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Johansen Quijano

Name

[Quijano, Johansen]
  • Adjunct Assistant Professor, English
  • Lecturer

Biography

Johansen Quijano is currently teaching First Year English at the University of Texas at Arlington, where he completed a Doctoral Degree in English with a focus on media narrative, rhetoric, and composition. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in the Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), a Master’s Degree in Curriculum and Development focusing on language acquisition, and a Master’s Degree in English Literature from the University of Puerto Rico. His research in education has focused on the effects and application of digital narratives in the ESL classroom, and his work on literature ranges from Romantic poetry to digital narratives. He has published and presented on a variety of topics including video game studies, popular culture studies, education, teaching methodology, language acquisition, romantic poetry, and Victorian literature. His research interests include the above-mentioned topics as well as narrative, interactivity, simulation, new media in general, and 18th century literature. He also enjoys creative writing (fiction, historical fiction, and poetry), and reading all kinds of epic literary works - from the Epic Poem of Gilgamesh to Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series.

Professional Preparation

    • 2010 MA in EnglishUniversity of Puerto Rico
    • 2015 PhD in EnglishUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • 2007 M.Ed. in Literacy/Teaching English as a Second LanguageUniversity of Puerto Rico
    • 2005 BA in Language EducationUniversity of Puerto RIco

Appointments

    • July 2010 to Present Instructor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Sept 2008 to July 2010 Department Chair (Arts and Science)
      Centro de Estudios Multidisciplinarios
    • Sept 2005 to Sept 2008 Professor of English
      Centro de Estudios Multidisciplinarios

Memberships

  • Professional
    • Jan 2012 to Present Far West Popular Culture Association
  • Professional
    • Jan 2012 to Present American Popular Culture Association
  • Professional
    • June 2005 to Present Puerto Rico TESOL

Awards and Honors

    • Aug  2013 Best Practices in Teaching Award sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington, English Department
      Achievements:

      Demonstrated thoroughness in lesson planning.

    • Aug  2012 Best Practices in Teaching Award sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington, English Department
      Achievements:

      Demonstrated proficiency in teaching practices, including lesson planning, group control, pacing, and student engagement.

Research and Expertise

  • Various Research Interests

    Narrative, transmediation, interactivity, simulation, new media, social network media, digital theory, visual culture, nineteenth century English poetry, Caribbean literature, language acquisition, teaching methodology.

Publications

      Book Chapter Published
      • Quijano, Johansen “Theory and Practice of Digital Media in the Literature Classroom: Using Virtual Spaces to Teach Literature." In Hetland, T. and Highes, J.  Digital Technology in the Literature Classroom. (Forthcoming, 2016).

        {Book Chapter }

      Journal Article 2011
      • Quijano, Johansen. “How Linearity Affects Narrative: The Incomplete Story of Final Fantasy XIII.” Eludamos 5.1 (July 2011): 105 - 110. Digital.

        {Journal Article }
      2011
      • Quijano, Johansen. "Teaching Values Through Games: The Procedural Rhetoric of Missile Command and Jenga". PRTESOLGram 2-2011 (December 2011): 18-20. Print

        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2011
      • Quijano, Johansen. “Morality, Ethics, and Animal Rights in Romantic Poetry and Victorian Thought.” In Vyas, Manish & Patel, Yogesh.L. (June, 2011). Being for the Other: Issues in Animal Rights and Literature.

        {Book Chapter }
      2011
      • Quijano, Johansen. “Modern Media and Animal Rights: How Training your Dragon and Pokemon Influence Contemporary Animal Ethics.” In Vyas, Manish & Patel, Yogesh (June, 2011). Being for the Other: Issues in Animal Rights and Literature.

        {Book Chapter }

      Book Review 2011
      • Quijano, Johansen. "Review: Boys' Love Manga: Essays on the Sexual Ambiguity and Cross Cultural Fandom of the Genre." Journal of Popular Romance Studies 2.1 (October 2011): Digital.

        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 2010
      • Quijano, Johansen. “English Dungeons and Dragons: Tabletop Role Playing Games in the ESL Classroom.”PRTESOLGram, 1 2010. (June, 2010): 7 - 10. Print.

        {Exhibition Catalog }

      Journal Article 2009
      • Quijano, Johansen. “Chopin’s Dream as Reality: A Critical Reading of Eternal Sonata.” Eludamos 3.2 (November, 2009): 209 - 218. Digital.

        {Journal Article }
      2009
      • Quijano, Johansen. “The Effects of Using Role Playing Video Games as a Form of  New Media Literature in the ESL Classroom.” Revista Cayey 88. (April, 2009): 43 - 55. Print.

        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2009
      • Quijano, Johansen. “Language-Based Games and Motivation:  Using Games in the ESL Classroom.” In Vyas, Manish & Patel, Yogesh (2009, November). Teaching English as a Second Language: A New Pedagogy for a New Century.New Delhi: Phi Learning.

        {Book Chapter }
      2009
      • Quijano, Johansen. “Tabletop Role Playing Games.In Andrade, M. (2009, March). Classroom Practices: Language Games. Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages INC.

