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Dr. Wendy J Casper

Name

[Casper, Dr. Wendy J]
  • Professor, Department of Management

Biography

Wendy Casper is Professor of Organizational Behavior, Human Resource Management, and Research Methods, and Director of the PhD Programs in the College of Business.  Prior to joining the faculty at UTA, Dr. Casper was on the faculty of the University of Tulsa and George Washington University.  She has also taught internationally in Morocco, China, Taiwan, and Cyprus. Wendy holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from George Mason University and is a Fellow of the Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology.  Her research interests include work-life issues, diversity and cross-cultural issues, training and career development, and recruitment.  She has published numerous papers in journals such as Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Journal of Business Ethics, and Human Resource Management.  She currently serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Applied Psychology, the Journal of Vocational Behavior and the Journal of Business and Psychology. She was a finalist for the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for Excellence in Work-Family Research and has received research grants from the Society for Human Resource Management Foundation and the Center for Human Resource Management at the University of Illinois.  Her work has been featured in media outlets such as the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, MSNBC News, HR Magazine, and Working Mother Magazine.

Professional Preparation

    • 2000 Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational PsychologyGeorge Mason University
    • 1996 M.A. in Industrial/Organizational PsychologyGeorge Mason University
    • 1989 B.S. in PsychologyPennsylvania State University

Appointments

    • May 2016 to Present Director, Ph.D. Program
      College of Business, University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2014 to Present Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • July 2014 to Aug 2016 Coordinator, PhD Program in Management
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2015 to May 2016 Co-Director, College of Business PhD Program
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2008 to Aug 2014 Associate Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • June 2004 to Aug 2008 Assistant Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2001 to May 2004 Assistant Professor
      University of Tulsa
    • Aug 1997 to Dec 2001 Adjunct Instructor
      George Washington University
    • Jan 1997 to Aug 1998 Consultant
      NYLCare Mid-Atlantic
    • Aug 1997 to May 1998 Teaching Assistant
      George Mason University
    • Oct 1997 to Mar 1998 Part Time Associate
      Pittman & Associates
    • Aug 2000 to July 2001 Senior Associate
      Caliber Associates
    • June 1999 to Aug 2000 Associate
      Caliber Associates
    • July 1998 to May 1999 Research Associate
      Personnel Decisions Research Institutes
    • Aug 1993 to May 1998 Research Assistant
      George Mason University
    • Jan 1993 to Jan 1994 Human Resources Representative
      NovaCare, Inc
    • Jan 1994 to Jan 1997 Human Resources Management Consultant
      American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy
    • June 1994 to Jan 1995 Research Assistant
      Management Research Institute
    • Jan 1996 to Aug 1996 Selection and Placement Intern
      United States Postal Service
    • Jan 1995 to May 1995 Leadership Training Facilitator
      MENTOR Management Training Program
    • Jan 1992 to Aug 1994 Human Resources Manager
      NovaCare, Inc
    • Jan 1992 to Jan 1993 Employee Relations Specialist
      International Telecharge/Oncor Communications
    • Jan 1992 to Jan 1993 Employee Relations Specialist
      International Telecharge/Oncor Communications
    • Jan 1990 to Jan 1992 Human Resources Representative
      ComputerLand Mid-Atlantic
    • Jan 1990 to Jan 1992 Human Resources Representative
      ComputerLand Mid-Atlantic

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Jan 2011 to Present Work and Family Researchers Network
    • Jan 2000 to Present Academy of Management
    • Jan 2000 to Present Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology
    • Jan 2000 to Present American Psychological Association (APA)

Awards and Honors

    • Apr  2015 Outstanding Research Achievement Award sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
      Achievements:

      Outstanding research activity for a three year period, 2012-2014

    • May  2012 Dean's Fellowship, 2012-2014 sponsored by College of BusinessOffice of the Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsOffice of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
      Achievements:

      Recognition of research activity

    • Dec  2011 Research Grant "Electronic Interruptions during Work and Nonwork Time: Cognitive Performance and Burnout, The Moderating Effects of Individual, Contextual and Organizational Differences sponsored by Center for Human Resource Management, University of Illinois
      Achievements:

      $9250 grant for research

      Description:

      $9250 grant for research

    • Apr  2010 George Mason University Industrial/Organizational Psychology Program Outstanding Alumni Award sponsored by George Mason University Industrial/Organizational Psychology Program
    • Apr  2010 Faculty Fellowship on Sustainability in the Curriculum sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • Oct  2008 Research Grant "Work-Family Policies as a Strategic Human Resource Initiative: A Meta-Analysis of Program Effects on Organizational Outcomes" sponsored by Society for Human Resource Management Foundation
      Description:

      $25,865 to conduct meta-analysis

    • Jul  2008 Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for Excellence in Work-Family Research, Finalist sponsored by Center for Families at Purdue University, the Center for Work and Family at Boston College, and the Alliance of Work-Life Progress

News Articles

    • Will Work For One

      A story published today in the Tulsa World reviews a new study about the perceptions and treatment of singles in the workplace.

      The majority of working singles said they aren't treated as fairly as their married-with-children co-workers, according to a study from the University of Tulsa.

    • The Friendly Professor

      Every three minutes, a colleague or student popped into Wendy Casper’s office to crack an inside joke, chit-chat or flash a smile. She has only been at UTA for two months and already takes Latin dance classes with a group of co-workers.

      “That’s one of the reasons I came to UTA,” she said. “Because of the people.”

      Casper is one of six new faculty members who arrived this fall to teach for the College of Business Administration. An assistant professor and researcher of multivariate statistics and organizational behavior, she has decorated her office wall with framed degrees, proving she is qualified for the job.

Publications

      Journal Article Forthcoming
      • Casper, W. J., Vaziri, H. Wayne, J. H., DeHauw, S. & Greenhaus, J. (in press). The jingle-jangle of work-nonwork balance: A comprehensive and meta-analytic review of its meaning and measurement. Journal of Applied Psychology

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      Forthcoming
      • Volpane, S. D., Marquardt, D., Casper, W. J., Avery, D. R. (in press). Minimizing cross-cultural maladaptation: How minority status facilitates change in international acculturation. Journal of Applied Psychology

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2017
      • Wayne, J. H., Butts, M., Casper, W. J. & Allen, T. D. (2017). In search of balance: A conceptual and empirical integration of multiple meanings of work-family balance. Personnel Psychology, 70(1), 167-210.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2017
      • Jiraporn, N., Vora, D., & Casper, W. J. (2017). Do multicultural Hispanic Americans choose more culturally appropriate persuasive arguments than monocultural Americans? Journal of International Consumer Marketing

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2017
      • Marquardt, D. J., Brown, L. W., & Casper, W. J. (2017). Ethical leadership perceptions:  Does it matter if you are black or white?  Journal of Business Ethics

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2016
      • Wayne, J. H. & Casper, W. J. (2016). What do women want? Understanding gender differences in job seeker preferences for family friendly policy and culture. Sex Roles, 75(9-10), 459–475.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2016
      • Basuil, D., Manegold, J., & Casper, W. J. (2016). Subordinate perceptions of family-supportive supervision: The role of similar family-related demographics and its effect on affective commitment. Human Resource Management Journal, 26(4), 523-540. 

