65–73.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2013
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Samir, T.S., Roner, M.R. and Barot, G. 2013.  Synthesis and Structural Characterization of niobocene Polyamine Ethers containing the Antiviral Drug Acyclovir.   J. Polym. Mater.  30:1:1-14.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2013
      • Carraher, C.E., Barot, G., Shahi, K. and Roner, M.R.  2013.  Influence of DMSO on the inhibition of various cancer cells by water-soluble organotin polyethers.  Vol. 1, No. 4, 294–304, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/22243682.2013.869481

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2013
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E.; Barot, G.; Vetter, S. W.; Nayak, G. and Roner, M.R.  2013. Degradation of the Organotin Polyether Derived From Dibutyltin Dichloride and Hydroxyl-Capped Poly(ethylene Glycol) in Trypsin and Evaluation of Trypsin Activity Employing Light Scattering Photometry and Gel Electrophoresis.  JCAMS. Volume 1 (1), 1-6.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2013
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E., Truong, N.T.C., Roner, M.R., Moric, A. and Trang, N.T.  2013. Synthesis of Organoarsenic, Organoantimony, and Organobismuth Poly(ether Esters) From Reaction With Glycyrrhetinic Acid  and Their Preliminary Activity Against Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines.  JCAMS. Vol. 1 (2), 134-150.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2013
      • Carraher Jr.,C.E. and Roner, M.R.  2013. Organotin Polymers as Anticancer and Antiviral Agents.  50th Anniversary Issue of the Journal of Organometallic Chemistry. 751:67-82.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Paper 2013
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Thibodeau, R. and Roner, M.R.  2013. Synthesis of Norfloxacin-Containing Polyester Amines From Reaction of Triphenylarsenic, Triphenylantimony, and Triphenylbismuth Dihalides.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  109.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Islam, Z. and Roner, M.R.  2013. Synthesis of Polyamines From the Interfacial Polycondensation Reaction of Histamine with Group VA Dihalo Reactants.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  109.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Dorestant, J. and Roner, M.R.  2013. Synthesis of Polyester Amines From Reaction of Triphenylarsenic, Triphenylantimony, and Triphenylbismuth Dihalides with Ampicillin.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  109.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Dorestant, J and Roner, M.R.  2013.  Synthesis of Polyester Amines from Reaction of Triphenylarsenic, Triphenylantimony, and Triphenylbismuth Dihalides with Ampicillin.  Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering.  169, pages 1-4, 2013.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Thibodeau, R. and Roner, M.R.  2013.  Synthesis of Norfloxacin-Containing Polyester Amines From Reaction of Triphenylarsenic, Triphenylantimony, and Triphenylbismuth Dihalides.  Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering.  170, pages 1-4, 2013.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Islam, Z. and Roner, M.R.  2013.  Synthesis of Polyamines From the Interfacial Polycondensation Reaction of Histamine with Group VA Dihalo Reactants.  Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering.  171, pages 1-4, 2013.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Islam, Z. and Roner, M.R.  2013.  Synthesis of Organotin Polyamines From the Interfacial Polycondensation Reaction of Histamine with Organotin Dihalides.  Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering.  172, pages 1-4, 2013.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Ayoub, M., Roner, M.R. and Pham, N.  2013.  Synthesis of Polyesters Formed From the Reaction of Chelidonic Acid with Group VA Dihalo Reactants.  Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering.  173, pages 1-4, 2013.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Pham, N. and Roner, M.R.  2013.  Synthesis of Group VA Polyesters Containing Thiodiglycolic Acid.  Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering.  174, pages 1-4, 2013.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Ayoub, M., Roner, M.R. and Pham, N.  2013. Synthesis of Polyesters Formed From the Reaction of Chelidonic Acid with Group VA Dihalo Reactants.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  109.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Pham, N, and Roner, M.R.  2013. Synthesis of Group VA Polyesters Containing Thiodiglycolic Acid.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  109.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Islam, Z. and Roner, M.R.  2013. Synthesis of Organotin Polyamines From the Interfacial Polycondensation Reaction of Histamine with Organotin Dihalides.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  109.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Islam and Roner, M.R.,.  2013.   MALDI MS of Histamine-Containing Polymers Derived From Group IVB Metallocene Dichlorides.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  108: 198-200.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Ayoub, M. and Roner, M.R.  2013.  Organotin Polyesters Containing Chelidonic Acid: MALDI MS Results.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  108: 184-186.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Roner, M.R., Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric, A., Trang, N.T., Truong, N.T.C., Islam, Z. and Morrison, A.  2013.   Comparison of Employing WI-38 and NIH/3T3 Cells for Evaluation of Chemotherapeutic Index and Growth Inhibition Values for Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines for Group IVB Metallocene and Group VA Metal-Containing Polymers Derived from Glycyrrhetinic Acid, 3,5-Pyridine-dicarboxylic Acid, and Histamine.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  108: 187-190.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Roner, M.R., Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric, A., Trang, N.T., Islam, Z., Truong, N.T.C. and Williams-Sheffler, J.  2013.   Comparison of WI-38 and NIH/3T3 Cells as Standards for the Evaluation of the Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines by Organotin Polymers Containing Histamine and Phentolamine.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  108: 195-197.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Conference Paper 2012
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Pham, N. and Roner, M.R.  2012.  Organotin Polyesters Containing Thiodiglycolic Acid: Synthesis.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  107: 345-347.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2012
