Skip to content. Skip to main navigation.

avatar

Dr. Penelope Ingram

Name

[Ingram, Dr. Penelope]
  • Distinguished Teaching Professor
  • Associate Professor, Tenured, English

Professional Preparation

    • 1992 B.A in English/Comp. LitSmith College
    • 1994 M.A. in EnglishYale University
    • 1999 Ph.D. in EnglishU of New South Wales

Appointments

    • Jan 2007 to Present Assoc Prof
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2012 to Aug 2014 Graduate Advisor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2012 to May 2014 Associate Chair
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2006 to Jan 2007 Assoc Prof
      Auburn University
    • Jan 2000 to Jan 2006 Assist Professor
      Auburn University
    • Jan 1999 to Jan 2000 Research Fellow
      University of New South Wales
    • Jan 1988 to Jan 1999 Associate Lecturer
      University of New South Wales

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Aug 2009 to Present Popular Culture Association
    • Aug 2007 to Present International Association for Philosophy and Literature
    • June 2006 to Present Society for Women in Philosophy
    • June 1999 to Present Association for Study of Australian Literature
    • Jan 1998 to Present MLA: Modern Language Association

Awards and Honors

    • Apr  2017 Distinguished Teaching Professor, Academy of Distinguished Teachers, UTA sponsored by Office of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Sep  2016 2016 Outstanding Teaching Award for Tenured Faculty sponsored by College of Liberal ArtsUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Apr  2016 Faculty Development Leave sponsored by College of Liberal ArtsOffice of the Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsOffice of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Feb  2014 2013 Outstanding Teaching Award College of Liberal Arts sponsored by College of Liberal ArtsOffice of the Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsOffice of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Feb  2014 2013 Outstanding Advisor Award (nominated) sponsored by Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsOffice of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Feb  2014 2014 Outstanding Advisor Award (Honorable Mention) sponsored by Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsOffice of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Feb  2014 2011 President's Award for Excellence in Teaching by a Tenured Faculty Member (nominated) sponsored by Office of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington

News Articles

Other Activities

    • Uncategorized
      • Humanities Development Grant, Auburn U, Summer 2005
      • NEH Summer Stipend, Summer 2004
      • CLA Research Travel Grant, Auburn U, 2005
      • Humanities Development Grant, Auburn U, Summer 2004
      • Humanities Development Grant, Auburn U, Summer 2002
      • Competitive Research Grant, Auburn U, Summer 2001
      • Australian Postgraduate Award 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998
      • Arts and Social Sciences Research & Travel Grant 1998
      • UNSW Humanities Research Program Award
      • UTA President's Award for Undergraduate Teaching 2011 (nominated)
      • UTA College of Liberal Arts Teaching Award 2012 (nominated)
      • UTA Outstanding Academic Advisor 2012 (nominated)
      • Rachel Jones reviews Ingram's Signifying Body
      • “’So that’s the Monster’: Interpreting Maternal Ambivalence in Contemporary Hollywood Film.” Women’s and Gender Studies Fall Lecture, Gonzaga University, October 25, 2012.
      • “’So that’s the Monster’: Interpreting Maternal Ambivalence in Contemporary Hollywood Film.” Feminist Research Institute, The University of New Mexico, February 15, 2013.
      • “Hurt Locker and Beyond.” UTA “One Book” Panel, Central Library, March 4th, 2011.
      • “Ned Kelly and the Outlaw Body.” Auburn Women’s Club, Auburn, AL., October 23, 2003.
      • “Race, Gender, and the Queer Body in the work of Carson McCullers.” Panel presentation at the Jan Dempsey Arts Center, Auburn, AL., October 9, 2003.

Research and Expertise

  • Critical Theory, Film Studies

    I am a specialist in critical theory with a specific expertise in feminist, postcolonial, and fim studies.

Publications

      Book Chapter 2014
      • “Framing the mother in Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Babel .”Mothering and Psychoanalysis: Feminist, Sociological and Clinical Perspectives, ed. Petra Buskens. Bradford, ON: Demeter Press, 2014.

