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John W Priest

Name

[Priest, John W]
  • Professor, Industrial,Manufacturing,&Systems Engineering

Biography

Dr. John Priest is Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering and Co-Director of CREST Multi-Disciplinary Research Center. He is former Associate Director of the Texas Radio Frequency Innovation and Development Center and former Associate Director of the Automation and Robotics Research Institute. In 2001, he received the University of Texas at Arlington Outstanding Engineering Research Award. While at UTA he has published over 160 technical articles, authored 2 books, received 7 patents, 1 pending and received over $7 Million funded research as principal and co-principal investigator. From 1982 to 1996, Dr. Priest was on the President's Committee for Employment of Persons with Disabilities. Between 1978 and 1999, he has worked on several major government task forces to improve the processes of technical risk assessment, product development, and producibility. He is former chair of the Faculty Senate and member of UT System Faculty Advisory Board.. Prior to academia, he worked for Texas Instruments, Rockwell International and General Motors. Dr. Priest's research interests include product and process development, commercialization, systems analysis, cost analysis, producibility, intelligent knowledge based systems and process improvement. His current research works include converting lignite coal to liquid crude, scheduling algorithms for General Motors, preventing runway incursions at DFW Airport, systems analysis of improved tracking methods for AA Cargo, micro fabrication methods for micro-reactors for biodiesel, coal and natural gas liquidification, and producibility and technical risk assessment of medical micro-devices. These projects are funded by the Department of Energy, DARPA, and private companies.

Professional Preparation

    • 1980 Ph.D. in Industrial EngineeringUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • 1975 M.S. in Industrial EngineeringUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • 1973 B.S. in Industrial EngineeringKettering University

Appointments

    • June 1982 to Present Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1982 to Jan 1988 Presidential Committee
      Employment of the Handicapped

Awards and Honors

    • Jun  2013 Outstanding Research Award sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
      Description:

      2001

Research and Expertise

  • Research Interest
    Dr. Priest's research interests include product and process development, RF applications, systems analysis, cost analysis, producibility, intelligent systems and process improvement. His current research includes cost analysis and prototyping for coal to liquid fuel gasification, natural gas to liquid fuel conversion, scheduling algorithms for General Motors, preventing runway incursions at DFW Airport, systems analysis of improved tracking methods for AA Cargo, micro fabrication methods for micro reactors for biodiesel, and producibility and technical risk assessment of medical microdevices.

Publications

      Journal Article 2012
      • “Air Impacts from Three Alternatives for Producing JP-8  Jet Fuel”. Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association,  2012, K. Kositkanawuth, R. H. Gangupomu, M. L. Sattler, B. Dennis, F. MacDonnell, R. Billo, J. Priest.

        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

        Conference Proceeding 2011
        • "Life Cycle Analysis of Emissions from Three Alternatives for Producing Crude”, Proceedings of 104th Annual Conference of the Air & Waste Management Association. Orlando, Florida, June 2011. K. Kositkanawuth, R. H. Gangupomu, M. L. Sattler, B. Dennis, F. MacDonnell, R. Billo, J. Priest.

          {Conference Proceeding} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
        • 2011
          • “Decision-Making Using Lean Six Sigma”, Proceedings of Industrial Engineering Research Conference (IERC), May, 2011. C. Chandler and J. Priest

            {Conference Proceeding} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

            Technical Report 2009
            • Priest. (2009). Technologies to Prevent Runway Incursions. DFW Airport: UTA.
              {Technical Report} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
            • 2009
              • Priest. (2009). Priority Parcel Servcie Tracking. American Airlines: UTA.
                {Technical Report} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
              • 2009
                • Rosenberger, P. (2009). Sceduling Alogrithm for Paint Department. General Motors: UTA.
                  {Technical Report} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

                  Conference Paper 2006
                  • A. Abu-Suleiman and J. Priest. "A Framework for Quantitative Enterprise Strategy Management Using Strategy Maps," presented at Proceeding of Industrial Engineering Research Conference, Houston, TX, May 2006.
                    {Conference Paper} [Refereed/Juried]
                  • 2006
                    • B. Sarder and D. H. Liles. "Mapping Design Activities across Product Development Life Cycle," presented at Proceeding of Industrial Engineering Research Conference, Houston, TX, May 2006.
                      {Conference Paper} [Refereed/Juried]
                    • 2006
                      • C. C. S. Chang and J. Priest. "Case-Based Representation of Assembly Part Design Knowledge," presented at Proceedings of Industrial Engineering Research Conference, Orlando, Florida, 2006.
                        {Conference Paper} [Refereed/Juried]
                      • 2006
                        • J. Priest, A. Chang, and C. C. Su. "Adaptation for Mechanical Design Based on Potential Risk Analysis," presented at Proceedings of Industrial Engineering Research Conference, Orlando, FL, 2006.
                          {Conference Paper} [Refereed/Juried]
                        • 2006
                          • J. Priest, M. B. Sarder, D. H. Liles, and Y. Moon. "Activity Modeling of Product and Process Design Using IDEF0," presented at roceedings of the 36th International Conference on Computers and Industrial Engineering, Taipei, Taiwan, 2006.
                            {Conference Paper} [Refereed/Juried]
                          • 2006
                            • J. Priest, A. Chang, and C. C. Su. "Applying Case-Based Reasoning to Assembly Part Design," presented at Proceedings of 36th International Conference on Computers and Industrial Engineering, Taipei, Taiwan, 2006.
                              {Conference Paper} [Refereed/Juried]

                            • Journal Article 2006
                              • L. B. Priest and C. H. Sanchez. "The Crescent Lab: A Smart Home for Students," ENC-2006, SLP, Mexico, Sep. 19-21, 2006.
                                {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

                                Conference Paper 2005
                                • J. Priest, A. Chang, and C. C. Su. "Retrieving Assembly Part Design using Case-Based Reasoning and Genetic Algorithms," presented at Proceedings of ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, Orlando, FL, 2005.
                                  {Conference Paper} [Refereed/Juried]
                                • 2005
                                  • J. Priest, A. Chang, and C. C. Su. "Adaptation for Assembly Part Design with Incomplete Information," presented at Proceedings of International Conference on Industrial Engineering Theory, Clearwater Beach, FL, 2005.
                                    {Conference Paper} [Refereed/Juried]
                                  • 2005
                                    • J. Priest, A. Chang, and C. C. Su. "A Decision Support System for Assembly Part Design using CBR Approach," presented at Proceedings of International Conference on Industrial Engineering Theory, Clearwater Beach, FL, 2005.
                                      {Conference Paper} [Refereed/Juried]

                                      Book Chapter 2004
                                      • J. Priest, L. Burnell, and J. R. Durrett. "An overview of A Virtual Advisor Utilizing Multi-Agent Software Teams and Contingency Theoretic Coordination Models," Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology, vol. I-III Idea Group Publishers, 2004.
                                        {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]
                                      • 2004
                                        • G. T. Stevens and J. Priest. "Robot Manufacturing Applications," CRC Handbook of Mechanical Engineering, Second Edition, 2004.
                                          {Book Chapter} [Refereed/Juried]

                                        • Journal Article 2004
                                          • Priest, John, John Durrett, and Lisa Burnell. "A Comparative Study of Traditional and Contingency Theoretic Object-Oriented Design Meatphors for Agile Manufacturing Systems." Journal of Agile Manufacturing (2004).
                                            {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
                                          • 2004
                                            • Priest, John, John Durrett, and Lisa Burnell. "Teaching Distributed Systems Design Using an Open Source Development Model." Creative College Teaching Journal 1, no 1 (2004): 69-77.
                                              {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

                                              Journal Article 2002
                                              • Priest, John, Lisa Burnell, and John Durrett. "Teaching Distributed Multidisciplinary Software Development." IEEE Software 10, no 5 (2002): 86-93.
                                                {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
                                              • 2002
                                                • Priest, John, John Durrett, and Lisa Burnell. "A Hybrid Analysis and Architectural Design Method for Development of Smart Home Components." IEEE Wireless Communications ,Vol. 9, no 6 (2002): 85-91.
                                                  {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

                                                  Book 2001
                                                  • J. Priest, Product Development and Design for Manufacturing: A Collaborative Approach for Producibility and Reliability. New York, New York: Marcel Dekker, 2001.
                                                    {Book} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

                                                    Book 1988
                                                    • J. Priest, Engineering Design for Producibility and Reliability. New York, New York: Marcel Dekker, 1988.
                                                      {Book} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

                                                      Journal Article 1986
                                                      • Engineering Design for Producibility and Reliability (1986)
                                                        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Presentations

  • Past
    •  
      Natural Gas to Liquid Fuels
  • Past
    •  
      CREST - Coal to Liquid Fuels - Department of Energy
  • Past
    •  
      Coal to Liquid Fuels - DARPA

Support & Funding

    • July 2013 to July 2014 A Novel Glass Microfluidic Neuro-Sensor For High- Throughput Drug Discovery" sponsored by  - $100000
    • Jan 2012 to Dec 2012 Coal to Liquid Fuel sponsored by  - $360000
    • July 2009 to July 2011 Coal to Liquid Fuel Conversion sponsored by  - $787000
    • July 2009 to July 2011 DFW Genesis Energy Group sponsored by  - $225000
    • Jan 2009 to Dec 2009 Micro reactor for Natural Gas sponsored by  - $50000
    • Jan 2009 to Dec 2009 Vacuum Hot Press sponsored by  - $125000
    • July 2008 to July 2012 CREST Phases 1 and 2 sponsored by  - $2160000
    • July 2008 to July 2009 Microreactor Biodiesel Production sponsored by  - $219000
    • July 2007 to July 2009 Arlington Chamber of Commerce and Texas Workforce Commission sponsored by  - $227000
    • July 2007 to July 2007 RFID Systems and Smart Containers sponsored by  - $20000
    • July 2006 to July 2009 Smart CPR Strip sponsored by  - $325000
    • July 2002 to July 2006 Collaborative Learning Program in Smart Home Technologies sponsored by  - $324000
    • July 2000 to July 2002 High Speed Liquid Metal Jetting for Metal Parts and Electronic Interconnects sponsored by  - $159600

Patents

    • Jan 2013 Patent No. 12/556,857  Methods and Systems for Improved Biodiesel Production

      Methods and Systems for Improved Biodiesel Production

    • June 2013 Patent No. 8,404,005  Methods and Systems for Improved Biodiesel Production

      Methods and Systems for Improved Biodiesel Production

    • June 2006 Patent No. 11/764,174  Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Sensor

      Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Sensor

    • June 1998 Patent No. 5,810,988  Apparatus and Method for Generation of Microspheres of Metals and Other Materials

      Apparatus and Method for Generation of Microspheres of Metals and Other Materials

    • June 1996 Patent No. 5,560,543  Heat Resistant Broad-Bandwidth Liquid Droplet Generators

      Heat Resistant Broad-Bandwidth Liquid Droplet Generators

Courses

      • IE 4345-001 Knowledge and Technology Management

        IE 5345 Syllabus

        Spring 2016  

        APPLIED KNOWLEDGE ENGINEERING and DATA ANALYTIC APPLICATIONS.

         3 Hours.

        Name: John W. Priest    Ph.D. P.E.

        Office Number: 404 Woolf Hall          Office Telephone Number: 817-272-3092

        Email Address: jpriest@uta.edu (best method for communication)

        Office Hours:  Due to the level of research I do in the field with industry and in 2 labs, I am never in my office!  Email if you have any questions or want to schedule a meeting. I will meet your at any mutually agreed upon time and place.

        Book:

        Decision Analysis for Management Judgment, 5th edition, by Goodwin and Wright, Wiley books, 2014

        Time and Place of Class Meetings: Tuesday and Thursday at 12:30 PM and 2:30 class PM

        Test Dates:

        February 18

        March 29 Tuesday

        Final as schedule by univeristy

        Distance Student Requirements:     Distance testing must follow all the College of Engineering rules including use of approved proctors.


        For problems viewing ClassRev (Echo360) recordings:   contact classroomsupport@uta.edu.

        Description of Course Content:

        Why important

        Understand the issues, ramifications and parameters of complex decision making

        Learn how to analyze complex decisions using proven techniques

        Document system design decisions to provide explanations for others to review and understand and impress your boss

        Provide decision documentation that could allow future automation (smart software to be implemented)

        Learn some of the most advanced model building techniques

        2 part class  

        1.decision analysis and

        2. advanced methods of applied artificial intelligence (intelligent systems, expert/smart systems, neural networks, genetic algorithms, fuzzy logic, etc.)

        Learn how to analyze and document decisions which provide the outline/specifications for incorporating into smart systems/products/processes/services/apps etc.

        Why this is important

        One of the fastest growing areas of technology with job opportunities

        Decision support, intelligent systems and data analytics are becoming an integral part of our work and life. (Who is not using software and wireless technologies every day to communicate and solve problems?) – smart phones, apps, NFC, etc.

        Applicable to any industry or organization

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 4339-001 Product Development, Producibility and Reliability Design

        This course covers the product and process development and engineering design process with focus on collaborative design in the enterprise environment. Manufacturing, reliability, testing, logistical and product support considerations are emphasized.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5339-001 Product Design, Development, Producibility, and Reliability Design

        This course covers product development and engineering design process with a focus on collaborative design. Software, manufacturing, reliability, testing, logistical and product support considerations are emphasized.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5345-001 knowledge

        IE

        IE 5345 Syllabus
        Spring 2017  
        APPLIED KNOWLEDGE ENGINEERING and DATA ANALYTIC APPLICATIONS.
         3 Hours.

        Name: John W. Priest    Ph.D. P.E.

        Office Number: 404 Woolf Hall          Office Telephone Number: 817-272-3092

        Email Address: jpriest@uta.edu (best method for communication)
        Office Hours:  Due to the level of research I do in the field with industry and in 2 labs, I am never in my office!  Email if you have any questions or want to schedule a meeting. I will meet your at any mutually agreed upon time and place.

        Book:
        Decision Analysis for Management Judgment, 5th edition, by Goodwin and Wright, Wiley books, 2014

        Time and Place of Class Meetings: Tuesday and Thursday at 12:30 PM and 2:30 class PM

        Test Dates:
        1. February 18
        2. March 29 Tuesday
        3. Final as schedule by univeristy

        Distance Student Requirements:     Distance testing must follow all the College of Engineering rules including use of approved proctors.

        For problems viewing ClassRev (Echo360) recordings:   contact classroomsupport@uta.edu.

        Description of Course Content:
        Why important
        1. Understand the issues, ramifications and parameters of complex decision making
        2. Learn how to analyze complex decisions using proven techniques
        3. Document system design decisions to provide explanations for others to review and understand and impress your boss
        4. Provide decision documentation that could allow future automation (smart software to be implemented)
        5. Learn some of the most advanced model building techniques

        2 part class  
        1.decision analysis and
        2. advanced methods of applied artificial intelligence (intelligent systems, expert/smart systems, neural networks, genetic algorithms, fuzzy logic, etc.)

        Learn how to analyze and document decisions which provide the outline/specifications for incorporating into smart systems/products/processes/services/apps etc.

        Why this is important
        • One of the fastest growing areas of technology with job opportunities
        • Decision support, intelligent systems and data analytics are becoming an integral part of our work and life. (Who is not using software and wireless technologies every day to communicate and solve problems?) – smart phones, apps, NFC, etc.
        • Applicable to any industry or organization

        Requirements: 
        Self learning or active learning for enabling life-long learning is a goal of this class. This means that you will be given reading assignments that you will have to take an active role in learning the material on your own in order to complete the assignment. You will be asked to perform assignments that I have not previously completed or might not be able to do myself. As in industry and the “real world”, assignments may be vague and change throughout the class.

        In addition, this is a “reading intensive and survey class” covering many new and state-of-the-art topics in decision support systems, knowledge management, knowledge engineering, intelligent systems, expert systems, data mining, etc. As a result, the book, ectures and notes are an integral part of this course. The student is responsible for studying and learning the lectures and handout materials whether or not the particular topic is discussed in class. All tests will contain questions on reading/studying the materials that were not discussed in class.

        Attend class, take good class notes of lectures, stay current, read and study the handouts and textbook, do homework and you will have no trouble. 

        Computers used in class must only be used to take notes. This includes any open windows.

        The syllabus can be viewed as a 'blueprint' for the course; changes in the syllabus can be made as needed. Students will be informed of any substantive changes in class lectures concerning examination, the grading or attendance policies and changes in project assignments.

        New policy – no computer, Ipad, cell phones or any electronic internet devices can be used in class. Certain exceptions can be made.


        Grading and Attendance Policy:  (Undergraduate and Graduate Students)
        Class attendance is  strongly encouraged (think as compulsery); so you do not miss critical attendance quiz points. Watching class videos is not the same thing as attending.. Attendance starts from the first day of class regardless of the circumstances. Late registration, just arriving from overseas, visa problems, graduate school, staying in your country for medical/dental/wedding/birthday issues or any other circumstances does not change your responsibility to catch up on your own and any surprise quizzes. This does not include approved absences.

         Your final grade is based on exams and surprise or attendance quizzes nothing else.  There are no extra credit projects, papers, lab work, etc.   No exceptions,   If you do poorly on the early exam(s), please drop the course; especially graduate students on probation.

        I expect that we will have 3 exams (1/3 each) and 2 to 7 (or more) attendance quizzes either deducting points or adding extra points to your grades.  Computation of the final average may vary from the original syllabus. Final grades will depend as modified during the course including any pop/surprise attendance quizzes and whether the final is comprehensive. Remember, final grade is based on only exams and attendance quizzes; nothing else!

        I reserve the right to lower your final grade by one letter for excessive absenses

        After further discussion with Dr Componation, there will no longer be grade changes except for exceptional circumstances.

        Under no circumstances will grade changes be made if the student has consistent poor grades on multiple tests and lack of attendance. Getting a job/internship, going through graduation ceremonies, probation, medical issues, possible dismissal, CTD or employer reimbursement is not a consideration for changing your final grade.

        You are welcome to meet with Dr. Componation to plead your case or go through the UTA formal grade appeal process.

        Key factors in a good grade are taking good note, written notes, sitting close to the front, not sitting by your friends that will distract you, and study a little every day, read the material before the lecture.

        No Whine Policy Concerning Test and Final Grades
         Discussion of the test and test questions is limited.  All requests for a regrade or questions concerning grading of a person’s individual test must be submitted in writing before the start of the next class period. The student must state what question is to be reviewed and why more credit should be given. This can be written on the test or on a separate sheet of paper.

        An individual’s test questions are not answered, reviewed or regraded while the student is in my presence.

        Pop or Surprise Quizzes
        When attendance is low, pop or surprise quizzes might be given in class to encourage attendance from all students. The value or credit for the quiz will vary. These quizzes may only be a signup sheet.

        Make-up Exams:      Excused Absences for Exams
        The only acceptable excuses for missing exams/quizzes or project due dates is a signed medical doctor's note that specifically states that you are unable to attend the exam/quiz/project, a traffic report showing that you were in a wreck, death in family etc. Not arriving for the first few classes due to travel schedules is not an excused absence.

        Expectations for Out-of-Class Study: Beyond the time required to attend each class meeting, students enrolled in this course should expect to spend at least an additional 6 hours per week of their own time in course-related activities, including reading required materials, completing assignments, preparing for exams, etc.

        Grade Grievances:  Any appeal of a grade in this course must follow the procedures and deadlines for grade-related grievances as published in the current undergraduate / graduate catalog.  For undergraduate courses, see http://wweb.uta.edu/catalog/content/general/academic_regulations.aspx#10; for graduate courses, see http://www.uta.edu/gradcatalog/2012/general/regulations/#grades.]

        Copying any written or web based materials for a project without proper referencing will not be tolerated.

        Xerox copies of the book that infringe on copyright laws will not be allowed in class.  

        Copyright Information: Copyright 2016 J.W. Priest as to this syllabus and all lectures and handouts as appropriate or specified otherwise.  Students are prohibited from selling (or being paid for taking) notes during this course to (or by) any person or commercial firm without the express permission of the professor teaching this course

        Drop Policy:  I use the university drop policy
        Students may drop or swap (adding and dropping a class concurrently) classes through self-service in MyMav from the beginning of the registration period through the late registration period. After the late registration period, students must see their academic advisor to drop a class or withdraw. Undeclared students must see an advisor in the University Advising Center. Drops can continue through a point two-thirds of the way through the term or session. It is the student's responsibility to officially withdraw if they do not plan to attend after registering. Students will not be automatically dropped for non-attendance. Repayment of certain types of financial aid administered through the University may be required as the result of dropping classes or withdrawing. For more information, contact the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships (http://wweb.uta.edu/aao/fao/).

        Counseling and Psychological Services, (CAPS)   www.uta.edu/caps/ or calling 817-272-3671.

        Only those students who have officially documented a need for an accommodation will have their request honored. Information regarding diagnostic criteria and policies for obtaining disability-based academic accommodations can be found at www.uta.edu/disability or by calling the Office for Students with Disabilities at (817) 272-3364.

        Title IX: The University of Texas at Arlington does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities, genetic information, and/or veteran status in its educational programs or activities it operates. For more information, visit uta.edu/eos. For information regarding Title IX, visit www.uta.edu/titleIX.

        Academic Integrity:

        Students enrolled all UT Arlington courses are expected to adhere to the UT Arlington Honor Code:

        I pledge, on my honor, to uphold UT Arlington’s tradition of academic integrity, a tradition that values hard work and honest effort in the pursuit of academic excellence.
        I promise that I will submit only work that I personally create or contribute to group collaborations, and I will appropriately reference any work from other sources. I will follow the highest standards of integrity and uphold the spirit of the Honor Code.

        UT Arlington faculty members may employ the Honor Code as they see fit in their courses, including (but not limited to) having students acknowledge the honor code as part of an examination or requiring students to incorporate the honor code into any work submitted. Per UT System Regents’ Rule 50101, §2.2, suspected violations of university’s standards for academic integrity (including the Honor Code) will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. Violators will be disciplined in accordance with University policy, which may result in the student’s suspension or expulsion from the University.
        UTA expects all students, whether in class or online, to abide by its Honor Code. The code is posted at http://www.uta.edu/engineering/current-students/academic-honesty.php.

        It is the philosophy of The University of Texas at Arlington that academic dishonesty is a completely unacceptable mode of conduct and will not be tolerated in any form. All persons involved in academic dishonesty will be disciplined in accordance with University regulations and procedures. Discipline may include suspension or expulsion from the University.

        "Scholastic dishonesty includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, and the submission for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, taking an examination for another person, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such acts." (Regents’ Rules and Regulations, Series 50101, Section 2.2)

        Copying any written or web based materials for a project without proper referencing will not be tolerated.

        Xerox copies of the book that infringe on copyright laws will not be allowed in class. 

        Copyright Information: Copyright 2016 J.W. Priest as to this syllabus, handouts and all lectures.  Students are prohibited from selling (or being paid for taking) notes during this course to (or by) any person or commercial firm without the express permission of the professor teaching this course
         
        Student Support Services Available: 
        The University of Texas at Arlington supports a variety of student success programs to help you connect with the University and achieve academic success. These programs include learning assistance, developmental education, advising and mentoring, admission and transition, and federally funded programs. Students requiring assistance academically, personally, or socially should contact the Office of Student Success Programs at 817-272-6107 for more information and appropriate referrals.

        Final Review Week:
        : A period of five class days prior to the first day of final examinations in the long sessions shall be designated as Final Review Week. The purpose of this week is to allow students sufficient time to prepare for final examinations. During this week, there shall be no scheduled activities such as required field trips or performances; and no instructor shall assign any themes, research problems or exercises of similar scope that have a completion date during or following this week unless specified in the class syllabus. During Final Review Week, an instructor shall not give any examinations constituting 10% or more of the final grade, except makeup tests and laboratory examinations. In addition, no instructor shall give any portion of the final examination during Final Review Week. During this week, classes are held as scheduled. In addition, instructors are not required to limit content to topics that have been previously covered; they may introduce new concepts as appropriate.

        Student Feedback Survey: At the end of each term, students enrolled in classes categorized as “lecture,” “seminar,” or “laboratory” can complete an online Student Feedback Survey (SFS). Instructions on how to access the SFS for this course will be sent directly to each student through MavMail approximately 10 days before the end of the term. Each student’s feedback enters the SFS database anonymously and is aggregated with that of other students enrolled in the course. UT Arlington’s effort to solicit, gather, tabulate, and publish student feedback is required by state law; students are strongly urged to participate. For more information, visit http://www.uta.edu/sfs

        Librarian to Contact:  Librarian located in the basement of Nedderman Hall

        E-Culture Policy: 
        The University of Texas at Arlington has adopted the University email address as an official means of communication with students.  Through the use of email, UT-Arlington is able to provide students with relevant and timely information, designed to facilitate student success.  In particular, important information concerning registration, financial aid, payment of bills, and graduation may be sent to students through email.

        All students are assigned an email account and information about activating and using it is available at www.uta.edu/email.  New students (first semester at UTA) are able to activate their email account 24 hours after registering for courses.  There is no additional charge to students for using this account, and it remains active as long as a student is enrolled at UT-Arlington.  Students are responsible for checking their email regularly.

        It is the classroom and distance students’ responsibility for all communications with Dr. Priest and the school administration. All emails should start with the class name “5345” in the subject.

        Emergency Exit Procedures: Should we experience an emergency event that requires us to vacate the building, students should exit the room and move toward the nearest exit. When exiting the building during an emergency, one should never take an elevator but should use the stairwells. Faculty members and instructional staff will assist students in selecting the safest route for evacuation and will make arrangements to assist individuals with disabilities.

        Student Support Services: UT Arlington provides a variety of resources and programs designed to help students develop academic skills, deal with personal situations, and better understand concepts and information related to their courses. Resources include tutoring, major-based learning centers, developmental education, advising and mentoring, personal counseling, and federally funded programs. For individualized referrals, students may visit the reception desk at University College (Ransom Hall), call the Maverick Resource Hotline at 817-272-6107, send a message to resources@uta.edu, or view the information at http://www.uta.edu/universitycollege/resources/index.php
        The English Writing Center (411LIBR): Hours are 9 am to 8 pm Mondays-Thursdays, 9 am to 3 pm Fridays and Noon to 5 pm Saturdays and Sundays. Walk In Quick Hits sessions during all open hours Mon-Thurs. Register and make appointments online at http://uta.mywconline.com. Classroom Visits, Workshops, and advanced services for graduate students and faculty are also available. Please see www.uta.edu/owl for detailed information.
        Drop Policy: Students may drop or swap (adding and dropping a class concurrently) classes through self-service in MyMav from the beginning of the registration period through the late registration period. After the late registration period, students must see their academic advisor to drop a class or withdraw. Undeclared students must see an advisor in the University Advising Center. Drops can continue through a point two-thirds of the way through the term or session. It is the student's responsibility to officially withdraw if they do not plan to attend after registering. Students will not be automatically dropped for non-attendance. Repayment of certain types of financial aid administered through the University may be required as the result of dropping classes or withdrawing. For more information, contact the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships (http://wweb.uta.edu/aao/fao/).

        Disability Accommodations: UT Arlington is on record as being committed to both the spirit and letter of all federal equal opportunity legislation, including The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), The Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act (ADAAA), and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. All instructors at UT Arlington are required by law to provide “reasonable accommodations” to students with disabilities, so as not to discriminate on the basis of disability. Students are responsible for providing the instructor with official notification in the form of a letter certified by the Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD).  Only those students who have officially documented a need for an accommodation will have their request honored. Students experiencing a range of conditions (Physical, Learning, Chronic Health, Mental Health, and Sensory) that may cause diminished academic performance or other barriers to learning may seek services and/or accommodations by contacting:
        The Office for Students with Disabilities, (OSD)  www.uta.edu/disability or calling 817-272-3364. Information regarding diagnostic criteria and policies for obtaining disability-based academic accommodations can be found at www.uta.edu/disability.

        Counseling and Psychological Services, (CAPS)   www.uta.edu/caps/ or calling 817-272-3671 is also available to all students to help increase their understanding of personal issues, address mental and behavioral health problems and make positive changes in their lives.


        Non-Discrimination Policy: The University of Texas at Arlington does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities, genetic information, and/or veteran status in its educational programs or activities it operates. For more information, visit uta.edu/eos.

        Title IX Policy: The University of Texas at Arlington (“University”) is committed to maintaining a learning and working environment that is free from discrimination based on sex in accordance with Title IX of the Higher Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX), which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs or activities; Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII), which prohibits sex discrimination in employment; and the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act (SaVE Act). Sexual misconduct is a form of sex discrimination and will not be tolerated. For information regarding Title IX, visit www.uta.edu/titleIX or contact Ms. Jean Hood, Vice President and Title IX Coordinator at (817) 272-7091 or jmhood@uta.edu.

        Academic Integrity: Students enrolled all UT Arlington courses are expected to adhere to the UT Arlington Honor Code:

        I pledge, on my honor, to uphold UT Arlington’s tradition of academic integrity, a tradition that values hard work and honest effort in the pursuit of academic excellence.
        I promise that I will submit only work that I personally create or contribute to group collaborations, and I will appropriately reference any work from other sources. I will follow the highest standards of integrity and uphold the spirit of the Honor Code.

        UT Arlington faculty members may employ the Honor Code in their courses by having students acknowledge the honor code as part of an examination or requiring students to incorporate the honor code into any work submitted. Per UT System Regents’ Rule 50101, §2.2, suspected violations of university’s standards for academic integrity (including the Honor Code) will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. Violators will be disciplined in accordance with University policy, which may result in the student’s suspension or expulsion from the University. Additional information is available at https://www.uta.edu/conduct/.

        Electronic Communication: UT Arlington has adopted MavMail as its official means to communicate with students about important deadlines and events, as well as to transact university-related business regarding financial aid, tuition, grades, graduation, etc. All students are assigned a MavMail account and are responsible for checking the inbox regularly. There is no additional charge to students for using this account, which remains active even after graduation. Information about activating and using MavMail is available at http://www.uta.edu/oit/cs/email/mavmail.php.

        Student Feedback Survey: At the end of each term, students enrolled in face-to-face and online classes categorized as “lecture,” “seminar,” or “laboratory” are directed to complete an online Student Feedback Survey (SFS). Instructions on how to access the SFS for this course will be sent directly to each student through MavMail approximately 10 days before the end of the term. Each student’s feedback via the SFS database is aggregated with that of other students enrolled in the course.  Students’ anonymity will be protected to the extent that the law allows. UT Arlington’s effort to solicit, gather, tabulate, and publish student feedback is required by state law and aggregate results are posted online. Data from SFS is also used for faculty and program evaluations. For more information, visit http://www.uta.edu/sfs.

        Final Review Week: for semester-long courses, a period of five class days prior to the first day of final examinations in the long sessions shall be designated as Final Review Week. The purpose of this week is to allow students sufficient time to prepare for final examinations. During this week, there shall be no scheduled activities such as required field trips or performances; and no instructor shall assign any themes, research problems or exercises of similar scope that have a completion date during or following this week unless specified in the class syllabus. During Final Review Week, an instructor shall not give any examinations constituting 10% or more of the final grade, except makeup tests and laboratory examinations. In addition, no instructor shall give any portion of the final examination during Final Review Week. During this week, classes are held as scheduled. In addition, instructors are not required to limit content to topics that have been previously covered; they may introduce new concepts as appropriate.

        Emergency Exit Procedures:  Should we experience an emergency event that requires us to vacate the building, students should exit the room and move toward the nearest exit, which is located [insert a description of the nearest exit/emergency exit]. When exiting the building during an emergency, one should never take an elevator but should use the stairwells. Faculty members and instructional staff will assist students in selecting the safest route for evacuation and will make arrangements to assist individuals with disabilities.

        Student Support Services:UT Arlington provides a variety of resources and programs designed to help students develop academic skills, deal with personal situations, and better understand concepts and information related to their courses. Resources include tutoring, major-based learning centers, developmental education, advising and mentoring, personal counseling, and federally funded programs. For individualized referrals, students may visit the reception desk at University College (Ransom Hall), call the Maverick Resource Hotline at 817-272-6107, send a message to resources@uta.edu, or view the information at http://www.uta.edu/universitycollege/resources/index.php.

        The IDEAS Center (2nd Floor of Central Library) offers free tutoring to all students with a focus on transfer students, sophomores, veterans and others undergoing a transition to UT Arlington. To schedule an appointment with a peer tutor or mentor email IDEAS@uta.edu or call (817) 272-6593.
        The English Writing Center (411LIBR): [Optional.] The Writing Center Offers free tutoring in 20-, 40-, or 60-minute face-to-face and online sessions to all UTA students on any phase of their UTA coursework. Our hours are 9 am to 8 pm Mon.-Thurs., 9 am-3 pm Fri. and Noon-6 pm Sat. and Sun. Register and make appointments online at http://uta.mywconline.com. Classroom Visits, workshops, and specialized services for graduate students are also available. Please see www.uta.edu/owl for detailed information on all our programs and services.
        The Library’s 2nd floor Academic Plaza offers students a central hub of support services, including IDEAS Center, University Advising Services, Transfer UTA and various college/school advising hours. Services are available during the library’s hours of operation. http://library.uta.edu/academic-plaza
        Emergency Phone Numbers: In case of an on-campus emergency, call the UT Arlington Police Department at 817-272-3003 (non-campus phone), 2-3003 (campus phone). You may also dial 911. Non-emergency number 817-272-3381


        Faculty members should feel free to incorporate any of the following information into your course syllabus or other course materials. All library services can be found by going to the main page. For direct links, see below.

        Library Home Page library.uta.edu     Resources for Students
        Academic Help
        Academic Plaza Consultation Services library.uta.edu/academic-plaza
        Ask Us ask.uta.edu/
        Library Tutorials library.uta.edu/how-to
        Subject and Course Research Guides libguides.uta.edu
        Subject Librarians library.uta.edu/subject-librarians
        Resources
        A to Z List of Library Databases libguides.uta.edu/az.php
        Course Reserves pulse.uta.edu/vwebv/enterCourseReserve.do
        FabLab fablab.uta.edu/
        Special Collections library.uta.edu/special-collections
        Study Room Reservations openroom.uta.edu/
        Teaching & Learning Services for Faculty
        Copyright Consultation library-sc@listserv.uta.edu
        Course Research Guide Development, Andy Herzog amherzog@uta.edu or your subject librarian
        Data Visualization Instruction, Peace Ossom-Williamson peace@uta.edu
        Digital Humanities Instruction, Rafia Mirza rafia@uta.edu
        Graduate Student Research Skills Instruction, Andy Herzog amherzog@uta.edu or your subject librarian
        Project or Problem-Based Instruction, Gretchen Trkay gtrkay@uta.edu
        Undergraduate Research Skills Instruction, Gretchen Trkay gtrkay@uta.edu or your subject librarian.

        4345/5345 Syllabus Spring 2015  

        APPLIED KNOWLEDGE ENGINEERING And DATA ANALYTIC APPLICATIONS. 3 Hours.

        Name: John W. Priest    Ph.D. P.E.

        Office Number: 404 Woolf Hall          Office Telephone Number: 817-272-3092

        Email Address: jpriest@uta.edu (best method for communication)

        Office Hours:  Due to the level of research I do in the field and in 2 labs, I am rarely in my office.  Email if you have any questions or want to schedule a meeting. I will meet your at any mutually agreed upon time and place.

        Book:

        Data Science for Business by Foster Provost and Tom Fawcett, 2013, O'Reilly

        Publisher, ISBN 978-1-449-36132-7

        Time and Place of Class Meetings: UTA 4345 class Tuesday and Thursday at 12:30 PM and 5345 class Tuesday and Thursday at 2:00 PM

        Distance Student Requirements:     Distance testing must follow all the College of Engineering guidelines, located at http://www.uta.edu/engineering/future-students/engineering-online/proctor-information.php.

        Students using Blackboard administered tests should review the Test Taking Tips information at http://www.uta.edu/blackboard/students/test-taking-tips.php.

        UTA expects all students, whether in class or online, to abide by its Honor Code. The code is posted at http://www.uta.edu/engineering/current-students/academic-honesty.php.

        No cell phones on desk or answered during exams. This will be considered cheating

        For problems viewing ClassRev (Echo360) recordings:   contact classroomsupport@uta.edu.

        Final Grade: your final grade is based on exams and surprise quizzes nothing else.  There are no extra credit projects, papers, lab work, etc.   No exceptions,   If you do poorly on the early exam(s), please drop the course; especially graduate students.

        Description of Course Content:

        Review of application issues in data analytics, knowledge engineering, and applied artificial intelligence. Topics include knowledge acquisition, decision support systems, data analytic techniques, big data, data mining, neural networks, expert systems, genetic algorithms, and case based reasoning. Prerequisite: accepted in an UTA engineering professional program.

        Class learning objectives:

        This is a professional course for students who will demonstrate an understanding of the terminology, acronyms and concepts of decision support systems, intelligent systems, knowledge engineering, knowledge management, applied A.I. and data analytics

        For this area of knowledge, the objectives include  

        (i)  Recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning (self learning)

        (j)  Knowledge of contemporary issues (current, modern)

        (k) Ability to use the techniques, skills, & modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

        Why this is important

        One of the fastest growing areas of technology with job opportunities

        Decision support, intelligent systems and data analytics are becoming an integral part of our work and life. (Who is not using software and wireless technologies every day to communicate and solve problems?) – smart phones, apps, NFC, etc.

        Applicable to any industry or organization

        Requirements: 

        Self learning or active learning for enabling life-long learning is a goal of this class. This means that you will be given assignments that you will have to take an active role in learning the material on your own in order to complete the assignment. You will be asked to perform assignments that I have not previously completed or might not be able to do myself. As in industry and the “real world”, assignments may be vague and change throughout the class.

        In addition, this is a “reading intensive and survey class” covering many new and state-of-the-art topics in decision support systems, knowledge management, knowledge engineering, intelligent systems, expert systems, data mining, etc. As a result, the lectures and notes are an integral part of this course. The student is responsible for studying and learning the lectures and handout materials whether or not the particular topic is discussed in class. All tests will contain questions on reading/studying the materials that were not discussed in class.

        This course and topic areas are evolving so the course requirements will be defined as the course progresses. What portions of the class will help you in the future are hard to know at this time.

        Attend class, take good class notes of lectures, stay current, read and study the handouts and texbook, do homework and you will have no trouble. 

        Computers used in class must only be used to take notes. This includes any open windows.

        The syllabus can be viewed as a 'blueprint' for the course; changes in the syllabus can be made as needed. Students will be informed of any substantive changes in class lectures concerning examination, the grading or attendance policies and changes in project assignments.

        I expect that we will have 3 tests  

        Grading Policy:

        Final Grade Calculation

        I expect that we will have 3 exams (1/3 each).  Computation of the final average will almost always vary from the original syllabus. Final grades will depend as modified during the course including any pop/surprise quizzes and whether the final is comprehensive . Final grade is based on exams and quizzes; nothing else.  No extra credit projects, papers, lab work, etc.   No exceptions.  If you do poorly on the early exam(s), please drop the course; especially graduate students

        Tests and quizzes

        All tests and quizzes are multiple choice, closed book and computer graded using web based blackboard. Anyone looking at their cell phones, computer and not using lockdown software during a test/quiz will be considered cheating.

        No Whine Policy Concerning Test and Final Grades

        Tests will always be returned and reviewed in the next class period.  Discussion of the test and test questions is limited to this class.  All requests for a regrade or questions concerning grading of a person’s individual test must be submitted in writing before the start of the next class period. The student must state what question is to be reviewed and why more credit should be given. This can be written on the test or on a separate sheet of paper.

        An individual’s test questions are not answered, reviewed or regraded while the student is in my presence.

        Special final grade requirements:

        Any special final grade requirements must be provided by e-mail to me in the 1.  first 2 weeks of the class and 2. after final exam, to be considered in final grade considerations. (E.g. graduating senior, probation, must have a c grade to graduate or stay in school, I work full time, scholarship requirements etc.).

        Attendance Policy:  (Undergraduate and Graduate Students)

        Attendance starts from the first day of class regardless of the circumstances. Late registration, just arriving from overseas, visa problems, graduate school, staying in your country for medical/dental/wedding/birthday issues or any other circumstances does not change your responsibility to catch up on your own and any surprise quizzes. This does not include approved absences.

        Attendance: At The University of Texas at Arlington, taking attendance is not required. Rather, each faculty member is free to develop his or her own methods of evaluating students’ academic performance, which includes establishing course-specific policies on attendance. As the instructor of this section, [insert your attendance policy and/or expectations, e.g. “I will not take attendance” or “I allow students to attend class at their own discretion” or “I have elected to take attendance but will not factor attendance into the grade” or “I have decided that attendance at class meetings is not required but strongly encouraged” or “I have established following attendance policy: …”]

        [Important!  Be sure that you include this section on attendance, even if you do not track attendance or factor attendance into the grade. It is important that students understand that any attendance rules applied in your course are your own and not a matter of institutional policy. Doing so will keep the University in compliance with Federal regulations as they apply to Title IV funding. (For a summary, see http://www.tgslc.org/pdf/Program-integrity-R2T4-Taking-Attendance.pdf.) If you are teaching a course in which attendance / hours must be tracked to meet other non-institutional requirements (e.g., to earn an academically-grounded professional credential), then be sure to clearly indicate the agency that has established the requirement.]

        No excuses for missing the scheduled final     i.e wanting to leave school early to go home or attend some function.

        Excused Absences

        The only acceptable excuses for missing exams/quizzes or project due dates is a signed medical doctor's note that specifically states that you are unable to attend the exam/quiz/project, a traffic report showing that you were in a wreck, death in family etc. Not arriving for the first few classes due to travel schedules is not an excused absence.

        Drop Policy:  I use the university drop policy

        Americans with Disabilities Act:

        The University of Texas at Arlington is on record as being committed to both the spirit and letter of federal equal opportunity legislation; reference Public Law 92-112 - The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended. With the passage of federal legislation entitled Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), pursuant to section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, there is renewed focus on providing this population with the same opportunities enjoyed by all citizens.

        As a faculty member, I am required by law to provide "reasonable accommodations" to students with disabilities, so as not to discriminate on the basis of that disability. Student responsibility primarily rests with informing faculty of their need for accommodation and in providing authorized documentation through designated administrative channels.  Information regarding specific diagnostic criteria and policies for obtaining academic accommodations can be found at www.uta.edu/disability.   Also, you may visit the Office for Students with Disabilities in room 102 of University Hall or call them at (817) 272-3364.

        Title IX: The University of Texas at Arlington is committed to upholding U.S. Federal Law “Title IX” such that no member of the UT Arlington community shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity. For more information, visit www.uta.edu/titleIX.

        Academic Integrity:


        UTA expects all students, whether in class or online, to abide by its Honor Code. The code is posted at http://www.uta.edu/engineering/current-students/academic-honesty.php.
         

        It is the philosophy of The University of Texas at Arlington that academic dishonesty is a completely unacceptable mode of conduct and will not be tolerated in any form. All persons involved in academic dishonesty will be disciplined in accordance with University regulations and procedures. Discipline may include suspension or expulsion from the University.

        "Scholastic dishonesty includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, and the submission for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, taking an examination for another person, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such acts." (Regents’ Rules and Regulations, Series 50101, Section 2.2)

        Anyone looking at their cell phones or computer during a test/quiz will be considered cheating.

        Copying any written or web based materials for a project without proper referencing will not be tolerated.

        Xerox copies of the book that infringe on copyright laws will not be allowed in class.  

        Copyright Information: Copyright 2015 J.W. Priest as to this syllabus, handouts and all lectures.  Students are prohibited from selling (or being paid for taking) notes during this course to (or by) any person or commercial firm without the express permission of the professor teaching this course

         
        Student Support Services Available: 
        The University of Texas at Arlington supports a variety of student success programs to help you connect with the University and achieve academic success. These programs include learning assistance, developmental education, advising and mentoring, admission and transition, and federally funded programs. Students requiring assistance academically, personally, or socially should contact the Office of Student Success Programs at 817-272-6107 for more information and appropriate referrals.

        Final Review Week:
        I will attempt to provide a period of five days prior to the first day of final examinations in the long sessions to be designated as Final Review Week.

        Librarian to Contact:  Librarian located in the basement of Nedderman Hall

        E-Culture Policy:  

        The University of Texas at Arlington has adopted the University email address as an official means of communication with students.  Through the use of email, UT-Arlington is able to provide students with relevant and timely information, designed to facilitate student success.  In particular, important information concerning registration, financial aid, payment of bills, and graduation may be sent to students through email.

        All students are assigned an email account and information about activating and using it is available at www.uta.edu/email.  New students (first semester at UTA) are able to activate their email account 24 hours after registering for courses.  There is no additional charge to students for using this account, and it remains active as long as a student is enrolled at UT-Arlington.  Students are responsible for checking their email regularly.

        It is the classroom and distance students’ responsibility for all communications with Dr. Priest and the school administration. All emails should start with the class name “Knowledge” in the subject.

        Make-up Exam Policy:

        For classroom students there are no make-up exams/quizzes or project due dates. The only acceptable excuse for missing exams/quizzes or project due dates is a signed medical doctor's note that specifically states that you are unable to attend the exam/quiz/project. For unexcused situations, penalties for missing an exam/quiz/project are at the discretion of Dr. Priest but will be at least one letter grade for the final grade.

        Grade Grievance Policy:  Refer to catalog on web site

        IE 4345/5345 Syllabus Spring 2015  

        APPLIED KNOWLEDGE ENGINEERING And DATA ANALYTIC APPLICATIONS. 3 Hours.

        Name: John W. Priest    Ph.D. P.E.

        Office Number: 404 Woolf Hall          Office Telephone Number: 817-272-3092

        Email Address: jpriest@uta.edu (best method for communication)

        Office Hours:  Due to the level of research I do in the field and in 2 labs, I am rarely in my office.  Email if you have any questions or want to schedule a meeting. I will meet your at any mutually agreed upon time and place.

