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Jason Hogue

Name

[Hogue, Jason]
  • Enhanced GTA, English

Biography

I am a PhD candidate in English literature. My focuses are Early Modern/Renaissance literature, Medieval literature, and Ecocriticism/Eco-theory. Im especially interested in literary representations of forest spaces and the concept of wilderness. Im also interested in outlaw literature, notably the early songs and stories of Robin Hood. The working title for my dissertation is "Trees and Punishment in Medieval Poetry and Early Modern Drama." I write and perform music on occasion - you can find links to recordings I have made with various bands under the creative activities tab.

Professional Preparation

    • 2012 M.A. in EnglishUniversity of West Florida
    • 2009 B.A. in English (Teacher Education),  University of West Florida

Recordings

  • 2015
    • Aug 2015 Walter Brown, Jr.

      Punk rock project originally formed in Pensacola, FL (as "Walter Brown"); reunited in San Antonio, TX, in 2015 to record a digital EP, available at walterbrownjr.bandcamp.com/releases

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 2014
    • Apr 2014 Dragline

      Alternative/punk rock band based out of Pensacola, FL

      Recordings available at reverbnation.com/dragline6

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Courses

      • ENGL 2303-003 TOPICS IN LITERATURE

        This course will explore a variety of literary depictions of green spaces, ranging from Robin Hood’s greenwood to Henry David Thoreau’s Walden woodland to the vanishing forest of Dr. Seuss’s The Lorax. The course will also engage with a number of individual literary trees such as the speaking tree of Anglo-Saxon lore in “The Dream of the Rood,” Tolkien’s mystical beings Old Man Willow and Treebeard, and Shel Silverstein’s beloved “Giving Tree” of children’s poetry. We will use this theme to think about the relationship of humans with their immediate environments as well as with the Earth itself in an age of climate change and ecological uncertainty. Students will consider the value of literature in our current era and evaluate how literary representations of trees and forest spaces change or affect the way people understand themselves, plants, and the relationship between them. Additionally, students in this course will explore the concept of plant agency and the idea of viewing the world from a “plant’s-eye view” in order to better imagine complex ecological relationships. Furthermore, students will engage with literature to trace how our understanding of trees and forests has changed over time. Genres for the course include poetry, novels, plays, short stories, essays, and comic books.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-015 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-048 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.  

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-051 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.  

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-008 Trees and Forests in Literature

        This course will explore a variety of literary depictions of green spaces, ranging from Robin Hood’s greenwood to Henry David Thoreau’s Walden woodland to the vanishing forest of Dr. Seuss’s The Lorax. The course will also engage with a number of individual literary trees such as the speaking tree of Anglo-Saxon lore in “The Dream of the Rood,” Tolkien’s mystical beings Old Man Willow and Treebeard, and Shel Silverstein’s beloved “Giving Tree” of children’s poetry. We will use this theme to think about the relationship of humans with their immediate environments as well as with the Earth itself in an age of climate change and ecological uncertainty. Students will consider the value of literature in our current era and evaluate how literary representations of trees and forest spaces change or affect the way people understand themselves, plants, and the relationship between them. Additionally, students in this course will explore the concept of plant agency and the idea of viewing the world from a “plant’s-eye view” in order to better imagine complex ecological relationships. Furthermore, students will engage with literature to trace how our understanding of trees and forests has changed over time.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2319-001 BRITISH LITERATURE

        ENGL 2319 BRITISH LITERATURE Concentration on works of British literature with focus on how cultural, geographic, and political issues shape and reflect literature in a particular culture. Examines at least three genres and six authors. Emphasis on critical thinking, reading, and writing.

        Course Description: This course treads a path through the wild realm of “outlaw literature,” exploring outlaws and outcasts as they are portrayed in British literature in a variety of forms, including ballads, poems, plays, novels, short stories, and comic books. We will chart our way through British literature in a chronological way, beginning in Anglo-Saxon England with an early outcast: Beowulf’s rival, the demon-monster Grendel. From there we will move into early modern English drama to join other misfits and exiles, such as the castaways of William Shakespeare’s play The Tempest. As we enter the Romantic and Victorian periods, we will come across a host of highwaymen (and women) of the “Penny Dreadfuls” like Dick Turpin and Ela the Outcast. Our literary travels will conclude in more recent times with London’s modern urban outlaws and outcasts such as the anonymous vigilante “V” from V for Vendetta. We will use this theme of exile and outlawry to guide our discussions in class, and students are expected to expand their own understanding of the ways that literature helps us interpret our relationship to the law, the government, authority figures, and structures of power, as well as our perception of those who have been cast out or cast down by society.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-001 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course requires students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. Students will write three essays: an analysis of a discourse community of their choice, a rhetorical analysis, and a synthesis essay.

      • ENGL 1302-001 Rhetoric and Composition II

        This course continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

      • ENGL 100-004 Integrated Reading/Writing

        ENGL 0100 is a workshop based session that allows you to work closely with your instructor on ENGL 1301 assignments. You must revise each major assignment multiple times, and it is these revisions that your ENGL 0100 grade is based on.

      • ENGL 1302-001 Rhetoric and Composition II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-011 Rhetoric and Composition II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-001 Rhetoric and Composition II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-004 Rhetoric and Composition II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-001 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course requires students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-003 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course requires students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours