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James E Warren

Name

[Warren, James E]
  • Associate Professor, English

Professional Preparation

    • 2006 Ph.D. in EnglishUniversity of Texas at Austin (UT)
    • 1999 M.A. in EnglishThe University of Virginia
    • 1997 BA in EnglishThe University of Oklahoma

Appointments

    • Sept 2014 to Present Associate Professor, Tenured
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2008 to Present Assist Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2007 to Present Consultant
      The University of Texas
    • Jan 2007 to Jan 2008 Consultant
      San Antonio Independent School District
    • Jan 2006 to Jan 2008 Postdoctoral Fellow
      The University of Texas
    • Jan 1999 to Jan 2006 Assistant Instructor
      The University of Texas
    • Jan 1999 to Jan 2001 Staff Member and Proctor
      The University of Texas
    • Jan 1999 to Jan 2001 Writing Center Consultant
      The University of Texas
    • Jan 2001 to Jan 2002 Assistant Instructor
      The University of Texas
    • Jan 1997 to Jan 1998 Teaching Assistant
      The University of Virginia

Memberships

  • Membership
    • May 2006 to Present Conference on College Composition and Communication
    • May 2006 to Present Rhetoric Society of America

Awards and Honors

    • May  2013 Dean’s Accolade Award sponsored by College of Liberal ArtsOffice of the Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsOffice of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • May  2013 Faculty Service Teacher sponsored by Center for Community Service LearningOffice of the Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsOffice of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • May  2009 Texas College and Career Readiness Initiative Faculty Collaborative Grant sponsored by Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB)
    • May  2007 James L. Kinneavy Prize for Scholarship in Rhetoric and Composition sponsored by Department of Rhetoric and Writing, UT-Austin
    • May  2004 Maxine Hairston Prize for Excellence in Teaching sponsored by Department of Rhetoric and Writing, UT-Austin

Publications

      Journal Article 2014
      • Warren, James. "Aristotle, Academic Literacy, and America's Pastime." The International Journal of Sport and Society 4(3), 2014, 23-32.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2013
      • Warren, James. "'But Enough About Me--What Do You Think of Me': The Rhetoric of College Application Essays." American Secondary Education, under review.

        {Journal Article }
      2013
      • Warren, James. "Speaking or Overhearing? How Scholars Read Lyric Poems." Scientific Study of Literature, under review.

        {Journal Article }
      2013
      • Warren, James. "Rhetorical Reading as a Gateway to Disciplinary Literacy." Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy 56.5 (2013): 391-399.

        {Journal Article }
      2013
      • Warren, James. "Rhetorical Reading and the Development of Disciplinary Literacy Across the High School Curriculum." Across the Disciplines 10.1 (2013).

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2011
      • Warren, James. “‘Generic’ and ‘Specific’ Expertise in English: An Expert/Expert Study in Poetry Interpretation and Academic Argument,” Cognition and Instruction 29.3 (2011): 349-374.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2010
      • Warren, James. "Taming the Warrant in Toulmin's Model of Argument." English Journal 99.6 (2010): 41-46.

        {Journal Article }
      2010
      • Warren, James. "First-Year College Writing and the Advanced Placement English Language Exam: How a High School/College Partnership Affected Exam Performance." Writing Program Administration 33.3 (2010): 78-103.

        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2007
      • Warren, James. “Teaching Argument as Inquiry.” The Next Level Online. Association of Texas Colleges and Universities, 2007. <http://webdev3.sedl.org/educators/ed-course3.php>.
        {Book Chapter }

      Journal Article 2006
      • Warren, James. “Literary Scholars Processing Poetry and Constructing Arguments.” Written Communication 23.2 (2006): 202-226.

        {Journal Article }

Presentations

    • May  2012
      Reframing High School Reading Instruction through Rhetorical Reading

      Paper presented at Rhetoric Society of America conference.

    • June  2011
      Cross-College Connections and Collaboration: Integrating the College and Career Readiness Standards into English/Language Arts and Reading Teacher Preparation Courses

      Presentation at College and Career Readiness Initiative: English/Language Arts Faculty Collaborative.