        Book:

        Data Science for Business by Foster Provost and Tom Fawcett, 2013, O'Reilly

        Publisher, ISBN 978-1-449-36132-7

        Time and Place of Class Meetings: UTA 4345 class Tuesday and Thursday at 12:30 PM and 5345 class Tuesday and Thursday at 2:00 PM

        Distance Student Requirements:     Distance testing must follow all the College of Engineering guidelines, located at http://www.uta.edu/engineering/future-students/engineering-online/proctor-information.php.

        Students using Blackboard administered tests should review the Test Taking Tips information at http://www.uta.edu/blackboard/students/test-taking-tips.php.

        UTA expects all students, whether in class or online, to abide by its Honor Code. The code is posted at http://www.uta.edu/engineering/current-students/academic-honesty.php.

        For problems viewing ClassRev (Echo360) recordings:   contact classroomsupport@uta.edu.

        Final Grade: your final grade is based on exams and surprise quizzes nothing else.  There are no extra credit projects, papers, lab work, etc.   No exceptions,   If you do poorly on the early exam(s), please drop the course; especially graduate students.

        Description of Course Content:

        Review of application issues in data analytics, knowledge engineering, and applied artificial intelligence. Topics include knowledge acquisition, decision support systems, data analytic techniques, big data, data mining, neural networks, expert systems, genetic algorithms, and case based reasoning. Prerequisite: accepted in an UTA engineering professional program.

        Class learning objectives:

        This is a professional course for students who will demonstrate an understanding of the terminology, acronyms and concepts of decision support systems, intelligent systems, knowledge engineering, knowledge management, applied A.I. and data analytics

        For this area of knowledge, the objectives include  

        (i)  Recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning (self learning)

        (j)  Knowledge of contemporary issues (current, modern)

        (k) Ability to use the techniques, skills, & modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

        Why this is important

        One of the fastest growing areas of technology with job opportunities

        Decision support, intelligent systems and data analytics are becoming an integral part of our work and life. (Who is not using software and wireless technologies every day to communicate and solve problems?) – smart phones, apps, NFC, etc.

        Applicable to any industry or organization

        Requirements: 

        Self learning or active learning for enabling life-long learning is a goal of this class. This means that you will be given assignments that you will have to take an active role in learning the material on your own in order to complete the assignment. You will be asked to perform assignments that I have not previously completed or might not be able to do myself. As in industry and the “real world”, assignments may be vague and change throughout the class.

        In addition, this is a “reading intensive and survey class” covering many new and state-of-the-art topics in decision support systems, knowledge management, knowledge engineering, intelligent systems, expert systems, data mining, etc. As a result, the lectures and notes are an integral part of this course. The student is responsible for studying and learning the lectures and handout materials whether or not the particular topic is discussed in class. All tests will contain questions on reading/studying the materials that were not discussed in class.

        This course and topic areas are evolving so the course requirements will be defined as the course progresses. What portions of the class will help you in the future are hard to know at this time.

        Attend class, take good class notes of lectures, stay current, read and study the handouts and texbook, do homework and you will have no trouble. 

        Computers used in class must only be used to take notes. This includes any open windows.

        The syllabus can be viewed as a 'blueprint' for the course; changes in the syllabus can be made as needed. Students will be informed of any substantive changes in class lectures concerning examination, the grading or attendance policies and changes in project assignments.

        I expect that we will have 3 tests  

        Grading Policy:

        Final Grade Calculation

        I expect that we will have 3 exams (1/3 each).  Computation of the final average will almost always vary from the original syllabus. Final grades will depend as modified during the course including any pop/surprise quizzes and whether the final is comprehensive . Final grade is based on exams and quizzes; nothing else.  No extra credit projects, papers, lab work, etc.   No exceptions.  If you do poorly on the early exam(s), please drop the course; especially graduate students

        Tests and quizzes

        All tests and quizzes are multiple choice, closed book and computer graded using web based blackboard. Anyone looking at their cell phones, computer and not using lockdown software during a test/quiz will be considered cheating.

        No Whine Policy Concerning Test and Final Grades

        Tests will always be returned and reviewed in the next class period.  Discussion of the test and test questions is limited to this class.  All requests for a regrade or questions concerning grading of a person’s individual test must be submitted in writing before the start of the next class period. The student must state what question is to be reviewed and why more credit should be given. This can be written on the test or on a separate sheet of paper.

        An individual’s test questions are not answered, reviewed or regraded while the student is in my presence.

        Special final grade requirements:

        Any special final grade requirements must be provided by e-mail to me in the 1.  first 2 weeks of the class and 2. after final exam, to be considered in final grade considerations. (E.g. graduating senior, probation, must have a c grade to graduate or stay in school, I work full time, scholarship requirements etc.).

        Attendance Policy:  (Undergraduate and Graduate Students)

        Attendance starts from the first day of class regardless of the circumstances. Late registration, just arriving from overseas, visa problems, graduate school, staying in your country for medical/dental/wedding/birthday issues or any other circumstances does not change your responsibility to catch up on your own and any surprise quizzes. This does not include approved absences.

        No excuses for missing the scheduled final     i.e wanting to leave school early to go home or attend some function.

        Excused Absences

        The only acceptable excuses for missing exams/quizzes or project due dates is a signed medical doctor's note that specifically states that you are unable to attend the exam/quiz/project, a traffic report showing that you were in a wreck, death in family etc. Not arriving for the first few classes due to travel schedules is not an excused absence.

        Drop Policy:  I use the university drop policy

        Americans with Disabilities Act:

        The University of Texas at Arlington is on record as being committed to both the spirit and letter of federal equal opportunity legislation; reference Public Law 92-112 - The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended. With the passage of federal legislation entitled Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), pursuant to section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, there is renewed focus on providing this population with the same opportunities enjoyed by all citizens.

        As a faculty member, I am required by law to provide "reasonable accommodations" to students with disabilities, so as not to discriminate on the basis of that disability. Student responsibility primarily rests with informing faculty of their need for accommodation and in providing authorized documentation through designated administrative channels.  Information regarding specific diagnostic criteria and policies for obtaining academic accommodations can be found at www.uta.edu/disability.   Also, you may visit the Office for Students with Disabilities in room 102 of University Hall or call them at (817) 272-3364.

        Academic Integrity:


        UTA expects all students, whether in class or online, to abide by its Honor Code. The code is posted at http://www.uta.edu/engineering/current-students/academic-honesty.php.
         

        It is the philosophy of The University of Texas at Arlington that academic dishonesty is a completely unacceptable mode of conduct and will not be tolerated in any form. All persons involved in academic dishonesty will be disciplined in accordance with University regulations and procedures. Discipline may include suspension or expulsion from the University.

        "Scholastic dishonesty includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, and the submission for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, taking an examination for another person, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such acts." (Regents’ Rules and Regulations, Series 50101, Section 2.2)

        Anyone looking at their cell phones or computer during a test/quiz will be considered cheating.

        Copying any written or web based materials for a project without proper referencing will not be tolerated.

        Xerox copies of the book that infringe on copyright laws will not be allowed in class.  

        Copyright Information: Copyright 2015 J.W. Priest as to this syllabus, handouts and all lectures.  Students are prohibited from selling (or being paid for taking) notes during this course to (or by) any person or commercial firm without the express permission of the professor teaching this course

         
        Student Support Services Available: 
        The University of Texas at Arlington supports a variety of student success programs to help you connect with the University and achieve academic success. These programs include learning assistance, developmental education, advising and mentoring, admission and transition, and federally funded programs. Students requiring assistance academically, personally, or socially should contact the Office of Student Success Programs at 817-272-6107 for more information and appropriate referrals.

        Final Review Week:
        I will attempt to provide a period of five days prior to the first day of final examinations in the long sessions to be designated as Final Review Week.

        Librarian to Contact:  Librarian located in the basement of Nedderman Hall

        E-Culture Policy:  

        The University of Texas at Arlington has adopted the University email address as an official means of communication with students.  Through the use of email, UT-Arlington is able to provide students with relevant and timely information, designed to facilitate student success.  In particular, important information concerning registration, financial aid, payment of bills, and graduation may be sent to students through email.

