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Farid Derisavifard

Name

[Derisavifard, Farid]
  • Lecturer

Biography

Dr. Farid Derisavifard is a Lecturer at Department of Mathematics, University of Texas at Arlington.

His research area is in Application of fuzzy logic in olor reproduction and workflow automation in prepress and printing.

Professional Preparation

    • 1977 B.S. in EconomicsPahlavi University
    • 1981 M.S. in Industrial Engineering
    • 1995 Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering
    • 1979 M.S. in Industrial AdministrationUniversity of Dallas

Appointments

    • Sept 1980 to Present Adjunct Faculty
      Tarrant County College

Publications

      Journal Article 1999
      • Temponi, F. D. F.; Corley, H. W. A fuzzy decision model for color reproduction. international journal of production economics 1999, 58 (1), 31-37.
        {Journal Article }

Courses

      • MATH 1327-001 ARCHITECTURAL CALCULUS

        Upon completion of Math 1327, the students will be able to perform various tasks including (but not limited to) those outlined below with algebraic, trigonometric and transcendental functions.

        Students will be able to compute the limit of various functions without the aid of a calculator.

        Students will be able to compute the derivatives and differentials of various functions without the aid of a calculator, and interpret certain limits as derivatives. In particular, they will be able to compute derivatives and differentials using differentiation techniques such as chain rule, implicit differentiation and logarithmic differentiation.

        Students will be able to find the equation of the tangent line to the graph of a function at a point by using the derivative of the function. They will be able to estimate the value of a function at a point using a tangent line near that point.

        Students will be able to sketch the graphs of functions by finding and using first-order and second-order critical points, extrema, and inflection points.

        Students will be able to solve word problems involving the rate of change of a quantity or of related quantities. Students will be able to solve optimization problems in the context of real-life situations by using differentiation and critical points of functions.  The problem topics include (but are not limited to) population dynamics, finance, physics, biology, chemistry and sociology.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • MATH 1327-001 ARCHITECTURAL CALCULUS

        Upon completion of Math 1327, the students will be able to perform various tasks including (but not limited to) those outlined below with algebraic, trigonometric and transcendental functions.

        Students will be able to compute the limit of various functions without the aid of a calculator.

        Students will be able to compute the derivatives and differentials of various functions without the aid of a calculator, and interpret certain limits as derivatives. In particular, they will be able to compute derivatives and differentials using differentiation techniques such as chain rule, implicit differentiation and logarithmic differentiation.

        Students will be able to find the equation of the tangent line to the graph of a function at a point by using the derivative of the function. They will be able to estimate the value of a function at a point using a tangent line near that point.

        Students will be able to sketch the graphs of functions by finding and using first-order and second-order critical points, extrema, and inflection points.

        Students will be able to solve word problems involving the rate of change of a quantity or of related quantities. Students will be able to solve optimization problems in the context of real-life situations by using differentiation and critical points of functions.  The problem topics include (but are not limited to) population dynamics, finance, physics, biology, chemistry and sociology.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1325-001 ANALYTIC GEOMETRY

        Upon Completion of Math 1325

        1. Students will be able to write equations of lines, circles, and conics in 2-space and to identify these curves from their equations.

        2. Students will be able to write equations of lines and planes in the 3-space and to identify lines and planes from their equation.

        3. Students will be able to measure the distances between points, lines, and planes

        4. Students will be able to use vectors in 2- and 3-space to solve problems.

        5. Students will be able to use rectangular and polar coordinates in 2-space.

        6. Students will be able to use rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates in 3-space.

        7. Students will be able to perform translations and rotations in 2-space 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 2326-002 CALCULUS III

        MATH 2326Fall 2010

        1. Instructor:Farid Derisavifard

        2. Office Location:

        3. Office Hours:TuTh 6:30PM - 7:00PM

        4. Phone:817-721-5315

        5. Email:faridd@uta.edu

        6. Text:

        Thomas' Calculus, Early Transcendentals, 11th edition by Weir, Haas, and Giordano

        7. Homework: To get HW assignments, go to:

        http://www.uta.edu/math/pages/main/assignments/Math_2326.pdf

        8. Course Description:

        Partial differentiation, multiple integrals (with applications), line integrals, Green's Theorem, surface integrals, Stokes' Theorem, divergence theorem.

        9. Expected Learning Outcomes:

        Upon completion of Math 2326, students will be able to

        1. Use the concepts of continuity, differentiation, and integration of vector-valued functions to determine unit tangent and unit normal vectors in the process of modeling objects in three dimensions. Students will be able to parameterize piecewise-smooth curves using arc length. They will be able to compute the curvature of a space curve.

        2. Compute and sketch level curves for functions of several variables and sketch the graphs of functions of two variables. Analyzing limits, determining continuity, and computing partial derivatives of multivariate functions are also expected. Students will be able to use tangent planes, directional derivatives, gradients, the second partials test, and Lagrange multipliers to approximate and solve optimization problems.

        3. Demonstrate techniques of multiple integrations and compute iterated integrals over rectangular regions, non-rectangular regions, and in other coordinate systems. They will be able to apply multiple integrals in problem situations involving area, volume, surface area, etc.

        4. Compute line integrals and surface integrals by applying the

        Fundamental Theorem for line integrals, Green’s theorem, Stoke’s Theorem and the Divergence Theorem. Applying these integrals to solve applications such as mass and work problems is also expected.

        10. Attendances and Drop Policy:

        The last day this semester to drop a course is November 5, 2010. Any students who drops the course on or before November 5 will receive a W. Students must contact an advisor in their major in order to drop a course.

        11. Grading:

        90-100, A; 80-89, B; 70-79, C; 60-69, D; 0-59, F

        Midterm 1 25%Tuesday, Oct 05

        Midterm 2 30%Thursday, Nov 9

        Final Exam 35%Saturday, Dec 11

        Quizzes10%Weekly

        12. Missed Exams, Quizzes and Makeup Work:

        Lowest two quizzes will be dropped - so no make-up quizzes.

        If you have a conflict with either midterm or final, you must contact the instructor no later than Census Date (September 13, 2010).

        13. Calculators:

        On the midterms and final, you will be allowed to use non-programmable calculators with basic computational features, such as arithmetic and transcendental functions. Calculators with the following features are NOT allowed: graphing, equation solving, differentiation and integration. Any device that has Internet or e-mail capabilities – this includes cell phones – and any device with a QWERTY keyboard is also not permitted.

        "Scholastic dishonesty includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, the submission for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, taking an examination for another person, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such actsâ€

        16. Grade Replacement Policy: See www.uta.edu/catalog/general/academicreg.

        The deadline for filing a grade replacement request is Census Date September 13, 2010.

        17. Student Disruption: The University reserves the right to impose disciplinary action for an infraction of University policies. For example, engagement in conduct, alone or with others, intended to obstruct, disrupt, or interfere with, or which in fact obstructs, disrupts, or interferes with, any function or activity sponsored, authorized by or participated in by the University.

        Ringing cell phones or leaving during the lecture are examples of disruptive behavior.

        Math 2326 – Calculus III

        Assignment Sheet

        Text: Thomas’ Calculus, Early Transcendentals, Weir, Haas & Giordano, 11/E, 2006,

        ISBN #978-0-321-51181-2, Prentice Hall

        13.1: Vector Functions

        1, 4, 7, 10, 11, 14, 15, 18, 21, 24, 26, 27, 29, 32, 33, 34, 37, 38

        13.3: Arc Length and the Unit Tangent Vector

        2, 3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 18

        13.4: Curvature and the Unit Normal Vector

        2, 3, 5, 11, 12, 13, 17

        14.1: Functions of Several Variables

        2, 3, 6, 7, 12, 14, 15, 18, 29, 30, 32, 33, 35, 36, 39, 41, 42

        14.2: Limits and Continuity in Higher Dimensions

        1, 4, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 20, 21, 24, 26, 27, 30, 33, 34, 39, 41, 51, 53, 58

        14.3: Partial Derivatives

        3, 8, 11, 13, 16, 17, 20, 23, 26, 27, 31, 43, 46, 47, 50, 53, 57, 58, 63, 66

        14.4: Chain Rule

        1, 6, 9, 12, 14, 17, 18, 19, 24, 27, 28, 31, 37, 38

        14.5: Directional Derivatives and Gradient Vectors

        1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 14, 15, 16, 20, 21, 23, 24, 34, 36

        14.6: Tangent Planes and Differentials

        1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 11, 12, 15, 20, 21, 28, 29, 40, 41

        14.7: Extreme Values and Saddle Points

        3, 8, 13, 16, 19, 24, 27, 32, 35, 39, 42, 52, 53

        14.8: Lagrange Multipliers

        1, 6, 9, 33, 36, 38, 39

        15.1: Double Integrals

        1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 13, 17, 20, 25, 28, 30, 35, 38, 41, 44, 47, 48

        15.2: Area, Moments and Center of Mass

        3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

        15.3: Double Integrals in Polar Form

        1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 14, 16, 19, 21, 29, 30, 31, 32, 40

        15.4: Triple Integrals in Rectangular Coordinates

        3, 4, 5, 10, 13, 16, 19, 21, 22, 23, 26, 29, 30, 31, 36, 37, 40, 42, 44

        15.6: Triple Integrals in Cylindrical and SphericalCoordinates

        1, 4, 6, 7, 9, 14, 15, 18, 21, 24, 25, 28, 29,

        39, 41, 50, 53, 58, 59, 62, 63, 66

        15.7: Substitutions in Multiple Integrals

        2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 20

        16.1: Line Integrals

        1, 6, 8, 9, 12, 14, 18, 19, 21

        16.2: Vector Fields, Work, Circulation & Flux

        2, 3, 4, 8, 10, 18, 19, 20, 23, 25, 28, 29, 30

        16.3: Path Independence, Potential Functions & Conservative Fields

        2, 3, 6, 7, 9, 12, 13, 15, 16, 18, 21, 25, 28, 32

        16.4: Green’s Theorem in the Plane

        1, 3, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 17, 19, 20

        16.5: Surface Area & Surface Integral

        1, 4, 7, 9, 10, 12, 14, 17, 18, 24, 25, 26, 31, 32

        16.7: Stokes’ Theorem

        1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8

        16.8: The Divergence Theorem and a Unified Theory

        2, 3, 4, 6, 10, 12, 25, 26

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus
      • MATH 2326-002 CALCULUS III

        MATH 2326Fall 2010

        1. Instructor:Farid Derisavifard

        2. Office Location:

        3. Office Hours:TuTh 6:30PM - 7:00PM

        4. Phone:817-721-5315

        5. Email:faridd@uta.edu

        6. Text:

        Thomas' Calculus, Early Transcendentals, 11th edition by Weir, Haas, and Giordano

        7. Homework: To get HW assignments, go to:

        http://www.uta.edu/math/pages/main/assignments/Math_2326.pdf

        8. Course Description:

        Partial differentiation, multiple integrals (with applications), line integrals, Green's Theorem, surface integrals, Stokes' Theorem, divergence theorem.

        9. Expected Learning Outcomes:

        Upon completion of Math 2326, students will be able to

        1. Use the concepts of continuity, differentiation, and integration of vector-valued functions to determine unit tangent and unit normal vectors in the process of modeling objects in three dimensions. Students will be able to parameterize piecewise-smooth curves using arc length. They will be able to compute the curvature of a space curve.

        2. Compute and sketch level curves for functions of several variables and sketch the graphs of functions of two variables. Analyzing limits, determining continuity, and computing partial derivatives of multivariate functions are also expected. Students will be able to use tangent planes, directional derivatives, gradients, the second partials test, and Lagrange multipliers to approximate and solve optimization problems.

        3. Demonstrate techniques of multiple integrations and compute iterated integrals over rectangular regions, non-rectangular regions, and in other coordinate systems. They will be able to apply multiple integrals in problem situations involving area, volume, surface area, etc.

        4. Compute line integrals and surface integrals by applying the

        Fundamental Theorem for line integrals, Green’s theorem, Stoke’s Theorem and the Divergence Theorem. Applying these integrals to solve applications such as mass and work problems is also expected.

        10. Attendances and Drop Policy:

        The last day this semester to drop a course is November 5, 2010. Any students who drops the course on or before November 5 will receive a W. Students must contact an advisor in their major in order to drop a course.

        11. Grading:

        90-100, A; 80-89, B; 70-79, C; 60-69, D; 0-59, F

        Midterm 1 25%Tuesday, Oct 05

        Midterm 2 30%Thursday, Nov 9

        Final Exam 35%Saturday, Dec 11

        Quizzes10%Weekly

        12. Missed Exams, Quizzes and Makeup Work:

        Lowest two quizzes will be dropped - so no make-up quizzes.

        If you have a conflict with either midterm or final, you must contact the instructor no later than Census Date (September 13, 2010).

        13. Calculators:

        On the midterms and final, you will be allowed to use non-programmable calculators with basic computational features, such as arithmetic and transcendental functions. Calculators with the following features are NOT allowed: graphing, equation solving, differentiation and integration. Any device that has Internet or e-mail capabilities – this includes cell phones – and any device with a QWERTY keyboard is also not permitted.

        "Scholastic dishonesty includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, the submission for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, taking an examination for another person, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such actsâ€

        16. Grade Replacement Policy: See www.uta.edu/catalog/general/academicreg.

        The deadline for filing a grade replacement request is Census Date September 13, 2010.

        17. Student Disruption: The University reserves the right to impose disciplinary action for an infraction of University policies. For example, engagement in conduct, alone or with others, intended to obstruct, disrupt, or interfere with, or which in fact obstructs, disrupts, or interferes with, any function or activity sponsored, authorized by or participated in by the University.

        Ringing cell phones or leaving during the lecture are examples of disruptive behavior.

        Math 2326 – Calculus III

        Assignment Sheet

        Text: Thomas’ Calculus, Early Transcendentals, Weir, Haas & Giordano, 11/E, 2006,

        ISBN #978-0-321-51181-2, Prentice Hall

        13.1: Vector Functions

        1, 4, 7, 10, 11, 14, 15, 18, 21, 24, 26, 27, 29, 32, 33, 34, 37, 38

        13.3: Arc Length and the Unit Tangent Vector

        2, 3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 18

        13.4: Curvature and the Unit Normal Vector

        2, 3, 5, 11, 12, 13, 17

        14.1: Functions of Several Variables

        2, 3, 6, 7, 12, 14, 15, 18, 29, 30, 32, 33, 35, 36, 39, 41, 42

        14.2: Limits and Continuity in Higher Dimensions

        1, 4, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 20, 21, 24, 26, 27, 30, 33, 34, 39, 41, 51, 53, 58

        14.3: Partial Derivatives

        3, 8, 11, 13, 16, 17, 20, 23, 26, 27, 31, 43, 46, 47, 50, 53, 57, 58, 63, 66

        14.4: Chain Rule

        1, 6, 9, 12, 14, 17, 18, 19, 24, 27, 28, 31, 37, 38

        14.5: Directional Derivatives and Gradient Vectors

        1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 14, 15, 16, 20, 21, 23, 24, 34, 36

        14.6: Tangent Planes and Differentials

        1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 11, 12, 15, 20, 21, 28, 29, 40, 41

        14.7: Extreme Values and Saddle Points

        3, 8, 13, 16, 19, 24, 27, 32, 35, 39, 42, 52, 53

        14.8: Lagrange Multipliers

        1, 6, 9, 33, 36, 38, 39

        15.1: Double Integrals

        1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 13, 17, 20, 25, 28, 30, 35, 38, 41, 44, 47, 48

        15.2: Area, Moments and Center of Mass

        3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

        15.3: Double Integrals in Polar Form

        1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 14, 16, 19, 21, 29, 30, 31, 32, 40

        15.4: Triple Integrals in Rectangular Coordinates

        3, 4, 5, 10, 13, 16, 19, 21, 22, 23, 26, 29, 30, 31, 36, 37, 40, 42, 44

        15.6: Triple Integrals in Cylindrical and SphericalCoordinates

        1, 4, 6, 7, 9, 14, 15, 18, 21, 24, 25, 28, 29,

        39, 41, 50, 53, 58, 59, 62, 63, 66

        15.7: Substitutions in Multiple Integrals

        2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 20

        16.1: Line Integrals

        1, 6, 8, 9, 12, 14, 18, 19, 21

        16.2: Vector Fields, Work, Circulation & Flux

        2, 3, 4, 8, 10, 18, 19, 20, 23, 25, 28, 29, 30

        16.3: Path Independence, Potential Functions & Conservative Fields

        2, 3, 6, 7, 9, 12, 13, 15, 16, 18, 21, 25, 28, 32

        16.4: Green’s Theorem in the Plane

        1, 3, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 17, 19, 20

        16.5: Surface Area & Surface Integral

        1, 4, 7, 9, 10, 12, 14, 17, 18, 24, 25, 26, 31, 32

        16.7: Stokes’ Theorem

        1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8

        16.8: The Divergence Theorem and a Unified Theory

        2, 3, 4, 6, 10, 12, 25, 26

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus

Other Teaching Activities

  • 2016
    • Math 1327
      • Mar 2016 Architectural Calculus

        Upon completion of Math 1327, the students will be able to perform various tasks including (but not limited to) those outlined below with algebraic, trigonometric and transcendental functions.

        Students will be able to compute the limit of various functions without the aid of a calculator.

        Students will be able to compute the derivatives and differentials of various functions without the aid of a calculator, and interpret certain limits as derivatives. In particular, they will be able to compute derivatives and differentials using differentiation techniques such as chain rule, implicit differentiation and logarithmic differentiation.

        Students will be able to find the equation of the tangent line to the graph of a function at a point by using the derivative of the function. They will be able to estimate the value of a function at a point using a tangent line near that point.

        Students will be able to sketch the graphs of functions by finding and using first-order and second-order critical points, extrema, and inflection points.

        Students will be able to solve word problems involving the rate of change of a quantity or of related quantities. Students will be able to solve optimization problems in the context of real-life situations by using differentiation and critical points of functions.  The problem topics include (but are not limited to) population dynamics, finance, physics, biology, chemistry and sociology.