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Erin Murrah-Mandril

Name

[Murrah-Mandril, Erin]
  • Assistant Professor, English

Biography

Erin Murrah-Mandril is a scholar of late-nineteenth and early twentieth-century American literature, focusing on Mexican American literary history. Her most recent article in Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies resituates the canonical Mexican American novel, The Squatter and the Don, within the context of U.S. temporal colonization.  Murrah-Mandrils other peer-reviewed articles  have appeared in Arizona Quarterly, Western American Literature, and the Recovering the U.S. Hispanic Literary Heritage series. She holds a Ph.D. in American Literature from the University of New Mexico.

Her current project, In the Mean Time: The Temporal Colonization of Mexican America, is a book-length examination of the multiple ways Mexican American authors navigate the colonizing force of U.S. time that was based on racialized constructions of progress and development in the century following the U.S.-Mexico War.

Murrah-Mandril is a core faculty member for the Center for Mexican American Studies at UTA (CMAS). She teaches courses for CMAS as well at the English Department. Her teaching interests include Chicana/o literature, Latina/o literature, literature of the U.S. West, Multi-ethnic autobiography, literary history, regionalism, early American and twentieth-century American literature.

Professional Preparation

    • 2014 Ph.D. in EnglishUniversity of New Mexico
    • 2008 M.A. in EnglishUniversity of New Mexico
    • 2005 BA in HistoryUniversity of New Mexico

Appointments

    • Sept 2015 to Present Assistant Professor of English
      University of Texas at Arlinton

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Sept 2006 to Present Modern Language Association (MLA)

Publications

      Journal Article In-press
      • “Ruiz de Burton’s ‘Contemporary Novel’: Multifarious Time in The Squatter and the Don. Accepted by Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies. 41.2 (2016): 37-63.

        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2012
      • “Autobiographical Politics in the Contact Zone: Miguel Antonio Otero’s My Life on the Frontier.” Recovering the U.S. Hispanic Literary Heritage, Vol. VIII. Ed. Gabriela Baeza Ventura and Clara Lomas. Houston, Texas: Arte Público Press, 2012. 123-37.

        {Book Chapter }

      Encyclopedia Entry 2012
      • “Los Rinches” Celebrating Latino Folklore: An Encyclopedia of Cultural Traditions. Ed. Maria Herrera-Sobek. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, 2012. 720-24.

        {Encyclopedia Entry }
      2012
      • “Bourke, Captain John Gregory (1846-96),” Celebrating Latino Folklore: An Encyclopedia of Cultural Traditions. Ed. Maria Herrera-Sobek. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, 2012. 138-40.

        {Encyclopedia Entry }
      2012
      • “Adobe,” Celebrating Latino Folklore: An Encyclopedia of Cultural Traditions. Ed. Maria Herrera-Sobek. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, 2012. 4-7.

        {Encyclopedia Entry }

      Book Review 2012
      • Rev. of Pushing the Bear: After the Trail of Tears, by Diane Glancy. Western American Literature 45.3 (2010): 313-14.

        {Book Review }
      2012
      • Rev. of NINES (Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-Century Electronic Scholarship). Society for the History of Authorship Newsletter 21.3 (2012): 7, 14.

        {Review essay }

      Journal Article 2011
      • “Jovita González and Margaret Eimer’s Caballero as Memory-Site.” Arizona Quarterly 67.4 (2011): 135-54.

        {Journal Article }

      Anthology Work/Essay 2010
      • “Biography and Autobiography” Realism and Regionalism, 1865-1914. Ed. Gary Scharnhorst and Tom Quirk. New York: Facts on File, 2010. 27-31.

        {Anthology Work/Essay }

      Journal Article 2008
      • “Miguel Antonio Otero: Destabilizing Identity in the West.” Western American Literature 43.1 (2008): 129-46.

        {Journal Article }

Presentations

    • February  2016
      “Repressing Tejana History: Adina DeZavala's History and Legends of the Alamo as Decolonial Recovery Work.”

      presentation

Students Supervised

Courses

      • ENGL 3346-001 MEXICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE

        This introductory class will cover Mexican American authored texts in several literary genres—poetry, memoir, novel, drama, and short story—and the ways the genres intersect, overlap, and b(l)end identities. The course will include selections from the 19th century to the present, with special attention paid to the Chicano Movement, the Latina literary boom, and historical literary recovery. We will be exploring what shapes Chicana/o literature and the ways that this literature works to shape a Chicana/o readership.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6339-001 TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE

        Examines nineteenth and tentieth century Latina/o, African American, Native, and Asian-American writers who write from and about the U.S. West. The course engages in archival methodologies,

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAS 2300-001 Mexican American Studies

        An introduction to the interdisciplenary field of Mexican American Studies. Students will explore history, literature, sociology of peoples in the US of Mexican Descent. Topics may include Spanish colonization, the US-Mexico War, Spanish language press in the US, immigration, education, literature and visual art, folklore, the Chicano movement, and relevent current events.
         

      • ENGL 4399-001 SENIOR SEMINAR

        This course will interrogate the idea of “Western American Literature” through the work of multicultural authors writing from within the U.S. West including: Mexican American, Native American, African American, Asian American and Women’s experiences. Texts may include The Life and Adventures of Joaquin Murieta by John Rollin Ridge, Life Among the Piutes by Sarah Winnemucca, Down the Santa Fe Trail and into Mexico by Susan Shelby Magoffin, “Mrs. Spring Fragrance” by Sui Sin Far, and/or The Life and Adventures of Nat Love by Nat Love, among others.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2309-018 WORLD LITERATURE

        Students will read/watch, discuss, and write about significant works of world literature (poems, short stories, films, and novels) of the 20th and 21st century chosen from various national and cultural traditions with emphasis on the ways in which they reflect cultural and aesthetic values and engage cross-cultural issues. The course examines at least three genres and six authors and emphasizes critical thinking, reading, and writing.