        All students are assigned an email account and information about activating and using it is available at www.uta.edu/email.  New students (first semester at UTA) are able to activate their email account 24 hours after registering for courses.  There is no additional charge to students for using this account, and it remains active as long as a student is enrolled at UT-Arlington.  Students are responsible for checking their email regularly.

        It is the classroom and distance students’ responsibility for all communications with Dr. Priest and the school administration. All emails should start with the class name “Knowledge” in the subject.

        Make-up Exam Policy:

        For classroom students there are no make-up exams/quizzes or project due dates. The only acceptable excuse for missing exams/quizzes or project due dates is a signed medical doctor's note that specifically states that you are unable to attend the exam/quiz/project. For unexcused situations, penalties for missing an exam/quiz/project are at the discretion of Dr. Priest but will be at least one letter grade for the final grade.

        Grade Grievance Policy:  Refer to catalog on web site

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5346-001 Technology Development and Deployment

        Review of management issues in developing and implementing new technologies and methodologies into an organization. Topics include technology forecasting, management of technology based projects, technological competitiveness, technology alliances, and collaboration.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 4345-001 Ie 4345-001 Knowledge and Technology Management

        Review of contemporary issues in knowledge management, knowledge engineering, technology management, and intelligent systems. Topics include knowledge acquisition, intelligent database design, decision support systems, artificial intelligence technologies, designs and tools, and collaborative development.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5345-001 Management of Knowledge and Technology

        Review of contemporary issues in knowledge management, databases, decision support systems, and intelligent systems. Topics include knowledge acquisition, intelligent database design, decision support systems, data mining, knowledge transfer, and collaborative development.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 4339-001 Product Development, Producibility and Reliability Design

        This course covers the product and process development and engineering design
        process with focus on collaborative design in the enterprise environment.
        Manufacturing, reliability, testing, logistical and product support
        considerations are emphasized.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5339-001 Product Design, Development, Producibility, and Reliability Design

        This course covers product development and engineering design process with a
        focus on collaborative design. Software, manufacturing, reliability, testing,
        logistical and product support considerations are emphasized.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5346-001 Technology Development and Deployment

        Review of management issues in developing and implementing new technologies and
        methodologies into an organization. Topics include technology forecasting,
        management of technology based projects, technological competitiveness,
        technology alliances, and collaboration.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 4345-001 Knowledge and Technology Management
        Review of contemporary issues in knowledge management, knowledge engineering, technology management, and intelligent systems. Topics include knowledge acquisition, intelligent database design, decision support systems, artificial intelligence technologies, designs and tools, and collaborative development. Prerequisite: junior standing. 
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • IE 5345-001 Management of Knowledge and Technology
        Review of contemporary issues in knowledge management, databases, decision support systems, and intelligent systems. Topics include knowledge acquisition, intelligent database design, decision support systems, data mining, knowledge transfer, and collaborative development. Prerequisites: graduate standing.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • IE 4349-001 Automation and Robotics II
        Project oriented course focusing on the design, implementation, and operation of technology. An in-depth study of the design and deployment of industrial technology to meet the needs of high-precision, multi-product environments. The laboratory activities associated with the course provide practical experience. Prerequisite: IE 4325.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • IE 6310-001 Industrial Robot Applications

        Project oriented course focusing on the requirements and selection criteria for the integration of technology into simple and complex industrial activities. Prerequisite: IE 5330

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • IE 5339-001 PRODUCT DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCIBILITY, AND RELIABILITY DESIGN

        This course covers product development and engineering design process with a focus on collaborative design. Software, manufacturing, reliability, testing, logistical and product support considerations are emphasized. 

        Prerequisite: graduate standing.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • IE 4339-001 PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCIBILITY AND RELIABILITY DESIGN

        This course covers the product and process development and engineering design process with focus on collaborative design in the enterprise environment. Manufacturing, reliability, testing, logistical and product support considerations are emphasized.

        Prerequisite: Junior standing.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • IE 5346-001 TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT

        Description: Review of management issues in developing and implementing new technologies and methodologies into an organization. Topics include technology forecasting, management of technology based projects, technological competitiveness, technology alliances, and collaboration.

        Prerequisites: graduate standing.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • IE 4349-001 Automation and Robotics II
        Project oriented course focusing on the design, implementation, and operation of technology. An in-depth study of the design and deployment of industrial technology to meet the needs of high-precision, multi-product environments. The laboratory activities associated with the course provide practical experience.

        Prerequisite: IE 4325 and instructor approval.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • IE 5339-001 PRODUCT DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCIBILITY, AND RELIABILITY DESIGN
        This course covers the product and process development and engineering design process with focus on collaborative design in the enterprise environment. Manufacturing, reliability, testing, logistical and product support considerations are emphasized. Prerequisite: junior standing
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • IE 5339-001 PRODUCT DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCIBILITY, AND RELIABILITY DESIGN
        This course covers the product and process development and engineering design process with focus on collaborative design in the enterprise environment. Manufacturing, reliability, testing, logistical and product support considerations are emphasized. Prerequisite: junior standing
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • IE 4339-001 PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCIBILITY AND RELIABILITY DESIGN

        Survey of topics in concurrent engineering, collaborative design, producibility and reliability in the product development process.
        Prerequisite: Junior standing.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • IE 5346-001 TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT
        Description: Review of management issues in developing and implementing new technologies and methodologies into an organization. Topics include technology forecasting, management of technology based projects, technological competitiveness, technology alliances, and collaboration. Prerequisites: graduate standing.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • IE 4349-001 Automation and Robotics II
        Study of the design, implementation, and operation of robotics technology. An in-depth study of the design and deployment of industrial automation and robotics technology to meet the needs of high-precision, multi-product production environments. The laboratory activities associated with the course provide practical experience in the areas of sensor-driven automated process development, industrial vision, modular and reconfigurable automation, simulation-based system design and an introduction to computer-based manufacturing control and execution technologies. Prerequisite: IE 4325 and instructor approval.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • IE 6310-001 Industrial Robot Applications
        A study of the requirements and selection criteria for the integration of robots into simple and complex industrial activities. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • IE 5345-001 Management of Knowledge and Technology
        Review of contemporary issues in knowledge management, databases, decision support systems, and intelligent systems. Topics include knowledge acquisition, intelligent database design, decision support systems, data mining, knowledge transfer, and collaborative development. Prerequisites: graduate standing.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • IE 5341-001 Knowledge Engineering and Knowledge Management
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • IE 4345-001 Knowledge and Technology Management
        Review of contemporary issues in knowledge management, knowledge engineering, technology management, and intelligent systems. Topics include knowledge acquisition, intelligent database design, decision support systems, artificial intelligence technologies, designs and tools, and collaborative development. Prerequisite: junior standing.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • IE 3315-001 Operations Research
        Introduction to the major deterministic techniques of operations research and their application to decision problems. Linear programming, integer programming, network analysis, dynamic programming, nonlinear programming. Course software is used. Project required. Prerequisite: IE 3301 or concurrent enrollment and MATH 2326.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2009

Other Service Activities

  • Uncategorized
    • Dec  CO-FOUNDER

      Micro Fabrication Laboratory

      Auto ID Labratory

    • Dec  Committee on Active Learning and Higher Order Thinking
      2007-2012
    • Dec  Member of SAKS Quality Evaluation Plan (QEP) investigating new methods of “Active Learning” to improve “Higher Order Thinking Skills across UTA
      2006-2007
    • Dec  Faculty Senate

      Chair, 2007-2009
      Chair Elect, 2006-2007
      Secretary, 2004-2005

    • Dec  Co-Chair of Provost Search Committee
      2007
    • Dec  QEP Steering committee
      2006-2007
    • Dec  Chair of Engineering Promotion and Tenure Committee
      2005
    • Dec  UT System Faculty Advisory Committee
      2005-2010