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Truong, N.T.C. and Roner, M.R.  2012.   MALDI MS of the Products of Transition Metal Metallocene Dichlorides with Glycyrrhetinic Acid.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  106: 509-512.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2012
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Islam, Z. and Roner, M.R.  2012.   MALDI MS of the Products of Organotin Dihalides with Histamine.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  106: 506-508.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2012
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Morrison, A. and Roner, M.R.  2012.   MALDI MS of the Products of Organotin Dihalides with 3,5-Pyridinedicarboxylic Acid.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  106: 503-505.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2012
      • Roner, M.R., Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric, A., Trang, A., Arnold, T., Lambert, R. and Morrison, A.. 2012.   Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines by Metal-Containing Polymers Derived from Thiamine, 3,5-Pyridinedicarboxylic Acid and Isomannide.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  106: 498-502.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2012
      • Roner, M.R., Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric, A., Trang, A., Truong, N.T.C., Gupta, A., Islam, Z. and Williams-Sheffler, J. 2012.   Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines by Metal-Containing Polymers Derived from Glycyrrhetinic Acid, 6-Aminopenicillic Acid, Histamine, and Phentolamine (Regitine).  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  106: 492-497.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2012
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Arnold, T. and Roner, M.R.  2012.   Fragmentation TOF MALDI MS of the Polyether Products of Group IVB Metallocene Dichlorides with Isomannide.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  106: 489-491.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2012
      • Roner, M.R., Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric, A., Trang, N.T., Islam, Z.and Morrison, A.  2012.   Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines by Group IVB Metallocene and Group VA Metal-Containing Polymers Derived from Glycyrrhetinic Acid, 3,5-Pyridine-dicarboxylic Acid, and Histamine.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  107: 325-328.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2012
      • Roner, M.R., Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric, A., Trang, N.T., Ayoub, M. and Pham, N.  2012.   Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines by Organotin Polyesters Containing Thiodiglycolic Acid and Chelidonic Acid.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  107: 329-331.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2012
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Morrison, A. and Roner, M.R.  2012.   Initial Synthesis of Organotin Polyesters Containing 3,5-Pyridinedicarboxylic Acid.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  107: 332-335.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2012
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Truong, N.T.C., and Roner, M.R.  2012. Initial Synthesis of Organoarsenic, Organoantimony, and Organobismuth Polyether Esters From Reaction With Glycyrrhetinic Acid.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  107: 336-341.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2012
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Ayoub, M. and Roner, M.R.  2012.   Organotin Polyesters Containing Chelidonic Acid: Synthesis.  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  107: 342-344.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2012
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Gupta, A. and Roner, M.R.  2012  Organotin Polyamine Esters from reaction of 6-Aminopencillanic Acid and Organotin Dihalides.  Journal of Polymeric Materials.  2012, 29(4):377-390.  
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2012
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Barot, G., Roner, M.R., Shahi, K.,Pellerito, C., Fiore, T., Scopelliti, M., and Pellerito, L.  2012  Synthesis, Structural Analysis, Fiber Formation and Preliminary Anticancer Characterization of the Organotin Polyether from Dibutyltin Dichloride and 2,5 Dimethyl-3-hexyne-2,5-diol.  Journal of Polymeric Materials.  2012, 29(4):361-376.  
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Paper 2011
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Lambert, R.E. and Roner, M.R.  2011.  Synthesis of Organotin Polyamine Ethers containing Thiamine (Vitamine B1). Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  105: 983-986.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2011
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Truong, N.T.C. and Roner, M.R.  2011.  Synthesis of Organotin Polyamine Ethers from the reaction of Organotin Dihalides with Glycyrrhetinic Acid  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  105: 987-989.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2011
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Arnold, T. and Roner, M.R.  2011.  Synthesis of Organotin Polyamine Ethers from the reaction of Organotin Dihalides with Isomannide (D-Mannitol).  Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  105: 990-992.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2011
      • Carraher, C. E., Jr.; Lambert, R. E.; Arroyo, L.; Roner, M. R. MALDI MS for the Products of Organotin Dihalides and Thiamine. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2011, 104, 21-25.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2011
      • Carraher, C. E., Jr.; Arnold, T.; Arroyo, L.; Roner, M. R. Moderate Mass Ion Fragment Analysis Employing F TOF MALDI MS from the Products of Organotin Dihalides with Isomannide. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2011, 104, 17-20.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2011
      • Carraher, C. E., Jr.; Trang, N.; Truong, C.; Arroyo, L.; Roner, M. R. MALDI MS of the Products of Organotin Dihalides with Glycyrrhetinic Acid. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2011, 104, 12-16.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2011
      • Roner, M.R., Carraher, C.E., Shahi, K. and Barot, G.  Antiviral Activity of Metal-Containing Polymers-Organotin and Cisplatin-Like Polymers.  Materials 2011 4:991-1012
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2011
      • Carraher Jr., C.E.; Naoshima, Y., Nagao, K., Roner, M.R. Zhao, A., Barot, G. and Battin, A.  2011. Antibacterial, Yeast and Fungal Polymeric Materials Derived from Organotim-Containing Materials.  J. Polymer Mater. Vol. 28, No. 3, 303-336.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2011
      • Carraher, C. E., Jr.; Battin, A. J.; Roner, M. R. Effect of Electrical Conductivity Through the Bulk Doping of the Product of Titanocene Dichloride and 2-Nitro-1,4-phenylenediamine. Journal of Functional Biomaterials 2011, 2 (1), 18-30.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2011
      • Carraher, C. E., Jr; Roner, M. R.; Shahi, K.; Barot, G. Structural Consideration in Designing Organotin Polyethers to Arrest the Growth of Breast Cancer Cells In Vitro. Materials 2011, 4, 801-815.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2011
      • Tam, K. I.; Roner, M. R. Characterization of in vivo anti-rotavirus activities of saponin extracts from Quillaja Saponaria Molina Antiviral. Antiviral Research 2011 90:231-241.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2010
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Blumn, F.D., Nair, M.B., Barot, G., Battin, A., Fiore, T., Pellerito, C., Scopelliti, M., Zhao, A., Roner, M.R. and Pellerito, L.  2010.   Organotin-containing polyethers as potential anticancer drugs.  Journal of Inorganic Organometallic Polymers  20:570-585.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2010
      • Roner, M. R.; Tam, K. I.; Kiesling-Barrager, M. Prevention of rotavirus infections in vitro with aqueous extracts of Quillaja Saponaria Molina. Future Medicinal Chemistry 2010, 2 (7), 1083-1097.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2010
      • Carraher, C. E., Jr.; Roner, M. R.; Barot, G. Organotin-containing polyethers as potential anticancer drugs. Cancer Research Journal 2010, 3 (3-4), 207-232.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Paper 2010
      • Roner, M. R.; Lambert, R. E.; Carraher, C. E., Jr. Ability of Organotin Polymers Derived from Thiamine to Inhibit Ovarian, Colon, Lung, Prostrate, Pancreatic and Breast Cancer Cells. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2010, 102, 83-85.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2010
      • Roner, M. R.; Johnson, J. D.; Carraher, C. E., Jr. Ability of Organotin Polyether Amines Derived from Anticoagulant Dicumarol to Inhibit Ovarian, Colon, Lung, Prostrate, Pancreatic and Breast Cancer Cells. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2010, 102, 80-82.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2010
      • Roner, M. R.; Williams-Sheffler, J.; Carraher, C. E., Jr. Ability of Organotin Polyether Amines Derived from Phentolamine (Regitine) to Inhibit Ovarian, Colon, Lung, Prostrate, Pancreatic and Breast Cancer Cells. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2010, 102, 77-79.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2010
      • Roner, M. R.; Carraher, C. E., Jr.; Shahi, K.; Barot, G. Organotin Polyether Structural Similarities in the Inhibiiton of Estrogen-Sensitive MCF-7 and Non-Estrogen-Sensitive MDA Cancer Cells. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2010, 103, 73-75.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Conference Paper 2009
      • Roner, M. R., K. R. Shahi, A. Battin, and C. E. Carraher, Jr. "Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines by Dibutyltin Polyamines Derived from 4,6-Diaminopyrimidines." Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 101 (2009): 1388-1390.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2009
      • Shahi, K., M. R. Roner, Y. Ashida, G. Barot, and C. E. Carraher, Jr. "Cell Inhibition by Titanocene and Hafnocene Polyethers Containing the Synthetic Hormone Dienestrol." Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 100 (2009): 3-6.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2009
      • Shahi, K., M. R. Roner, Y. Ashida, G. Barot, and C. E. Carraher, Jr. "Ability of Organotin Polyethers Derived from Dienestrol to Inhibit Ovarian, Colon, Lung, and Breast Cancer Cells." Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 100 (2009): 22-25.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2009
      • Roner, M. R., K. Shahi, G. Barot, A. J. Battin, and C. E. Carraher, Jr. "Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines by Selected Organotin Polymers." Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 100 (2009): 37-39.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2009
      • Shahi, K., M. R. Roner, G. Barot, and C. E. Carraher, Jr. "Ability of a Series of Organotin Polyethers Derived from Substituted Hydroquinones to Inhibit the Vaccinia and Herpes Simplex Viruses." Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 100 (2009): 48-50.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2009
      • Shahi, K., M. R. Roner, G. Barot, and C. E. Carraher, Jr. "Inhibition of the HSV-1 and Vaccinia Viruses by Organotin Polyethers Containing Methylene Spacers." Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 100 (2009): 51-53.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2009
      • Roner, M. R.; Barot, G.; Carraher, C. E., Jr. Ability of Organotin Monomers to Inhibit Ovarian, Colon, Lung, Prostrate, Pancreatic and Breast Cancer Cells. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2009, 101, 1381-1382.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2009
      • Barot, G., S. Vetter, G. Navak, M. R. Roner, and C. E. Carraher, Jr. "Enzymatic Effects on the Organotin Polyether Derived from Dibutyltin Dichloride and Hydroxyl-Capped Poly(Ethylene Glycol) and Evaluation of Trypsin Activity Employing Light Scattering Photometry and Gel Electrophoresis." Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 101 (2009): 1383-1384.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2009
      • Roner, M. R., K. R. Shahi, G. Barot, and C. E. Carraher, Jr. "Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines by Simple Dibutyltin Polyethers." Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 101 (2009): 1385-1387.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2009
      • Barot, G.; Roner, M. R.; Naoshima, Y.; Nagao, K.; Shahi, K.; Carraher, C. E. Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Preliminary Biological Characterization of Organotin Polyethers Derived from Hydroquinone and Substituted Hydroquinones. J. Inorganic & Organometallic Polymers and Materials 2009, 19 (1), 12-27.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2009
      • Roner, M. R., K. R. Shahi, G. Barot, A. Battin, and C. E. Carraher. "Preliminary results for the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cells by organotin polymers." . J. Inorganic & Organometallic Polymers and Materials 19.3 (2009): 410-414.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2009
      • Roner, M. R.; Carraher, C. E., Jr.; Shahi, K.; Ashida, A.; Barot, G. Ability of Group IVB Metallocene Polyethers Containing Dienestrol to Arrest the Growth of Selected Cancer Cell Lines. BMC Cancer 2009, 9, 358.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2009
      • Carraher, C. E., Jr.; Roner, M. R. Organotin polyethers as potential Biomaterials. Material 2009, 2, 1558-1598.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Paper 2008
      • Shahi, K., Roner, M.R., Barot, G. and Carraher, C.E., Jr.  2008.  Ability of a Series of Dibutyltin Polyethers Based On Substituted Hydroquinones To Inhibit Colon, Prostrate, Breast, and Lung Cancer Cells.   Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  99: 343-345.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2008