        {Book Chapter }

      Newsletter Article 2009
      • Quijano, Johansen. “Videogames and Learning: Reflections on X  Congreso de Investigación en la Educación held on March 2009.” Congreso de Investigación en la Educación – Centro de investigaciones Educativas. (September, 2010).  Digital.

        {Newsletter Article }

      Journal Article 2008
      • Quijano, Johansen. “Interactive Narrative in the form of New Media: Defining Role Playing Games.”  Pedagogia, 41. (December, 2008): 61 - 71. Print.

        {Journal Article }
      2008
      • Quijano, Johansen. “Using Literary Theory to Read Games: Power, Ideology, and Repression in Atlus’ Growlanser: Heritage of War.” Eludamos, 2.2 (September, 2008): 161 - 168. Print.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 1969
      • Quijano, Johansen. “Immersion and Player Involvement in Heavy   Rain.” Eludamos, (In Review for 2014). Digital.

        {Journal Article }

Presentations

    • April  2015
      Ludic Textuality, Immersion, and Character Representation as a Mirror: Ludonarrative Identity and Player Identification in Watch Dogs

      This paper analyzes Watch_Dogs from a ludic perspective and argues that the game serves as a mirror to reflect the player's use of hacking tools to invade the privacy of non playable characters back at them, thus presenting an argument against mass surveillance.

    • April  2014
      The Lost Humanity of The Last of Us: Ludonarrative Explorations of Morality and Ethics in Post Apocalyptic Playgrounds

      This talk approaches The Last of Us from ludonarrative and ludovisual lenses in order to explore the arguments made about human nature in the text.

    • February  2013
      Procedural Rhetoric as Narrative February 2013 Far West PCA Annual Conference (Concurrent Session Speaker)
    • November  2012
      The Digital World as a Classroom: Using Virtual and Augmented Spaces to Teach November 2012 PRTESOL 39th Annual Convention (Concurrent Session Speaker)
    • February  2012
      The Fear of Fallout: Choice and Self in Gaming February 2012 Far West PCA Annual Conference (Concurrent Session Speaker)
    • April  2011
      Exploring Romance in Final Fantasy VIII and Lunar April 2011 Popular / American Culture Association 2011 National Conference (Concurrent Session Speaker)
    • November  2010
      The Evolution of Media in Education November 2010 PRTESOL 37th Annual Convention (Concurrent Session Speaker)

Other Creative Activities

  • 2013
    • Other Activities
      • July 2013 Geverica Vol. 1 (Videogame)

        The game Generica - Vol. 1 was created by Johansen Quijano in a span of two months. It was created to show basic genre conventions of the JRPG games, and to demonstrate the kind of product that can be created with the RMK XP tool with limited time and resources and with basic or no formal programming instruction.

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Courses

      • ENGL 2338-008 TECHNICAL WRITING

        Intensive study and practice of writing in professional settings. Focus on the types of documents necessary to make decisions and take action on the job, such as proposals, reports, instructions, policies and procedures, email messages, letters, and descriptions of products and services. Practice individual and collaborative processes involved in the creation of ethical and efficient documents.

        Course work will include readings from textbooks and assigned articles, summary assignments based on the readings, essays written outside of class, and essay exams written in class. 

        More detailed course objectives are listed below. Note that you will need to access the Internet, Blackboard, and the Library's online databases to complete the requirements of this class.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-002 TECHNICAL WRITING

        Intensive study and practice of writing in professional settings. Focus on the types of documents necessary to make decisions and take action on the job, such as proposals, reports, instructions, policies and procedures, email messages, letters, and descriptions of products and services. Practice individual and collaborative processes involved in the creation of ethical and efficient documents.

        Course work will include readings from textbooks and assigned articles, summary assignments based on the readings, essays written outside of class, and essay exams written in class. 

        More detailed course objectives are listed below. Note that you will need to access the Internet, Blackboard, and the Library's online databases to complete the requirements of this class.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-073 Reading, Writing, and Critical Thinking I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Core Objectives:

        Critical Thinking Skills: To include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information.

        Communication Skills: To include effective development and expression of ideas through written, oral, and visual communication.

        Teamwork: To include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal.

        Personal Responsibility: To include the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making.

        ENGL 1301 Expected Learning Outcomes. By the end of ENGL 1301, students should be able to demonstrate:

        Rhetorical Knowledge

        Use knowledge of the rhetorical situation—author, audience, exigence, constraints—to analyze and construct texts

        Compose texts in a variety of genres, expanding their repertoire beyond predictable forms

        Adjust voice, tone, diction, syntax, level of formality, and structure to meet the demands of different rhetorical situations

        Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing

        Use writing, reading, and discussion for inquiry, learning, communicating, and examining assumptions

        Employ critical reading strategies to identify an author’s position, main ideas, genre conventions, and rhetorical strategies

        Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts

        Find, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate sources to inform, support, and situate their own claims

        Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts

        Processes

        Practice flexible strategies for generating, revising, and editing texts

        Practice writing as a recursive process that can lead to substantive changes in ideas, structure, and supporting evidence through multiple revisions

        Use the collaborative and social aspects of writing to critique their own and others’ texts

        Conventions

        Apply knowledge of genre conventions ranging from structure and paragraphing to tone and mechanics

        Summarize, paraphrase, and quote from sources using appropriate documentation style

        Control such surface features as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling

        Employ technologies to format texts according to appropriate stylistic conventions

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-032 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

         Core Objectives:

        Critical Thinking Skills: To include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information.

        Communication Skills: To include effective development and expression of ideas through written, oral, and visual communication.

        Teamwork: To include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal.

        Personal Responsibility: To include the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making.
         

        ENGL 1302 Expected Learning Outcomes

        In ENGL 1302, students build on the knowledge and information that they learned in ENGL 1301. By the end of ENGL 1302, students should be able to:

        Rhetorical Knowledge

        Identify and analyze the components and complexities of a rhetorical situation

        Use knowledge of audience, exigence, constraints, genre, tone, diction, syntax, and structure to produce situation-appropriate argumentative texts, including texts that move beyond formulaic structures

        Know and use special terminology for analyzing and producing arguments

        Practice and analyze informal logic as used in argumentative texts

        Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing

        Understand the interactions among critical thinking, critical reading, and writing

        Integrate personal experiences, values, and beliefs into larger social conversations and contexts

        Find, evaluate, and analyze primary and secondary sources for appropriateness, timeliness, and validity

        Produce situation-appropriate argumentative texts that synthesize sources with their own ideas and advance the conversation on an important issue

        Provide valid, reliable, and appropriate support for claims, and analyze evidentiary support in others’ texts

        Processes

        Practice flexible strategies for generating, revising, and editing complex argumentative texts

        Engage in all stages of advanced, independent library research

        Practice writing as a recursive process that can lead to substantive changes in ideas, structure, and supporting evidence through multiple revisions

        Use the collaborative and social aspects of writing to critique their own and others’ arguments

        Conventions

        Apply and develop knowledge of genre conventions ranging from structure and paragraphing to tone and mechanics, and be aware of the field-specific nature of these conventions

        Summarize, paraphrase, and quote from sources using appropriate documentation style

        Revise for style and edit for features such as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling

        Employ technologies to format texts according to appropriate stylistic conventions

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-052 Rhetoric and Composition II

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Course work will include readings from textbooks and assigned articles, summary assignments based on the readings, essays written outside of class, and essay exams  written in class. 

        Detailed course objectives are listed below. Note that you will need to access the Internet, Blackboard, and the Library's online databases to complete the requirements of this class.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-063 Rhetoric and Composition II

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Course work will include readings from textbooks and assigned articles, summary assignments based on the readings, essays written outside of class, and essay exams  written in class. 

        Detailed course objectives are listed below. Note that you will need to access the Internet, Blackboard, and the Library's online databases to complete the requirements of this class.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-063 Rhetoric and Composition 2

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Course work will include readings from textbooks and assigned articles, summary assignments based on the readings, essays written outside of class, and essay exams  written in class. 

        Detailed course objectives are listed below. Note that you will need to access the Internet, Blackboard, and the Library's online databases to complete the requirements of this class.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-032 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Course work will include readings from textbooks and assigned articles, summary assignments based on the readings, essays written outside of class, and essay exams  written in class. 

        Detailed course objectives are listed below. Note that you will need to access the Internet, Blackboard, and the Librarys online databases to complete the requirements of this class.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INGL 1302-054 English 1302: Rhetoric and Composition II (053/054)

        ENGL 1302 - This course continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • INGL 1302-053 English 1302: Rhetoric and Composition II (053/054)

        ENGL 1302 - This course continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-061 English 1301: Rhetoric and Composition I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Core Objectives:

        Critical Thinking Skills: To include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information.

        Communication Skills: To include effective development and expression of ideas through written, oral, and visual communication.

        Teamwork: To include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal.

        Personal Responsibility: To include the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-001 Rhetoric, Composition, and Critical Thinking

        ENGL 1302 - This course continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-066 Rhetoric and Composition I

        ENGL 1301, Introduction to College Reading and Writing, is a course that emphasizes reading, recursive writing processes, synthesis of sources, rhetorical analysis, and argument. Students read a wide variety of texts, practice recursive writing processes, and participate in university discourses. Students read a wide variety of texts and complete both informal writing assignments and formal essay projects that draw upon outside sources as well as their own experiences.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-006 Interactivity, Media, and Genre

        Sophomore literature builds upon and extends the critical reading skills introduced in 1301 and 1302. By familiarizing students with an awareness of different genres and some elements of literature, we provide them with additional vocabulary and tools to enhance their ability to read critically.

        The focus of this course will be on the elements of literary genres and how these genres adapt and transmediate into digital interactive texts such as hypertext fiction, visual novels, and video game texts. It will mix elements of literary studies, digital media studies, and popular culture into its design and allow students to think critically about literature as well as contemporary interactive texts. The course will also emphasize how literary modes of inquiry can help shed light on questions regarding digital texts.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours