Skip to content. Skip to main navigation.

avatar

John D. Garrigus

Name

[Garrigus, John D.]
  • Professor, History
  • Fellow, National Humanities Center (2017-18)

Professional Preparation

    • 1988 PhD in HistoryThe Johns Hopkins University
    • 1985 MA in HistoryThe Johns Hopkins University
    • 1983 BA in HistoryDePauw University

Appointments

    • Sept 2016 to Present Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington   University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2006 to Present Assoc Prof
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Sept 1999 to June 2006 Professor
      Jacksonville University
    • Jan 1999 to June 1999 Visiting Fulbright Professor
      State University of Haiti
    • Sept 1995 to Sept 1999 Assoc Prof
      Jacksonville University
    • Sept 1988 to Sept 1995 Assist Professor
      Jacksonville University

Awards and Honors

    • Sep  2015 Outstanding Graduate Advisor Award sponsored by UT Arlington College of Liberal Arts
    • Nov  2009 Alicia Smotherman Award for Innovative Teaching sponsored by College of Liberal ArtsOffice of the Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsOffice of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
      Description:

      Awarded by the College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas at Arlington, 2009

    • Jan  2007 Gilbert Chinard Prize sponsored by Society for French Historical Studies Award Details
      Description:

      Awarded for Before Haiti: Race and Citizenship in French Saint-Domingue

    • May  2004 Outstanding Faculty Researcher sponsored by Jacksonville University, Jacksonville FL
    • May  2000 Professor of the Year sponsored by Jacksonville University, Jacksonville FL
    • Jan  1994 Tibesar Prize sponsored by Conference on Latin American History
      Description:

      Awarded for the year’s best article in the journal Americas

Research and Expertise

  • Caribbean history

    I study social and cultural life in Saint-Domingue, as Haiti was known under French colonial rule. The colony was the largest and most profitable slave plantation colony in the Atlantic world in the eighteenth century, with an enslaved population that outnumbered free people nearly 10 to 1 by the 1780s. Moreover the colony had a free population of color that was nearly as large as the white colonial population and included a number of wealthy planters and merchants. The evolution of French racial attitudes as they affected this wealthy class was the subject of my first research monograph. Mly second research monograph is a co-authored study depicting Saint-Domingue and Jamaica, the highly similar British colony that was about 150 miles away.

Publications

      Book Review Forthcoming
      • Review of Julia Gaffield, Haitian Connections in the Atlantic World: Recognition After Revolution, in New West Indies Guide/Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Anthology Work/Essay 2016
      • Laurent Dubois and John Garrigus. Slave Revolution in the Caribbean, 1789-1804: A Brief History with Documents. The Bedford Series in History and Culture. Second edition. New York: Bedford Saint-Martins.

        {Anthology Work/Essay} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book 2016
      Book Chapter 2016
      • "’Victims of our own credulity and indulgence’: The Life of Louis-François Boisrond Tonnerre (1776-1806)" pages 42-57 in Julia Gaffield, ed., The Haitian Declaration of Independence: Creation, Context, and Legacy.  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2016.

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2016
      • Garrigus, J. "Cuba, Haiti, and the Age of Atlantic Revolution." Reviews in American History, vol. 44 no. 1, 2016, pp. 52-57. Project MUSE, doi:10.1353/rah.2016.0012. [review of Ada Ferrer, Freedom’s Mirror: Cuba and Haiti in the Age of Revolution. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015.]

        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Chapter 2015
      • "La confession du Médor, au commencement de l'affaire Macandal, (partie française de Saint-Domingue, 1757)" page 73-84 in Dominique Rogers, ed. Voix d'esclaves: Antilles, Guyane et Louisiane françaises, xviiie - xix siècles. Paris: Karthala, 2015.

        {Book Chapter} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Encyclopedia Entry 2015
      • “The Haitian Revolution in Atlantic Context,” pages 44-48 in Joseph C. Miller, ed. The Princeton Companion to Atlantic History. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2015.

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2015
      • “’Affranchis’ and ‘Coloreds’: Why Were Racial Codes Stricter in Eighteenth-Century Saint-Domingue than in Jamaica?” Quaderni Storici 148 (April 2015):69-86.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2014
      • “'Des François qui gémissent sous le joug de l'oppression': Les libres de couleur et la question de l’identité au début de la Révolution française,” pages 149-68 in Cécile Vidal, ed.  Français : La nation en débat entre colonies et métropole  (XVIe – XIXe siècle) Paris: Editions de l’EHESS, 2014.

        {Peer Reviewed} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2014
      • Review of Fear of French Negroes : Transcolonial Collaboration in the Revolutionary Americas, by Sara E. Johnson (Berkeley, 2012) in Americas 71 (July 2014), 144-45.

        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2014
      • Review of Michael Kwass, Contraband: Louis Mandrin and the Making of a Global Underground in American Historical Review (Dec. 2014): 1782-1783.

        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2013
      • Review of Andrew S. Curran, "The Anatomy of Blackness: Science & Slavery in an Age of Enlightenment," for the New West Indies Guide/ Nieuwe West-Indische Gids 87 (2013),135-7. doi: 10.1163/22134360-12340010  
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Review of Malick Ghachem, The Old Regime and the Haitian Revolution for Slavery & Abolition 34 (4) (2013): 683-684.

        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2012
      • Review of Rebecca Schloss, Sweet Liberty: The Final Days of Slavery in Martinique, for French Studies : A Quarterly Review (2012) 66(1): 128 doi:10.1093/fs/knr244  

        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2012
      • Review of  Madeleine Dobie, "Trading Places: Colonization and Slavery in Eighteenth-Century French Culture"  for French Studies: A Quarterly Review 2012; 66(4): 567 - 568 doi:10.1093/fs/kns223
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2012
      • Featured Review of Kate Ramsey, The Spirits and the Law: Vodou and Power in Haiti for The American Historical Review, 117 (October 2012), 1176-78.  
        {Book Review} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2011
      • Review of Jeremy Popkin, You Are All Free: The Haitian Revolution and the Abolition of Slavery for Journal of Social History, 45, (4) (October 2011), 855-6.

        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Encyclopedia Entry 2011
      • Garrigus, John D. “Historiography of the Francophone Caribbean.” In Handbook of Latin American Studies, edited by Library of Congress. Vol. 66. Austin [etc.]: University of Texas Press [etc.], 2011.

        {Encyclopedia Entry} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2011
      • Garrigus, John D. "Vincent Ogé Jeune (1757–91): Social Class and Free Colored Mobilization on the Eve of the Haitian Revolution," The Americas 68, 1 (July 2011): 33-62.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book 2010
      • Co-editor with Christopher Morris, Assumed Identities: The Meanings of Race in the Atlantic World. Texas A&M University Press, 2010.

        {Book} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Chapter 2010
      • Garrigus, John D. "Julien Raimond (1744-1801): Planter, Revolutionary, and Free Man of Color in Saint-Domingue." Pages 117-43 in The Human Tradition in the Atlantic World 1500-1850, ed. Karen Racine and Beatriz Gallotti Mamigonian.  Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield, c2010.

        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]
      2010
      • Garrigus, John D. "The Legacies of Pre-Revolutionary Saint-Domingue." Haiti Rising: Haitian History, Culture, and the Earthquake of 2010, edited by Martin Munro, 115-125. Liverpool University Press, 2010.

        {Book Chapter} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2010
      • Garrigus, John. "“Thy coming fame, Ogé! Is sure': New Evidence on Ogé’s Revolt (1790) and the Beginnings of the Haitian Revolution.” Pages 19-45 in Assumed Identities: The Meanings of Race in the Atlantic World, edited by John D. Garrigus and Christopher Morris, College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2010.

        {Book Chapter} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Encyclopedia Entry 2010
      • Garrigus, John. "Free People of Color." Pages 234-47 in The Routledge History of Slavery, edited by Gad Heuman and Trevor Burnard, London: Routledge, 2010.

        {Encyclopedia Entry} [Refereed/Juried]
      2010
      • Garrigus, John. "French Slavery." Pages 173-200 in Oxford Handbook of Slavery in the Americas, edited by Mark Smith and Robert Paquette, New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.

        {Encyclopedia Entry} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2009
      • Garrigus, John. "Saint-Domingue's Free People of Color and the Tools of Revolution." Pages 49-64 in The World of the Haitian Revolution, edited by David P. Geggus and Norman Fiering. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2009.

        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2009
      • Review of Jeremy Popkin, Surviving Racial Revolution, for French Studies: A Quarterly Review (2009) 63(4): 475 doi:10.1093/fs/knp163

        {Review essay} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2008
      • Review of Christopher Miller, The French Atlantic Triangle for H-France Forum 3 (3) (2008) http://www.hfrance.net/forum/forumvol3/GarrigusOnMiller1.pdf

        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book 2007
      • Garrigus, John, ed. La Mulâtre ou la femme comme il y a beaucoup de blanches (Paris, 1803). Paris: L'Harmattan, 2007.

        {Book} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2007
      • Garrigus, John. "'To establish a community of property': Marriage and race before and during the Haitian Revolution." Journal of the History of the Family 12, no 2 (2007): 142-152.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2007
      • Garrigus, John. "Opportunist or Patriot? Julien Raimond (1744-1801) and the Haitian Revolution." Slavery & Abolition 48 (2007): 1-27.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book 2006
      • Garrigus, John. Before Haiti: Race and Citizenship in French Saint-Domingue. New York: Palgrave-MacMillan, 2006.
        {Book} [Refereed/Juried]
      2006
      • Garrigus, John and Laurent Dubois. Slave Revolution in the Caribbean, 1789-1804:A Brief History with Documents. Bedford St. Martin's, 2006.
        {Book} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Chapter 2006
      • Garrigus, John. "Colonial Saint-Domingue." Common Routes: St. Domingue-Louisiana: The Historic New Orleans Collection, edited by Lynn D. Adams, Somogy Art Publishers, 2006.
        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

      Exhibition Catalog 2006
      • “Colonial Saint-Domingue,” in Lynn D. Adams, ed., Common Routes: St. Domingue-Louisiana: The Historic New Orleans Collection [New Orleans]: The Historic New Orleans Collection; [Paris]: Somogy Art Publishers, c2006.

        {exhibition catalog} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2006
      • « Moreau de Saint-Méry et le patriotisme créole à Saint-Domingue » in Moreau de Saint-Méry, ou les ambiguïtés d'un créole des Lumières. Fort-de-France: Archives départementales de la Martinique, 2006.

        {Exhibition Catalog} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Conference Proceeding 2004
      • “Le patriotisme américain: Emilien Petit and the Dilemma of French-Caribbean Identity Before and After the Seven Years’ War,” Proceedings of the Western Society for French History: Selected Papers of the 2002 Annual Meeting 30 (University Press of Colorado, 2004), 18-29.

        {Conference Proceeding} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Chapter 2003
      • “Race, genre, et vertu dans la fiction fondationnelle haïtienne manquée,” 1802 en Guadeloupe et à Saint-Domingue : Réalités et mémoire Basse-Terre: Société d’histoire de la Guadeloupe, 2003.

        {Book Chapter} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2003
      • “Race, Gender, and Virtue in Haiti’s Failed Foundational Fiction: La Mulâtre comme il y a peu de blanches (1803),” pages 73-94 in Sue Peabody and Tyler Stovall eds., The Color of Liberty: Histories of Race in France. Durham: Duke University Press, 2003.

        {Peer Reviewed} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Chapter 2001
      • “New Christians / 'New Whites': Sephardic Jews, Free People of Color, and Citizenship in French Saint-Domingue, 1760-1789,” pages 314-332 in Paolo Bernadini and Norman Fiering, eds., The Jews and the Expansion of Europe to the West: 1450 to 1800. New York: Berghan Books, 2001.

        {Book Chapter} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Presentations

    • December  2015
      “A Secret Brotherhood? The Question of Black Freemasonry Before and During the Haitian Revolution”

      Workshop on Transatlantic Fraternalism

    • October  2015
      Twin Pearls of the Antilles: French Saint-Domingue and British Jamaica in the Eighteenth Century

      Presentation comparing slavery and capitalism in eighteenth-century Saint-Domingue and Jamaica

    • February  2014

      LES LIBRES DE COULEUR DANS L’ESPACE ATLANTIQUE, Université de Nantes, February 13 and 14, 2014, “"Affranchis" and "Coloreds": Why Were Racial Codes Stricter in Eighteenth-Century Saint-Domingue than in Jamaica?

    • May  2013
      A Secret Brotherhood? The Question of Black Freemasonry Before and During the Haitian Revolution.
    • May  2013
      Slave resistance in the French Atlantic World in the Age of Revolutions (1750-1850)
    • March  2013
      New Light on Makandal the Poisoner
    • March  2013
      Victims of our own credulity and indulgence: The Life of Louis-François Boisrond Tonnerre (1776-1806)
    • October  2013

      TEACHING OF HISTORY CONFERENCE, University of North Texas/Texas State Historical Association; October 5,  2013; “Jean-Pierre Boyer (r. 1818-1843): Buying Haiti out of International Isolation”

    • May  2012

      'The Case of Makandal the Poisoner (1757): War, Religion, and Slave Resistance in Saint-Domingue'

    • April  2012

      'A Secret Brotherhood? The Question of Black Freemasonry before and during the Haitian Revolution'

    • October  2012

      'Beyond Mountains, Mountains: French Cartography and Topography in the Antilles, 1600-1800'

      public lecture

    • April  2012

      'An African Poisoner in the Caribbean? A New Perspective on Slave Resistance before the Haitian Revolution'

      public lecture

    • January  2011

      "The Cultural Construction of Resistance: The Legend of Makandal the Poisoner."

      Presentation and discussion of a work-in-progress:

    • October  2010

      'Before the Haitian Revolution: How French Was Saint-Domingue'

      Luncheon keynote speaker

    • January  2009

      'Vincent Ogé jeune (1757–91): History, Biography, and the Haitian Revolution'

    • October  2008

      "'Des François qui gémissent sous le joug de l'oppression' : The Evolving Question of Identity for Free People of Color During the Early French Revolution"

    • January  2007

      "Black and White Brothers: The Secret History of Freemasons during the Haitian Revolution"

  • Past
    •  
      Newberry Library/Warwick University Summer Workshop for graduate students
      "Connections, Convergences and Disjuncture - the Joint Histories of Seventeenth-Century and Eighteenth Century England/Britain and English/British America, 1650-1750"
  • Past
  • Past
    •  
      Migration, Diaspora, Ethnicity, & Nationalism in History
      "'Buccaneers Became Ballet Masters': The Emergence of a New Creole Identity in Saint-Domingue, 1763-1779" 
  • Past
    •  
      42ND Annual Webb Lectures; University of Texas at Arlington
      "The Man Who Started the Haitian Revolution: The Many Identities of Vincent Ogé"
  • Past
  • Past
    •  
      GROUPE D’HISTOIRE DE L’ATLANTIQUE FRANÇAISE : HAÏTI DANS LE MONDE ATLANTIQUE
      "An Atlantic Context for New World Identities in Saint-Domingue and Haiti"
  • Past
    •  
      STORIES OF SAINT-DOMINGUE, STORIES OF HAITI: REPRESENTING THE HAITIAN REVOLUTION, 1789-2009
      L’Orgueil des mulâtres: Nineteenth Century Accounts of Free Men of Color in the Haitian Revolution”
  • Past
    •  
      CONTEST FOR CONTINENTS: THE SEVEN YEARS WAR IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
      “Saint-Domingue and the Seven Years’ War: Redefining the Place of Free Colored Soldiers in the French Caribbean”
  • Past
    •  

      LES LIBRES DE COULEUR DANS L’ESPACE ATLANTIQUE, Université de Nantes, February 13 and 14, 2014; “"Affranchis" and "Coloreds": Why Were Racial Codes Stricter in Eighteenth-Century Saint-Domingue than in Jamaica?

  • Past
    •  
      Commentator

      Review of PhD drafts and book mansucript chapters.

  • Past
    •  
      A Secret Brotherhood: The Question of Black Freemasonry Before and During the Haitian Revolution.

      Investigates whether Toussaint Louverture's distinctive signature meant he was a Freemason in Saint-Domingue before or during the Haitian Revolution.   

  • Past
    •  
      Twin Pearls of the Antilles: French Saint-Domingue and British Jamaica in the Eighteenth Century

      Describes the deep economic and political similarities of these two important sugar colonies.

Projects

  • 2016
    • Mar 2016 to Aug 2016 The Spatial History of a Slave Poisoning Plot: Recreating the Macandal Conspiracy of 1757

       For the past 200 years, nearly every historian of the Haitian Revolution -- the only successful slave uprising in modern world history -- has described the Macandal "poison conspiracy" of 1757-58 as inspiring the rebels who forced the end of French colonial slavery in 1794. However a spatial perspective gained through GIS provides a fresh interpretation of this important slave conspiracy. We know little about François Macandal's worldview, but GIS allows us to recreate the environmental, economic, and cultural contexts of his life. Combining a digital elevation model of Saint-Domingue's northern plain, plus data from historical maps and censuses, with the testimony of convicted poisoners and royal administrators, this project suggests that French masters and enslaved Africans misunderstood why they were experiencing a wave of human and livestock mortality.

      Role: Principal Investigator PI: John Garrigus
  • 2015
    • Apr 2015 to Present “Macandal Is Saved”: The Legend and Reality of Saint-Domingue’s Most Famous Rebel

      On January 20, 1758, executioners lashed a one-armed black man to a stake in the main square of Cap Français, the largest city in Saint-Domingue, to be burned alive. Most French colonists believed that he orchestrated a massive poisoning campaign in 1758, a conspiracy that killed thousands of people and tens of thousands of animals. Authorities had already immolated over two dozen men and women alleged to be members of his poisoning network. But as French colonists celebrated his impending death, François, better known as Macandal, snapped the stake and leapt from the flames. Shouts of “Macandal is saved” went up from slaves in the crowd as masters gasped in horror. Soldiers quickly recaptured the prisoner, tied him to a plank and threw him back onto the blazing pyre. François/Macandal had once claimed that the whites could never kill him, and though the fire reduced his body to cinders, the story of his invincibility lived on. For decades after this Saint-Domingue’s colonists trembled at the thought that another Macandal would rise against them.

      The story of an African poisoner of uncanny abilities, fiercely opposed to the French colonial slave regime, has become a central element in the narrative of the Haitian Revolution. Historians and novelists have seen Macandal as a precursor of the slave revolt of 1791, and have made him a symbol of the struggle against French colonial slavery.

      Macandal Is Saved re-constructs this famous story in two fundamental ways. It argues that historians and contemporaries misunderstood the nature of the conspiracy and it proposes a new explanation of the devastating mortality blamed on African poisons. First, it confirms slaves’ confession that they were working together to win individual freedom by manipulating their owners using spiritual/medical substances. Their stated goal – eventually realized in the events of 1791 – was to create so many free blacks that this group could “stand up to the French” and “finish off the colony.” Masters believed a network of poisoners was distributing toxic powders across Saint-Domingue’s northern region. Macandal Is Saved contends that these deaths were triggered by changes in food smuggling patterns during the blockades of the Seven Years War.

      Role: Other PI: John Garrigus

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • Sept 2017 to May 2018 Residential Fellow, National Humanities Center sponsored by  - $43500
    • Mar 2016 to Aug 2016 Spatial History Research Collaboration sponsored by  - $10000

Students Supervised

Collaborators

    • thumbnail
      Duration : May 2007 to Present

      Co-author of current book project: Plantation Machine: Wealth and Belonging in Saint-Domingue and Jamaica, 1748-1788.

    • thumbnail
      Duration : Feb 2004 to Nov 2006

      Co-editors for the first edition of Slave Revolutions in the Caribbean (Bedford-St. Martins', 2006)

    • thumbnail
      Duration : Oct 2015 to Present

      For second edition of Slave Revolutions in the Caribbean (Bedford St Martin)

Courses

      • HIST 4366-001 LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY: ORIGINS THROUGH INDEPENDENCE

        Focusing on the years from 1300 to 1825, this course charts the emergence of creole cultures in Mexico, Central America and South America in the years before political independence from Europe. We will focus on the cultural, social, and economic history of Latin America and, necessarily, on the indigenous, Iberian, and West African societies that shaped it. As we will do this we will use and discuss the intellectual tools and approaches historians use to understand the past. Our readings reflect the ongoing “revisionism” that is an essential aspect of historical thinking.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 4369-001 History of the Caribbean

        This course will present a picture of the Caribbean quite different from that held by many North Americans. For 500 years, this region has been the site of encounters and clashes among Native Americans, Europeans, Africans, and Asians. For three centuries Europe's leading states fought each other to control these islands, which were the most valuable real estate in the Atlantic world. At the same time Dutch, English, French and Spanish colonists imported millions of enslaved men, women, and children from Africa to work on the sugar and coffee plantations that made the region so profitable for its masters. Supported by racism and colonialism, plantation slavery left its mark on the Caribbean long after emancipation and independence.

        But poverty and powerlessness could not prevent Caribbean people from developing their own resilient and resourceful cultures, forged in resistance to slavery and rooted in a shared African heritage. In music, religion, and literature the Caribbean has given the world new voices and modes of expression that many North Americans value, though often without understanding their origins.

        The goal of this class is to trace the emergence of modern multi-ethnic Caribbean nations from the slave colonies of the not-so-distant past. We will show that that though they provide tourists with a picturesque "escape" destination, the islands of the Caribbean have played a central role in the history of the Atlantic world for the last 500 years.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 4366-002 Latin America Through Independence

        Focusing on the years from 1300 to 1825, this course charts the emergence of creole cultures in Mexico, Central America and South America in the years before political independence from Europe. We will focus on the cultura and social history of Latin America and, necessarily, on the indigenous, Iberian, and West African societies that shaped it.  As we will do this we will use and discuss the intellectual tools and approaches historians use to understand the past. Our readings reflect the ongoing "revisionism" that is an essential aspect of historical thinking.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5311-001 The French Atlantic, 1500-1848

        This class is designed to introduce students to the concept of "The French Atlantic". Canada, Louisiana, and Saint-Domingue [colonial Haiti] are the key geographic areas we will examine, mostly in the eighteenth century. Thematically, our readings focus on questions of identity, that is, how contemporaries understood the nature of Indians, Europeans, American-born Europeans, Africans, and American-born Africans, and the societies in which they lived together. We will not be reading about the distinctiveness of French versus British or Spanish imperial practices and cultures. But these comparative questions will be part of our class discussions.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2302-005 History of Civilization II
        This is an on-line course, taught via Blackboard. Follow the link below to see the syllabus which describes the course fully.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 20121 Link
      • HIST 5349-001 Introduction to Transatlantic History
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 20121 Link
      • HIST 6301-001 Colloquium in Exploration, Discovery, and Cartography
        Please click here to see my home page where you can find the most up-to-date materials and links.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2008
      • HIST 2302-001 History of Civilization
        This course is taught as a history of the world from1500 to 2001.Please click here to see my home page where you can find the most up-to-date materials and links.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 20071 Link
      • HIST 4369-001 History of the Caribbean
        A history of the Caribbeanfrom 1492 to the present.