      • Shahi, K., Roner, M.R., Barot, G. and Carraher, C.E., Jr.  2008.  Ability of Dibutyltin Poly(ethylene Oxides) to Inhibit the Viruses Associated with Small Pox and Herpes .   Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  99: 346-348.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2008
      • Shahi, K., Roner, M.R., Barot, G. and Carraher, C.E., Jr.  2008.  Ability to Inhibit Various Cancer Cell Lines by Dibutyltin Polyethers Derived From 1,1- and 1,2-Diols.   Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  99: 349-351.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2008
      • Barot, G., Roner, M.R. and Carraher, C.E., Jr.  2008.  Synthesis of Dibutyltin Polyethers from a Series of Substituted Hydroquinones.   Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  99: 362-364.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2008
      • Shahi, K., Roner, M.R., Battin, A. and Carraher, C.E., Jr.  2008.  Ability of Organotin Pyrimidine Polyamines to Inhibit HSV-1 (Herpes Simplex Virus) and Vaccinia (Small Pox Virus) Viruses.   Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  99: 365-367.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2008
      • Barot, G., Roner, M.R., Shahi, K. and Carraher, C.E., Jr.  2008.  Synthesis and Structural and Preliminary Anticancer Characterization of the Organotin Polyether from Dibutyltin Dichloride and 2,5-Dimethyl-3-hexyne-2,5- diol.   Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.  99: 383-385.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2008
      • Shahi, K.; Roner, M. R.; Barot, G.; Carraher, C. E. J. Ability of a Series of Organotin Polyethers Containing Methylene Spacers to Inhibit Prostrate, Breast, Colon, and Lung Cancer Cell Lines. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2008, 98, 375-377.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2008
      • Shahi, K.; Roner, M. R.; Carraher, C. E., Jr. Ability of a Series of Organotin Polyethers Derived from Diethylstilbestrol to Inhibit Ovarian, Colon, Lung, and Breast Cancer Cells. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2008, 98, 414-416.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2008
      • Shahi, K.; Roner, M. R.; Barot, G.; Carraher, C. E., Jr. Molecular Weight Dependency on the Ability of Organotin Polyethers Based on Hydroxyl-Terminated Poly(ethylene glycols) to Inhibit Cancer Cell Growth. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2008, 98, 390-392.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2008
      • Shahi, K.; Roner, M. R.; Barot, G.; Carraher, C. E., Jr. Effect of Chain Length on Ability to Inhibit Cancer Cell Lines for Organotin Polyethers Derived from Diols with Varying Methylene Spacers. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2008, 98, 384-386.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2008
      • Shahi, K.; Roner, M. R.; Ashida, Y.; Barot, G.; Carraher, C. E., Jr. Cell Inhibition by Titanocene, Zirconocene, and Hafnocene Polyethers Containing the Synthetic Hormone Diethylstilbestrol. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2008, 98, 378-380.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2008
      • Roner, M. R.; Carraher, C. E., Jr.; Dhanji, S.; Barot, G. Antiviral and Anticancer Activity of Cisplatin Derivatives of Tilorone. J. Inorganic & Organometallic Polymers and Materials 2008, 1, 374-383.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2008
      • Carraher, C. E., Jr.; Roner, M. R.; Shahi, K.; Ashida, Y.; Barot, G. Synthesis and Initial Cell Line results of Organotin Polyethers containing Diethylstilbestrol. J. Inorganic & Organometallic Polymers and Materials 2008, 18, 180-188.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2008
      • Zhao, A.; Shahi, K. R.; Roner, M. R.; Barot, G.; Fiore, T.; Pellerito, C.; Scopelliti, P.; Carraher, C. E., Jr. Ciprofloxacin Polymers Derived from Diallyltin and Divinyltin Dihalides. J. Polymer Mater 2008.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2008
      • Roner, M. R.; Joklik, W. J. Structure and Molecular Biology of Segmented Double-Stranded RNA Viruses. John T. Patton and Max L. Nibert, Eds.; Springer Sci. Publisher: 2008; 19, pp 335-349.
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]
      2008
      • Roner, M. R.; Jr, C. E. C. Cisplatin Derivatives as Antiviral Agents. In Main Group and Transition Macromolecules; Springer Books: 2008; 8, pp 188-218.
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2007
      • Roner, M. R., Carraher, C.E., Jr., Dhanji, S. and Barot, G.  2007.  Antiviral and anticancer activity of cisplatin derivatives of methotrexate.  J. Polymer  Mater.  24:371-385.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2007
      • Carraher, C.E., Jr., Roner, M.R., Shahi, K., Ashida, Y., and Barot, G.  2007.   Synthesis, structural characterization, and anti-cancer evaluation of Group IVB-metallocene polyethers containing the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol.   J. Polymer Mater.  24:357-369.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2007
      • Roner, M. R.; Sprayberry, J.; Spinks, M.; Dhanji, S. Antiviral activity obtained from aqueous extracts of the Chilean soap bark tree - Quillaja Saponaria Molina. J. Gen Virology 2007, 88, 275-285.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2007
      • Roner, M. R.; Steele, B. G. Localizing the reovirus packaging signals using an engineered m1 and s2 ssRNA. Virology 2007, 358 (1), 89-97.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2007
      • Roner, M. R.; Mutsoli, C. Use of Monoreassortants to map reovirus lysis of select tumor cell lines. Journal of Virological Methods 2007, 139 (2), 132-142.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2007
      • Roner, M. R.; Steele, B. G. Features of the Mammalian orthoreovirus 3 Dearing l1 ssRNA that direct packaging and serotype restriction. J. Gen. Virology 2007, 88, 3401-3412.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2007
      • Carraher, J.; Battin, A.; Shahi, K.; Roner, M. R. Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Initial Evaluation as Anticancer Drugs of Dibutyltin Polyamines Derived from various 4,6-Diaminopyrimidines. J. Inorganic & Organometallic Polymers and Materials 2007, 17, 631-639.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2007
      • Braden, A.; Roner, M.; Ganter, J.; Nelson, K. Transport of Biologically Active Molecules to Intracellular Environments Utilizing a Lyzosomally Cleavable Random Block Copolymer of Polyethylenimine. J. Biomedical Nanotechnology 2007, 3 (2), 120-130.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2007
      • Braden, A.; Roner, M.; Ganter, J.; Nelson, K. Enhanced delivery of bioactive molecules to intracellular environments utilizing a cytosolically reducable grafted analog of polyethylenimine. J. Nanosci. Nanotechnol. 2007, 7 (3), 925-36.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2007
      • Barot, G.; Shahi, K.; Roner, M. R.; Carraher, C. E., Jr. Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Ability to Inhibit Cancer Growth of a Series of Organotin Poly(ethylene glycols). J. Inorganic & Organometallic Polymers and Materials 2007, 17, 595-603.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Paper 2007
      • ShaShahi, K.; Roner, M. R.; Battin, A. J.; Jr, C. E. C. Ability of dibutyltin polyamine derivatives of diaminopyrimidines to inhibit ovarian, bone, colon, lung, and breast cancer cells. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2007, 97, 469-472.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2007
      • Shahi, K.; Roner, M. R.; Jr, C.; Barot, G. Ability of Organotin Polymers Derived from Diaminopyrimidines to Inhibit Cancer Cell Growth. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2007, 96, 383-386.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2007
      • Shahi, K.; Roner, M. R.; Jr, C.; Barot, G. Ability of a Series of Organotin Poly(ethylene glycols) to Inhibit Various Cancer Cell Lines. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2007, 96, 387-389.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Popular Press Article 2007
      • Roner, M. R.; Sprayberry, J.; Spinks, M.; Dhanji, S. A soapy solution to HIV. Microbiology Today. Microbes Shaping History 2007, 36.
        {Popular Press Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Conference Paper 2006
      • Roner, M. R.; Carraher, J.; Sabir, S. T.; Shahi, K.; Roehr, J. L.; Bassett, K. D. Anticancer and Antiviral Activities of Organotin Polyether Amines Derived From the Antiviral Acyclovir. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2006, 95, 525-527.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2006
      • Shahi, K.; Roner, M. R.; Carraher, C. E. J.; Barot, G. Selected Organotin Polyethers As Potential Anti-Cancer Drugs. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2006, 94, 466-468.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2006
      • Carraher, C. E., Jr.; Sabir, T. E.; Roner, M. R.; Shahi, K.; Bleicher, R. E.; Bassett, K. E. Synthesis of Organotin Polyamine Ethers Containing Acyclovir and Their Preliminary Anticancer and Antiviral Activity. J. Inorganic & Organometallic Polymers 2006, 16 (3), 249-257.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2006
      • Barot, G.; Shahi, K.; Roner, M. R.; Carraher, C. E. J. Synthesis, Anomalous Fiber Formation, and Preliminary Anticancer Study of the Organotin Polyether Derived from 2-Butyne-1,4-diol. J. Polym. Mater. 2006, 23 (4), 423-436.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2006
      • Roner, M. R.; Roehr, J. The 3' sequences required for incorporation of an engineered ssRNA into the Reovirus genome. Virology Journal 2006, 3 (1).
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2006
      • Roner, M. R.; Charles, E.; Carraher, J.; Roehr, J. L.; Bassett, K. D. Antiviral and Anticancer Activity of Organotin Polymers and Reactants Derived From Norfloxacin And Ampicillin. J. Polym. Mater. 2006, 23, 153-159.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Paper 2005
      • Roner, M. R.; Jr, C. Antiviral Activity of Cisplatin Derivatives of Methotrexate Against Vaccinia Virus, Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV), Reovirus ST3, and Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1). Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2005, 93, 410-413.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2005
      • Roner, M. R.; Jr, C.; Salima, D. Antiviral Activity of Cisplatin Derivatives of Tilorone Against Reovirus ST3, Vaccinia Virus, Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV), and Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1). Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering 2005, 92, 499-501.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2004
      • Roner, M. R.; Roehr, J. L.; Bassett, K. D. Identification of the 5’ sequences required for incorporation of an engineered ssRNA into the Reovirus genome. Virology 2004, 329, 348-360.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Paper 2003
      • Roner, M.R., Carraher, Jr. C. E., Zhao, A., Roehr, J. L., Bassett, K. D., and Siegmann-Louda, D. W.2003.Anti-Viral Activity of organotin Polymers Derived from Acyclovir and Ciprofloxacin.Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering.89:525-527.
        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2001
      • Roner, M.R., and W. K. Joklik. 2001. Reovirus reverse genetics: Incorporation of the CAT gene into the reovirus genome. PNAS 98:8036-8041
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 1999
      • Roner, M.R. 1999. Rescue Systems for dsRNA Viruses of Higher Organisms. Virus Research. Volume 53:p 355-367.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 1997
      • Roner, M. R., Nepluev, I.,Sherry, B., and W. K. Joklik. 1997.Construction and Characterization of a Reovirus Double ts Mutant.PNAS. 94:6826-6830.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 1996
      • Joklik, W. K., and Roner, M. R.1996.Molecular Recognition in the Assembly of the Segmented Reovirus Genome.Progress in Nucleic Acids and Molecular Biology.Volume 53:249-281. Review.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 1995
      • Joklik, W. K., and Roner, M. R..1995.What Reassorts when Reovirus Genome Segments Reassort.Journal Biological Chemistry.207:4181-4184.Mini Review.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      1995
      • Roner, M. R., Lin, P., Nepluev, I., Kong, L., and W. K. Joklik.1995.Identification of Signals Required for the Insertion of Heterologous Genome Segments into the Reovirus Genome. PNAS.92:12362-12366.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 1994
      • Joklik, W. K., and Roner, M. R.1994.Molecular Basis of Viral Evolution. Chapter 25 - The Evolution of Reoviridae.CambridgeUniversity Press.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 1993
      • Roner, M. R., L. A. Roner, and W. K. Joklik.1993.Translation of reovirus RNA species m1 can initiate at either of the first two in-frame initiation codons. PNAS 90:8947-8951.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 1990
      • Roner, M. R., L. A. Sutphin, and W. K. Joklik.1990.Reovirus RNA is infectious.Virology.179:845-852.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 1989
      • Roner, M. R., R. J. Gaillard, and W. K. Joklik.1989.Control of Reovirus Messenger RNA Translation Efficiency by the Regions Upstream of Initiation Codons.Virology. 168:292-301.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 1985
      • Roner, M. R., and D. C. Cox.1985.Cellular integrity is required for inhibition of initiation of cellular DNA synthesis by reovirus type 3.J. Virol.53:350-359.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

Presentations

  • Past
    •  
      Synthesis of Group VA Polyesters Containing 3,5-Pyridinedicarboxylic Acid.

      Carraher, C.E. Jr., Black, Kendra and Roner, M.R..

      250th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Boston, MA., August 16-20, 2015

  • Past
    •  
      Ability of Organotin Polyamines Synthesized from the Reaction of 3-Amino-1,2,4-triazole and Organotin Dihalides to Inhibit Cancer Cell Lines.

      Roner, M.R., Carraher, C.E. Jr., Moric-Johnson, A., Miller, L and Crichton, Ryan.

      250th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Boston, MA., August 16-20, 2015

  • Past
    •  
      MALDI MS Results of the Products from Reaction of the Salt of D-Camphoric Acid and Organotin Dihalides.

      Carraher, C.E. Jr., Campbell, A.G. and Roner, M.R.,

      250th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Boston, MA., August 16-20, 2015

  • Past
    •  
      Synthesis of Organotin Polyether Esters from Reaction of Salicylic Acid and Organotin Dihalides.

      Carraher, C.E. Jr., Lynch, M., Sookedo, N. and Roner, M.R.

      250th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Boston, MA., August 16-20, 2015

  • Past
    •  
      Synthesis of Group IVB Metallocene Polyamine Esters From Reaction of 6-Aminopenicillanic Acid with Group IVB Metallocene Dihalides Employing Interfacial Polycondensation.

      Carraher, C.E. Jr., Patel, D., Sookedo, N. and Roner, M.R.

      250th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Boston, MA., August 16-20, 2015

  • Past
    •  
      Ability of Group VA Organoethers Derived from the Anticoagulant Dicumarol to Inhibit Cancer Cells.

      Roner, M.R., Carraher, C.E. Jr., Sookedo, N., Moric-Johnson, A. and Miller, L.

      250th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Boston, MA., August 16-20, 2015

  • Past
    •  
      Use of the Dioctyltin Polyether Ester Synthesized from Reaction of Alpha-Cyano-4-Hydroxycinnamic Acid and Dioctyltin Dichloride Itself Acting as the MALDI MS Matrix.

      Suresh, V., Carraher, C.E., Jr. and Roner, M.R.    

      249th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Denver, CO., March 22-26, 2015

  • Past
    •  
      Inhibition of Cancer Cell Lines by the Organotin Polyether Esters Synthesized from Reaction of the Salt of Alpha-Cyano-4-Hydroxycinnamic Acid and Organotin Dihalides.

      Roner, M.R , Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric-Johnson, A., Miller, L. and Suresh, V.

      249th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Denver, CO., March 22-26, 2015

  • Past
    •  
      Initial Study of the Ability of Organotin Polyethers Derived from the Anticoagulant Dicumarol to Inhibit Cancer Cell Lines.

      Roner, M.R , Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric-Johnson, A., Miller, L. and Suresh, V

      249th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Denver, CO., March 22-26, 2015

  • Past
    •  
      Inhibition of Cancer Cell Lines by Organotin Polyesters Synthesized from Reaction of the Salt of D-Camphoric Acid and Organotin Dihalides.

      Roner, M.R , Carraher, C.E., Jr., Moric-Johnson, A., Miller, L. and Sookedo, N.

      249th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Denver, CO., March 22-26, 2015

  • Past
    •  
      Synthesis of Organotin Polyamines from Reaction of 3-Amino-1,2,4-triazole and Organotin Dihalides.

      Carraher, C.E., Jr., Crichton, R. and Roner, M.R.  .   

      249th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Denver, CO., March 22-26, 2015

  • Past
    •  
      MALDI MS Results for Organotin Polyamines Synthesized from Reaction of 3-Amino-1,2,4-triazole and Organotin Dihalides.

      Carraher, C.E., Jr., Suresh, V., Crichton, R. and Roner, M.R. 

      249th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Denver, CO., March 22-26, 2015

Projects

  • 2015
    • Aug 2015 to Present Viral persistence: How do viruses replicate, spread and evade host defenses?

      1.  Antivirals

      Block replication – Organometallics (organotins)

      Attachment – Natural products (spaonins)

      2.  Genome replication and assortment

      Signals within individual genome segments

      Reverse genetics systems

      Virus replication interference

      3.  Oncolytic viruses

      Understanding the mechanisms

      Utilization as antitumor agents

      4.  Uncharacterized virus variants

      Pathogenic reoviruses?

      Role: Principal Investigator PI: Dr. Michael Roner

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • July 2015 to June 2016 Rapid and Ultrasensitive Diagnosis of Rotavirus by Thermoplasmonic Amplification sponsored by  - $41000
    • Jan 2014 to Jan 2015 Desert King International sponsored by  - $10000
    • Jan 2009 to Jan 2013 Development of a Single Step Immunosorbent Assay sponsored by  - $108000
    • Jan 2007 to Jan 2011 In Vivo Antiviral Activity of Saponins sponsored by  - $222000

Other Research Activities

  • 2015
    • Research
      • Aug 2015 Rapid and Ultrasensitive Infectious Diagnosis of Rotavirus by Thermoplasmonic Amplification

        Infectious diseases continue to pose a major threat to worldwide human health and lead to significant morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs.  Among them, rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea disease in newborns and young children worldwide with approximately 300,000 pre-adolescent deaths each year.(RW.ERROR - Unable to find reference:65) Rapid diagnosis is critical for early and accurate treatment, as well as initiation and reduction of transmission which eventually reduces hospital stays, antibiotic over-prescription, and taxing limited laboratory resources. Current diagnostic methods are either slow (viral culture, PCR), or lack sufficient sensitivity (e.g. rapid diagnostic tests). The goal of this project is to develop rapid and ultrasensitive diagnostic tests with potential to replace current viral culture and PCR based laboratory tests. 

      • Aug 2015 Multiscale Modeling and Simulation as a Means for Combating the Ebola Virus

        This  project  investigates  the  dynamic modeling and computer simulation of the Ebola virus (EBOV). The simulation is then used as a tool for finding or de- signing compounds that can disrupt these receptors, and prevent it from infecting a cell.  The result of this study should be one or several candi- date compounds that can effectively combat the spread of the EBOV.  Since its discovery in 1976, five strains of EBOV have been identi-fied.  Though virulent with a high lethality (50-90%), most EBOV out- breaks have been well contained. The current 2014 outbreak has killed more than all others combined. This outbreak has been more difficult to contain than prior ones, which high- lights an urgent need for a medicinal remedy to stop the spread of this infection.

Students Supervised

Collaborators

    • thumbnail
      Duration : May 2015 to Present

      Infectious diseases continue to pose a major threat to worldwide human health and lead to significant morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs.  Among them, rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea disease in newborns and young children worldwide with approximately 300,000 pre-adolescent deaths each year.(RW.ERROR - Unable to find reference:65) Rapid diagnosis is critical for early and accurate treatment, as well as initiation and reduction of transmission which eventually reduces hospital stays, antibiotic over-prescription, and taxing limited laboratory resources. Current diagnostic methods are either slow (viral culture, PCR), or lack sufficient sensitivity (e.g. rapid diagnostic tests). The goal of this project is to develop rapid and ultrasensitive diagnostic tests with potential to replace current viral culture and PCR based laboratory tests. 

    • thumbnail
      Duration : Aug 2003 to Present

      Viruses, for the most part, utilize cellular machinery to replicate the viral genome and produce new virus particles.  In an attempt to target viral replication, the cellular processes in uninfected cells are also undesirably affected.  Polymeric drugs offer the opportunity to avoid some of these effects.  As part of a collaborative effort with Dr. Charles Carraher, Jr. at Florida Atlantic University, I am involved in the application of organotin and other metal-containing polymers as novel antiviral and antitumor drugs.  Together, we will submit at least two grant applications to NIH to fund this work and move forward to animal testing with a number of promising results for destroying prostate and pancreatic cancer cells.

              

Courses

      • BIOL 4312-001 INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY

         This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also which  current approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 5304-001 VIROLOGY

         This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also which  current approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4312-001 INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY

         This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also which  current approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Winter - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 3312-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY

        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 5309-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY

        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4317-001 BACTERIAL PATHOGENESIS

        This course is a study of medically important microorganisms.  Special emphasis will be placed on recent advances in the molecular genetics of host pathogen interactions.  This course will focus on the various strategies microorganisms use to attach, invade and multiply in a host.  Knowledge of these mechanisms of pathogenesis is being used to develop prevention and treatment strategies for a number of diseases.  We will use current literature and case studies to focus on selected model organisms that will introduce the major concepts in microbial pathogenesis.  

        “Infectious disease is one of the few genuine adventures left in the world. The dragons are all dead and the lance grows rusty in the chimney corner. ... About the only sporting proposition that remains unimpaired by the relentless domestication of a once free-living human species is the war against those ferocious little fellow creatures, which lurk in dark corners and stalk us in the bodies of rats, mice and all kinds of domestic animals; which fly and crawl with the insects, and waylay us in our food and drink and even in our love.”
        -Hans Zinsser,  Rats Lice and History  1935

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 5317-001 BACTERIAL PATHOGENESIS

        This course is a study of medically important microorganisms.  Special emphasis will be placed on recent advances in the molecular genetics of host pathogen interactions.  This course will focus on the various strategies microorganisms use to attach, invade and multiply in a host.  Knowledge of these mechanisms of pathogenesis is being used to develop prevention and treatment strategies for a number of diseases.  We will use current literature and case studies to focus on selected model organisms that will introduce the major concepts in microbial pathogenesis.  

        “Infectious disease is one of the few genuine adventures left in the world. The dragons are all dead and the lance grows rusty in the chimney corner. ... About the only sporting proposition that remains unimpaired by the relentless domestication of a once free-living human species is the war against those ferocious little fellow creatures, which lurk in dark corners and stalk us in the bodies of rats, mice and all kinds of domestic animals; which fly and crawl with the insects, and waylay us in our food and drink and even in our love.”
        -Hans Zinsser,  Rats Lice and History  1935

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 3312-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY

        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.

        Summer - Intersession - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 3311-001 SELECTED TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY

        To provide information on the pathology, symptomatology, treatment, and prognosis of fungal diseases in humans. Numerous medically important fungi will be described and illustrated in sufficient detail so that students can identify them.

      • BIOL 4317-001 BACTERIAL PATHOGENESIS

        This course is a study of medically important microorganisms.  Special emphasis will be placed on recent advances in the molecular genetics of host pathogen interactions.  This course will focus on the various strategies microorganisms use to attach, invade and multiply in a host.  Knowledge of these mechanisms of pathogenesis is being used to develop prevention and treatment strategies for a number of diseases.  We will use current literature and case studies to focus on selected model organisms that will introduce the major concepts in microbial pathogenesis.  

        “Infectious disease is one of the few genuine adventures left in the world. The dragons are all dead and the lance grows rusty in the chimney corner. ... About the only sporting proposition that remains unimpaired by the relentless domestication of a once free-living human species is the war against those ferocious little fellow creatures, which lurk in dark corners and stalk us in the bodies of rats, mice and all kinds of domestic animals; which fly and crawl with the insects, and waylay us in our food and drink and even in our love.”
        -Hans Zinsser,  Rats Lice and History  1935

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 5317-001 BACTERIAL PATHOGENESIS

        This course is a study of medically important microorganisms.  Special emphasis will be placed on recent advances in the molecular genetics of host pathogen interactions.  This course will focus on the various strategies microorganisms use to attach, invade and multiply in a host.  Knowledge of these mechanisms of pathogenesis is being used to develop prevention and treatment strategies for a number of diseases.  We will use current literature and case studies to focus on selected model organisms that will introduce the major concepts in microbial pathogenesis.  

        “Infectious disease is one of the few genuine adventures left in the world. The dragons are all dead and the lance grows rusty in the chimney corner. ... About the only sporting proposition that remains unimpaired by the relentless domestication of a once free-living human species is the war against those ferocious little fellow creatures, which lurk in dark corners and stalk us in the bodies of rats, mice and all kinds of domestic animals; which fly and crawl with the insects, and waylay us in our food and drink and even in our love.”
        -Hans Zinsser,  Rats Lice and History  1935

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4312-001 INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY

         This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also which  current approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 5304-001 VIROLOGY

         This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also which  current approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 3312-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY

        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 5309-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY

        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 3312-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY

        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.

        Summer - Intersession - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 3311-001 SELECTED TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY

        To provide information on the pathology, symptomatology, treatment, and prognosis of fungal diseases in humans. Numerous medically important fungi will be described and illustrated in sufficient detail so that students can identify them.

      • BIOL 4312-001 INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY

         This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also which  current approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 5304-001 VIROLOGY

         This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also which  current approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 3312-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY

        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 5309-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY

        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 3312-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY

        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.

        Summer - Intersession - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 3311-001 SELECTED TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY

        To provide information on the pathology, symptomatology, treatment, and prognosis of fungal diseases in humans. Numerous medically important fungi will be described and illustrated in sufficient detail so that students can identify them.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4312-001 INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY

         This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also which  current approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 5304-001 VIROLOGY

         This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also which  current approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4312-001 INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY

        This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also whichcurrent approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Winter - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 3312-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY

        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 5309-001 Biol 5309-001

        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 3311-001 SELECTED TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY

        To provide information on the pathology, symptomatology, treatment, and prognosis of fungal diseases in humans. Numerous medically important fungi will be described and illustrated in sufficient detail so that students can identify them.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4312-001 Biol 4312-001

         This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also which  current approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 5304-001 Biol 5304-001

         This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also which  current approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4312-001 INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY

        This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also whichcurrent approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Winter - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 3312-001 Biol 3312-001

        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4312-001 INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY
        This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also whichcurrent approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 5304-001 VIROLOGY
        This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also whichcurrent approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 3312-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY
        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 5309-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY
        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 3312-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY
        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 4312-001 INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY

        This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also whichcurrent approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 3311-001 SELECTED TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY

        To provide information on the pathology, symptomatology, treatment, and prognosis of fungal diseases in humans. Numerous medically important fungi will be described and illustrated in sufficient detail so that students can identify them.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 4312-001 INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY
        This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also whichcurrent approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 5304-001 VIROLOGY
        This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also whichcurrent approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 4312-001 INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY
        This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also whichcurrent approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.
        Winter - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 3312-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY
          This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 5309-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY
          This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 3312-001 IMMUNOBIOLOGY
        This course is designed to acquaint students with fundamental cellular processes involved in the generation of an immune response. It will provide students with detailed knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system, their organization and diversity, and their specialized functions at different anatomical locations. The importance of immune cell receptors and cytokines in cellular interactions and co-ordination of immunological mechanisms is also emphasized.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 4312-001 INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY

        This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also whichcurrent approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 5304-001 VIROLOGY

        This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also whichcurrent approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 4312-001 INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY

        This course is an introduction to molecular virology and the importance of viruses in human disease. It covers the methods available to study virus architecture, genome structure, replication strategies and virus interactions with cellular factors. Viruses have a major impact on humanity. They cause a number of acute diseases which can be serious or even life-threatening, but can also cause long-term complications such as paralysis, are involved in the induction of some cancers and may even cause some forms of diabetes and heart disease. The introduction of molecular approaches over the past 20 years has transformed our understanding of viruses and has provided a number of routes to the development of vaccines and anti-virus therapy. This course will give an introduction to the unique nature and importance of viruses then will show, using a number of detailed, specific examples, how molecular approaches are used in their study and what are the results of these approaches. The course will highlight molecular features which are critical in the induction of disease and also whichcurrent approaches are likely to lead to novel ways of controlling virus infections.

        Winter - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus
      • BIOL 5101-001 Urban Ecology
        Seminar  -  Emerging Infectious Diseases
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2009

Service to the Community

  • Volunteered
    • June 2009 to  Present Biosafety Chairman - Fort Worth Regional Science and Engineering Fair Science review Committee 2009-current

      2016/2017, 406 participants and 338 projects.

      2015/2016, 500 participants and 400 projects.

      2014/2015, 761 participants and 543 projects.

      2013/2014, 700 participants and 478projects.

      2012/2013, 615 participants and 446projects.

      2011/2012, 509 participants and 418projects.

      2010/2011, 358 participants and 293projects.

      2009/2010, 303 participants and 244 projects.

Service to the Profession

  • Appointed
    • Aug 2002 to  Present Peer Review of submitted manuscripts for the following journals;

      Virology, Journal of Virology, Virus Genes, Scientific Journals International (SJI), Future Virology, BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Molecules, Journal of Medical Microbiology, Leukemia Research, eXPRESS Polymer Letters, Journal of Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers and Material, European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, BMC Genomics, Journal of Ocean University of China, The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Virology Journal, Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Service to the University

  • Appointed
    • June 2002 to  Present Biology Department

      Peer Review of Teaching Committee 2015- current

      Graduate Advisor for perspective students 2011- current

      Chair of the Graduate Studies Committee 2011- current

      Member of Biology Equipment Committee 2008- current

      IACUC liaison  2003- current

      Liaison for Animal Care/Licensed drugs  2003 - current

      Chair search committee 2014

      Chair of the Microbiology Search Committee 2009-2010

      Member of Cell Biology and Microbiology search committee 2005-2006

      Member of Microbiology search committee 2004-2005

    • Aug 2015 to  Present College of Science

      Science & Engineering Innovation and Research (SEIR) Building Programming Committee  2015-

    • Aug 2003 to  Present University

      Chair (2003-present)  -  Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) – currently 84 active protocols.

      Vice-Chair (2004-present), Founding Member (2002-2004), - Institutional Biosafety Committee – currently 17 active protocols.

      Member (2015- ) - QEP Development Team at UT Arlington

      Member (2010- )  -  Animal Care facility (AFC) Users Committee

      Member(2012- )Responsible Conduct in Research Committee

      Member(2012- ) College of Science Doctoral Student Recruiting Committee

      Member(2012-2014 )Research Integrity Committee

      Member(2010) Research Integrity Investigation Panel

      Member (2006-2008) - Intellectual Property Committee