    • March  2011
      Moving beyond Comprehension through Rhetorical Reading

      Keynote talk at College and Career Readiness Initiative: English/Language Arts Faculty Collaborative.

    • September  2010
      College Readiness and Adolescent Literacy: Aligning Standards for Student Success

      Presentation at College and Career Readiness Initiative: English Language Arts Faculty Collaborative.

    • May  2010
      "But Enough About Me—What Do You Think of Me?": The Rhetoric of College Application Essays

      Paper presented at Rhetoric Society of America conference.

    • May  2008
      (Con)testing Rhetorical Education: The (Ir)responsibilities of AP English

      Paper presented at Rhetoric Society of America conference.

    • April  2008
      First-Year College Writing and the Advanced Placement English Language Exam: How a High School/College Partnership Affected Exam Performance.

      Paper presented at Conference on College Composition and Communication.

    • December  2007
      "There Are Three Rules to Writing. Unfortunately, No One Knows What They Are"; or, How Does High School English Prepare College Writers?

      Paper presented at Modern Language Association conference.

    • May  2006
      The Rhetoric of Lyric Reading: A Case of Blurred Disciplinary Boundaries

      Paper presented at Rhetoric Society of America conference.

    • March  2006
      Literary Studies and Writing in the Disciplines: Building Better Relations

      Paper presented at Conference on College Composition and Communication.

    • May  2004
      The Politics of Expression Not Heard But Overheard: The Lyric as Rhetorical Object

      Paper presented at Rhetoric Society of America conference.

Students Supervised

Courses

      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English BA with Secondary Teacher Certification, so these students constitute the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.

        We’ll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and influences the type of language instruction predominant in public education.

        As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the English/Language Arts classroom, we’ll consider questions like the following: What is “rhetoric,” “composition,” and “rhetoric and composition?” Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two?

        This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but to study composition is to study writing instruction as a research field. Consequently, the content knowledge you acquire will inform your own teaching practices. As you learn what pedagogical practices are supported by the latest scholarship in rhetoric and composition, you’ll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you’ll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You’ll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I’ll take you “behind the scenes” of writing assignments that you then complete. We’ll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We’ll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English BA with Secondary Teacher Certification, so these students constitute the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.

        We’ll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and influences the type of language instruction predominant in public education.

        As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the English/Language Arts classroom, we’ll consider questions like the following: What is “rhetoric,” “composition,” and “rhetoric and composition?” Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two?

        This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but to study composition is to study writing instruction as a research field. Consequently, the content knowledge you acquire will inform your own teaching practices. As you learn what pedagogical practices are supported by the latest scholarship in rhetoric and composition, you’ll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you’ll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You’ll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I’ll take you “behind the scenes” of writing assignments that you then complete. We’ll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We’ll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5389-001 Topics in Teaching Composition

        One main objective of this course is to prepare new GTAs to teach ENGL 1301 for the first time this semester. To that end, about half the course is practical, with students completing the same reading and writing assignments as ENGL 1301 students and discussing how best to teach those assignments.

        The second main objective of this course is to introduce students to composition pedagogy. This theoretical half of the course will begin with some introductory lectures on best practices for teaching composition before progressing into a direct examination of significant pieces of composition scholarship.

        Taken together, the dual emphasis of this course should help students develop a philosophy of composition teaching and prepare them to teach first-year composition at a wide variety of institutions. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English BA with Secondary Teacher Certification, so these students constitute the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.

        We’ll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and influences the type of language instruction predominant in public education.

        As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the English/Language Arts classroom, we’ll consider questions like the following: What is “rhetoric,” “composition,” and “rhetoric and composition?” Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two?

        This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but to study composition is to study writing instruction as a research field. Consequently, the content knowledge you acquire will inform your own teaching practices. As you learn what pedagogical practices are supported by the latest scholarship in rhetoric and composition, you’ll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you’ll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You’ll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I’ll take you “behind the scenes” of writing assignments that you then complete. We’ll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We’ll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English BA with Secondary Teacher Certification, so these students constitute the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.

        We’ll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and influences the type of language instruction predominant in public education.

        As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the English/Language Arts classroom, we’ll consider questions like the following: What is “rhetoric,” “composition,” and “rhetoric and composition?” Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two?

        This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but to study composition is to study writing instruction as a research field. Consequently, the content knowledge you acquire will inform your own teaching practices. As you learn what pedagogical practices are supported by the latest scholarship in rhetoric and composition, you’ll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you’ll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You’ll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I’ll take you “behind the scenes” of writing assignments that you then complete. We’ll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We’ll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5359-001 Argumentation Theory

        This course provides support for GTAs teaching ENGL 1302 for the first time and prepares students to teach written argumentation more generally. Students complete the same major assignments as ENGL 1302 students and acquire instructional materials intended to help undergraduates grasp key argumentation concepts.

        Despite this pedagogical focus, the majority of the seminar will be spent reading those argumentation theorists who have been most influential in composition, including Aristotle, Perelman, Toulmin, Rogers, and Burke. The course also includes some exposure to more recent argumentation theory, with an emphasis on the ethics of argument and alternatives to argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5389-002 Seminar on Critical Reading, Writing, and Thinking

        The main objective of this course is to familiarize students with the history, theory, and research that constitute composition studies. As the semester progresses, students learn contemporary “best practices” for composition teaching.This course should help students develop a philosophy of composition teaching and prepare them to teach first-year composition at a wide variety of institutions. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English BA with Secondary Teacher Certification, so these students constitute the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.

        We’ll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and influences the type of language instruction predominant in public education.

        As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the English/Language Arts classroom, we’ll consider questions like the following: What is “rhetoric,” “composition,” and “rhetoric and composition?” Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two?

        This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but to study composition is to study writing instruction as a research field. Consequently, the content knowledge you acquire will inform your own teaching practices. As you learn what pedagogical practices are supported by the latest scholarship in rhetoric and composition, you’ll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you’ll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You’ll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I’ll take you “behind the scenes” of writing assignments that you then complete. We’ll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We’ll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.

        Summer - 5 Weeks I - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English BA with Secondary Teacher Certification, so these students are the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.

        We’ll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and determines the type of language instruction predominant in public education.

        As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the classroom, we’ll consider questions like: What is “rhetoric,” “composition,” and “rhetoric and composition?” Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two?

        This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but we will examine writing instruction itself as a research field. You’ll learn what pedagogical practices are supported by recent scholarship in rhetoric and composition, and as you do so, you’ll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you’ll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You’ll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I’ll include you in the process of composing writing assignments that you then complete. We’ll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We’ll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English BA with Secondary Teacher Certification, so these students are the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.

        We’ll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and determines the type of language instruction predominant in public education.

        As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the classroom, we’ll consider questions like: What is “rhetoric,” “composition,” and “rhetoric and composition?” Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two?

        This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but we will examine writing instruction itself as a research field. You’ll learn what pedagogical practices are supported by recent scholarship in rhetoric and composition, and as you do so, you’ll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you’ll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You’ll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I’ll include you in the process of composing writing assignments that you then complete. We’ll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We’ll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • ENGL 5359-001 Argumentation Theory

        This course provides support for GTAs teaching ENGL 1302 for the first time and prepares students to teach written argumentation more generally. Students complete the same major assignments as ENGL 1302 students and acquire instructional materials intended to help undergraduates grasp key argumentation concepts.

        Despite this pedagogical focus, the majority of the seminar will be spent reading those argumentation theorists who have been most influential in composition, including Aristotle, Perelman, Toulmin, Rogers, and Burke. The course also includes some exposure to more recent argumentation theory, with an emphasis on the ethics of argument and alternatives to argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5389-002 Seminar on Critical Reading, Writing, and Thinking

        The main objective and first priority of this course is to prepare new GTAs to teach ENGL 1301 for the first time this semester. To that end, the course is strongly practical, with students completing the same major assignments as ENGL 1301 students, trying out various styles of commenting on student writing, norming their grading procedures to align with program standards, and developing in-class activities to support the growth of undergraduate writers.

        A secondary objective of this course is to familiarize students with the history, theory, and research that constitute composition studies. As the semester progresses, students learn contemporary “best practices” for composition teaching, and the ENGL 1301 and 1302 curriculum is examined as an attempt to embody said practices.

        Taken together, the dual emphasis of this course should help students develop a philosophy of composition teaching and prepare them to teach first-year composition at a wide variety of institutions. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English BA with Secondary Teacher Certification, so these students are the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.

        We’ll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and determines the type of language instruction predominant in public education.

        As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the classroom, we’ll consider questions like: What is “rhetoric,” “composition,” and “rhetoric and composition?” Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two?

        This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but we will examine writing instruction itself as a research field. You’ll learn what pedagogical practices are supported by recent scholarship in rhetoric and composition, and as you do so, you’ll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you’ll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You’ll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I’ll include you in the process of composing writing assignments that you then complete. We’ll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We’ll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.

        Summer - 5 Weeks II - 2016Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English degree with Secondary Teacher Certification and students seeking Mid-Level English Language Arts Certification, so these students are the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.

        We’ll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and determines the type of language instruction predominant in public education.

        As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the classroom, we’ll consider questions like: What is “rhetoric,” “composition,” and “rhetoric and composition?” Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two?

        This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but we will examine writing instruction as itself a research field. You’ll learn what pedagogical practices are supported by recent scholarship in rhetoric and composition, and as you do so, you’ll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you’ll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You’ll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I’ll include you in the process of composing writing assignments that you then complete. We’ll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We’ll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-047 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        This course continues the instruction in recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument begun in ENGL 1301. It builds on 1301 by introducing students to advanced techniques of written argument, including issue identification, formal and informal logic, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and argument production.

        What distinguishes this course from regular ENGL 1302 classes is that we will delve much more deeply into argumentation theory, reading those theorists who have been most influential in Writing Studies. In particular, this course looks ahead to the Honors Senior Project by examining the field-specific ways that academic disciplines use writing to establish and communicate new knowledge.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English degree with Secondary Teacher Certification and students seeking Mid-Level English Language Arts Certification, so these students are the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.

        We’ll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and determines the type of language instruction predominant in public education.

        As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the classroom, we’ll consider questions like: What is “rhetoric,” “composition,” and “rhetoric and composition?” Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two?

        This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but we will examine writing instruction as itself a research field. You’ll learn what pedagogical practices are supported by recent scholarship in rhetoric and composition, and as you do so, you’ll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you’ll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You’ll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I’ll include you in the process of composing writing assignments that you then complete. We’ll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We’ll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5359-001 Argumentation Theory

        One objective of this course is to prepare GTAs to teach ENGL 1302 for the first time this semester. To that end, students will complete the same major writing assignments and some of the same readings as ENGL 1302 students. A second objective is to introduce students to major argumentation theorists, especially those who have influenced the teaching of written argument in the field of rhetoric and composition.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5389-001 Seminar on Critical Reading, Writing, and Thinking

        The main objective and first priority of this course is to prepare new GTAs to teach ENGL 1301 for the first time this semester, but it should also prove useful to anyone who teaches—or plans to teach—rhetorically-based first-year composition. The course is strongly practical, with students completing the same major assignments as ENGL 1301 students, but also theoretical in that we draw on current rhet/comp research to examine the ENGL 1301 curriculum. Particular attention will be paid to best practices for constructing writing assignments, providing formative and summative assessments of student writing, and conducting peer review.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5389-002 Seminar on Critical Reading, Writing, and Thinking

        The main objective and first priority of this course is to prepare new GTAs to teach ENGL 1301 for the first time this semester, but it should also prove useful to anyone who teaches—or plans to teach—rhetorically-based first-year composition. The course is strongly practical, with students completing the same major assignments as ENGL 1301 students, but also theoretical in that we draw on current rhet/comp research to examine the ENGL 1301 curriculum. Particular attention will be paid to best practices for constructing writing assignments, providing formative and summative assessments of student writing, and conducting peer review.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English degree with Secondary Teacher Certification and students seeking Mid-Level English Language Arts Certification, so these students are the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.

        We’ll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and determines the type of language instruction predominant in public education.

        As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the classroom, we’ll consider questions like: What is “rhetoric,” “composition,” and “rhetoric and composition?” Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two?

        This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but we will examine writing instruction as itself a research field. You’ll learn what pedagogical practices are supported by recent scholarship in rhetoric and composition, and as you do so, you’ll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you’ll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You’ll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I’ll include you in the process of composing writing assignments that you then complete. We’ll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We’ll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.

        Summer - 5 Weeks I - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English degree with Secondary Teacher Certification and students seeking Mid-Level English Language Arts Certification, so these students are the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English degree with Secondary Teacher Certification and students seeking Mid-Level English Language Arts Certification, so these students are the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5359-001 Argumentation Theory

        One objective of this course is to prepare GTAs to teach ENGL 1302 for the first time this semester. To that end, students will complete the same major writing assignments and some of the same readings as ENGL 1302 students. A second objective is to introduce students to major argumentation theorists, especially those who have influenced the teaching of written argument in the field of rhetoric and composition.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5389-001 Topics in Teaching Composition

        The main objective and first priority of this course is to prepare new GTAs to teach ENGL 1301 for the first time this semester, but it should also prove useful to anyone who teaches—or plans to teach—rhetorically-based first-year composition. The course is strongly practical, with students completing the same major assignments as ENGL 1301 students, but also theoretical in that we draw on current rhet/comp research to examine the ENGL 1301 curriculum. Particular attention will be paid to best practices for constructing writing assignments, providing formative and summative assessments of student writing, and conducting peer review.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English degree with Secondary Teacher Certification and students seeking Mid-Level English Language Arts Certification, so these students are the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.

        Summer - 5 Weeks I - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • LA 1302-001 Reading, Writing, and Arguing across Academic Disciplines

        This course continues the instruction in recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument begun in ENGL 1301/HONR-LA 1301. It builds on 1301 by introducing students to advanced techniques of written argument, including issue identification, formal and informal logic, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and argument production.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English degree with Secondary Teacher Certification and students seeking Mid-Level English Language Arts Certification, so these students are the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5389-001 Topics in Teaching Composition

        The main objective and first priority of this course is to prepare new GTAs to teach ENGL 1301 for the first time this semester, but it should also prove useful to anyone who teaches—or plans to teach—rhetorically-based first-year composition. The course is strongly practical, with students completing the same major assignments as ENGL 1301 students, but also theoretical in that we draw on current rhet/comp research to examine the ENGL 1301 curriculum. Particular attention will be paid to best practices for constructing writing assignments, providing formative and summative assessments of student writing, and conducting peer review.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5359-001 Argumentation Theory

        One objective of this course is to prepare GTAs to teach ENGL 1302 for the first time this semester. To that end, students will complete the same major writing assignments and some of the same readings as ENGL 1302 students. A second objective is to introduce students to major argumentation theorists, especially those who have influenced the teaching of written argument in the field of rhetoric and composition.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is required for students pursuing an English degree with Secondary Teacher Certification and students seeking Mid-Level English Language Arts Certification, so these students are the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction.  We’ll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and determines the type of language instruction predominant in public education. As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the classroom, we’ll consider questions like: What is “rhetoric,” “composition,” and “rhetoric and composition?” Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two?  This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but we will examine writing instruction as itself a research field. You’ll learn what pedagogical practices are supported by recent scholarship in rhetoric and composition, and as you do so, you’ll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you’ll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You’ll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I’ll include you in the process of composing writing assignments that you then complete. We’ll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We’ll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.

        Summer - 5 Weeks I - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4339-001 Rhetoric and Composition: History, Theory, and Practice
        The separate fields of rhetoric and composition have dubious histories. Beginning with Plato’s blistering critique, rhetoric has had to defend itself against accusations that it is at best empty and ornamental and at worst manipulative and propagandistic. Composition emerged in the late 19th century when colleges grudgingly began to offer a first-year course to complete the writing instruction students should have received (so the thinking went) at the secondary level. As a combined field, however, Rhet/Comp has been on the rise for the past 40 years, and it is now one of the “hottest” fields in English studies. Then again, most Rhet/Comp courses are still taught at the introductory level by instructors who are poorly paid and often poorly trained. In this course we’ll trace this complicated history: we’ll survey the history of rhetoric with an eye toward its influence on composition, and we’ll survey contemporary composition pedagogies as an outgrowth of the rhetorical tradition. By the end you should have a fairly thorough understanding of how Rhet/Comp came to be and a wide familiarity with different philosophies of composition.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS
        This course is required for students pursuing an English degree with Secondary Teacher Certification and students seeking Mid-Level English Language Arts Certification, so these students are the primary audience. However, the course is designed to appeal to any student interested in the history, theory, and practice of reading and writing instruction. We’ll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and determines the type of language instruction predominant in public education. As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the classroom, we’ll consider questions like: What is “rhetoric,” “composition,” and “rhetoric and composition?” Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two? This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but we will examine writing instruction as itself a research field. You’ll learn what pedagogical practices are supported by recent scholarship in rhetoric and composition, and as you do so, you’ll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you’ll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You’ll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I’ll include you in the process of composing writing assignments that you then complete. We’ll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We’ll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • ENGL 5359-001 Argumentation Theory
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 5311-001 Foundations of Rhetoric and Composition
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS
        No Description Provided.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is intended for students planning a career teaching high school English, but its appeal will be much broader than that. We'll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and determines the type of language instruction predominant in public education.

        As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the classroom, we'll consider questions like: What is "rhetoric," "composition," and "rhetoric and composition?" Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two?

        This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but we will examine writing instruction as itself a research field. You'll learn what pedagogical practices are supported by recent scholarship in rhetoric and writing, and as you do so, you'll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you'll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You'll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I'll include you in the process of composing writing assignments that you then complete. We'll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We'll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 4339-001 Rhetoric and Composition: History, Theory, and Practice

        The separate fields of rhetoric and composition have dubious histories. Beginning with Plato’s blistering critique, rhetoric has had to defend itself against accusations that it is at best empty and ornamental and at worst manipulative and propagandistic. Composition emerged in the late 19th century when colleges grudgingly began to offer a first-year course to complete the writing instruction students should have received (so the thinking went) at the secondary level. As a combined field, however, Rhet/Comp has been on the rise for the past 40 years, and it is now one of the “hottest†fields in English studies. Then again, most Rhet/Comp courses are still taught at the introductory level by instructors who are poorly paid and often poorly trained.

        In this course we’ll trace this complicated history: we’ll survey the history of rhetoric with an eye toward its influence on composition, and we’ll survey contemporary composition pedagogies as an outgrowth of the rhetorical tradition. By the end you should have a fairly thorough understanding of how Rhet/Comp came to be and a wide familiarity with different philosophies of composition.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS
          This course is intended for students planning a career teaching high school English, but its appeal will be much broader than that. We'll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and determines the type of language instruction predominant in public education. As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the classroom, we'll consider questions like: What is "rhetoric," "composition," and "rhetoric and composition?" Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two? This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but we will examine writing instruction as itself a research field. You'll learn what pedagogical practices are supported by recent scholarship in rhetoric and writing, and as you do so, you'll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you'll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You'll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I'll include you in the process of composing writing assignments that you then complete. We'll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We'll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • ENGL 5311-001 Foundations of Rhetoric and Composition

        The foundations of rhetoric and composition reveal some cracks. Rhetoric took a hit from Plato and has since had to defend itself against accusations that it is at best empty and ornamental and at worst manipulative and propagandistic. Meanwhile, composition as we know it emerged in the late 19th century when colleges grudgingly began to offer a first-year course to complete the writing instruction students should have received (so the thinking went) at the secondary level. Even now, as rhetoric and composition studies have become legitimate research fields, and as Rhet/Comp has become a “hot†field in English studies, most Rhet/Comp courses are taught at the introductory level by instructors who are poorly paid and often poorly trained. In this course we’ll survey the history of rhetoric with an eye toward its influence on composition, and we’ll survey contemporary composition pedagogies as an outgrowth of the rhetorical tradition. By the end you should have a fairly thorough understanding of how Rhet/Comp came to be and a wide familiarity with different philosophies of composition.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • ENGL 4370-001 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

        This course is intended for students planning a career teaching high school English, but its appeal will be much broader than that. We'll frame the course with some of the historical and epistemological issues involved in the study of rhetoric, paying particular attention to the quarrel between rhetoric and philosophy that spans virtually the entire history of Western thought. In many ways, this dispute remains with us today and determines the type of language instruction predominant in public education.

        As we delve into rhetorical theory as manifested in the classroom, we'll consider questions like: What is "rhetoric," "composition," and "rhetoric and composition?" Why do we teach reading and writing differently from the way it was taught 50 or 100 years ago? Why is reading and writing taught so differently in college and in high school, and what, if anything, should we do to improve alignment between the two?

        This is a content course, not a pedagogy course, but we will examine writing instruction as itself a research field. You'll learn what pedagogical practices are supported by recent scholarship in rhetoric and writing, and as you do so, you'll occupy the dual role of student and teacher-in-training. For example, you'll learn how to teach analytic reading skills as you practice these skills. You'll learn how to teach argument as inquiry as you produce written arguments that engage timely issues. I'll include you in the process of composing writing assignments that you then complete. We'll talk about how to comment on and grade student writing as I give you feedback on your writing. We'll consider the best ways to teach grammar and mechanics as you sharpen your command of Standard Written English.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2009
      • ENGL 5358-001 Writing Assessment, Evaluation, and Response
        Perhaps more than ever, students of all ages are expected to demonstrate scholastic competence as a condition of advancement, and schools at all levels (elementary, secondary, postsecondary) are feeling increased pressure from federal, state, and institutional entities to demonstrate teaching effectiveness. Consequently, valid, reliable, fair assessments of student learning have never been more important. This situation is particularly problematic when it comes to the assessment of writing, which is as idiosyncratic and context-bound as any academic subject. Teachers and administrators of writing programs must remain abreast of best practices for writing assessment not only to increase their chances for success but also as a defense against outside pressure to assess writing in cheaper, quicker, simpler ways. In this seminar, you’ll be introduced to significant research into writing assessment that has been conducted over the past 25 years or so. We’ll examine some of the issues involved in classroom, program, and large-scale assessment, and we’ll trace the movement from objective tests to holistic scoring of essays to portfolio assessment as the preferred method of assessment. In the second half of the course, we’ll consider the theoretical underpinnings of various methods of assessment, procedures for conducting assessments, and the political implications of writing assessment. The idea is to follow more of a case-study model than a coverage model—we’ll look at individual (but typical) controversies and advances in research rather than trying to digest everything that’s been discovered.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2009

Service to the University

  • Appointed
    • Aug 2008 to  May 2009 Doctoral Applications Subcommittee

      Member of English Department's Doctoral Applications Subcommittee.

    • Aug 2010 to  May 2011 Advisory Committee

      Member of English Department's Advisory Committee.

    • Aug 2008 to  Present Graduate Studies Committee

      Member of English Department's Graduate Studies Committee.

    • Aug 2008 to  Present First-Year English Committee

      Member of English Department's First-Year English Committee.

  • Elected
    • Aug 2008 to  Present Recruitment & Retention/Alumni Outreach

      Chair of English Department's Recruitment & Retention/Alumni Outreach Committee.

  • Volunteered
    • Aug 2012 to  Present Adjunct Faculty Committee

      Chair of English Department's Adjunct Faculty Committee.

    • Aug 2014 to  Present Tenure and Promotion

      Member of English Department's Tenure and Promotion Committee.