        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2011
      • Review of Transnational Whiteness Matters. Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Maryrose Casey and Fiona Nicoll (eds), 2008. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. Australian Feminist Studies 26:70 (2011).
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book 2011
      • Framing the Mother: Psychoanalysis and the Maternal Gaze

        {Book} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2009
      • Ingram, Penelope. "Veiled Resistance: Algerian Women and the Resignification of Patriarchal and Colonial Discourses of Embodiment." Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 19.1 (2009): 50-65.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book 2008
      • Ingram, Penelope. The Signifying Body: Toward an Ethics of Sexual and Racial Difference. Buffalo NY: SUNY Press, 2008.
        {Book} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2006
      • Ingram, Penelope, "Representing the Irish Body: Reading Ned's Armour." Antipodes 20:1 (2006): 12-19

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2001
      • Ingram, Penelope. "Racializing Babylon: Settler Whiteness and the 'New Racism'." New Literary History 32, no 1 (2001): 157-176.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2000
      • Ingram, Penelope. "From Goddess Spirituality to Irigaray's Angel: The Politics of the Divine." Feminist Review 66 (2000): 46-72.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 1999
      • Ingram, Penelope. "'One Drifts Apart': To the Lighthouse as Art of Response." Philosophy and Literature 23.1 (1999): 78-95.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      1999
      • Ingram, Penelope. "Can the Settler Speak? : Appropriating Subaltern Silence in Janet Frame's The Carpathians." Cultural Critique 41 (1999): 79-107.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

Presentations

    • January  2013
      “’Mommy I don’t want to do this.’” Reading Richie through Laura’s trauma in Stephen Daldry’s The Hours” SWTX Popular Culture Association Conference, Albuquerque, NM, February 13-16,
    • January  2013
      “Where the Wild Fathers Aren’t: Monsters and the Single Mom.” Popular Culture Association Conference, Washington Dc. March 27-30,
    • January  2012
      “’Pathologies of Maternal Desire’: Mildred Pierce and the Ambivalent Mother.” Popular Culture Association Conference, Boston, MA. April 11-14,
    • April  2011
      "Framing the mother in Alejandro González Iñárritu's Babel "University of Queensland Brisbane

      27-30 April 2011

    • March  2008
      "The Signifying Body: Veiled Women and the Ethics of Representation." Building Coalitions Across Difference.

      March 6-8, 2008.

    • October  2007
      "Bodies, Veils, and the Ethics of Representation."

      October 26-27, 2007.

    • March  2004
      "The Signifying Body: Towards an Ethics of Sexual and Racial Difference."

      March 5, 2004.

    • December  2003
      "White Masculinity and the Convict Body: Reading Ned's Armour."

      December 8, 2003.

    • September  2003
      "Ned Kelly and the Postcolonial Body: Reading Peter Carey's True History of the Kelly Gang

      September 19, 2003.

    • October  2002
      "Metaphysics and Difference, or how Heidegger can help Feminism.

      October 10, 2002.

Courses

      • ENGL 4399-001 Representations of Race in Contemporary Science Fiction

        Studying a variety of texts, including novels, novellas, and film and television productions, this course will explore representations of race in contemporary science fiction and compare it to representations found in earlier texts. We will consider whether science fiction as a genre offers the promise of a future without racism or whether it resorts to well-traveled stereotypes of difference. Central to this investigation will be an introduction to the field of Afrofuturism, a movement of artists and intellectuals that provides a variety of black perspectives on science, science fiction, and technology, imagining new worlds and new possibilities for raced bodies in and out of space.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6360-001 From Beauvoir to Bordo, Butler, and Beyond

        This course attempts to cover many of the key issues, conversations, and debates central to feminist thought of the twentieth and early twenty-first century in an effort to provide you with an overview of the field of feminist theory. The course is organized thematically and includes readings related to race, class, sexuality, reproduction, science, and authorship. We will devote two weeks at the end of the semester to discuss a variety of feminist methodologies in order to help you identify and articulate your own research questions. This course is a requirement of the Women’s and Gender Studies Graduate Certificate.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • WOMS 6360-001 From Beauvoir to Bordo, Butler, and Beyond

        This course attempts to cover many of the key issues, conversations, and debates central to feminist thought of the twentieth and early twenty-first century in an effort to provide you with an overview of the field of feminist theory. The course is organized thematically and includes readings related to race, class, sexuality, reproduction, science, and authorship. We will devote two weeks at the end of the semester to discuss a variety of feminist methodologies in order to help you identify and articulate your own research questions. This course is a requirement of the Women’s and Gender Studies Graduate Certificate.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5300-001 Theory and Practice

        English 5300 is a core course of the graduate program in English.  This course introduces a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to English studies, which serve as a foundation for subsequent courses. Along with interpretive methods, the course also includes an introduction to research methodology in the profession.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-003 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        What do we do when we read? How do we arrive at an interpretation of a text’s “meaning”? Can a text have more than one “meaning”? Why does interpretation matter? How do you translate an interpretive reading into a piece of analytic writing? In this course we will examine these questions and issues related to them through an introduction to some of the key concepts in English studies.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-004 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        What do we do when we read? How do we arrive at an interpretation of a text’s “meaning”? Can a text have more than one “meaning”? Why does interpretation matter? How do you translate an interpretive reading into a piece of analytic writing? In this course we will examine these questions and issues related to them through an introduction to some of the key concepts in English studies.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5330-001 Representations of Race in Contemporary Science Fiction

        Studying a variety of film and television productions, this course will explore representations of race in contemporary science fiction cinema and television. We will consider whether science fiction as a genre offers the promise of a future without racism or whether it travels in well-traveled stereotypes of difference. In our analysis of more recent TV and film, including Almost Human and Extant, Rise of the Planet of the Apes and Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, we will explore the connections between current anxieties around bioengineering and android/cyborg life and race relations in the twenty-first century.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-003 Introduction to Analysis and Interpretation

        What do we do when we read? How do we arrive at an interpretation of a text’s “meaning”? Can a text have more than one “meaning”? Why does interpretation matter? How do you translate an interpretive reading into a piece of analytic writing? In this course we will examine these questions and issues related to them through an introduction to some of the key concepts in English studies.

      • ENGL 2350-004 Introduction to Textual Analysis and interpretation

        What do we do when we read? How do we arrive at an interpretation of a text’s “meaning”? Can a text have more than one “meaning”? Why does interpretation matter? How do you translate an interpretive reading into a piece of analytic writing? In this course we will examine these questions and issues related to them through an introduction to some of the key concepts in English studies.

      • ENGL 5300-001 Engl 5300-001

        This course is a core requirement for the English graduate programs at UTA. FOr more information, please refer to the attached syllabus.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6329-001 Postcolonial Literature and Theory

        This course will introduce students to a burgeoning field in literary studies: postcolonial theory. We will begin with a study of the central tenets of postcolonial theory and then proceed to a sampling of literary texts that foreground a number of these issues. Postcolonial literature is literature produced by formerly colonized nations, including India, Pakistan, the West Indies, various countries in Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and others. Such literature is concerned with the way colonial subjects are produced in and by Empire. Postcolonial literature can be a tool by which the colonized subject “writes back” to Empire, engaging with themes like identity, belonging, exile, place, language, sovereignty, and hybridity. The course will explore the pervasive artistic, psychological, and political impact of colonization through a reading of both literary texts and critical essays.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5330-001 Film and Political Ideology

        Film and Political Ideology

        This course will examine the variety of ways that Hollywood shapes the politics of war and peace. We will investigate the influence that political agencies like the Pentagon and the CIA exert on films dealing with war and politics and how Hollywood responds to political pressure for financial gain. We will also examine the ways that Hollywood rewrites history, often depicting a more hawkish or more humane military in order to promote a particularly American form of heroism.

        We will look at films critical of the Vietnam War, such as Platoon, Apocalypse Now, and Full Metal Jacket as well as films from the 80s and 90s such as Officer and a Gentleman and Saving Private Ryan, which work hard to redeem the military’s image. We will then turn to more recent representations of war in film such as Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty as well as TV shows like Homeland. We will then turn to specific involvement by the CIA in films, such as In the Company of Spies, The Sum of All Fears, The Bourne Identity, The Recruit and The Good Shepherd, and more recent representations of the agency in Syriana and Argo.

        Readings will include chapters from the following texts:

        Jenkins, Tricia. The CIA in Hollywood (2012)

        Robb, David. Operation Hollywood (2004)

        Ryan, Michael and Douglas Kellner. Camera Politica (1988)

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5370-001 SCHOLARLY ARGUMENT
        This course is for advanced PhD students and enrollment requires permission from the instructor. Each student will be assigned to a writing group at the beginning of the semester. The object of the course is to develop effective writing habits and to make considerable progress on the writing of the dissertation. Students will establish writing goals within their groups and workshop chapters with the group and the instructor. Grade will be determined by the successful attainment of a series of writing benchmarks.



        Demystifying Dissertation Writing: A Streamlined Process from Choice of Topic to Final Text
        Peg Boyle Single Ph.D. (Author), Richard M. Reis Ph.D. (Foreword)

        Writing Your Dissertation in Fifteen Minutes a Day: A Guide to Starting, Revising, and Finishing Your Doctoral Thesis . Joan Bolker.

        How to Prepare a Dissertation Proposal: Suggestions for Students in Education and the Social and Behavioral Sciences , David R. Krathwohl (Author), Nick L. Smith (Author.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 5300-001 Theory and Practice

        COURSE DESCRIPTION:English 5300 is a core course of the graduate program in English.This course introduces a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to English studies, which serve as a foundation for subsequent courses. Along with interpretive methods, the course also includes an introduction to research methodology and new media techniques.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 5370-001 SCHOLARLY ARGUMENT
        This course is for advanced PhD students and enrollment requires permission from the instructor. Each student will be assigned to a writing group at the beginning of the semester. The object of the course is to develop effective writing habits and to make considerable progress on the writing of the dissertation. Students will establish writing goals within their groups and workshop chapters with the group and the instructor. Grade will be determined by the successful attainment of a series of writing benchmarks.



        Demystifying Dissertation Writing: A Streamlined Process from Choice of Topic to Final Text
        Peg Boyle Single Ph.D. (Author), Richard M. Reis Ph.D. (Foreword)

        Writing Your Dissertation in Fifteen Minutes a Day: A Guide to Starting, Revising, and Finishing Your Doctoral Thesis . Joan Bolker.

        How to Prepare a Dissertation Proposal: Suggestions for Students in Education and the Social and Behavioral Sciences , David R. Krathwohl (Author), Nick L. Smith (Author.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • ENGL 2350-004 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        What do we do when we read? How do we arrive at an interpretation of a text’s “meaning� Can a text have more than one “meaning� Why does interpretation matter? How do you translate an interpretive reading into a piece of analytic writing? In this course we will examine these questions and issues related to them through an introduction to some of the key concepts in English studies. We will learn a range of theoretical approaches to interpretation, including New Criticism, Deconstruction, Postcolonial Criticism, Cultural Studies, and Feminist Criticism. We will undertake 4 writing assignments, including a 2 page poetry explication using a New Critical approach, a 1-2 page essay on critical approaches to a play, a 3 page literature review and bibliography, and a 6-7 page research paper on one of the texts read in class.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • WOMS 2310-001 INTRO TO WOMEN'S & GENDER STUDIES
        This class aims to introduce you to a variety of issues relating to women. The class is not only for women, for any treatment of gender must also examine the role of men in culture and society. However, we will be placing women's experience at the center of our inquiry, examining women’s relationship to and engagement with topics such as media, sex, reproduction, family, sexual orientation, religion, and creativity.

        Course Objectives

        • To develop a working knowledge of key concepts in women’s studies.
        • To develop skills for identifying and interpreting issues relating to gender in culture.
        • To hone analytical and critical thinking skills.
        • To improve interpretive and writing skills.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4340-001 The Culture and Politics of Mothering

        From Mary to Medea, Angelina Jolie to the Octomom, mothers can be seen as a screen onto which a society’s anxieties are projected.Deified and vilified, feared and revered, competing images of her pervade history, mythology, and religion. This course will examine the legacy of these images in literature and popular culture and analyze the ideological work that such images do. How do these images shape societal expectations about mothering and mothers? How do they impinge upon women’s legal and political freedoms? How do they frame debates about reproductive technologies? How do they shape ideas about race, ethnicity, and class?

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6360-001 The Culture and Politics of Mothering

        No Description Provided.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5330-001 Novel into Film

        In this course we will examine the process of film adaptation. Audiences tend to view films as lesser versions of their literary source texts. We frequently complain about the kinds of license that directors and screenwriters take when they cut out characters and scenes, change endings or even alter the race or gender of the protagonist. Recently, scholars of adaptation have encouraged viewers to see adapted films not as faithless copies of a sacred original, but rather as originals in their own right. If we proceed from the assumption that literature and film are different mediums, then we must acknowledge that what inspires, excites, and moves an audience in one genre is likely to change in the other. This seems especially true when the source text is a graphic novel, Watchmen, or a children’s story, Where the Wild Things Are. In this course we will examine the challenges and opportunities that source texts present to the makers and viewers of films. We will discuss ideas of fidelity, intertextuality, genre, and translation (of period, place, and culture) in the process of adaptation and examine a number of text/film couplings.

      • ENGL 2350-003 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        No Description Provided.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4350-001 Film and Literature: Nature, Environment, and Animals in Film and Theory

        No Description Provided.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-004 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        What do we do when we read? How do we arrive at an interpretation of a text’s “meaning� Can a text have more than one “meaning� Why does interpretation matter? How do you translate an interpretive reading into a piece of analytic writing? In this course we will examine these questions and issues related to them through an introduction to some of the key concepts in English studies. We will learn a range of theoretical approaches to interpretation, including New Criticism, Deconstruction, Postcolonial Criticism, Cultural Studies, and Feminist Criticism. We will undertake 4 writing assignments, including a 2 page poetry explication using a New Critical approach, a 1-2 page essay on critical approaches to a play, a 3 page literature review and bibliography, and a 6-7 page research paper on one of the texts read in class.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • ENGL 5300-002 Theory and Practice Grad Studies

        English 5300 is a core course of the graduate program in English.This course introduces a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to English studies, which serve as a foundation for subsequent courses. Along with interpretive methods, the course also includes an introduction to research methodology and new media techniques.

        COURSE OBJECTIVES:

        ·To develop a knowledge of some of the key concepts in critical and literary theory.

        ·To understand the historical and philosophical tradition from which these theories developed.

        ·To hone analytical and critical thinking skills.

        ·To improve analytical and critical writing skills.

        ·To become familiar with research methodology and new media techniques.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • ENGL 3355-001 POST-COLONIAL LITERATURE IN ENGLISH

        This course will introduce students to a burgeoning field in literary studies: postcolonial literature and theory. We will begin with a study of the central tenets of postcolonial theory and then proceed to a sampling of literary texts that foreground a number of these issues. Postcolonial literature is literature produced by formerly colonized nations, including India, Pakistan, the West Indies, various countries in Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and others. Such literature is concerned with the way colonial subjects are produced in and by Empire. Postcolonial literature can be a tool by which the colonized subject “writes back†to Empire, engaging with themes like identity, belonging, exile, place, language, sovereignty, and hybridity. The course will explore the pervasive artistic, psychological, and political impact of colonization through a reading of both literary texts and critical essays.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • ENGL 4399-002 Senior Seminar: Existentialism, or, The Projects of Our Lives
        This course will examine representations of race, gender, class, and sexuality in a variety of twentieth-century films. We will investigate the relationship between the treatment of specific groups of people in film and in real life. We will examine the cultural work that films do, specifically how they promote, undermine, support, and/or critique racial and sexual stereotypes.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • ENGL 3355-001 POST-COLONIAL LITERATURE IN ENGLISH

        This course will introduce students to a burgeoning field in literary studies: postcolonial literature and theory. We will begin with a study of the central tenets of postcolonial theory and then proceed to a sampling of literary texts that foreground a number of these issues. Postcolonial literature is literature produced by formerly colonized nations, including India, Pakistan, the West Indies, various countries in Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and others. Such literature is concerned with the way colonial subjects are produced in and by Empire. Postcolonial literature can be a tool by which the colonized subject “writes back†to Empire, engaging with themes like identity, belonging, exile, place, language, sovereignty, and hybridity. The course will explore the pervasive artistic, psychological, and political impact of colonization through a reading of both literary texts and critical essays.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • ENGL 4399-002 Senior Seminar: Existentialism, or, The Projects of Our Lives
        This course will examine representations of race, gender, class, and sexuality in a variety of twentieth-century films. We will investigate the relationship between the treatment of specific groups of people in film and in real life. We will examine the cultural work that films do, specifically how they promote, undermine, support, and/or critique racial and sexual stereotypes.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • ENGL 3355-001 POST-COLONIAL LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2009

Administrative Appointment

  • 2012
    • Aug 2012 to Aug 2014 - Graduate Adivsor, UTA English Department
    • Aug 2012 to May 2014 - Associate Chairperson, UTA English Department