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Dr. Jason Shelton

Name

[Shelton, Dr. Jason]
  • Associate Professor

Biography

Jason E. Shelton is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Texas at Arlington. His primary research interests concern the sociology of religion, as well as the intersections of race, class, and political/social attitudes in the post-Civil Rights Era. Dr. Shelton’s articles have appeared in Social Science Quarterly, Du Bois Review, Sociological Perspectives, Journal of African American Studies, American Behavioral Scientist, and other respected publications. New York University Press published his award-winning first book, Blacks and Whites in Christian America: How Racial Discrimination Shapes Religious Convictions, which was recognized by the Southern Conference on African American Studies and the American Sociological Association’s Section on the Sociology of Religion. Dr. Shelton has been interviewed by major media outlets for news stories relevant to his research such as the Chicago Tribune, USA Today, the British Broadcasting Company (BBC), Houston Chronicle, and network television affiliates in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. He earned his PhD and MA degrees in Sociology at the University of Miami (FL), and BA in Sociology at Kent State University. From 2006-2008, Dr. Shelton served as a Postdoctoral Fellow in Sociology at Rice University, where he worked on the the first wave of the Portraits of American Life Study (PALS).

Professional Preparation

    • 2005 Ph.D. in SociologyUniversity of Miami
    • 2000 M.A. in SociologyUniversity of Miami
    • 1998 B.A. in Sociology (Pan African Studies),  Kent State University

Appointments

    • Aug 2014 to Present Associate Professor, Tenured
      University of Texas at Arlington   Office of the President   Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs   College of Liberal Arts   Department of Sociology and Anthropology
    • Jan 2008 to Present Assist Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2006 to Jan 2008 Postdoctoral Fellow
      Rice University
    • Jan 2005 to Jan 2006 Assist Professor
      The College of Wooster
    • Jan 2004 to Jan 2005 Visiting Assistant Professor
      The College of Wooster
    • Jan 2001 to Jan 2003 2001-2003 Adjunct Faculty Member
      Miami-Dade College
    • Jan 2001 to Jan 2003 2001-2003 Graduate Instructor
      University of Miami
    • Jan 2000 to Jan 2003 2000-2003 Adjunct Faculty Member
      Miami-Dade College
    • Jan 2000 to Jan 2001 2000 Adjunct Faculty Member
      Miami-Dade College
    • Jan 1999 to Jan 2003 1999-2003 Reading Lab Instructor
      Miami-Dade College
    • Jan 1998 to Jan 2000 Graduate Assistant
      University of Miami

Memberships

  • Professional
    • June 2013 to Present American Sociological Association: Section on Racial/Ethnic Minorities AND Sociology of Religion Section
    • June 2013 to Present Association for the Sociology of Religion
    • June 2013 to Present Association of Black Sociologists
    • June 2013 to Present Southern Conference on African American Studies, Inc.
    • June 2013 to Present Southern Sociological Society
  • Membership
    • June 2012 to June 2013

Awards and Honors

    • Aug  2014 Distinguished Book Award (Honorable Mention for Blacks and Whites in Christian America) sponsored by American Sociological Association's Section on the Sociology of Religion
    • Apr  2013 Food For Thought Faculty Luncheon sponsored by FLOC
      Description:

      (freshman student leaders honor faculty members for their dedication and commitment to higher education).

    • Apr  2012 Food For Thought Faculty Luncheon sponsored by FLOC
      Description:

      (freshman student leaders honor faculty members for their dedication and commitment to higher education)

    • Feb  2012 C. Calvin Smith Distinguished Book Award (Blacks and Whites in Christian America) sponsored by Southern Conference on African American Studies
      Description:

      This award recognizes “the most distinguished scholarly book on African American Studies published in the calendar year.”

    • Oct  2010 The Alicia Wilkerson Smotherman Faculty Award sponsored by College of Liberal ArtsOffice of the Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsOffice of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
      Description:

      (recognizes faculty in the College of Liberal Arts for exceptional teaching contributions and mentorship).

Research and Expertise

  • Research Interests

    RESEARCH INTERESTS

    Black Middle Class Culture and Ideology

    Racial and Ethnic Attitudes

    Sociology of Religion

    The Debate over Race vs. Class

Publications

      Journal Article 2014
      • J.E. Shelton. "A Dream Deferred? Privileged Blacks' and Whites' Beliefs about Racial Inequality."

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

        Book 2012
        • Shelton, J. E. & Emerson, M. O. 2012. Blacks and Whites in Christian America: How Racial Discrimination Shapes Religious Convictions. New York: New York University Press.

          {Book} [Refereed/Juried]

        • Essay 2012
          • Jason E. Shelton and George Wilson. 2012. “Introduction: Evolving Issues of Integration and Inequality among Middle Class Minorities.”

            {Essay} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
          • 2012
            • Wilson, George and Jason E. Shelton. 2012. “Race, Ethnicity, and Socioeconomic Inequality among Minority Middle Classes.” American Behavioral Scientist, 56(5): 643-649.

              {Essay} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

            • Journal Article 2012
              • Shelton, J. E. & Greene, A. D. 2012. "Get Up, Get Out, & Git Sumthin': How Race and Class Influence African Americans' Attitudes about Inequality." American Behavioral Scientist, 56 (11): 1480-1507.

                {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

                Journal Article 2010
                • Shelton, J. & Emerson, M. O. 2010. Extending the Debate over Nationalism versus Integration: How Cultural Commitments and Assimilation Trajectories Influence Beliefs about Black Power. Journal of African American Studies, 14, 312-336.

                  {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
                • 2010
                  • Shelton, J. E. 2010. E Pluribus Unum? How Racial, Ethnic, and Religious Group Memberships Impact Beliefs about American National Identity. Nationalism and Ethnic Politics, 16(1), 67-91.

                    {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

                    Journal Article 2009
                    • Shelton, J. E. & Coleman, M. N. 2009. After the Storm: How Race, Class, and Immigration Concerns Influenced Beliefs about the Katrina Evacuees. Social Science Quarterly, 90(3), 480-496.

                      {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
                    • 2009
                      • Shelton, J. E. & Wilson, G. 2009. Race, Class, and the Basis of Group Alignment: An Analysis of Support for Redistributive Policy among Privileged Blacks. Sociological Perspectives, 52(3), 385-408.

                        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

                        Encyclopedia Entry 2008
                        • Shelton, J. 2008. Contributed entries on "Malcolm X" (with Jeff Johnson, pgs.864-867), "Prisons" (with Sarah Spain, pgs.1070-1073), and "Ghetto" (pgs.546-548). In Richard T. Schaefer (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity, and Society Los Angeles, CA: Sage Publications.

                          {Encyclopedia Entry} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

                        • Journal Article 2008
                          • Shelton, J. E. 2008. The Investment in Blackness Hypothesis: Toward Greater Understanding of Who Teaches What During Racial Socialization. Du Bois Review, Social Science Research on Race, 5(2), 235-257.

                            {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

                            Journal Article 2006
                            • Shelton, J. E. & Wilson, G. (2006). Socioeconomic Status and Racial Group Interests among Black Americans. Sociological Spectrum, 26(2), 183-204.
                              {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

                              Popular Press Article 1998
                              • Shelton, Jason. "Black United Students: The Foundation Years, 1968-1970." Uhuru Magazine 1998.
                                {Popular Press Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Presentations

  • Past
    •  
      "Authors Meet Critics Session for Blacks and Whites in Christian America" at the annual meeting of the Association for the Sociology of Religion.

      Shelton, Jason and Michael O. Emerson. August 2013. New York, NY.

  • Past
    •  
      "Why do African Americans Pray So Often?"

      Shelton, Jason and Michael O. Emerson. April 2011. Revised paper presented at the Race and Power Mini-Conference, a subsection of the annual meeting of the Southern Sociological Society. Jacksonville, FL.

  • Past
    •  
      "Get Up & Get Out: How Race and Class Influence African Americans' Attitudes about Inequality."

      Shelton, Jason E. and Anthony D. Greene. August 2011. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association. Las Vegas, NV.

  • Past
    •  
      "Far-Reaching Faith: Evidence of an Inclusive Religious Doctrine among African Americans."

      Shelton, Jason and Michael O. Emerson. August 2011. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association. Las Vegas, NV.

  • Past
    •  
      "Get Up, Get Out, & Git Sumthin': How Race and Class Influence African Americans' Attitudes about Inequality."

      Shelton, Jason E. and Anthony D. Greene. February 2012. Revised paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Conference on African American Studies, Inc.. Houston, TX.

  • Past
    •  
      "Melting Into the Mainstream: Privileged Blacks' Beliefs about Racial Inequality."

      Shelton, Jason E. August 2012. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association. Denver, CO.

  • Past
    •  
      "Why Do African Americans Pray So Often?"

      Shelton, Jason and Michael O. Emerson. February 2013. Featured presentation on our book, Blacks and Whites in Christian America, at the annual meeting of the Southern Conference on African American Studies, Inc. Tallahassee, FL.

Courses

      • SOCI 3343-001 SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION

        This course provides an overview of the scientific study of religion from a sociological perspective. While theology and history are important, we will focus on theories, research, and trends concerning religion in the contemporary United States. Some of the topics to be addressed include (but are not limited to) understanding the rich variety of religious traditions and affiliations, faith-based practices and beliefs, as well as the dynamic role that religion plays in both facilitating and limiting social change as well as conflict in society. We will also examine differences within various religious traditions such as “mainline” and “fundamentalist” believers, secularization processes, and the often controversial ways in which religion intersects with other spheres of society such as science, morality, politics, race relations, sex and gender.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 1311 Introduction to Sociology

        Sociology is the systematic and scientific study of human behavior, social groups, and society. The goal of this course is to examine the impact that social structures, social forces, and institutions have upon individuals and groups. By the end of this class, students should not only be able to identify fundamental sociological concepts and theories—as well as the person(s) who developed them—but also apply this mode of thinking to current events and social problems. Some of the topics to be addressed in this course include an overview of the sociology of culture, socialization, race and ethnicity, stratification, gender, crime, religion, politics, and the family.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 5330-001 Seminar in Social Differentiation (Race and Ethnicity)

        This course compares and contrasts the immigration, acculturation, and adjustment processes of various racial and ethnic groups in the United States. We will examine conventional and controversial arguments, as well as classical and contemporary theories concerning the dynamics of inter-group relations in America. Some of the more controversial topics in sociology—such as debates over assimilation, Americanization, and enduring conflicts between groups—are the foremost intellectual topics to be addressed. The reading list includes a diverse group of scholars who advance relevant research on race and ethnic relations.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 4365-004 Seminars in Social Differentiation (Race and Ethnicity)

        This course compares and contrasts the immigration, acculturation, and adjustment processes of various racial and ethnic groups in the United States. We will examine conventional and controversial arguments, as well as classical and contemporary theories concerning the dynamics of inter-group relations in America. Some of the more controversial topics in sociology—such as debates over assimilation, Americanization, and enduring conflicts between groups—are the foremost intellectual topics to be addressed. The reading list includes a diverse group of scholars who advance relevant research on race and ethnic relations.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 1311-002 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

        Sociology is the systematic and scientific study of human behavior, social groups, and society. The goal of this course is to examine the impact that social structures, social forces, and institutions have upon individuals and groups. By the end of this class, students should not only be able to identify fundamental sociological concepts and theories—as well as the person(s) who developed them—but also apply this mode of thinking to current events and social problems. Some of the topics to be addressed in this course include an overview of the sociology of culture, socialization, race/ethnicity, stratification, gender, crime, religion, politics, and the family.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 3338-001 Sociology of the Contemporary Black Experience (Undergrad)

        This course is an overview of the classical and contemporary sociological literature on the black experience in America. Some of the topics to be addressed include racial differences across income, education, and family composition. Other important areas include persistent racial discrimination, the debate over race and class, tensions over the cultural and attitudinal adaptation to inequality, as well as emerging disputes within the African American community over what it “means to be black” in the post-Civil Rights Era. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 1311-001 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

        Sociology is the systematic and scientific study of human behavior, social groups, and society. The goal of this course is to examine the impact that social structures, social forces, and institutions have upon individuals and groups. By the end of this class, students should not only be able to identify fundamental sociological concepts and theories—as well as the person(s) who developed them—but also apply this mode of thinking to current events and social problems. Some of the topics to be addressed in this course include an overview of the sociology of culture, socialization, race/ethnicity, stratification, gender, crime, religion, politics, and the family. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 3337-001 Racial and Ethnic Groups in the US

        This course compares and contrasts the immigration, acculturation, and adjustment processes of various racial and ethnic groups in the United States. We will examine conventional and controversial arguments, as well as classical and contemporary ideas concerning the dynamics of inter-group relations in America. The subject matter for this course focuses on (but is not limited to) addressing similarities and differences among African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and white ethnic groups. Some topics to be address include family patterns, cultural commitments, socioeconomic position, discrimination, and beliefs about “what does it mean to be an American.”

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 1311-004 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

        Course Description: Sociology is the systematic and scientific study of human behavior, social groups, and society. The goal of this course is to examine the impact that social structures, social forces, and institutions have upon individuals and groups. By the end of this class, students should not only be able to identify fundamental sociological concepts and theories—as well as the person(s) who developed them—but also apply this mode of thinking to current events and social problems. Some of the topics to be addressed in this course include an overview of the sociology of culture, socialization, race/ethnicity, stratification, gender, crime, religion, politics, and the family.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 5319-001 Seminar in Social Institutions and Change (Sociology of Religion)

        This course provides an overview of the scientific study of religion from a sociological perspective. While theology and history are important, we will focus on theories, research, and trends concerning religion in the contemporary United States. Some of the topics to be addressed include (but are not limited to) understanding the rich variety of religious traditions and affiliations, religious practices and beliefs, as well as the role that religion plays in facilitating and limiting social change as well as conflict in society. We will also examine differences across various religious traditions such as “mainline” and “fundamentalist” believers, secularization, and the often controversial ways that religion intersects with other spheres of society such as   morality, politics, race and ethnic relations, sex and gender.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 1311-003 Introduction to Sociology

        Sociology is the systematic and scientific study of human behavior, social groups, and society. The goal of this course is to examine the impact that social structures, social forces, and institutions have upon individuals and groups. By the end of this course, students should not only be able to identify some of the fundamental sociological concepts and theories—as well as the person(s) who developed them—but also apply this mode of thinking to current events and social problems. Some of the topics to be addressed in this course include an overview of the sociology of culture, socialization, race/ethnicity, stratification, gender, crime, religion, politics, and the family.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 1311-004 Introduction to Sociology

        Sociology is the systematic and scientific study of human behavior, social groups, and society. The goal of this course is to examine the impact that social structures, social forces, and institutions have upon individuals and groups. By the end of this course, students should not only be able to identify some of the fundamental sociological concepts and theories—as well as the person(s) who developed them—but also apply this mode of thinking to current events and social problems. Some of the topics to be addressed in this course include an overview of the sociology of culture, socialization, race/ethnicity, stratification, gender, crime, religion, politics, and the family.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 1311-004 Introduction to Sociology

        Sociology is the systematic and scientific study of human behavior, social groups, and society. The goal of this course is to examine the impact that social structures, social forces, and institutions have upon individuals and groups. By the end of this course, students should not only be able to identify some of the fundamental sociological concepts and theories—as well as the person(s) who developed them—but also apply this mode of thinking to current events and social problems. Some of the topics to be addressed in this course include an overview of the sociology of culture, socialization, race/ethnicity, stratification, gender, crime, religion, politics, and the family. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 3338-001 Contemporary Black Experience

        This course is an overview of the classical and contemporary sociological literature on the black experience in America. Some of the topics to be addressed include racial differences across income, education, and occupational status. Other important areas include persistent racial discrimination, the debate over race and class, tensions over the cultural and attitudinal adaptation to inequality, as well as emerging disputes within the African American community over what it “means to be black” in the post-Civil Rights Era.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 1311-003 Introduction to Sociology

        Sociology is the systematic and scientific study of human behavior, social groups, and society. The goal of this course is to examine the impact that social structures, social forces, and institutions have upon individuals and groups. By the end of this course, students should not only be able to identify some of the fundamental sociological concepts and theories – as well as the person(s) who developed them – but also apply this mode of thinking to current events and social problems. Some of the topics to be addressed in this course include an overview of the sociology of culture, socialization, race/ethnicity, stratification, gender, crime, religion, politics, and the family. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 1311-004 Introduction to Sociology

        Sociology is the systematic and scientific study of human behavior, social groups, and society. The goal of this course is to examine the impact that social structures, social forces, and institutions have upon individuals and groups. By the end of this course, students should not only be able to identify some of the fundamental sociological concepts and theories – as well as the person(s) who developed them – but also apply this mode of thinking to current events and social problems. Some of the topics to be addressed in this course include an overview of the sociology of culture, socialization, race/ethnicity, stratification, gender, crime, religion, politics, and the family. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 3343-001 Sociology of Religion

        This course provides an overview of the scientific study of religion from a sociological perspective. While theology and history are important, we will focus on theories, research, and trends concerning religion in the contemporary United States. Some of the topics to be addressed include (but are not limited to) understanding the rich variety of religious traditions and affiliations, religious practices and beliefs, as well as the role that religion plays in facilitating and limiting social change and conflict in society. We will also examine differences within various religious traditions such as “mainline” versus “fundamentalist” believers, secularization, and the often controversial ways that religion intersects with other spheres of society such as science, morality, politics, race relations, sex and gender

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 3337-001 Racial and Ethnic Groups in the United States

        This course compares and contrasts the immigration, acculturation, and adjustment processes of various racial and ethnic groups in the United States. The reading list includes conventional and controversial arguments, as well as classical and contemporary ideas about the dynamics of inter-group relations in America. The subject matter focuses on addressing similarities and differences among Native Americans, white ethnic groups, Asian Americans, Latinos, and African Americans.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 1311-001 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

        Sociology is the systematic and scientific study of human behavior, social groups, and society. The goal of this course is to examine the impact that social structures, social forces, and institutions have upon individuals and groups. Students should not only be able to identify some of the fundamental sociological concepts and theories -- as well as the person(s) who developed them -- but also apply this mode of thinking to current events and social problems. Some of the topics to be addressed in this course include an overview of the sociology of culture, race/ethnicity, stratification, gender, crime, religion, politics, and the family.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • SOCI 1311-003 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
        Course Description: Sociology is the systematic and scientific study of human behavior, social groups, and society. The goal of this course is to examine the impact that social structures, social forces, and institutions have upon individuals and groups. By the end of this course, students should not only be able to identify some of the fundamental sociological concepts and theories – as well as the person(s) who developed them – but also apply this mode of thinking to current events and social problems. Some of the topics to be addressed in this course include an overview of the sociology of culture, socialization, race/ethnicity, stratification, gender, crime, religion, politics, and the family.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • SOCI 3338-001 Sociology of the Contemporary Black Experience (Undergrad)

        This course is an overview of the classical and contemporary sociological literature on the black experience in America. Some of the topics to be addressed include racial differences across income, education, and occupational status. Other important areas include persistent racial discrimination, the debate over race and class, tensions over the cultural and attitudinal adaptation to inequality, as well as emerging disputes within the African American community over what it “means to be black†in the post-Civil Rights Era.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • SOCI 3336-001 Social Inequality

        This course addresses the uneven distribution of wealth, power, and prestige in the contemporary United States. We will focus on several important dimensions of inequality – namely social class, race/ethnicity, and gender. Other topics to be discussed include the intersections race, class, and gender, as well as politics and immigration. By the end of this course, students should be able to identify and explain relevant theories, processes, and consequences of inequality as they pertain to individuals and groups in society.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • SOCI 5319-001 Fast Capitalism

        This course compares and contrasts the immigration, acculturation, and adjustment processes of various racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Some of the more controversial topics in sociology ��" such as debates over assimilation, Americanization, and enduring conflicts between groups ��" are the foremost intellectual topics to be addressed. The reading list includes a diverse group of scholars who advance interesting arguments about the progress of race and ethnic relations among white ethnics, Asian Americans, Latinos, African Americans, and other groups.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus
      • SOCI 5330-001 Women and Work
        This course is an overview of the contemporary sociological literature on the black experience in America. Some of the topics to be addressed include (but are not limited to) racial differences across various spheres of society such as income and education. Other important substantive areas include the persistence of racial discrimination, the debate over race and class, tensions over the cultural/attitudinal adaptation to inequality, and emerging disputes within the black community regarding what it â€"means to be black†in the post-Civil Rights Era. 
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2008 Download Syllabus

Service to the Profession

  • Appointed
    • Jan 2015 to  Aug 2015 Distinguished Book Award Committee

      American Sociological Association's Section on the Sociology of Religion

  • Volunteered
    • June 2013 to  Present Manuscript Reviewer
      • American Behavioral Scientist
      • American Journal of Sociology
      • American Sociological Review
      • Du Bois Review: Social Science Research On Race
      • Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion
      • Sociological Forum
      • Sociological Perspectives

Service to the University

  • Appointed
    • Aug 2008 to  Present Sociology Student Association, Faculty Advisor

      (Department of Sociology and Anthropology)

    • June 2013 to  Present Undergraduate Core Curriculum Revisions Representative

      (Sociology Program)

    • Aug 2014 to  May 2015 Tenure and Promotion Committee

       Inter-Disciplinary Studies Program (School of Urban and Public Affairs). University of Texas at Arlington

  • Elected
    • Aug 2014 to  Present Faculty Senate

      Representative for the Department of Sociology and Anthropology

  • Volunteered
    • June 2013 to  Present Kathryn A. Head Scholarship Committee

      , which rewards a deserving student on the basis of his/her grades, career aspirations, and possesses a strong interest in attending graduate school (McNair Scholars Program and Student Support Services). University of Texas at Arlington.

    • June 2013 to  Present Search Committee

      member to hire the first “Director” of the new Center for African American Studies.