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Dr. Jacqueline Fay

Name

[Fay, Dr. Jacqueline]
  • Associate Professor, English
  • Associate Professor, English

Biography

I am an Associate Professor of English at the University of Texas at Arlington specializing in Anglo-Saxon literature and culture.  After receiving both my B.A. and M.Phil degrees from the University of Manchester in the U.K., where I am originally from, I moved to the U.S. and graduated in 2003 with a Ph.D. in English from the University of Notre Dame.   I am the author of a number of articles on the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, saints' lives, and documentary lists, among other topics, and am also co-editor of A Handbook of Anglo-Saxon Studies, published in 2012 by Blackwell.  I am currently finishing a book under contract with Oxford University Press entitled Englishness and the Body in Early Cultural Texts, which examines Englishness in Anglo-Saxon England as a specifically embodied identity.  My recent work concentrates on the relationship of the human and non-human in Anglo-Saxon England, in particular re-reading texts in relation to plant and animal ecology. 

Professional Preparation

    • 2003 Ph.D. in English Language and LiteratureUniversity of Notre Dame
    • 1995 M.Phil. in Old English LiteratureUniversity of Manchester
    • 1994 B.A., Honors in English Language and LiteratureUniversity of Manchester

Appointments

    • Aug 2010 to Present Assoc Prof
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2003 to July 2010 Assist Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2002 to July 2003 Visiting Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 1997 to July 1999 Instructor
      University of Notre Dame

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Nov 2006 to Present Modern Language Association
    • Nov 2006 to Present International Society of Anglo-Saxonists

Awards and Honors

    • Aug  2006 2006-7 UTA Faculty Development Semester Research Leave sponsored by UTA
    • Jul  2006 2006 NEH Summer Seminar “Holy Men and Holy Women of Anglo-Saxon England” Cambridge University, England 3 July-11 August 2006 sponsored by National Endowment for Humanities

News Articles

Research and Expertise

  • Old English literature and culture

    Old English was the language written and spoken in England from at least the seventh century to the eleventh century by a people scholars now call the Anglo-Saxons.  The texts and culture of this period are my area of scholarly expertise.

  • History of the English Language

    I have taught History of the English Language at the undergraduate and graduate levels for many years, and as an Anglo-Saxonist, the history of the language is intrinsic to my research.

Publications

      Book Chapter Accepted
      • "Medieval Genders."  In Macmillan Interdisciplinary Handbook, Gender: Matter, ed. Stacy Alaimo.  Macmillan Press, forthcoming.

        {Exhibition Review }

      Book In-progress
      • Fay, Jacqueline, Associate Editor for Old English and Old Norse.  Encyclopedia of Medieval British Literature.  Wiley Blackwell. 5 vols. 

        {Book }
      Accepted
      • Fay, Jacqueline.  Englishness and the Body in Early Cultural Texts. (Oxford University Press, forthcoming).

        {Book }

      Book Review 2016
      • Review of Malasree Home.  The Peterborough Version of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Anglo-Saxon Studies, 27. Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2015. The Medieval Review 16.01.01.

        {Book Review }

      Book Chapter 2013
      • Stodnick, Jacqueline. "Bodies of Land: the Place of Gender in the Old English Martyrology." In Writing Women Saints in Anglo-Saxon England, ed. P. E. Szarmach.  Toronto: Toronto University Press, 2013.

        {Book Chapter }

      Book Review 2012
      • Review of Guillemette Bolens.  The Style of Gestures: Embodiment and Cognition in Literary Narrative.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012. The Medieval Review 13.09.30.

        {Book Review }

      Book 2012
      • A Handbook for Anglo-Saxon Studies. Eds. Stodnick, Jacqueline and Renee Trilling. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012. 

        {Book }

      Journal Article 2010
      • Stodnick, Jacqueline and Renee Trilling. "Before and After Theory: Seeing Through the Body in Anglo-Saxon England."  Postmedieval 1 (2010).  <http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/pmed.2010.35 >

        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2010
      • "Emergent Englishness," The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Literature, ed. Elaine Treharne and Greg Walker.  Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010.

        {Book Chapter }

      Book Chapter 2009
      • Stodnick, Jacqueline. "Sentence to Story: Reading the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as Formulary." Reading the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle: Language, Literature, History. Ed. Alice Jorgensen. Turnhout: Brepols International, 2009.

        {Book Chapter }

      Book Review 2008
      • Review of Nicholas Howe.  Writing the Map of Anglo-Saxon England: Essays in Cultural Geography.  New Haven, Conn., and London: Yale University Press, 2008.  Speculum 86 (2011): 508-10.

        {Book Review }
      2008
      • Review of Alastair Minnis and Jane Roberts, eds. Text, Image, Interpretation: Studies in Anglo-Saxon Literature and its Insular Context in Honour of Eamonn O Carragain.  The Review of English Studies 2008; doi: 10.1093/res/hgn034

        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 2007
      • Stodnick, Jacqueline. "Teaching and Learning Guide for: Second-rate Stories: Changing Approaches to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle." Literature Compass 5 (2007): 165-9.

        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2006
      • Stodnick, Jacqueline. "Old Names of Kings and Shadows: Reading Documentary Lists." Essays in Anglo-Saxon Studies: Conversion and Colonization in Anglo-Saxon England. Eds. Howe, Nicholas and Catherine Karkov. Tempe: Medieval and Renaissance Text Series, 2006. 109-131.

        {Book Chapter }
      2006
      • Stodnick, Jacqueline. "The Interests of Compounding: Angelcynn to Englaland in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle." Anglo-Saxon Texts and their Transmission: Essays in Honour of Donald G. Scragg. Ed. Hugh Magennis and Jonathan Wilcox. Morgantown: West Virginia University Press, 2006. 337-367.

        {Book Chapter }

      Journal Article 2006
      • Stodnick, Jacqueline. "Second-rate Stories: Changing Approaches to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle." Literature Compass 3 (2006): 1-13.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2004
      • "What (and Where) is the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle About: Spatial Syntax in the C-text." Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester 86.2 (2004): 87-104.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 1997
      • Stodnick, Jacqueline. "Cynewulf as Author: Medieval Reality or Modern Myth?." Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester 79 (1997): 25-39.
        {Journal Article }

Presentations

    • May  2016
      "The Fragmented Corpus of Old English Medical Texts"

      Panel Presentation

    • April  2016
      "Finding Nature in Anglo-Saxon England: Plants and People in Old English Medical Texts"

      Panel Presentation

    • February  2016
      "Material Virginity in Old English Medical Texts"

      Invited talk at the University of Dublin.

    • May  2015
      "Beowulf and Scandinavians"

      Invited talk at the University of Seville

  • Past
    •  
      “Wundorlice hit hæleð: Wounds and Wonders in Old English Medical Texts”

      MLA Convention, Chicago.

  • Past
    •  
      “Gathering Petulant Plants: New Materialism and the Vegetable Agency of Early Medieval Medicine”

      Center for Theory, UTA.

  • Past
    •  
      “Gathering Petulant Plants: New Materialism and the Vegetable Agency of Early Medieval Medicine”

      New Materialisms IV Conference, University of Turku, Finland.

  • Past
    •  
      “Before and After Theory: Seeing Through the Body in Early Medieval England.”

      Center for Theory, UTA.

  • Past
    •  
      “Is there a theory in the house of Old English studies?”

      Kalamazoo International Medieval Congress, Western Michigan University.

  • Past
    •  
      “On Gendered Ground: Saintly Bodies and the Writing of Political Territory”

      International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, England.

  • Past
    •  
      “Her Again: Deictic Syntax in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle”

      Conference of the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists, London.

  • Past
    •  
      “Before Prejudice? Danes and Monsters in Anglo-Saxon England.”

      One Book, Brown Bag Conversations Lecture Series, UTA.

  • Past
    •  
      “Cutting Time: Danes and Englishness in the reign of Æþelred.”

      MLA Convention, Chicago.

  • Past
    •  
      “Beowulf and Anglo-Saxon England.”

      Dinner presentation at Premiere of Edward Perez’s Beowulf opera, Dallas-Fort Worth.

  • Past
    •  
      “Reading the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as Formulary.”

      International Society for Narrative Conference, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada.

  • Past
    •  
      “Heorot as Museum: Structures of Display in Beowulf.”

      International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, England.

  • Past
    •  
      “On Gendered Ground: Saintly Bodies and the Writing of Political Territory.”

      16th Annual Conference of the Texas Medieval Association, Baylor

                        University, Waco, TX.

  • Past
    •  
      “Side Effects.”

      SCMLA, Dallas.

  • Past
    •  
      “Reading Repetition in Beowulf.“

      MLA Convention, Philadelphia.

  • Past
    •  
      “The Interests of Compounding: How England Takes Place.”

      International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds.

  • Past
    •  
      “Old Names of Kings and Shadows: Reading the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as List.”

      The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle: An Interdisciplinary Conference, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York.

  • Past
    •  
      “Lists of Places and the Place of Lists in Writing Anglo-Saxon England.”

      International Society of Anglo-Saxonists Biannual Conference, Arizona.

  • Past
    •  
      “What (and Where) is the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle About?: Spatial History.”

      37th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo.

  • Past
    •  
      “Translating Places.”

      International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds.

  • Past
    •  
      “Lists of Places and the Place of Lists in Writing Anglo-Saxon England.”

      Ohio Medieval Colloquium.

  • Past
    •  
      “Writing Home: the Eventful Landscape of Bede’s Ecclesiastical History.”

      36th International Congress on Medieval Studies, W Michigan University.

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • Jan 2016 to May 2016 Sustainability in the Curriculum Faculty Fellowship sponsored by  - $3950
    • Aug 2015 to May 2016 Service Learning Faculty Fellowship sponsored by  - $2000
    • Aug 2015 to Jan 2016 Faculty Development Leave sponsored by  - $30000

Students Supervised

Peers Mentored

Collaborators

    • thumbnail
      Duration : Nov 2014 to Nov 2014

      A Handbook for Anglo-Saxon Studies, a collection of specially commissioned essays published by Wiley Blackwell in 2012.

      Reflecting the profound impact of critical theory on the study of the humanities, this collection of original essays examines the texts and artifacts of the Anglo-Saxon period through key theoretical terms such as ‘ethnicity’ and ‘gender’.

      • Explores the interplay between critical theory and Anglo-Saxon studies
      • Theoretical framework will appeal to specialist scholars as well as those new to the field
      • Includes an afterword on the value of the dialogue between Anglo-Saxon studies and critical theory

      Link to Wiley Blackwell website : http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1444330195.html

Courses

      • ENGL 4325-001 CHAUCER

        People have been reading Chaucer's works longer than they have been reading those of any other author writing in the English language. He's been described by various people at various times as the Father of English Literature, the first finder of our language, and the lodestar of our language. The twentieth-century poet Ted Hughes even imagined a field of cows enthralled by a shouted rendition of the opening of The Canterbury Tales, suggesting that there is no audience immune to Chaucer's artistry.

        But shouldn't you judge for yourself?

        Spend a semester reading the works of Chaucer--bawdy, reverent, spiritual, funny, thought-provoking, offensive, poignant, everyday, and dazzling.   The class will concentrate on The Canterbury Tales, but we will also read one of Chaucer's dream visions, The Parliament of Fowls.  In all cases, we will trace Chaucer's connections to the European literary trends of his time, and to patristic commentary, biblical and classical sources.  We will also persistently consider what Chaucer's texts have to say to us as twenty-first century readers.  Are we reading his works now for the cultural cachet of "knowing" Chaucer, or can Chaucer help us know ourselves a little better?

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5300-001 Theory and Practice

        This course provides a forum for beginning graduate students to encounter, define, and think through the question of methodology in contemporary English studies.  Students will become familiar with the major “schools” of critical theory, including formalism, structuralism, psychoanalysis, feminism, deconstruction, Marxism, post-colonial theory, ethnic studies, and post-humanism. We will read extracts from the writings of philosophers and literary critics along with essays that explain, interpret, and contextualize the relationships between these primary theoretical texts.  This strategy will enable us to gain a sense of “critical theory” not as a monolithic concept but as a diverse body of writings with a rich and specific intellectual genealogy. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2384-004 STRUCTURE OF MODERN ENGLISH

        This course will teach you the grammar of Modern English.  Sound boring and pointless? And aren't you are already using English just fine without necessarily knowing much about its grammar?  Yes, you are.  However, think for a moment—aren't you driving your car fine also, even though you don't know how the engine works?  But wouldn't it be helpful to know more about the engine of your car in case you ever break down or have to figure out whether you are being overcharged by a mechanic?  After all, your car is the only way you have to get around.  Similarly, but much more importantly, language is the most precise medium we have by which to communicate our feelings, our thoughts, and our dreams to other people.  Without it we would be islands to each other or even, as many scholars argue, lack coherence as individuals entirely.  And if language were a body, grammar would be its skeleton.  So think of this class as a crash course in the anatomy of the English language, starting with sounds, and then continuing with word-formation, and then how words are put together into clauses and sentences.  At the end of the course you will not only know when an English sentence is "correct," but also why it is.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4325-001 CHAUCER

        People have been reading Chaucer's works longer than they have been reading those of any other author writing in the English language.  He's been described by various people at various times as the Father of English Literature, the first finder of our language, and the lodestar of our language. The twentieth-century poet Ted Hughes even imagined a field of cows enthralled by a shouted rendition of the opening of The Canterbury Tales, suggesting that there is no audience immune to Chaucer's artistry.

        But shouldn't you judge for yourself?

        Spend a semester reading the works of Chaucer--bawdy, reverent, spiritual, funny, thought-provoking, offensive, poignant, everyday, and dazzling.   The class will concentrate on The Canterbury Tales, but we will also read one of Chaucer's dream visions, The Parliament of Fowls.  In all cases, we will trace Chaucer's connections to the European literary trends of his time, and to patristic commentary, biblical and classical sources.  We will also persistently consider what Chaucer's texts have to say to us as twenty-first century readers.  Are we reading his works now for the cultural cachet of "knowing" Chaucer, or can Chaucer help us know ourselves a little better?

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5300-001 The Theory and Practice of English Studies

        This course provides a forum for beginning graduate students to encounter, define, and think through the question of methodology in contemporary English studies.  Students will become familiar with the major “schools” of critical theory, including formalism, structuralism, psychoanalysis, feminism, deconstruction, Marxism, post-colonial theory, ethnic studies, and post-humanism.  We will read extracts from the writings of philosophers and literary critics along with essays that explain, interpret, and contextualize the relationships between these primary theoretical texts.  This strategy will enable us to gain a sense of “critical theory” not as a monolithic concept but as a diverse body of writings with a rich and specific intellectual genealogy.      

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4301-001 History of the English Language

        The goal of this course is to change how you think about English.  You will learn how the English language developed into its present form from its earliest recorded appearance as Old English, through Middle English, the Renaissance and modern periods.  The course will combine technical information, such as how to make a phonetic transcript and how to parse Old English sentences, with historical background about the events that motivated language change.  You will be encouraged to understand the progression of the English language as enmeshed with social and cultural movements, such as the migration of peoples or the political dominance of a region/group. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4301-001 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

        Course Description and Goals: The goal of this course is to change how you think about English.  You will learn how the English language developed into its present form from its earliest recorded appearance as Old English, through Middle English, the Renaissance and modern periods.  The course will combine technical information, such as how to make a phonetic transcript and how to parse Old English sentences, with historical background about the events that motivated language change.  You will be encouraged to understand the progression of the English language as enmeshed with social and cultural movements, such as the migration of peoples or the political dominance of a region/group. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4381-001 The Environment Before Environmentalism: Engaging Nature in Medieval Texts

        Description of Course Content: The modern environmentalist movement emerged in response to fears about the potentially apocalyptic effect of industrial practices on soil, air, water, plants, and animals.  Environmentalism did not only habituate us to recycling or re-use, but also ushered in a new vocabulary and an ethical mode of conceptualizing the interactions of humanity and nature—for example, eco-system, sustainability, and green, among other terms.  The “environment” would thus seem to be a modern phenomenon, comprised of the interaction of climatological and chemical factors and those discourses that represent and govern these factors.  This raises the question--did the environment exist before the twentieth-century? And if so, in what way? What were the predominant analogous terms to refer to the pre-environment? And, most importantly, can we learn anything from the pre-environment that can help us approach our own environmental issues with fresh eyes? 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4301-002 History of the English Language

        The goal of this course is to change how you think about English.  You will learn how the English language developed into its present form from its earliest recorded appearance as Old English, through Middle English, the Renaissance and modern periods.  The course will combine technical information, such as how to make a phonetic transcript and how to parse Old English sentences, with historical background about the events that motivated language change.  You will be encouraged to understand the progression of the English language as enmeshed with social and cultural movements, such as the migration of peoples or the political dominance of a region/group. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3351-001 HISTORY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I

        This course will survey British literature from its beginnings to the eighteenth century.  Literature will be treated as a cultural phenomenon, and texts will be read as products of and contributors to their historical and social milieu.  Students will read widely in a range of genres and will be encouraged to explore and interrogate traditional notions of literary "periods" and "the canon."

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4301-001 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

        The goal of this course is to change how you think about English.  You will learn how the English language developed into its present form from its earliest recorded appearance as Old English, through Middle English, the Renaissance and modern periods.  The course will combine technical information, such as how to make a phonetic transcript and how to parse Old English sentences, with historical background about the events that motivated language change.  You will be encouraged to understand the progression of the English language as enmeshed with social and cultural movements, such as the migration of peoples or the political dominance of a region/group. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4399-001 Mean Talking: Oaths, Cursing, and False Swearing

        This course will take both a thematic and a linguistic approach to the topic of mean language. The curiously double nature of such language is epitomized by the term “swearing,” which can refer both to a formal statement made with particular seriousness of intent and to the informal situation of uttering an obscenity. When and why is swearing an oath a laudable act? When is it an execrable act? What is the effect of the oath on the oath-swearer? On the course of the narrative? How does the reader recognize an oath as an oath, or as a false oath? Within what cultural and institutional networks does the notion of false swearing emerge? In thinking about these questions and others, we will read a number of texts that directly engage the topic of mean language.  While historicizing the concept of mean language, then, we will also be attentive to its particular historical manifestations. By using the OED we will trace the changing register of words as they move between the realms of ordinary language, slang, and obscenity. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4301-001 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

        The goal of this course is to change how you think about English.  You will learn how the English language developed into its present form from its earliest recorded appearance as Old English, through Middle English, the Renaissance and modern periods.  The course will combine technical information, such as how to make a phonetic transcript and how to parse Old English sentences, with historical background about the events that motivated language change.  You will be encouraged to understand the progression of the English language as enmeshed with social and cultural movements, such as the migration of peoples or the political dominance of a region/group. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5301-001 Introduction to Old English

        Old English was the language written and spoken in England from about 450 to 1150.  Our earliest recorded literature in English is written in Old English, and is inaccessible to the casual reader since the language has changed so much in the intervening centuries.  This course will provide you with all the tools to read this literature for yourself in the original.  We will learn how to pronounce Old English, the relevant parts of speech, and the system of endings that were added to make words meaningful in sentences.  As we progress through the language we will practice our skills by completing helpful online grammar exercises and by reading extracts from real Old English texts--including poems, histories, and saints’ lives.  We will also learn much about Anglo-Saxon history and society, looking at the period’s art, architecture, manuscripts, weaponry, jewelry, and dress. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3351-002 HISTORY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I

        This course will survey British literature from its beginnings to the eighteenth century.  Literature will be treated as a cultural phenomenon, and texts will be read as products of and contributors to their historical and social milieu.  Students will read widely in a range of genres and will be encouraged to explore and interrogate traditional notions of literary "periods" and "the canon."

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3351-003 HISTORY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I

        This course will survey British literature from its beginnings to the eighteenth century.  Literature will be treated as a cultural phenomenon, and texts will be read as products of and contributors to their historical and social milieu.  Students will read widely in a range of genres and will be encouraged to explore and interrogate traditional notions of literary "periods" and "the canon."

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4301-001 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

        The goal of this course is to change how you think about English.  You will learn how the English language developed into its present form from its earliest recorded appearance as Old English, through Middle English, the Renaissance and modern periods.  The course will combine technical information, such as how to make a phonetic transcript and how to parse Old English sentences, with historical background about the events that motivated language change.  You will be encouraged to understand the progression of the English language as enmeshed with social and cultural movements, such as the migration of peoples or the political dominance of a region/group. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3351-001 Engl 3351-001

        This course will survey British literature from its beginnings to the eighteenth century.  Literature will be treated as a cultural phenomenon, and texts will be read as products of and contributors to their historical and social milieu.  Students will read widely in a range of genres and will be encouraged to explore and interrogate traditional notions of literary "periods" and "the canon."

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5301-001 Engl 5301-001

        A connection between poverty in the medieval and the contemporary world has recently been drawn by the latest Pope electing to be named after Francis of Assisi, the thirteenth-century saint who established the ideal of voluntary poverty.  Pope Francis and President Obama have increased calls to address income disparity, while even celebrities like Beyonce and LeBron James, themselves multi-millionaires, are entering the poverty debate.  All over America well-off people are choosing to simplify and live in more restricted circumstances; in the same America, millions of people live in restricted circumstances because they have to.  In this course we will consider the representation, treatment, and lived experience of poverty in late medieval England and contemporary America.  In particular we will address the question of agency as it relates to poverty: to what degree can poverty be chosen, or does it by definition have to be an unwilled state?  How necessary are the poor to the functioning of certain social or imaginary structures?  How might poverty be combatted?  How does the existence of poverty affect the notion of work (and vice versa)?  How is poverty defined?  How is poverty treated in legislation?  In our exploration of these and other questions, we will be attentive to the differences and similarities between medieval and modern approaches to poverty, and what the contemporary world might have to learn from the past. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4301-001 History of the English Language

        The goal of this course is to change how you think about English.  You will learn how the English language developed into its present form from its earliest recorded appearance as Old English, through Middle English, the Renaissance and modern periods.  The course will combine technical information, such as how to make a phonetic transcript and how to parse Old English sentences, with historical background about the events that motivated language change.  You will be encouraged to understand the progression of the English language as enmeshed with social and cultural movements, such as the migration of peoples or the political dominance of a region/group. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3351-001 History of British Literature I

        This course will survey British literature from its beginnings to the eighteenth century.  Literature will be treated as a cultural phenomenon, and texts will be read as products of and contributors to their historical and social milieu.  Students will read widely in a range of genres and will be encouraged to explore and interrogate traditional notions of literary "periods" and "the canon."

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4390-001 Writing Internship

        The writing internship course is worth three credit hours and will act as a forum for students to put their writing skills into practice in non-profit organizations or businesses. Students will be in charge of setting up their internships, determining what the clients need in terms of writing/editing, and creating a portfolio of the writing/editing they do for the clients (brochures, grant proposals, website, mass mailing letters, etc.). In addition, each student will compose a research paper, positioning the function of writing in his/her internship field. Class meetings will be scheduled intermittently on key dates throughout the semester. Assessment for the course will include a portfolio, client evaluation, annotated bibliography, research paper, and final presentation.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4301-001 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
        The goal of this course is to change how you think about English.You will learn how the English language developed into its present form from its earliest recorded appearance as Old English, through Middle English, the Renaissance and modern periods.The course will combine technical information, such as how to make a phonetic transcript and how to parse Old English sentences, with historical background about the events that motivated language change.You will be encouraged to understand the progression of the English language as enmeshed with social and cultural movements, such as the migration of peoples or the political dominance of a region/group.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • ENGL 5331-001 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE OR DISCOURSE STUDIES

        The history of the English language is variously described in the titles of the hundreds of books dedicated to it by terms such as “triumph,” “evolution,” and “story.”English has been presented in relation to its “roots,” “its relatives,” and its “social contexts.”In narrating the history of the world’s most influential language, scholars must make choices about what exactly constitutes language change and, in turn, how such changes are presented: as driven by linguistic factors, or as enmeshed in social concerns such as migration, conquest, and colonization.In this class students will not only learn about the history of English, and the set of technical skills required to analyze its development, but will also question and challenge the different modes in which this history is told.As part of this questioning, the class will critically examine the role of philology in the academy, and in knowledge production more generally.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4301-001 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

        The goal of this course is to change how you think about English.  You will learn how the English language developed into its present form from its earliest recorded appearance as Old English, through Middle English, the Renaissance and modern periods.  The course will combine technical information, such as how to make a phonetic transcript and how to parse Old English sentences, with historical background about the events that motivated language change.  You will be encouraged to understand the progression of the English language as enmeshed with social and cultural movements, such as the migration of peoples or the political dominance of a region/group. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5300-001 Theory and Practice
        This course provides a forum for beginning graduate students to encounter, define, and think through the question of methodology in contemporary English studies. Students will become familiar with the major “schools” of critical theory, including formalism, structuralism, psychoanalysis, reader response theory, feminism, deconstruction, cultural studies, post-colonial theory, and new historicism. We will read extracts from the writings of philosophers and literary critics along with essays that explain, interpret, and contextualize the relationships between these primary theoretical texts. This strategy will enable us to gain a sense of “critical theory” not as a monolithic concept but as a diverse body of writings with a rich and specific intellectual genealogy.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • ENGL 3351-001 HISTORY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I
        This course will survey British literature from its beginnings to the eighteenth century. Literature will be treated as a cultural phenomenon, and texts will be read as products of and contributors to their historical and social milieu. Students will read widely in a range of genres and will be encouraged to explore and interrogate traditional notions of literary "periods" and "the canon."
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • ENGL 4301-001 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
        In this course you will learn how the English language developed into its present form from its earliest recorded appearance in Old English, through Middle English, the Renaissance and modern periods. The course will combine technical information, such as how to make a phonetic transcript and how to parse Old English sentences, with historical background about the events that motivated language change. You will be encouraged to understand the progression of the English language as enmeshed with social and cultural movements, such as the migration of peoples or the political dominance of a region/group.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 4301-002 History of the English Language
        In this course you will learn how the English language developed into its present form from its earliest recorded appearance in Old English, through Middle English, the Renaissance and modern periods. The course will combine technical information, such as how to make a phonetic transcript and how to parse Old English sentences, with historical background about the events that motivated language change. You will be encouraged to understand the progression of the English language as enmeshed with social and cultural movements, such as the migration of peoples or the political dominance of a region/group.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 4399-003 Utopian Literature
        This course will take both a thematic and a linguistic approach to the topic of mean language. The curiously double nature of such language is epitomized by the term “swearing,†which can refer both to a formal statement made with particular seriousness of intent and to the informal situation of uttering an obscenity. When and why is swearing an oath a laudable act? When is it an execrable act? What is the effect of the oath on the oath-swearer? On the course of the narrative? How does the reader recognize an oath as an oath, or as a false oath? Within what cultural and institutional networks does the notion of false swearing emerge? In thinking about these questions and others, we will read a number of texts that directly engage the topic of mean language. While historicizing the concept of mean language, then, we will also be attentive to its particular historical manifestations. By using the OED we will trace the changing register of words as they move between the realms of ordinary language, slang, and obscenity.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 5301-001 Introduction to Old English
        Old English was spoken in England from about 450 to 1150 and was, along with Latin, the primary language of written texts from the seventh-century onwards. The earliest recorded literature in English is written in Old English, but is inaccessible to the casual reader since the language has changed so much in the intervening centuries. This course will provide you with all the tools to read this literature for yourself in the original. You will learn how to pronounce Old English, the relevant parts of speech, and the system of endings that were added to make words meaningful in sentences. As you progress through the language you will practice your skills by completing online and in-class grammar exercises and by reading extracts from Old English texts--including poems, histories, and saints’ lives. You will also learn much about Anglo-Saxon history and society, in particular about art, architecture, manuscripts, weaponry, jewelry, and dress. Central to our investigation of Anglo-Saxon culture will be the question of how texts and material artifacts of this time worked to give the English a sense of themselves as a people.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 4399-004 The 1890s
        This course will take both a thematic and a linguistic approach to the topic of mean language. The curiously double nature of such language is epitomized by the term “swearing,†which can refer both to a formal statement made with particular seriousness of intent and to the informal situation of uttering an obscenity. When and why is swearing an oath a laudable act? When is it an execrable act? What is the effect of the oath on the oath-swearer? On the course of the narrative? How does the reader recognize an oath as an oath, or as a false oath? Within what cultural and institutional networks does the notion of false swearing emerge? In thinking about these questions and others, we will read a number of texts that directly engage the topic of mean language. While historicizing the concept of mean language, then, we will also be attentive to its particular historical manifestations. By using the OED we will trace the changing register of words as they move between the realms of ordinary language, slang, and obscenity.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 5301-001 Introduction to Old English
        Old English was spoken in England from about 450 to 1150 and was, along with Latin, the primary language of written texts from the seventh-century onwards. The earliest recorded literature in English is written in Old English, but is inaccessible to the casual reader since the language has changed so much in the intervening centuries. This course will provide you with all the tools to read this literature for yourself in the original. You will learn how to pronounce Old English, the relevant parts of speech, and the system of endings that were added to make words meaningful in sentences. As you progress through the language you will practice your skills by completing online and in-class grammar exercises and by reading extracts from Old English texts--including poems, histories, and saints’ lives. You will also learn much about Anglo-Saxon history and society, in particular about art, architecture, manuscripts, weaponry, jewelry, and dress. Central to our investigation of Anglo-Saxon culture will be the question of how texts and material artifacts of this time worked to give the English a sense of themselves as a people.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 4399-004 The 1890s
        This course will take both a thematic and a linguistic approach to the topic of mean language. The curiously double nature of such language is epitomized by the term “swearing,†which can refer both to a formal statement made with particular seriousness of intent and to the informal situation of uttering an obscenity. When and why is swearing an oath a laudable act? When is it an execrable act? What is the effect of the oath on the oath-swearer? On the course of the narrative? How does the reader recognize an oath as an oath, or as a false oath? Within what cultural and institutional networks does the notion of false swearing emerge? In thinking about these questions and others, we will read a number of texts that directly engage the topic of mean language. While historicizing the concept of mean language, then, we will also be attentive to its particular historical manifestations. By using the OED we will trace the changing register of words as they move between the realms of ordinary language, slang, and obscenity.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011

Other Service Activities

  • Service to the Department
    • Jul 2016 Academic Service

      2009-2010 Chair, Department Research Committee Chair, Recruitment and Retention Committee Brown Bag Organizer and Coordinator Honors College Liaison Member, Graduate Studies Committee Member, Student Grievance Committee Faculty Advisor, Sigma Tau Delta 2008-2009 Chair, Department Research Committee Chair, Recruitment and Retention Committee Brown Bag Organizer and Coordinator Honors College Liaison Member, Graduate Studies Committee Member, Student Grievance Committee Faculty Advisor, Sigma Tau Delta 2007-2008 Co-Chair, Hermanns Lecture Committee Chair, Department Research Committee Chair, Recruitment and Retention Committee Brown Bag Organizer and Coordinator Honors College Liaison Member, Graduate Studies Committee Member, Student Grievance Committee Faculty Advisor Society for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Faculty Advisor, Sigma Tau Delta Faculty Advisor, Graduate English Association 2006-2007 Co-Chair, Hermanns Lecture Committee Chair, Recruitment and Retention Committee Brown Bag Organizer and Coordinator Honors College Liaison Graduation Representative Member, Hermanns Lecture Committee Member, Graduate Studies Committee Member, Student Grievance Committee Faculty Advisor, Sigma Tau Delta Faculty Advisor, Graduate English Association 2005-2006 Chair, Hermanns Lecture Committee Chair, Recruitment and Retention Committee Brown Bag Organizer and Coordinator Honors College Liaison Graduation Representative Member, Hiring Committee for position in Renaissance Literature Member, Graduate Studies Committee Member, Student Grievance Committee Faculty Advisor, Sigma Tau Delta Faculty Advisor, Graduate English Association 2004-2005 Chair, Recruitment and Retention Committee Chair, Sub-committee on foreign language requirement Brown Bag Organizer and Coordinator Member, English Advisory Committee Member, Graduate Studies Committee Member, Student Grievance Committee Faculty sponsor for Medieval and Renaissance student organization 2003-2004 Chair, Recruitment and Retention Committee Brown Bag Organizer and Coordinator Member, Hiring Committee for position in Renaissance Literature Member, English Advisory Committee Member, Graduate Studies Committee Member, Student Grievance Committee Faculty sponsor for Medieval and Renaissance student organization 2002-2003 Member, Graduate Studies Committee Member, Student Grievance Committee Brown Bag Organizer and Coordinator