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2016
      • Cochiarra, F., Bell, M. B. & Casper, W. J. (2016). Sounding ‘different’: The role of sociolinguistic cues in evaluating job candidates.  Human Resource Management, 55(3), 463-478.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2016
      • Casper, W. J., Marquardt, D., Roberto, K. & Buss, C. (2016). The hidden family lives of singles without dependent children.  In Eby, L., & Allen, T. (Eds.) Oxford Handbook of Work and Family.

        {Book Chapter} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2015
      • Stavrou, E., Casper, W. J., & Ierodiakonou, C.  (2015). Support for part time work as a channel to female employment: The moderating effects of national gender empowerment and labor market conditions.  International Journal of Human Resource Management, 26(6), 88-706.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2015
      • Schleicher, D. J., Smith, T., Casper, W. J., Watt, J. D., & Greguras, G. (2015). It’s all in the attitude: The role of job attitude strength in job attitude – outcome relationships.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 100(4), 1259-1274.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2014
      • Casper, W. J., Allen, T. D. & Poelmans, S. A. Y. (2014).  International perspectives on work and family: An introduction to the special issue.  Applied Psychology: An International Review, 63(1), 1-4.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2014
      • Huffman, A., Casper, W. J., & Payne, S. C. (2014). How does spouse career support relate to employee turnover?  Work interfering with family and job satisfaction as mediators. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 35(2), 194–212.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2013
      • Casper, W. J., De Hauw, S., & Wayne, J. H. (2013). Concepts and measures in the work-family interface: Implications for work-family integration. In Major, D. & Burke, R. (Eds). Handbook of work-life integration of professionals: Challenges and opportunities. Edward Elgar.

        {Book Chapter} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2013
      • Wayne, J. H., Casper, W. J., Mathews, R., & Allen, T. D. (2013). Family-supportive organization perceptions and organizational commitment: The mediating role of work-family conflict and enrichment and partner attitudes.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 606-622.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2013
      • Griggs, T. L., Casper, W. J., & Eby, L. T. (2013). Work, family and community support as predictors of work-family conflict: A study of low-income workers. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 82, 59–68.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2013
      • Pattie, M., Benson, G., Casper, W. J., & McMahan, G. (2013). Goal congruence: Fitting international assignment into employee careers.  International Journal of Human Resource Management, 1-17.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2013
      • Butts, M., Casper, W. J.,& Yang, T. S. (2013).How important are work-family support programs? A meta-analysis of their effects on work-related outcomes.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 98, 1-25.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2013
      • Casper, W. J., Wayne, J. H., & Manegold, J. (2013). Who will we recruit? Targeting deep and surface-level diversity with human resource policy advertising? Human Resource Management, 52(3), 311-332.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2012
      • Wayne, J. H. & Casper, W. J. (2012). How does firm reputation in human resource policies influence college students? The mechanisms underlying job pursuit intentions.  Human Resource Management, 51, 121-142.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2012
      • Basuil, D. & Casper, W. J. (2012). Work-family planning attitudes among emerging adults.  Journal of Vocational Behavior, 52(3), 311-332.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2012
      • Casper, W. J. & DePaulo, B. (2012). A New Layer to Inclusion: Creating Singles-Friendly Work Environments. To be published in M. J. Sirgy, N. P. Reilly, & C. A. Gorman (Eds.) Handbook of Ethics and Employee Well-Being, Volume VII.  Springer Publishers.
        {Book Chapter} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2011
      • Casper, W. J., Harris, C., Taylor-Bianco, A. & Wayne, J. H. (2011). Work-family conflict, perceived supervisor support and organizational commitment among Brazilian professionals. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 79, 640-652.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2011
      • Casper, W. J. & Swanberg, J.E. (2011).  Career and work concerns of diverse and understudied workers. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 79, 611-612.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Encyclopedia Entry 2010
      • Quick, J. C. & Casper, W. J.(2010). Occupational Health Psychology. In Irving Weiner and Edward Craighead (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Psychology, fourth edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
        {Encyclopedia Entry} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Chapter 2009
      • Casper, W. J.& Swanberg, J. E. (2009). Single Childfree Adults: The Work-Life Stress of an Unexpected Group.  In A. Antoniou, G. Chrousos, C.L. Cooper, M. Eysenck, and C. Spielberger (Eds.). Handbook of Managerial Behavioral and Occupational Health Psychology. Athens, Greece and Oxford, England: Edward Elgar Publishing. (in Greek and English).
        {Book Chapter} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2008
      • Sitzmann, T., Brown, K., Casper, W. J., Ely, K. & Zimmerman, R. (2008). A review and meta-analysis of the nomological network of trainee reactions.  Journal of Applied Psychology.93, 280-295.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2008
      • Casper, W. J. & Harris, C. (2008). Work-life benefits and organizational attachment: Self-interest utility and signaling theory models. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 72, 95-109.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2008
      • Streich, M., Casper, W. J., & Salvaggio, A. N. (2008). Examining couples’ agreement about work-family conflict. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 23, 252-272.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2007
      • Casper, W. J., Weltman, D., & Kwesiga, E. (2007). Beyond family-friendly: The construct and measurement of sinlges-friendly work cultures. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 70(3), 478-501.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2007
      • Virick, M., Lilly, J., & Casper, W. J.  (2007). Doing more with less: Work-family balance among layoff survivors.  Career Development International, 12(5), 463-480.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2007
      • Casper, W. J., Eby, L. T., Bordeaux, C., Lockwood, A., & Lambert, D. (2007) A review of research methods in IO/OB work-family research.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 92(1), 28-43. 
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2006
      • Moore, T. W.; Casper, W. J. An examination of proxy measures of workplace spirituality: A profile measure of multidimensional constructs. Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies 2006, 12 (4), 109-118.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2005
      • Eby, L. T., Casper, W. J., Lockwood, A., Bordeaux, C., & Brinley, A. (2005). A twenty-year retrospective on work and family research in IO/OB: A review of the literature. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 66, 124-197.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2005
      • McGonigle, T. P., Casper, W. J., Meiman, E. P., Cronin, C., Cronin, B. E., & Harris, R. R. (2005). Linking military quality-of-life programs to individual and organizational performance. Military Psychology, 17, 25-39.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Encyclopedia Entry 2004
      Journal Article 2004
      • Chen, G., Goddard, T., & Casper, W. J. (2004). Relating general and work-specific self-evaluations and work-related control beliefs to an expanded job attitudes criterion.  Applied Psychology: An International Review, 53, 349-370.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2004
      • Casper, W. J. & Buffardi, L. C. (2004). The impact of work/life benefits and perceived organizational support on job pursuit intentions. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 65, 391-410. 
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2004
      • Kisamore, J. L., Casper, W. J., Martin, J. A., & Hall, S. M. (2004). More Tips for Obtaining a Job in Academia.  The Industrial-Organizational Psychologist, 42, 30-36.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2004
      • Kraiger, K., McLinden, D., & Casper, W. J.  (2004). High Impact Training Systems. Human Resource Management Journal, 43, 337-351.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2004
      • Casper, W. J., Fox, K., Sitzmann, T. M., & Landy, A. L. (2004). Supervisor referrals to work-family programs. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology. 9, 136-151. 

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2003
      • Casper, W. J., Watt, J. D., Schleicher, D. J., Champoux, J. E., Bachiochi, P. D., & Bordeaux, C. (2003). Feature film as a resource in teaching I-O psychology.  The Industrial-Organizational Psychologist, 41, 83-95.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2002
      • Casper, W. J., Martin, J. A, Buffardi, L. C., & Erdwins, C. J. (2002). Work-family conflict, perceived organizational support and organizational commitment of working mothers, Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 7, 99-108.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Popular Press Article 2001
      • Casper, W. J. (2001).  Reaping the rewards by promoting the effective self-managing team.  Today
        {Popular Press Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Conference Proceeding 2001
      • Casper, W. J., & Landy, A. L. (2001). Evaluating quality of life programs: Utilizing the balanced scorecard in conjunction with quasi-experimental design.  Proceedings of the Academy of Human Resource Development, 2, 910-917.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2001
      • Chen, G., Casper, W. J., & Cortina, J. M. (2001). The roles of self-efficacy and task complexity in the relationships among cognitive ability, conscientiousness, and task performance: A meta-analytic examination.  Human Performance, 14, 209-230.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2001
      • Erdwins, C. J., Buffardi, L. C., Casper, W. J., & O’Brien, A. S. (2001). The relationship of women’s role strain to social support, role satisfaction and self-efficacy.  Family Relations, 50, 230-238.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Monograph 2000
      • Landy, A. L., Casper, W. J., Walton, J. C., Hiesener, P., & Light, E. (2000, March). Defense Logistics Agency Quality of Life Goals and Measures Project Final Report.  Fairfax, VA: Caliber Associates.
        {Monograph} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2000
      • Morgan, R. B., & Casper, W. J. (2000).  Participant reactions to training: Their multi-dimensional nature. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 11, 301-317.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Paper 1999
      • Morgan, R. B., & Casper, W. J. (1999).  A factor analytic investigation of the content of participant reactions: Affective and utility judgments.  Proceedings of the Academy of Human Resource Development, 2, 806-814.

        {Conference Paper} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1999
      • Lazzarini, M., Pulakos, E. D., Schmitt, N., Casper, W. J., & Plamondon, K. (1999, January).  Development of promotion systems for sworn employees for commonwealth of Virginia department of state police. (Tech. Rep. No. 321). Arlington, VA: Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, Inc.  
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1998
      • Erdwins, C. J., Casper, W. J., & Buffardi, L. C. (1998).  Child care satisfaction: The effects of parental gender and type of child care used. Child and Youth Care Forum, 27, 111-123.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 1997
      • Casper, W. J., Chen, G., & Goddard, T. (1997).  Internal communications at NYLCare: Focus group summary report.  Fairfax, VA: George Mason University.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Presentations

    • November  2013

      Bilingualism and employment decisions: Do employers prefer Hispanic or Non-Hispanic bilinguals?

      Paper presentation at the Southern Management Association Conference.  New Orleans, LA.

    • August  2013

       The strength of job attitudes: A multi-study test.

      Paper Presentation at the Academy of Management Conference.  Orlando, FL.

    • August  2013

      Electronic interruptions at work and home: Cognitive predictors of work and nonwork outcomes.

      Paper presentation at the Academy of Management Conference. Orlando, FL.

    • August  2013

      What really is work-family balance? An investigation of balance satisfaction and effectiveness.

      Paper presentation at the 2013 Academy of Management conference. Orlando, FL.

    • August  2013

      Getting Published.  Advice from Highly Succesful Scholars

      Panel member for HR Division doctoral student consortium at the 2013 Academy of Management conference.

    • April  2013

      Singleism: The stigmatization of single workers.

      Paper presentation at 2013 Society for Industrial-Organizational Psychology conference. Houston, TX.

    • March  2013

      No Time to Think! The Effect of Electronic Interruptions on Work and Nonwork Outcomes

      Invited presentation at Macau University of Science and Technology

    • September  2012

      Why Should Organizations Foster Work-Life Balance?

      Invited Presenation for the Gateway Industrial-Organizational Psychology Association.

    • August  2012

      Family-supportive organization perceptions and organizational commitment: The mediating role of partner attitudes.

      Paper presentation at the 2012 Academy of Management conference. Boston, MA.

    • June  2012

      What is Work-Life Balance?

      Invited Presentation at Tilburg University

    • April  2012

      Understanding Work-Family Balance

      Invited presentation at University of Cyprus

    • November  2011

      Let's Talk About family-Friendly Organizations

      Invited Presentation at the Fox School of Business, Temple University

    • August  2011

      What is the meaning of “work-family balance”? A review and empirical examination.

      Paper presentation at the 2011 Academy of Management conference. San Antonio, TX.

    • July  2011

      Are you like me? How differences in family status and gender relate to supervisor family support and organizational attachment.

      Paper presentation at the IV International Conference of Work and Family, IESE Business School. Barcelona, Spain.

    • April  2011

      Do claims of excellence in work-life efforts influence applicant attraction? An experimental investigation.

  • Past
    •  
      Jiraporn, N., Vora, D., & Casper, W. J. (2014). The effect of multiculturalism on choice of persuasion appeals.

      Paper presentation at the 2014 Academy of International Business.  Vancouver, Canada.

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • Dec 2011 to Present Electronic Interruptions during Work and Nonwork Time: Cognitive Performance and Burnout, The Moderating Effects of Individual, Contextual and Organizational Differences sponsored by  - $9250
    • Dec 2008 to Present Work-Family Policies as a Strategic Human Resource Initiative: A Meta-Analysis of Program Effects on Organizational Outcomes sponsored by  - $25865
    • Jan 2005 to Present College of Business Administration Travel/Professional Development Award sponsored by  - $1350
    • Jan 2003 to Present Work-Family Conflict in Dual-Earner Couples sponsored by  - $1000
    • Jan 2003 to Present A Construct Validation Approach to Participant Reactions to Training sponsored by  - $500
    • Jan 2003 to Present A Comparison of Recruitment Strategies Emphasizing Family-Friendly, Diversity-Friendly or Employee Development Policies sponsored by  - $900
    • Jan 2002 to Present An Examination of Research Methods in Work-Family Research sponsored by  - $1000
    • Jan 2002 to Present Work-Life Issues among Single Working Adults sponsored by  - $500
    • Jan 2001 to Present Program Evaluator-Hope VI Program sponsored by  - $6048
    • Jan 2001 to Present Drug Elimination Program Survey sponsored by  - $7088
    • Jan 1999 to Present For the Academy of Management, Human Resource Management Division Doctoral Student Consortium sponsored by  - $350
    • Jan 1999 to Present For Paper Presentation at Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology Conference sponsored by  - $200
    • Jan 1998 to Present For Participant Idea Exchange Presentation at the American Psychological Society Conference sponsored by  - $70
    • Jan 1995 to Present For First Year of Doctoral Study sponsored by  - $2000
    • Jan 1994 to Present For Poster Presentation at the Stein Conference on Work and Family Issues sponsored by  - $100
    • Jan 1994 to Present For final year of masters degree study sponsored by  - $750

Other Creative Activities

  • 2010
    • The Huffington Post
      • July 2010 “Sonja Funakura, University Of Texas-Arlington Alumna, Will Pay $1,000 for Work,”
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
    • Fox 4 News
      • Jan 2010 Commenting on Pew Research Study on Economics of Marriage: The Rise of Wives,
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 2009
    • Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology
      • Dec 2009 “Frugal Festivities: Companies Continue Push for Less Lavish Holidays, Focus on Job Security” by Stephany Schings
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
    • Fort Worth Business Press
      • May 2009 “Weaver and Tidwell Succession on Ledger for Growth,”
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 2007
    • HR Magazine
      • Oct 2007 “Are you too family friendly?” by Susan J. Wells. HR Magazine, October 2007, Volume 52, Issue 10, p. 34-39.
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
    • BNET.com by CNET Network
      • Jan 2007 Single Employees and Family-Friendly Policies
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 2006
    • The Adult Space Child Free Podcast
      • Dec 2006 The News Landslide
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
    • Fort Worth Star Telegram
      • Sept 2006 “Feeling Left Out: Kid-Friendly Policies Don’t Help Childless Workers,”
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
    • The Washington Post
      • Sept 2006 “Kid-Friendly Policies Don’t Help Singles,”
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
    • Christian Science Monitor
      • June 2006 “In Family-Friendly Workplaces, Singles Feel Overlooked,”
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
    • MSNBC News
      • Jan 2006 “Workplace Policies and Singles,”
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 2004
    • Vive Magazine, Volume 4(3)
      • Mar 2004 “Mommy Track: How Modern Women Get on the Inside Track,”
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
    • Tulsa World
      • Mar 2004 “Will Work for One. Singles find the workplace stacked in favor of the married-with-children crowd.” March 7, 2004. Article reporting findings from my study Work-Life Issues Among Single Working Adults
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
    • Des Moines Register
      • Jan 2004 “Single Worker’s Priorities Not Less Important,”
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 2002
    • Tulsa World
      • Oct 2002 “Positive Thanking,”
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
    • Inc. Magazine
      • Oct 2002 “Human Resource Trends in Business,”
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 2001
    • Tulsa World
      • Dec 2001 “Workplace Change Exacerbates Stress,”
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      • Dec 2001 “Singled Out,” December 17, 2001, Feature Article on my study Work-Life Issues Among Single Working Adults
        [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Students Supervised

  • Doctoral
    • Present
      thumbnail

      Member, PhD Dissertation Committee

      The Moderating Effects of Ethical Leadership on Auditors' Propensity to Engage in Reduced Audit Quality Acts

    • Present
      thumbnail

      Chair, PhD Dissertation Committee

      Age Differences in Attraction to Instrumental and Symbolic Organizational Attributes

    • Present

      Member, PhD Dissertation Committee

    • Present

      Member, PhD Dissertation Committee

      The Effects of Gamification on Programmer Creative Performance

    • July 2013

      Member, Phd Dissertation Committee

      Understanding Drivers and Outcomes of Employee Responsiveness to Technological Interruptions from Work during Nonwork Time

    • Nov 2012
      thumbnail

      Member, PhD Dissertation Committee

      Explicating the Relationship between Job Embeddedness and Development of Social, Human, and Psychological Capital:  The IMportance of Identification and Thriving at Work

    • July 2012

      Member, PhD Dissertation Committee

      The Moderating Effects of Psychological Capital on Organizational Stress

    • Nov 2011

      Member, PhD Dissertation committee

      An Examination opf Personality Differences of Young Adult Restaurant Workers

    • July 2011

      Chair, PhD Dissertation Committee

      Are Coworkers Good Soliders or Good Actors?

    • Nov 2010

      Building Networks Between Non-Government Organizations to Facilitate DIsaster Response Effectiveness

    • Mar 2009

      Member, PhD Dissertation Committee

      Strategic Human Resource Management: Relationships among the Human Resource Capital Pool, Overlapping Tenure, Human Resource Behaviors, and Performance

    • Apr 2008

      Member Dissertation Committee

      Understanding the Effectiveness of Information Technology Project Teams

    • Nov 2007

      Dissertation committee member

      Comsumer Perceptions of Rebranding: The case of logo changes

    • Apr 2007
      thumbnail

      Dissertation committee member

      Why do people engage in social computing?  A need fulfillment perspective

    • Apr 2007

      Dissertation committee member

      Sociolinguistic cues as an actecedent to aversive racist behaviors in the employment selection process

    • Apr 2007

      Dissertation Committee member

      A communication-Centered approach to leadership: The relationship of interpersonal communication competence to transformational leadership and emotional intelligence

    • Apr 2007

      Dissertaation committee member

      The effects of supervisor-subordinate goal congruence on performance and turnover intentions during expatriation

    • Apr 2006

      Dissertation committee member

      Antecedents and effects of age discrimination agaionst employees under 40

  • Undergraduate

Collaborators

Courses

      • BSAD 6311-001 Experimental Design

        This course covers the fundamentals of applied social science research in various areas of business. It is designed to help you develop skills that will enable you to effectively evaluate the research of others and to design, conduct, and report on research of your own. In general, the scientific process employs both theory and data in an effort to describe, explain, predict, and/or influence some phenomenon of interest. Thus, we will be focusing on theory development, construct measurement, research methods, and research critiques as part of an integrated sequence. You will be exposed to the logic underlying the research process as well as a broad range of design and assessment methods. Throughout the course there will be an emphasis on both conceptual understanding and the development of practical "how‑to" skills. Topics covered in the sequence are organized in terms of the stages of the research process, beginning with theory building and ending with interpretation and verification.

        The theory building section will focus on issues such as philosophy of science, inferences of causality, and ascertainment of the current state of knowledge in a given domain. Hypothesis generation, selection of a research problem, and basic research design will also be covered in this section.

        The next section will move from theory building to data collection and construct measurement. This section will deal with construct definition, reliability and validity of measurement, and the link between theory and measurement systems. It will also focus on identifying key independent and dependent variables of interest for a particular research question.

        The measurement of constructs is only one part of the data collection process. The other part involves the selection of different research designs to answer different questions posed by research hypotheses. This section will cover the sampling strategies and strengths/disadvantages of alternative research methods.

        Each of these sections are part of a continuous cycle of theory building and theory testing. In this cycle, theories lead to hypotheses, which then drive measurement and data collection. The measurement and collection of data, in turn, influence the statistical techniques employed and the conclusions that can reasonably drawn from the data. These conclusions are then verified and influence future theory development.

        In this course we would like to provide you with flexible research skills that will help you to meet the challenges you will face as a scholar. If your goal is to do quality research, then you will benefit greatly from this course. Thus, I intend to give you the tools that will help you to build your knowledge and expertise in a chosen area of work. You will become familiar with methods ranging from classical experimental paradigms, to quasi‑experimental methods, to field/correlational approaches. Youll also be exposed to a wide range of measurement strategies, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, and archival data. After developing the conceptual foundation for conducting research, we will develop a basic understanding of research methods and designs. Over the course of the semester, you will identify a substantive area of interest, conduct a review of the relevant theoretical and empirical literature, and formulate a specific research question you would like to answer. This then, will help you to develop a detailed research plan, culminating in a research proposal.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MANA 3318-003 Organizational Behavior

        To gain an understanding or increase your knowledge of behavior in organizational settings.  Organizational behavior is a field of study that is concerned with the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations. This class will increase your understanding of behavior in organizational settings. In this course we will use existing theory and research from the behavioral sciences to help you understand the link between individual and group behavior and organizational performance.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BSAD 6311-001 Experimental Design

        This course covers the fundamentals of applied social science research in various areas of business. It is designed to help you develop skills that will enable you to effectively evaluate the research of others and to design, conduct, and report on research of your own. In general, the scientific process employs both theory and data in an effort to describe, explain, predict, and/or influence some phenomenon of interest. Thus, we will be focusing on theory development, construct measurement, research methods, and research critiques as part of an integrated sequence. You will be exposed to the logic underlying the research process as well as a broad range of design and assessment methods. Throughout the course there will be an emphasis on both conceptual understanding and the development of practical "how‑to" skills. Topics covered in the sequence are organized in terms of the stages of the research process, beginning with theory building and ending with interpretation and verification.

        The theory building section will focus on issues such as philosophy of science, inferences of causality, and ascertainment of the current state of knowledge in a given domain. Hypothesis generation, selection of a research problem, and basic research design will also be covered in this section.

        The next section will move from theory building to data collection and construct measurement. This section will deal with construct definition, reliability and validity of measurement, and the link between theory and measurement systems. It will also focus on identifying key independent and dependent variables of interest for a particular research question.

        The measurement of constructs is only one part of the data collection process. The other part involves the selection of different research designs to answer different questions posed by research hypotheses. This section will cover the sampling strategies and strengths/disadvantages of alternative research methods.

        Each of these sections are part of a continuous cycle of theory building and theory testing. In this cycle, theories lead to hypotheses, which then drive measurement and data collection. The measurement and collection of data, in turn, influence the statistical techniques employed and the conclusions that can reasonably drawn from the data. These conclusions are then verified and influence future theory development.

        In this course we would like to provide you with flexible research skills that will help you to meet the challenges you will face as a scholar. If your goal is to do quality research, then you will benefit greatly from this course. Thus, I intend to give you the tools that will help you to build your knowledge and expertise in a chosen area of work. You will become familiar with methods ranging from classical experimental paradigms, to quasi‑experimental methods, to field/correlational approaches. You'll also be exposed to a wide range of measurement strategies, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, and archival data. After developing the conceptual foundation for conducting research, we will develop a basic understanding of research methods and designs. Over the course of the semester, you will identify a substantive area of interest, conduct a review of the relevant theoretical and empirical literature, and formulate a specific research question you would like to answer. This then, will help you to develop a detailed research plan, culminating in a research proposal.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MANA 3318-003 Organizational Behavior

        To gain an understanding or increase your knowledge of behavior in organizational settings.  Organizational behavior is a field of study that is concerned with the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations. This class will increase your understanding of behavior in organizational settings. In this course we will use existing theory and research from the behavioral sciences to help you understand the link between individual and group behavior and organizational performance.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MANA 3318-009 Organizational Behavior

        To gain an understanding or increase your knowledge of behavior in organizational settings.  Organizational behavior is a field of study that is concerned with the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations. This class will increase your understanding of behavior in organizational settings. In this course we will use existing theory and research from the behavioral sciences to help you understand the link between individual and group behavior and organizational performance.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BSAD 6311-001 Experimental Design

        This course covers the fundamentals of applied social science research in various areas of business. It is designed to help you develop skills that will enable you to effectively evaluate the research of others and to design, conduct, and report on research of your own. In general, the scientific process employs both theory and data in an effort to describe, explain, predict, and/or influence some phenomenon of interest. Thus, we will be focusing on theory development, construct measurement, research methods, and research critiques as part of an integrated sequence. You will be exposed to the logic underlying the research process as well as a broad range of design and assessment methods. Throughout the course there will be an emphasis on both conceptual understanding and the development of practical "how‑to" skills. Topics covered in the sequence are organized in terms of the stages of the research process, beginning with theory building and ending with interpretation and verification.

        The theory building section will focus on issues such as philosophy of science, inferences of causality, and ascertainment of the current state of knowledge in a given domain. Hypothesis generation, selection of a research problem, and basic research design will also be covered in this section.

        The next section will move from theory building to data collection and construct measurement. This section will deal with construct definition, reliability and validity of measurement, and the link between theory and measurement systems. It will also focus on identifying key independent and dependent variables of interest for a particular research question.

        The measurement of constructs is only one part of the data collection process. The other part involves the selection of different research designs to answer different questions posed by research hypotheses. This section will cover the sampling strategies and strengths/disadvantages of alternative research methods.

        Each of these sections are part of a continuous cycle of theory building and theory testing. In this cycle, theories lead to hypotheses, which then drive measurement and data collection. The measurement and collection of data, in turn, influence the statistical techniques employed and the conclusions that can reasonably drawn from the data. These conclusions are then verified and influence future theory development.

        In this course we would like to provide you with flexible research skills that will help you to meet the challenges you will face as a scholar. If your goal is to do quality research, then you will benefit greatly from this course. Thus, I intend to give you the tools that will help you to build your knowledge and expertise in a chosen area of work. You will become familiar with methods ranging from classical experimental paradigms, to quasi‑experimental methods, to field/correlational approaches. You'll also be exposed to a wide range of measurement strategies, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, and archival data. After developing the conceptual foundation for conducting research, we will develop a basic understanding of research methods and designs. Over the course of the semester, you will identify a substantive area of interest, conduct a review of the relevant theoretical and empirical literature, and formulate a specific research question you would like to answer. This then, will help you to develop a detailed research plan, culminating in a research proposal.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BSAD 6314-001 MULTIVARIATE STATISTICS

        This course is designed to help you to effectively apply, interpret, and evaluate different multivariate statistical techniques. Throughout the course there will be an emphasis on both conceptual understanding and the development of practical "how‑to" skills. Topics covered in the sequence are organized in terms of complexity, beginning with a broad overview, moving into regression, and ending with structural equation modeling.

        Business scholars have made use of a broad range of methods and analytical strategies to address questions of interest.  Because each approach to answering research questions involves trade‑offs, researchers have often found it necessary to employ a combination of analytical techniques to reach any firm conclusions. A major goal of this course is to facilitate decision making within these constraints. 

        We will discuss a variety of advanced statistical techniques.  Throughout the semester, you will gain hands‑on experience through projects and learn how to draw statistical and substantive conclusions from results of analyses. You will be asked to prepare written summaries of results using either Academy of Management style or style guidelines for other journals in your field. If you use style guidelines other than those of the Academy of Management or the American Psychological Association, please provide a copy of these guidelines to me along with your first project so I can refer to them as I evaluate your projects.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BSAD 6311-001 Experimental Design

        This course covers the fundamentals of applied social science research in various areas of business. It is designed to help you develop skills that will enable you to effectively evaluate the research of others and to design, conduct, and report on research of your own. In general, the scientific process employs both theory and data in an effort to describe, explain, predict, and/or influence some phenomenon of interest. Thus, we will be focusing on theory development, construct measurement, research methods, and research critiques as part of an integrated sequence. You will be exposed to the logic underlying the research process as well as a broad range of design and assessment methods. Throughout the course there will be an emphasis on both conceptual understanding and the development of practical "how‑to" skills. Topics covered in the sequence are organized in terms of the stages of the research process, beginning with theory building and ending with interpretation and verification.

        The theory building section will focus on issues such as philosophy of science, inferences of causality, and ascertainment of the current state of knowledge in a given domain. Hypothesis generation, selection of a research problem, and basic research design will also be covered in this section.

        The next section will move from theory building to data collection and construct measurement. This section will deal with construct definition, reliability and validity of measurement, and the link between theory and measurement systems. It will also focus on identifying key independent and dependent variables of interest for a particular research question.

        The measurement of constructs is only one part of the data collection process. The other part involves the selection of different research designs to answer different questions posed by research hypotheses. This section will cover the sampling strategies and strengths/disadvantages of alternative research methods.

        Each of these sections are part of a continuous cycle of theory building and theory testing. In this cycle, theories lead to hypotheses, which then drive measurement and data collection. The measurement and collection of data, in turn, influence the statistical techniques employed and the conclusions that can reasonably drawn from the data. These conclusions are then verified and influence future theory development.

        In this course we would like to provide you with flexible research skills that will help you to meet the challenges you will face as a scholar. If your goal is to do quality research, then you will benefit greatly from this course. Thus, I intend to give you the tools that will help you to build your knowledge and expertise in a chosen area of work. You will become familiar with methods ranging from classical experimental paradigms, to quasi‑experimental methods, to field/correlational approaches. You'll also be exposed to a wide range of measurement strategies, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, and archival data. After developing the conceptual foundation for conducting research, we will develop a basic understanding of research methods and designs. Over the course of the semester, you will identify a substantive area of interest, conduct a review of the relevant theoretical and empirical literature, and formulate a specific research question you would like to answer. This then, will help you to develop a detailed research plan, culminating in a research proposal.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MANA 3318-003 Managing Organizational Behavior

        To gain an understanding or increase your knowledge of behavior in organizational settings.  Organizational behavior is a field of study that is concerned with the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations. This class will increase your understanding of behavior in organizational settings. In this course we will use existing theory and research from the behavioral sciences to help you understand the link between individual and group behavior and organizational performance.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MANA 3318-006 MANAGING ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

        To gain an understanding or increase your knowledge of behavior in organizational settings.  Organizational behavior is a field of study that is concerned with the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations. This class will increase your understanding of behavior in organizational settings. In this course we will use existing theory and research from the behavioral sciences to help you understand the link between individual and group behavior and organizational performance.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BSAD 6311-001 Experimental Design

        This course covers the fundamentals of applied social science research in various areas of business. It is designed to help you develop skills that will enable you to effectively evaluate the research of others and to design, conduct, and report on research of your own. In general, the scientific process employs both theory and data in an effort to describe, explain, predict, and/or influence some phenomenon of interest. Thus, we will be focusing on theory development, construct measurement, research methods, and research critiques as part of an integrated sequence. You will be exposed to the logic underlying the research process as well as a broad range of design and assessment methods. Throughout the course there will be an emphasis on both conceptual understanding and the development of practical "how‑to" skills. Topics covered in the sequence are organized in terms of the stages of the research process, beginning with theory building and ending with interpretation and verification.

        The theory building section will focus on issues such as philosophy of science, inferences of causality, and ascertainment of the current state of knowledge in a given domain. Hypothesis generation, selection of a research problem, and basic research design will also be covered in this section.

        The next section will move from theory building to data collection and construct measurement. This section will deal with construct definition, reliability and validity of measurement, and the link between theory and measurement systems. It will also focus on identifying key independent and dependent variables of interest for a particular research question.

        The measurement of constructs is only one part of the data collection process. The other part involves the selection of different research designs to answer different questions posed by research hypotheses. This section will cover the sampling strategies and strengths/disadvantages of alternative research methods.

        Each of these sections are part of a continuous cycle of theory building and theory testing. In this cycle, theories lead to hypotheses, which then drive measurement and data collection. The measurement and collection of data, in turn, influence the statistical techniques employed and the conclusions that can reasonably drawn from the data. These conclusions are then verified and influence future theory development.

        In this course we would like to provide you with flexible research skills that will help you to meet the challenges you will face as a scholar. If your goal is to do quality research, then you will benefit greatly from this course. Thus, I intend to give you the tools that will help you to build your knowledge and expertise in a chosen area of work. You will become familiar with methods ranging from classical experimental paradigms, to quasi‑experimental methods, to field/correlational approaches. You'll also be exposed to a wide range of measurement strategies, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, and archival data. After developing the conceptual foundation for conducting research, we will develop a basic understanding of research methods and designs. Over the course of the semester, you will identify a substantive area of interest, conduct a review of the relevant theoretical and empirical literature, and formulate a specific research question you would like to answer. This then, will help you to develop a detailed research plan, culminating in a research proposal.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MANA 5312-020 Management

        This course provides an overview of management in organizations.  We will examine what management is and learn important theories in management.  This class will use a case-based approach to encourage application of material to real-world organizations.  Although we will learn a variety of theories, the goal is to understand the value of the theories in understanding effective and ineffective management in organizations.  At the end of the course students should be able to diagnose management problems in organizations and make more effective management decisions.

        By the end of this course students will be able to:

        Describe the difference between a leader and manager, identify different leadership styles, and understand what leadership behaviors are most effective in a given situation Using consequential, character, and rule-based ethical theories, evaluate whether decisions made in work organizations are ethical.   Understand the levels of organizational culture and the role of culture in driving individual employee behavior in organizations.  Utilize the competing values framework to diagnose the culture of an organization Analyze a national culture using Hofstede’s five dimensions of cultural differences, and identify how these differences result in challenges working across cultural boundaries. Analyze sources of conflict in teams and understand how to improve team effectiveness. Identify your own and others’ preferred conflict resolution style, and the benefits of drawbacks of each style. Understand the role of incentives and feedback in employee motivation; evaluate the pros and cons of performance monitoring and evaluation systems (i.e., forced ranking). Utilize principles of job enrichment to evaluate the motivating potential of a job Utilize a variety of management theories to diagnose managerial problems in work organizations and identify potential solutions. 
      • MANA 3318-003 Organizational Behavior

        To gain an understanding or increase your knowledge of behavior in organizational settings.  Organizational behavior is a field of study that is concerned with the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations. This class will increase your understanding of behavior in organizational settings. In this course we will use existing theory and research from the behavioral sciences to help you understand the link between individual and group behavior and organizational performance.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MANA 3318-006 Organizational Behavior

        To gain an understanding or increase your knowledge of behavior in organizational settings.  Organizational behavior is a field of study that is concerned with the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations. This class will increase your understanding of behavior in organizational settings. In this course we will use existing theory and research from the behavioral sciences to help you understand the link between individual and group behavior and organizational performance.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BSAD 6314-001 Multivariate Statistics

        This course is designed to help you to effectively apply, interpret, and evaluate different multivariate statistical techniques. Throughout the course there will be an emphasis on both conceptual understanding and the development of practical "how‑to" skills. Topics covered in the sequence are organized in terms of complexity, beginning with a broad overview, moving into regression, and ending with structural equation modeling.

        Business scholars have made use of a broad range of methods and analytical strategies to address questions of interest.  Because each approach to answering research questions involves trade‑offs, researchers have often found it necessary to employ a combination of analytical techniques to reach any firm conclusions. A major goal of this course is to facilitate decision making within these constraints. 

        We will discuss a variety of advanced statistical techniques.  Throughout the semester, you will gain hands‑on experience through projects and learn how to draw statistical and substantive conclusions from results of analyses. You will be asked to prepare written summaries of results using either Academy of Management style or style guidelines for other journals in your field. If you use style guidelines other than those of the Academy of Management or the American Psychological Association, please provide a copy of these guidelines to me along with your first project so I can refer to them as I evaluate your projects.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MANA 3318-006 Organizational Behavior

        To gain an understanding or increase your knowledge of behavior in organizational settings.  Organizational behavior is a field of study that is concerned with the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations. This class will increase your understanding of behavior in organizational settings. In this course we will use existing theory and research from the behavioral sciences to help you understand the link between individual and group behavior and organizational performance.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BSAD 6311-001 Experimental Design

        This course covers the fundamentals of applied social science research in various areas of business. It is designed to help you develop skills that will enable you to effectively evaluate the research of others and to design, conduct, and report on research of your own. In general, the scientific process employs both theory and data in an effort to describe, explain, predict, and/or influence some phenomenon of interest. Thus, we will be focusing on theory development, construct measurement, research methods, and research critiques as part of an integrated sequence. You will be exposed to the logic underlying the research process as well as a broad range of design and assessment methods. Throughout the course there will be an emphasis on both conceptual understanding and the development of practical "how‑to" skills. Topics covered in the sequence are organized in terms of the stages of the research process, beginning with theory building and ending with interpretation and verification.

        The theory building section will focus on issues such as philosophy of science, inferences of causality, and ascertainment of the current state of knowledge in a given domain. Hypothesis generation, selection of a research problem, and basic research design will also be covered in this section.

        The next section will move from theory building to data collection and construct measurement. This section will deal with construct definition, reliability and validity of measurement, and the link between theory and measurement systems. It will also focus on identifying key independent and dependent variables of interest for a particular research question.

        The measurement of constructs is only one part of the data collection process. The other part involves the selection of different research designs to answer different questions posed by research hypotheses. This section will cover the sampling strategies and strengths/disadvantages of alternative research methods.

        Each of these sections are part of a continuous cycle of theory building and theory testing. In this cycle, theories lead to hypotheses, which then drive measurement and data collection. The measurement and collection of data, in turn, influence the statistical techniques employed and the conclusions that can reasonably drawn from the data. These conclusions are then verified and influence future theory development.

        In this course we would like to provide you with flexible research skills that will help you to meet the challenges you will face as a scholar. If your goal is to do quality research, then you will benefit greatly from this course. Thus, I intend to give you the tools that will help you to build your knowledge and expertise in a chosen area of work. You will become familiar with methods ranging from classical experimental paradigms, to quasi‑experimental methods, to field/correlational approaches. You'll also be exposed to a wide range of measurement strategies, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, and archival data. After developing the conceptual foundation for conducting research, we will develop a basic understanding of research methods and designs. Over the course of the semester, you will identify a substantive area of interest, conduct a review of the relevant theoretical and empirical literature, and formulate a specific research question you would like to answer. This then, will help you to develop a detailed research plan, culminating in a research proposal.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MANA 5323-001 Training and Development

        The primary purpose of this course is to provide an overview and in-depth study of training and development in organizations, facilitating both knowledge and skill acquisition.Specific topics to be discussed include needs assessment, learning and transfer, various training methods, training evaluation, and employee development.Coverage of these topics will emphasize a systematic and scientific perspective while stressing an appreciation for the context in which training and development activities occur (e.g., other HRM functions, business strategy and organizational politics, the legal arena, and broader societal concerns such as fairness and equal access).Particular emphasis will be placed on the knowledge and skills necessary for professional training and development activities.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • BSAD 6311-001 Experimental Design

        This course covers the fundamentals of applied social science research in various areas of business. It is designed to help you develop skills that will enable you to effectively evaluate the research of others and to design, conduct, and report on research of your own. In general, the scientific process employs both theory and data in an effort to describe, explain, predict, and/or influence some phenomenon of interest. Thus, we will be focusing on theory development, construct measurement, research methods, and research critiques as part of an integrated sequence. You will be exposed to the logic underlying the research process as well as a broad range of design and assessment methods. Throughout the course there will be an emphasis on both conceptual understanding and the development of practical "how‑to" skills. Topics covered in the sequence are organized in terms of the stages of the research process, beginning with theory building and ending with interpretation and verification.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus

Other Teaching Activities

  • 2013
    • MANA 4391
      • May 2013 International Organizational Behavior

        Study Abroad Program in Barcelona, Spain

Service to the Profession

  • Appointed
    • Aug 2012 to  July 2014 Co-Chair, Human Resource Division International Conference, Beijing, China

      Oversee coordination of all conference activities including submissions, review process, progam, and local logsitics for conference to be held in Beijing, China June 2014

    • May 2013 to  Present Editorial Board, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes

      Review submissions and make recommendations for publication

    • Jan 2008 to  Present Editorial Board, Journal of Business and Psychology

      Review submissions and make recommendations for publication

    • Jan 2007 to  Present Editorial Board, Journal of Vocational Behavior

      Review submissions and make recommendations for publication

    • Aug 2009 to  Feb 2013 Knowledge Manager, Human Resource Division, Academy of Management

      Manage and maintain HR Division organizational archives

    • Aug 2010 to  Aug 2013 Co-Chair, International Committee, Human Resource Division of the Academy of Management

      Oversee activities of international commitee

    • Jan 2011 to  Dec 2012 Associate Editor, Applied Psychology: An International Review

      Serve as AE for this journal

    • Jan 2005 to  Dec 2009 Editorial Board, Journal of Occupational Health Psychology

      Review submissions and make recommendations for publication

    • Jan 2004 to  Dec 2006 Chair, Measure Chest Project, Research Methods Division, Academy of Management

      Oversee development and implementation of measure chest to share scales of measurement between division researchers

    • Jan 2014 to  Present Editorial Board, Journal of Applied Psychology

      Review submissions and make recommendations for publicationb

  • Elected
    • Aug 2010 to  Aug 2013 Executive Committee, Human Resource Division, Academy of Management

      Serve on executive committee which governs the HR Division of the Academy of Management

    • Jan 2015 to  Jan 2017 Executive Committee Member, Work and Family Research Network

      Plan and organize 2016 Work and Family Research Network Conference in Washington, DC

  • Volunteered
    • Jan 2006 to  Dec 2008 Program and Awards Committee, Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology

      Review papers and select award winners for annual conference

Service to the University

  • Appointed
    • Aug 2012 to  Apr 2014 University Nominating Committee

      Review applications and make recommendations for Faculty Development Leaves

    • Aug 2012 to  Present CROME Board of Directors, Department of Management

      Oversee activities of CROME

    • Jan 2010 to  May 2011 International Oversight Committee

      Oversee decisions regarding international program such as travel during times of polical crisis in region

    • Jan 2010 to  May 2011 Faculty Senate

      Represent Department of Management on Faculty Senate

    • July 2014 to  Present Coordinator, PhD Program in Management

      Oversee PhD program admissions, monitor progress of PhD students in management, serve on college PhD program committee

  • Volunteered
    • Aug 2012 to  Present Carla Buss Memorial Scholarship Committee Chair

      Fundraising and setting up scholarship; oversight of award winner selection

    • Aug 2008 to  Present Faculty Mentor, Faculty Mentoring Program

      Mentor assistant professors at UTA

Other Service Activities

  • Uncategorized
    • Nov 2013 Professional Service

Administrative Appointment

  • 2016
    • Aug 2016 to Present - Director, PhD Programs, College of Business, University of Texas at Arlington
  • 2014
    • July 2014 to Aug 2016 - Coordinator, PhD Program in Management, University of Texas at Arlington