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Harvy L Baker

Name

[Baker, Harvy L]
  • Instructor, Department of Mathematics

Professional Preparation

    • 1960
    • 1965 Ph.D.

Courses

      • MATH 4314-001 ADVANCED DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

        Objectives and Nature of the Course Content:

        This course is a study in the theory of computation and associated ideas.  Topics covered include: (1) finite automata  (accepters) and  regular languages (which are the languages 'accepted' by finite automata), (2)  pushdown automata and context-free grammars (which generate the languages accepted by nondeterministic pushdown automata), (3) Turing machines (which are in essence modern computers in atomic form) -- and the central questions of the theory of computation  -- What things can be computed ?   And, assuming a 'thing' can be "computed", can it be computed in a way efficient enough to be feasible for the problems in the real world one wants to use it to solve?

        These topics and their derivatives, stated in more elegant technical language perhaps, are the subjects of much present day research in the theory of computation.   The basic results are often associated with classical work in mathematical logic in spirit, if not occasionally in fact. The material we cover in detail here will be limited of course by time.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1316-001 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS, BUSINESS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

         This course is the basic study of limits and continuity, differentiation, optimization and graphing, and integration of elementary functions, with emphasis on mathematical tools and applications in business, economics, and social sciences. Chapters 11, 12, 13 as well as integration by parts will be covered.    

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1327-001 ARCHITECT ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS

        Description of Course Content and Preqequisites:

        Topics from Analytic Geometry and Calculus including conics, polar coordinates, parametric equations; concepts of limit, continuity, differentiation and integration; applications of these concepts. This course will not substitute for MATH 1426. Prerequisite: Major or intended major in Architecture and C or better in MATH 1303 or MATH 1421, or a qualifying score on Math Placement Test.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1316-001 MATH FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

        Description of Course Content: This course is the basic study of limits and continuity, differentiation, optimization and graphing, and integration of elementary functions, with emphasis on mathematical tools and applications in business, economics, and social sciences. Chapters 11, 12, 13 as well as integration by parts will be covered.   

        -Course Learning Goals/Objectives: To develop mathematical tools that are useful in analysis of business and economics problems. The topics include: Differential and Integral calculus. After this course, the students should have an understanding of, Differential and Integral calculus sufficient to apply to real problems in Business and Finance..    .

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1327-001 ARCHITECTURAL CALCULUS

        Topics from Analytic Geometry and Calculus including conics, polar coordinates, parametric equations; concepts of limit, continuity, differentiation and integration; applications of these concepts. This course will not substitute for MATH 1426. Prerequisite: Major or intended major in Architecture and C or better in MATH 1303 or MATH 1421, or a qualifying score on Math Placement Test.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 4314-001 Advanced Discrete Mathematics

        Objectives and Nature of the Course Content:

        This course is a study in the theory of computation and associated ideas.  Topics covered include: (1) finite automata  (accepters) and  regular languages (which are the languages by finite automata), (2)  pushdown automata and context-free grammars (which generate the languages accepted by nondeterministic pushdown automata), (3) Turing machines (which are in essence modern computers in atomic form) -- and the central questions of the theory of computation  -- What things can be computed ?   And, assuming a can be "computed", can it be computed in a way efficient enough to be feasible for the problems in the real world one wants to use it to solve?

        These topics and their derivatives, stated in more elegant technical language perhaps, are the subjects of much present day research in the theory of computation.   The basic results are often associated with classical work in mathematical logic in spirit, if not occasionally in fact. The material we cover in detail here will be limited of course by time.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1316-001 ALGEBRA AND CALCULUS FOR ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS

        Description of Course Content: This course is the basic study of limits and continuity, differentiation, optimization and graphing, and integration of elementary functions, with emphasis on mathematical tools and applications in business, economics, and social sciences. Chapters 11, 12, 13 as well as integration by parts will be covered.   

        -Course Learning Goals/Objectives: To develop mathematical tools that are useful in analysis of business and economics problems. The topics include: Differential and Integral calculus. After this course, the students should have an understanding of, Differential and Integral calculus sufficient to apply to real problems in Business and Finance..    .

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1325-002 ANALYTIC GEOMETRY

        An introduction to vectors, lines in two dimensions, circles, conics, transformation of coordinates, polar coordinates, parametric equations, and the solid analytic geometry of vectors, lines, planes, cylinders, spherical and cylindrical coordinates.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1316-002 MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ANALYSIS

        A one semester course in the applications of differential and integral calculus to problems in business.  Also covered in the course are finance formulas and a review of logarithmic and exponential functions.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 2326-002 CALCULUS III

        From the UTA Catalog: Partial differentiation, multiple integrals (with applications), line integrals, Green's Theorem, surface integrals, Stokes' Theorem, divergence theorem

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 3314-001 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

        This is an elementary course intended to introduce the student to some of the background mathematics associated with problems primarily from the fields of computer science, mathematics and communications.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1315-050 COLLEGE ALGEBRA FOR ECONOMICS & BUSINESS ANALYSIS

        This course studies polynomial and radical equations, systems of equations (linear and those involving second degree terms and radicals), linear, polynomial and rational inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, matrices, permutations, combinations, probability, and linear programming.  Attention is paid to business applications throughout the course. Also covered are compound interest, annuities both present and future value of.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1315-002 COLLEGE ALGEBRA FOR ECONOMICS & BUSINESS

        This course studies polynomial and radical equations, systems of equations (linear and those involving second degree terms and radicals), linear, polynomial and rational inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, matrices, permutations, combinations, probability, and linear programming.  Attention is paid to business applications throughout the course. Also covered are compound interest, annuities both present and future value of.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 3314-001 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

        This is an elementary course intended to introduce the student to some of the background mathematics associated with problems primarily from the fields of computer science, mathematics and communications.  Topics include:  Logic, sets and the usual definitions and operations associated with them; mathematical induction, permutations and combinations, the binomial theorem, and applications of these things to recursively defined functions and formulas summing finite series in closed form (a number of these involve binomial coefficients);  graph theory and presentation of graphs by matrices and diagrams in several ways, relations, and a number of the important algorithms associated with graphs and computer science.  Boolean algebra and the simplification of Boolean expressions are also covered in some depth.  The material will be presented in roughly the order above and handouts will be given close to every week for the topics to be covered.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 4314-001 ADVANCED DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

        This course is a study in the theory of computation and associated ideas.  Topics covered include: (1)  finite automata  (accepters) and  regular languages (which are the languages 'accepted' by finite automata), (2)  pushdown automata and context-free grammars (which generate the languages accepted by nondeterministic pushdown automata), (3) Turing machines (which are in essence modern computers in atomic form) -- and the central questions of the theory of computation  -- What things can be computed ?   And, assuming a 'thing' can be "computed", can it be computed in a way efficient enough to be feasible for the problems in the real world one wants to use it to solve?

        These topics and their derivatives, stated in more elegant technical language perhaps, are the subjects of much present day research in the theory of computation.   The basic results are often associated with classical work in mathematical logic in spirit, if not occasionally in fact. The material we cover in detail here will be limited of course by time.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1303-004 Trigonometry

        Introduction to trigonometry, angles, radian measure, the trigonometric functions for a right triangle, the trigometric functions for any angles, inverse trigonometric functions, basic identities and introduction to periodic functions, law of sines and cosines, oblique triangles, introduction to vectors, graphs of trigonometric functions, identities of a non-basic type, formulas for functions of more than one angle (sum, difference, double and half-angle,   product-to-sum, sum-to-product, formulas), trigonometric equations and  a closer look at the  inverse trigometric functions and their graphs, polar coordinates and graphs, complex numbers.   Applications are stressed throughout.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 3314-001 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

        This is an elementary course intended to introduce the student to some of the background mathematics associated  with problems primarily from the fields of computer science and communications.  Topics include:  Logic, sets and the usual definitions and operations associated with them; mathematical induction, permutations and combinations, the binomial theorem, and applications of these things to recursively defined functions and formulas summing finite series in closed form (a number of these involve binomial coefficients);  graph theory and presentation of graphs by matrices and diagrams in several ways, relations, and a number of the important algorithms associated with graphs and computer science.  Boolean algebra and the simplification of  Boolean expressions are also covered in some depth.  The material will be presented in roughly the order above and handouts will be given close to every week for the topics to be covered.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1316-002 MATHEMATICS FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

        This is a one semester course in the applications of differential and integral calculus to problems in business.  Also covered in the course are finance formulas and a review of logarithmic and exponential functions.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 2326-004 CALCULUS III

         From the UTA Catalog: Partial differentiation, multiple integrals (with applications), line integrals, Green's Theorem, surface integrals, Stokes' Theorem, divergence theorem. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2425 or HONR-SC 2425

        ALSO SOME MATERIAL ON 3-D SURFACES AND GRAPHS OF EQUATIONS FROM CHAPTER 10

        This is a traditional multivariate third calculus course.  It may be used to satisfy the State of Texas core requirement in mathematics and is a required course on all engineering, physics, mathematics degree plans, as well as on BS degrees in chemistry and biochemistry which lead to certification by the ACS.  It also appears on various combined BS-MS degrees in science. 

        LEARNING OUTCOMES

        Upon completion of MATH 2326:

        1. Students will be able to use the concepts of continuity, differentiation, and integration of vector-valued functions to determine unit tangent and unit normal vectors in the process of modeling objects in three dimensions Students will be able to parametrize piecewise-smooth curves using arc length. They will be able to compute the curvature of a space curve.

        2. Students will be able to compute and sketch level curves and level surfaces for functions of several variables and sketch the graphs of functions of two variables.  Analyzing limits, determining continuity, and computing partial derivatives of multivariate functions is also expected. Students will be able to use tangent planes, directional derivatives, gradients, the second partials test, and Lagrange multipliers

        to approximate and solve optimization problems.

        3. Students will be able to demonstrate techniques of multiple integration and compute iterated integrals over rectangular regions, non-rectangular regions and in other coordinate systems. They will be able to apply multiple integrals in problem situations involving area, volume, surface area, center of mass, moments of inertia, etc.

        4. Students will be able to compute line integrals and surface integrals by applying the Fundamental Theorem for Line Integrals, Green’s Theorem, Stoke’s Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. Applying these integrals to solve applications such as

        mass and work problems is also expected.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 3314-001 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

        This is an elementary course intended to introduce the student to some of the background mathematics  associated  with problems primarily from the fields of computer science and communications.  Topics include:  Logic, sets and the usual definitions and operations associated with them; mathematical induction, permutations and combinations, the binomial theorem, and applications of these things to recursively defined functions and formulas summing finite series in closed form (a number of these involve binomial coefficients);  graph theory and presentation of graphs by matrices and diagrams in several ways, relations, and a number of the important algorithms associated with graphs and computer science.  Boolean algebra and the simplification of  Boolean expressions are also covered in some depth.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1316-101 MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ANALYSIS

        This is a one semester course in the applications of differential and integral calculus to problems
        in business.  Also covered in the course are  finance formulas and a review of logarithmic and exponential functions.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1303-004 Math 1303-004

        Introduction to trigonometry, angles, radian measure, the trigonometric functions for a right triangle, the trigometric functions for any angles, inverse trigonometric functions, basic identities and introduction to periodic functions, law of sines and cosines, oblique triangles, introduction to vectors, graphs of trigonometric functions, identities of a non-basic type, formulas for functions of more than one angle (sum, difference, double and half-angle,   product-to-sum, sum-to-product, formulas), trigonometric equations and  a closer look at the  inverse trigometric functions and their graphs, polar coordinates and graphs, complex numbers.   Applications are stressed throughout.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 2326-004 CALCULUS III

        COURSE PURPOSE, LEARNING OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES :

        PURPOSE

        This is a traditional multivariate third calculus course.It may be used to satisfy the State of Texas core requirement in mathematics and is a required course on all engineering, physics, mathematics degree plans, as well as on BS degrees in chemistry and biochemistry which lead to certification by the ACS.It also appears on various combined BS-MS degrees in science.

        LEARNING OUTCOMES

        Upon completion of MATH 2326:

        1. Students will be able to use the concepts of continuity, differentiation, and integration of vector-valued functions to determine unit tangent and unit normal vectors in the process of modeling objects in three dimensions Students will be able to parametrize piecewise-smooth curves using arc length. They will be able to compute the curvature of a space curve.

        2. Students will be able to compute and sketch level curves and level surfaces for functions of several variables and sketch the graphs of functions of two variables.Analyzing limits, determining continuity, and computing partial derivatives of multivariate functions is also expected. Students will be able to use tangent planes, directional derivatives, gradients, the second partials test, and Lagrange multipliers

        to approximate and solve optimization problems.

        3. Students will be able to demonstrate techniques of multiple integration and compute iterated integrals over rectangular regions, non-rectangular regions and in other coordinate systems. They will be able to apply multiple integrals in problem situations involving area, volume, surface area, center of mass, moments of inertia, etc.

        4. Students will be able to compute line integrals and surface integrals by applying the Fundamental Theorem for Line Integrals, Green’s Theorem, Stoke’s Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. Applying these integrals to solve applications such as

        mass and work problems is also expected.

        MATH 2326- 001Calculus III

        SEMESTER: FALL 2013TIME AND ROOM:TuTh 12:30-1:50, Science Hall (SH) 100

        INSTRUCTOR: Harvy Baker

        OFFICE:408 PKHOFFICE HOURS:2-3:20 TuTh

        E-MAIL:hbaker@uta.eduPHONE: 817-272-3261 (MAIN OFFICE)

        TEXTBOOK: Calculus: Early Transcendentals, Custom Edition for the University of Texas at Arlington, by Soo T. Tan

        PREREQUISITES: C or better in MATH 2425 or HONR-SC 2425

        IMPORTANT DATES:

        First day of classes Aug 22

        Labor Day HolidaySep 02

        Census DateSep 09

        Last day to drop classesOct 30

        Thanksgiving Holidays Nov 28, 29

        Last class dayDec 4

        FINAL EXAM !!!!3:30 -6 PM, SATURDAY DECEMBER 7 - AFTER OUR LAST CLASS DAY ON DEC 3

        Calculation of Grade:There will be three semester exams (each the entire period).The lowest will be replaced by the final exam score -- assuming the final is not the lowest.The final exam will still count as the final.Semester average = 70%xAverage of Semester Exams + 30%xFinal Exam

        ROOM TBA

        Course Schedule and Testing.The three semester exams will be spaced evenly throughout the semester.Both the date and material to be covered will be given well ahead of time (like a couple of weeks). Attached to this syllabus is an assignment sheet.These problems will not be taken up and graded but we will go over many of them in class (including any that you have questions about).THERE ARE 30 ASSIGNMENTS ON THIS SHEET, AND 29 CLASS DAYS.THREE OF THESE CLASS DAYS WILL BE FOR TESTING, WHICH LEAVES 26 LECTURE/REVIEW DAYS FOR 30 ASSIGNMENTS.SO WE WILL BE COVERING A LITTLE OVER 1 ASSIGNMENT PER LECTURE ON THE AVERAGE.

        Course Content: From the UTA Catalog: Partial differentiation, multiple integrals (with applications), line integrals, Green's Theorem, surface integrals, Stokes' Theorem, divergence theorem. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2425 or HONR-SC 2425

        This is a course which satisfies the mathematics core requirement for the State of Texas and as such you may be ask to submit a "signature" assignment which addresses the core objectives of the course.

        Attendance Policy: You are expected to attend class.Attendance may or may not be checked---depending on how good it is.Attendance will not count on your grade.

        COURSE PURPOSE, LEARNING OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES(SEE ATTACHED ASSIGNMENT SHEET):

        PURPOSE

        This is a traditional multivariate third calculus course.It may be used to satisfy the State of Texas core requirement in mathematics and is a required course on all engineering, physics, mathematics degree plans, as well as on BS degrees in chemistry and biochemistry which lead to certification by the ACS.It also appears on various combined BS-MS degrees in science.

        LEARNING OUTCOMES

        Upon completion of MATH 2326:

        1. Students will be able to use the concepts of continuity, differentiation, and integration of vector-valued functions to determine unit tangent and unit normal vectors in the process of modeling objects in three dimensions Students will be able to parametrize piecewise-smooth curves using arc length. They will be able to compute the curvature of a space curve.

        2. Students will be able to compute and sketch level curves and level surfaces for functions of several variables and sketch the graphs of functions of two variables.Analyzing limits, determining continuity, and computing partial derivatives of multivariate functions is also expected. Students will be able to use tangent planes, directional derivatives, gradients, the second partials test, and Lagrange multipliers

        to approximate and solve optimization problems.

        3. Students will be able to demonstrate techniques of multiple integration and compute iterated integrals over rectangular regions, non-rectangular regions and in other coordinate systems. They will be able to apply multiple integrals in problem situations involving area, volume, surface area, center of mass, moments of inertia, etc.

        4. Students will be able to compute line integrals and surface integrals by applying the Fundamental Theorem for Line Integrals, Green’s Theorem, Stoke’s Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. Applying these integrals to solve applications such as

        mass and work problems is also expected.

        Drop Policy: Students may drop or swap (adding and dropping a class concurrently) classes through self-service in MyMav from the beginning of the registration period through the late registration period. After the late registration period, students must see their academic advisor to drop a class or withdraw. Undeclared students must see an advisor in the University Advising Center. Drops can continue through a point two-thirds of the way through the term or session. It is the student's responsibility to officially withdraw if they do not plan to attend after registering. Students will not be automatically dropped for non-attendance. Repayment of certain types of financial aid administered through the University may be required as the result of dropping classes or withdrawing. For more information, contact the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships (http://wweb.uta.edu/aao/fao/).

        Americans with Disabilities Act: The University of Texas at Arlington is on record as being committed to both the spirit and letter of all federal equal opportunity legislation, including the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). All instructors at UT Arlington are required by law to provide "reasonable accommodations" to students with disabilities, so as not to discriminate on the basis of that disability. Any student requiring an accommodation for this course must provide the instructor with official documentation in the form of a letter certified by the staff in the Office for Students with Disabilities, University Hall 102. Only those students who have officially documented a need for an accommodation will have their request honored. Information regarding diagnostic criteria and policies for obtaining disability-based academic accommodations can be found at www.uta.edu/disability or by calling the Office for Students with Disabilities at (817) 272-3364.

        Academic Integrity: Students enrolled in this course are expected to adhere to the UT Arlington Honor Code:

        I pledge, on my honor, to uphold UT Arlington’s tradition of academic integrity, a tradition that values hard work and honest effort in the pursuit of academic excellence.

        I promise that I will submit only work that I personally create or contribute to group collaborations, and I will appropriately reference any work from other sources. I will follow the highest standards of integrity and uphold the spirit of the Honor Code.

        UT Arlington faculty members may employ the Honor Code as they see fit in their courses, including (but not limited to) having students acknowledge the honor code as part of an examination or requiring students to incorporate the honor code into any work submitted. Per UT System Regents’ Rule 50101, §2.2, suspected violations of university’s standards for academic integrity (including the Honor Code) will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. Violators will be disciplined in accordance with University policy, which may result in the student’s suspension or expulsion from the University.

        Student Support Services: THE MATH CLINIC IN ROOM 325 IS BY FAR THE BEST PLACE TO GO FOR HELP WITH THE COURSE.THE TUTORS ARE CAREFULLY CHOSEN.

        Electronic Communication: UT Arlington has adopted MavMail as its official means to communicate with students about important deadlines and events, as well as to transact university-related business regarding financial aid, tuition, grades, graduation, etc. All students are assigned a MavMail account and are responsible for checking the inbox regularly. There is no additional charge to students for using this account, which remains active even after graduation. Information about activating and using MavMail is available at http://www.uta.edu/oit/cs/email/mavmail.php.

        Student Feedback Survey: At the end of each term, students enrolled in classes categorized as “lecture,” “seminar,” or “laboratory” shall be directed to complete an online Student Feedback Survey (SFS). Instructions on how to access the SFS for this course will be sent directly to each student through MavMail approximately 10 days before the end of the term. Each student’s feedback enters the SFS database anonymously and is aggregated with that of other students enrolled in the course. UT Arlington’s effort to solicit, gather, tabulate, and publish student feedback is required by state law; students are strongly urged to participate. For more information, visit http://www.uta.edu/sfs.

        Final Review Week:A period of five class days prior to the first day of final examinations in the long sessions shall be designated as Final Review Week. The purpose of this week is to allow students sufficient time to prepare for final examinations. During this week, there shall be no scheduled activities such as required field trips or performances; and no instructor shall assign any themes, research problems or exercises of similar scope that have a completion date during or following this week unless specified in the class syllabus. During Final Review Week, an instructor shall not give any examinations constituting 10% or more of the final grade, except makeup tests and laboratory examinations. In addition, no instructor shall give any portion of the final examination during Final Review Week. During this week, classes are held as scheduled. In addition, instructors are not required to limit content to topics that have been previously covered; they may introduce new concepts as appropriate.

        Emergency Exit Procedures:Should we experience an emergency event that requires us to vacate the building, students should exit the room and move toward the nearest exit [TO BE DESCRIBED LATER].

        When exiting the building during an emergency, one should never take an elevator but should use the stairwells. Faculty members and instructional staff will assist students in selecting the safest route for evacuation and will make arrangements to assist handicapped individuals.

        Math 2326 Assignment SheetTextbook: Calculus Early Transcendentals, by Soo T. Tan

        1) 11.1 Vector-Valued Functions and Space Curves. 2, 6, 9, 11, 12, 13, 16, 21, 25, 33, 35, 36, 38, 40,

        41, 43, 45, 46, 53, 54

        2) 11.2 Differentiation and Integration of Vector-Valued Functions. 3, 6, 7, 11, 14, 17, 20, 22, 25, 30,

        33, 39, 49, 50

        3) 11.3 Arc Length and Curvature. 3, 7, 11, 12, 14, 16, 19, 25, 27, 30, 33, 34, 35, 36, 44

        4) 10.6 Surfaces in Space. 2, 3, 4, 9, 13-20, 22, 30, 39, 47, 49, 53

        5)12.1 Functions of Two or More Variables. 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 13, 15, 16, 24, 26, 27, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 3

        8, 43, 44, 46, 51, 53, 54, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62

        6)12.2 Limits and Continuity. 2, 5, 8, 11, 14, 15, 21, 27, 28, 32, 34, 35, 41

        7)12.3 Partial Derivatives. 1, 10, 17, 23, 30, 33, 35, 42, 43, 53, 61, 76

        8)12.4 Differentials. 1, 5, 8, 23, 25, 31, 33, 37

        9)12.5 The Chain Rule. 5, 7, 10, 13, 22, 25, 27, 30, 35, 41, 43, 52

        10)12.6 Directional Derivatives and Gradient Vectors. 3, 7, 13, 16, 22, 32, 35, 37, 53, 54

        11)12.7 Tangent Planes and Normal Lines. 3, 6, 11, 12, 22, 32, 33, 40

        12)12.8 Extrema of Functions of Two Variables. 4, 7, 15, 22, 33, 35, 41, 45, 49

        13)12.9 Lagrange Multipliers’. 1, 6, 10, 11, 15, 17, 19, 24, 32, 43

        14)13.1 Double Integrals. 1, 3, 7, 13, 16, 19, 25

        15)13.2 Iterated Integrals. 2, 5, 10, 13, 16, 22, 27, 31, 35, 38, 51, 54, 59, 62

        16)13.3 Double Integrals in Polar Coordinates. 9, 12, 15, 19, 24, 29, 37, 40

        17)13.4 Applications of Double Integrals. 3, 9, 13, 25, 26

        18)13.5 Surface Area. 3, 6, 9, 11, 14, 24

        19)13.6 Triple Double. 6, 9, 12, 13, 19, 27, 30, 44, 51, 57

        20)10.7 Cylindrical and Spherical Coordinates. 3, 11, 14, 22, 28, 36, 37, 43, 48, 53, 61, 64, 71

        21)13.7 Triple Integrals in Cylindrical and Spherical Coordinates. 3, 5, 11, 13, 16, 23, 26, 31, 32, 38,

        40, 41, 43

        22)13.8 Change of Variables in Multiple Integrals. 3, 4, 7, 10, 12, 13, 15, 18, 23, 26, 27, 28

        23)14.1 Vector Fields. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 14, 19, 21, 22, 27, 30, 31

        24)14.2 Divergence and Curl. 5, 10, 13, 14, 15, 19, 20, 27, 28

        25)14.3 Line Integrals. 3, 6, 7, 11, 18, 21, 25, 29, 30, 36

        26)14.4 Independence of Path and Conservative Vector Fields. 3, 7, 11, 14, 17, 20, 21, 23, 26, 27, 31,

        33, 37, 42

        27)14.5 Greens’ Theorem. 2, 3, 7, 12, 15, 18, 28, 29

        28)14.7 Surface Integrals. 5, 7, 10, 15, 17, 21, 25, 28, 29

        29)14.8 The Divergence Theorem. 3, 5, 8, 10, 17, 19

        30)14.9 Stokes’ Theorem. 3, 5, 9, 11, 14, 17, 24

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1302-098 COLLEGE ALGEBRA
        This course studies linear equations, lines, their applications, an elementary introduction to the "theory of equations" (relations bertween factors and zeros, synthetic division, etc.), complex numbers, polynomial and radical  and ansolute-value equations, systems of linear equations, linear, polynomial and rational inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, matrices and determinants,   Attention is devoted to applications throughout the course.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • MATH 3314-001 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
        Objectives and Nature of the Course Content:
        This is an elementary course intended to introduce the student to some of the background mathematics  associated  with problems primarily from the fields of computer science and communications.  Topics include:  Logic, sets and the usual definitions and operations associated with them; mathematical induction, permutations and combinations, the binomial theorem, and applications of these things to recursively defined functions and formulas summing finite series in closed form (a number of these involve binomial coefficients);  graph theory and presentation of graphs by matrices and diagrams in several ways, relations, and a number of the important algorithms associated with graphs and computer science.  Boolean algebra and the simplification of  Boolean expressions are also covered in some depth.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • MATH 4314-001 ADVANCED DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
        Objectives and Nature of the Course Content:
        This course is a study in the theory of computation and associated ideas.  Topics covered include: (1)  finite automata  (accepters) and  regular languages (which are the languages 'accepted' by finite automata), (2)  pushdown automata and context-free grammars (which generate the languages accepted by nondeterministic pushdown automata), (3) Turing machines (which are in essence modern computers in atomic form) -- and the central questions of the theory of computation  -- What things can be computed ?   And, assuming a 'thing' can be "computed", can it be computed in a way effecient enough to be feasible for the problems one wants to use it to solve?  These topics and their derivatives, stated in more elegant technical language perhaps, are the subjects of much present day research in the theory of computation.   The basic results are often associated with classical work in mathematical logic in spirit, if not ocassionally in fact . The material we cover in detail here will be limited of course by the time available.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • MATH 1315-001 COLLEGE ALGEBRA FOR ECONOMICS & BUSINESS ANALYSIS
        NATURE OF THE COURSE CONTENT:
        This course studies polynomial and radical equations, systems of equations (linear and those involving second degree terms and radicals), linear, polynomial and rational inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, matrices, permutations, combinations, probability, and linear programming.  Attention is paid to business applications throughout the course.
        There will be no make-up exams offered.  With a University approved excuse for missing an exam, the missing exam grade will be replaced by the final exam grade.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • MATH 1308-004 Elementary Statistical Analysis
        NATURE OF THE COURSE CONTENT:
        This course strongly stresses the concepts and underlying logic of some of the traditional
        procedures and techniques of elementary statistics.  From the catalog:  “Descriptive statistics,
        relationships between variables, interpretation of data and graphs, rudiments of probability,
        elementary statistical models, hypothesis testing, inference, estimation."
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • MATH 3314-001 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
        Objectives and Nature of the Course Content:
        This is an elementary course intended to introduce the student to some of the background mathematics  associated  with problems primarily from the fields of computer science and communications.  Topics include:  Logic, sets and the usual definitions and operations associated with them; mathematical induction, permutations and combinations, the binomial theorem, and applications of these things to recursively defined functions and formulas summing finite series in closed form (a number of these involve binomial coefficients);  graph theory and presentation of graphs by matrices and diagrams in several ways, relations, and a number of the important algorithms associated with graphs and computer science.  Boolean algebra and the simplification of  Boolean expressions are also covered in some depth.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • MATH 1308-004 Elementary Statistical Analysis
        This course strongly stresses the concepts and underlying logic of some of the traditional procedures and techniques of elementary statistics.  From the catalog:  â€�"Descriptive statistics, relationships between variables, interpretation of data and graphs, rudiments of probability,
        Elementary statistical models, hypothesis testing, inference, estimation."
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • MATH 1308-005 Elementary Statistical Analysis
        This course strongly stresses the concepts and underlying logic of some of the traditional procedures and techniques of elementary statistics.  From the catalog:  â€�"Descriptive statistics, relationships between variables, interpretation of data and graphs, rudiments of probability,
        Elementary statistical models, hypothesis testing, inference, estimation."

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • MATH 1303-002 TRIGONOMETRY

        NATURE OF THE COURSE, CONTENT: Introduction to trigonometry, angles, radian measure, the trigonometric functions for a right triangle, the trigometric functions for any angles, inverse trigonometric functions, basic identities and introduction to periodic functions, law of sines and cosines, oblique triangles, introduction to vectors, graphs of trigonometric functions, identities of a non-basic type, formulas for functions of more than one angle (sum, difference, double and half-angle,   product-to-sum, sum-to-product, formulas), trigonometric equations and  a closer look at the  inverse trigometric functions and their graphs, polar coordinates and graphs,

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • MATH 3314-001 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
        Objectives and Nature of the Course Content:
        This is an elementary course intended to introduce the student to some of the background mathematics  associated  with problems primarily from the fields of computer science and communications.  Topics include:  Logic, sets and the usual definitions and operations associated with them; mathematical induction, permutations and combinations, the binomial theorem, and applications of these things to recursively defined functions and formulas summing finite series in closed form (a number of these involve binomial coefficients);  graph theory and presentation of graphs by matrices and diagrams in several ways, relations, and a number of the important algorithms associated with graphs and computer science.  Boolean algebra and the simplification of  Boolean expressions are also covered in some depth.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • MATH 4314-001 ADVANCED DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
        Objectives and Nature of the Course Content:
        This course is a study in the theory of computation and associated ideas.  Topics covered include: (1)  finite automata  (accepters) and  regular languages (which are the languages 'accepted' by finite automata), (2)  pushdown automata and context-free grammars (which generate the languages accepted by nondeterministic pushdown automata), (3) Turing machines (which are in essence modern computers in atomic form) -- and the central questions of the theory of computation  -- What things can be computed ?   And, assuming a 'thing' can be "computed", can it be computed in a way effecient enough to be feasible for the problems in the real world one wants to use it to solve?
        These topics and their derivatives, stated in more elegant technical language perhaps, are the subjects of much present day research in the theory of computation.   The basic results are often associated with classical work in mathematical logic in spirit, if not ocassionally in fact . The material we cover in detail here will be limited of course by the time available.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • MATH 1302-002 College Algebra

        Text:   College Algebra,    AUTHOR:  Ellington,     EDITION  3rd,   COPYRIGHT YEAR:2011
        PUBLISHER:Pearson Custom Publishing  ISBN:9780558821487

        This course studies linear equations, lines, their applications, an elementary introduction to the "theory of equations" (relations bertween factors and zeros, synthetic division, etc.), complex numbers, polynomial and radical  and ansolute-value equations, systems of linear equations, linear, polynomial and rational inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, matrices and determinants,   Attention is devoted to applications throughout the course.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • MATH 4314-001 ADVANCED DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
        Objectives and Nature of the Course Content:
        This course is a study in the theory of computation and associated ideas.  Topics covered include: (1)  finite automata  (accepters) and  regular languages (which are the languages 'accepted' by finite automata), (2)  pushdown automata and context-free grammars (which generate the languages accepted by nondeterministic pushdown automata), (3) Turing machines (which are in essence modern computers in atomic form) -- and the central questions of the theory of computation  -- What things can be computed ?   And, assuming a 'thing' can be "computed", can it be computed in a way effecient enough to be feasible for the problems in the real world one wants to use it to solve?
        These topics and their derivatives, stated in more elegant technical language perhaps, are the subjects of much present day research in the theory of computation.   The basic results are often associated with classical work in mathematical logic in spirit, if not ocassionally in fact . The material we cover in detail here will be limited of course by the time available.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • MATH 4314-001 ADVANCED DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
        Objectives and Nature of the Course Content:
        This course is a study in the theory of computation and associated ideas.  Topics covered include: (1)  finite automata  (accepters) and  regular languages (which are the languages 'accepted' by finite automata), (2)  pushdown automata and context-free grammars (which generate the languages accepted by nondeterministic pushdown automata), (3) Turing machines (which are in essence modern computers in atomic form) -- and the central questions of the theory of computation  -- What things can be computed ?   And, assuming a 'thing' can be "computed", can it be computed in a way effecient enough to be feasible for the problems in the real world one wants to use it to solve?
        These topics and their derivatives, stated in more elegant technical language perhaps, are the subjects of much present day research in the theory of computation.   The basic results are often associated with classical work in mathematical logic in spirit, if not ocassionally in fact . The material we cover in detail here will be limited of course by the time available.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • MATH 1302-001 COLLEGE ALGEBRA

        Text:   College Algebra,    AUTHOR:  Ellington,     EDITION  3rd,   COPYRIGHT YEAR:2011
        PUBLISHER:Pearson Custom Publishing  ISBN:9780558821487

        This course studies linear equations, lines, their applications, an elementary introduction to the "theory of equations" (relations bertween factors and zeros, synthetic division, etc.), complex numbers, polynomial and radical  and ansolute-value equations, systems of linear equations, linear, polynomial and rational inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, matrices and determinants,   Attention is devoted to applications throughout the course.

        Winter - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • MATH 1303-004 TRIGONOMETRY

        Introduction to trigonometry, angles, radian measure, the trigonometric functions for a right triangle, the trigometric functions for any angles, inverse trigonometric functions, basic identities and introduction to periodic functions, law of sines and cosines, oblique triangles, introduction to vectors, graphs of trigonometric functions, identities of a non-basic type, formulas for functions of more than one angle (sum, difference, double and half-angle,

        product-to-sum, sum-to-product, formulas), trigonometric equations anda closer look at the

        inverse trigometric functions and their graphs, polar coordinates and graphs in polar

        coordinates, complex numbers and their representations geometrically and trigonometrically,

        roots and powers of complex numbers.Applications are stressed throughout.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011