        Please click here to see my home page where you can find the most up-to-date materials and links.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 20071 Link
      • HIST 6321-001 Seminar in Exploration, Discovery, and Cartography
        Please click here to see my home page where you can find the most up-to-date materials and links.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2007

Service to the Profession

  • Appointed
    • Sept 1992 to  Sept 2010 Francophone Caribbean contributor to the Handbook of Latin American Studies,

      Library of Congress publication, volumes 60, 62, 64, and 66

    • Sept 2000 to  Present Member, Board of Editors, H-Caribbean listserv, 2000 to present

      Part of the H-Net discussion and book review network

    • Sept 2010 to  Present Member, editorial board, French Colonial Historical Society Journal

      peer-reviewed journal

    • Sept 2008 to  Sept 2009 Member, editorial board, French Historical Studies

      peer reviewed journal

    • Sept 2010 to  Sept 2011 Chair, Chinard Prize Committee, Society For French Historical Studies, 2011

      The Gilbert Chinard prize is awarded annually to a distinguished scholarly book published in North America in 2013 in the history of themes shared by France and North, Central, or South America

    • July 2009 to  July 2009 Guest Faculty, NEH Summer Institute for College Teachers, “Slaves, Soldiers, Rebels: Currents of Black Resistance in the Tropical Atlantic, 1760 – 1888”

      Sponsored by the Center for Africana Studies at the Johns Hopkins University

    • July 2011 to  July 2011 Guest Faculty, NEH Summer Institute for College Teachers, “Slaves, Soldiers, Rebels: Currents of Black Resistance in the Tropical Atlantic, 1760 – 1888."

      Sponsored by the Center for Africana Studies at the Johns Hopkins University

    • Oct 2013 to  Oct 2013 Presenter, Teaching History Conference Texas State Historical Society and University of North Texas, 2013

      Made a presentation to high school teachers on “Jean-Pierre Boyer (r. 1818-1843): Buying Haiti out of International Isolation”

    • Aug 2006 to  Present Peer reviewer, book manuscripts

      Bedford/Saint-Martin’s Press

      Oxford University Press

      Blackwell Routledge

      University of Chicago Press

      University of Nebraska Press

    • Aug 2006 to  Present Peer reviewer, journal submissions

      Journal of International Political Sociology
      French Colonial History 
      Journal of Colonial History 
      American Historical Review 
      French Historical Studies 
      Journal of the Early Republic
      History Compass 
      Journal de la Société des Américanistes 
      Journal of Historical Sociology 
      Journal of Early American History 
      Journal of the Early Republic
      William and Mary Quarterly

    • Oct 2012 to  Present Reviewer, fellowship applications

      Fonds de recherché sur la société et la culture Québec
      National Humanities Center
      Paris Institute for Advanced Study

Service to the University

  • Appointed
    • Aug 2010 to  Present PhD Advisor, Transatlantic History Doctoral Program

       University of Texas at Arlington

    • May 2012 to  Feb 2013 Co-organizer, Belfer First Step Workshop on Teaching the Holocaust for pre-service teachers

      Worked with the US Holocaust Memorial Museum and fellow organizers Leisa Martin (College of Education) and Andrew Milson (College of Education) to develop this one-day workshop for 60 students.

    • Oct 2015 to  Present University of Texas at Arlington, College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Advisor award, 2015

      For work as advisor to the PhD program in Transatlantic History

  • Volunteered
    • Oct 2011 to  Mar 2012 Co-organizer THATCamp Texas 2012 (The Humanities and Technology Camp)

      Worked with co-organizers Kim Van Noort (College of Liberal Arts), Jody Baily (Library),  Laurel Stvans (Department of Linguistics), Rafia Mirza (Library) and Cedric May (Department of English) to develop a one-day Digital Humanities seminar for roughly 60 participants from around the state.

    • Sept 2014 to  Apr 2015 Texas Digital Humanities Consortium

      Member of organizing committee for the second annual meeting  [April 9-11, 2015] of the Texas Digital Humanities Consortium.

Other Service Activities

  • Featured Speaker
    • Oct 2012 Haiti Symposium, Lawrence University, Appleton Wisconsin, September 30-October 1, 2012

      Presented lectures on Haitian history to volunteers and university students