      • ENGL 3343-001 LATINA AND LATINO LIT

        Latina and Latino authors transform our understanding of American literature. From before the formation of the U.S. to the present, Latina/o poetry, fiction and drama have interrogated identity, colonization, indigeneity, nationalism, and migration in America or rather América. This survey addresses these concerns as it provides an overview of the history of Latino/a literature, examining major trends and historical contexts in Latina/o literature. Topics will include the intersectional influences of race, gender, sexuality, and class; bilingualism; the experiences of the exile, the immigrant, and the refugee; and Latino/a print culture.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5300-001 Theory and Practice

        This course introduces graduate students to the field of English studies, including its methods, institutional structure, and theorization of language and literature. Approximately half of the class will focus on the history and institution of English studies, research methods, and bibliographical and textual studies. The other half will provide a survey of literary theory.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAS 2300-002 INTRODUCTION TO MEXICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

        This is the online offering of the Introduction to Mexican American Studies, a multidisciplinary introduction to the Mexican American experience. It emphasizes history, culture, and contemporary socioeconomic and policy issues. The course is required for completion of the Mexican American Studies minor.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-016 AMERICAN LITERATURE

        Concentration on works of American literature with focus on how cultural, geographic, and political issues shape and reflect literature in a particular culture.  Examines at least three genres and six authors. Emphasis on critical thinking, reading, and writing.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAS 3346-001 MEXICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE

        This introductory class will cover Mexican American authored texts in several literary genres—poetry, memoir, novel, drama, and short story—and the ways the genres intersect, overlap, and b(l)end identities. The course will include selections from the 19th century to the present, with special attention paid to the Chicano Movement, the Latina literary boom, and historical literary recovery. We will be exploring what shapes Chicana/o literature and the ways that this literature works to shape a Chicana/o readership.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3346-001 The LIterary Canon of Mexican American Literature

        This introductory class will cover Mexican American authored texts in several literary genres—poetry, memoir, novel, drama, and short story—and the ways the genres intersect, overlap, and b(l)end identities. The course will include selections from the 19th century to the present, with special attention paid to the Chicano Movement, the Latina literary boom, and historical literary recovery. We will be exploring what shapes Chicana/o literature and the ways that this literature works to shape a Chicana/o readership.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5327-001 Readings in Chicano/a Literature

        The course will examine literature written by former Mexican citizens and their descendants in the U.S. spanning from the end of the U.S.-Mexico War to just before the Chicano Movement (roughly 1850-1950). This body of work was the subject of organized literary recovery that came to fruition in the 1990s.  As a latecomer to the broader project of literary recovery within the academy, the recovery of U.S. Hispanic/Latino literature has been intensely reflexive from its inception. We will read literary texts as cultural artifacts of Mexican American experiences after the U.S.-Mexico war and the burgeoning ethnic identity that formed in response to U.S. colonization. At the same time, the class will remain cognizant of the process of recovery that shaped each text, placing it within a new context that reverberates across history, effectively reshaping the past as well as the present. Literary texts will primarily consist of novels and autobiography and will be paired with relevant scholarship. The course will follow a theoretical undercurrent that examines the way cultural memory is constructed, along with theories of the archive.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAS 2300-002 INTRODUCTION TO MEXICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

        This is the online offering of the Introduction to Mexican American Studies, a multidisciplinary introduction to the Mexican American experience. It emphasizes history, culture, and contemporary socioeconomic and policy issues. The course is required for completion of the Mexican American Studies minor.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAS 2300-001 Mexican American Studies

        This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to the Mexican American/Latino experience with an emphasis on history, culture, and contemporary socioeconomic and policy issues. It is required for completion of the Mexican American Studies minor.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3340-003 HISTORY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE

        This borad survey course covers the scope of American literature from precolonial time to present. Student will read selescted texts in relation to the historical condition of their production. The class will examine the construction of the American literary canon  through the works of authors who have generally be excluded from that canon.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-036 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        ENGL 1302 emphasizes advanced techniques of academic argument. The course includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAS 2300-002 INTRODUCTION TO MEXICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

        A Multidisciplinary introduction to the Mexican American/Latina/o experience. Emphasis on history, culture, and contemporary socioeconomic and policy issues. Required for the completion of the Mexican American Studies minor.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3343-001 US CHICANO/LATINO LIT

        This introductory class will cover Chicana/o literary genres—poetry, memoir, novel, drama, and short story—and the ways the genres intersect, overlap, and b(l)end identities. The course will include selections from the 19th century to the present, with special attention paid to the Chicano Movement, the Latina literary boom, and historical literary recovery. We will be exploring what shapes Chicana/o literature and the ways that this literature works to shape a Chicana/o readership.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours

Service to the University

  • Appointed
    • Jan 2016 to  Dec 2016 Course Development

      Developed new online course for Introduction to Mexican American Studies, MAS 2300. First online course in the MAS minor program.

    • July 2016 to  Present Center for Greater Southwest Studies Fellow

      Center Fellows advise the director, plan events, and occasionally contribute to the Center's newsletter, Fronteras.