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Julienne A Greer

Name

[Greer, Julienne A]
  • Assistant Professor, Theatre Arts
  • Dr. Julienne Aleta Greer
  • Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts; Social Robotics and Performance
  • Marketing / Public Relations Chairperson, Maverick Theatre Company, Maverick Dance Company

Biography

Dr. Julienne Aleta Greer is a multi-disciplinary scholar/artist who directs, performs, produces, and writes in the theatre, social robotics, film, and game studies disciplines. Julienne is head of the Public Relations and Marketing Committee and head of the Recruiting Committee. She is a member of the Deptartment of Theatre Arts Performance Committee. She earned a BFA in Drama from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts and an MA in Media Arts from Texas Christian University’s Bob Schieffer’s College of Communication (formerly College of Communication). Dr. Greer earned a Ph.D. in Humanities at the University of Texas at Dallas School of Arts and Humanities. Her dissertation, Affective Connections: Performance Studies, Videogames, and Digital Characters focused on an analysis of existing performance techniques from theatre and cinema recontextualized to apply to videogame characters and to the emerging emotional/affective bond between the game player and digital characters in videogames. Dr. Greer brings a performance expertise based in method work and understanding of sensory data to interdisciplinary collaborations. Dr. Greer presented her paper, "Building emotional authenticity between humans and robots" at the International Conference for Social Robotics 2014 in Sydney, Australia and authored “Digital Companions: Analyzing the emotive connection between players and non-player character companions in video game space” at Videogame Cultures and the Future of Interactive Entertainment conference at Mansfield College at Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom in 2011. Dr. Greer is a 2015 recipient of the College of Liberal Arts faculty award granting the purchase of “Pepper” the emotional robot (Softbank/Aldebaran) for use in her interdisciplinary course at UTA - Robots, Digital Humanities, and Theatre. She is a member of Inter-Disciplinary.net 2011 - present, Actors Equity Association (AEA), and the Screen Actors Guild and American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG/AFTRA).

Professional Preparation

    • 2005 Master of Arts in Media ArtsTexas Christian University (TCU)
    • 2013 Ph.D. in Humanities Aesthetic StudiesUniversity of Texas at Dallas

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Feb 1999 to Present Actors Equity Association
    • Feb 1985 to Present Screen Actors Guild/American Federation of Radio Artists (SAG/AFTRA)

Awards and Honors

    • Jan  2015 Best Actor sponsored by Fort Worth Weekly
      Achievements:

      Performed in a the play, "The Other Place" at Circle Theatre. This play won a Tony nomination for Laurie Metcalf in New York City.

       

News Articles

    • Dec 2014 Best Tarrant-area Theatre of 2014

      Mark Lowry of Star-Telegram: The Other Place at Circle Theatre (May): A dark, twisty drama about a scientist developing a new drug and the tricks that memory can play, with a standout performance from Julienne Greer. Directed by Steven Pounders.


      Read more here: http://www.star-telegram.com/entertainment/arts-culture/article5006997.html#storylink=cpy

    • Apr 2014 Acting in Texas: Julienne Greer at Circle Theatre

      Senior editor, Nancy Wozny of Arts + Culture, interviews Julienne Greer on her role at Circle Theatre, Fort Worth, of "The Other Place." The play "chronicles the story of Juliana Smithton, a successful neurologist, who suffers from a devastating neurological event, while facing divorce, an estranged daughter and a life in free fall."

Research and Expertise

  • Areas of research: Social Robotics, Performance, Drama, Cinema, Game studies

    I

Publications

      Technical Report Published
      • Speaker and Paper presentation: RO-MAN 2017- Conference theme: Human-Robot Collaboration and Human Assistance for an Improved Quality of Life - The 26th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, RO-MAN 2017, will be held in Lisbon, Portugal, from August 28 to September 1, 2017. This symposium is a leading forum where state-of-the-art innovative results, the latest developments as well as future perspectives relating to robot and human interactive communication are presented and discussed. The conference covers a wide range of topics related to Robot and Human Interactive Communication, involving theories, methodologies, technologies, empirical and experimental studies. Papers related to the study of the robotic technology, psychology, cognitive science, artificial intelligence, human factors, interaction-based robot design and other topics related to human-robot interaction are welcome. Paper title, Method and Improvisation: theatre arts performance techniques to further HRI in social and affective robots. Peer-reviewed full paper with conference proceedings publication.

        Speaker and Paper presentation: United States-Korea Conference on Science, Technology, and Entrepreneurship (UKC 2016) - United States-Korea Conference on Science, Technology, and Entrepreneurship is jointly organized by the Korean-American Scientists and Engineers Association (KSEA) and The Korean Federation of Science and Technology Societies (KOFST) held on August 10 – August 13, 2016, Dallas, TX. The theme of UKC 2016 is Enriching Lives through Science, Technology, and Entrepreneurship and its goal is to promote solving issues of the world through science, technology, and entrepreneurship to greatly improve the quality of people’s lives. The UKC 2016 is the flagship and largest academic conference between the United States and Korea.

        Guest Speaker: The Robotics Innovation Show. 2015 Invited speaker and presenter at “The Robotics Innovation Show 2015” at ExCel in London, United Kingdom. October 20-21, 2015. Presentation content: “Empathy and Embodiment: Understanding humans in order to understand social robots.”

        Guest Speaker/Paper presentation: International Conference on Social Robotics 2014 (icsr2014) Invited Social Robotics Conference article/paper, "Building emotional authenticity between humans and robots." Paper was accepted at the International Conference of Social Robotics 2014 (icsr2014)  - Social Intelligence in Sydney, Australia, Oct. 27 – 29. Selected to present an interactive workshop.

        Guest Speaker/Paper presentation: International Videogame Cultures and the Future of Interactive Entertainment Conference. Invited Game Studies Conference article/paper, "Digital companions: analyzing the emotive connection between players and non-player companions in video game space." Paper was accepted at the International Videogame Cultures and the Future of Interactive Entertainment Conference at Mansfield College in Oxford, United Kingdom, 2011. Conference sponsored by Inter-Disciplinary.net: A Global Network for Dynamic Research and Publishing. Member of Inter-Disciplinary.net.

        NATIONAL SPEAKER, PAPER/PANELIST, MEDIA

        Guest Speaker/Panelist: Fort Worth Museum of Science and History. Rising Tide Initiative Launch and Panel Discussion. An inaugural evening with the theme of Emerging Technologies: Meeting our Future. The Rising Tide Initiative has a mission to enhance entrepreneurship, innovation, and technology in Fort Worth and Tarrant County through a vibrant and collaborative technological ecosystem. April, 2017. http://www.fortworthbusiness.com/news/fwmsh-hosting-rising-tide-initiative-event-friday/article_d12988e2-2a90-11e7-b0c5-f3f5c3095f6f.html

        Guest Speaker: Digital Arts and Humanities Initiative (DAHI) Speaker Series. The DAHI team will present the findings of the study A Robot Walks into a Waiting Room…Humor in Healthcare Waiting Rooms to Enhance HRI in the University of Texas at Arlington Library 6th floor Parlor.  See DAHI article below for link. April 6, 2017.

        Guest Speaker: National Robotics Week at University of Texas Research Institute (UTARI). A collaboration between College of Liberal Arts (CoLA), Department of Theatre Arts, and UTARI. Second year of presenting the robot, Nao, to 500+ middle and high school students. Presentation included multiple groups rotating in for a demonstration ranging from 12 minutes to 30 minutes. Demonstration included verbal commands, human-to-robot interaction, various animations including, Puppet, Air Guitar, Rowing the Boat, and concluded with Shakespearean Sonnet 18. April, 2017.

        Speaker and Silver Sponsor: University of Texas at Arlington INNOVATION DAY - A high school and college student competition featuring student and faculty startup pitches. Department of Theatre Arts participated as a silver sponsor alongside UTARI. Presentations were made by Dr. Greer with Nao the robot on theatre methodologies in social robotics. Conference is an annual event held on February 6. 2017.

        Guest Speaker: University of Texas at Arlington, Honors College Colloquium Series Will a Robot be your Next Friend? How theatre methodologies are utilized to enhance the relationship in human-robot interaction (HRI). The pros and cons of social robots entering the U.S. market in 2017. And, an introduction to the Department of Theatre’s research robot, Nao. This presentation was part of a monthly colloquium hosted by the Honors College in which a member of the UTA faculty discusses his or her research. Greer presentation given to honors students (30+) on research with the robot, Nao, which stands at the intersections of Theatre, Computer Science, Psychology, and Healthcare. Kevin Gustafson, Interim Dean of the Honors College, “Yours was easily among the most engaging of the more than twenty colloquia we have sponsored over the past four years.” December 2, 2016.

        Guest Speaker/Panelist: Leonardo Art + Science Evening Rendezvous (LASERs). Leonardo Art + Science Evening Rendezvous event at University of North Texas this fall, also known as LASERs. LASERs are an exciting event series at the intersection of arts and sciences that bring together leading experts to talk about their work and experiences at the forefront of discovery and creativity. Each evening event includes presenters from the sciences, technology, industry, and the arts who offer expertise from an angle that connect to the mixed-discipline community from the arts, sciences, industry, and technology in attendance. Dr. Greer was one of three invited guest speakers and panelists. October 6, 2016. Video content at http://arteca.mit.edu/video/julienne-greer-laser

        Invited Panelist: Research Integrity Symposium. Research Integrity Symposium sponsored by the Steering Committee that manages the Responsible Conduct of Research Training Program (RCR) at University of Texas at Arlington. This year’s theme will be Collaborative Research. The issued to be discussed will be: research integrity, responsible conduct, management of collaborations, formal agreements as well as informal arrangements addressing matters such as authorship, roles and responsibilities, research compliance, and mentoring of trainees. October 7, 2016.

        Guest Speaker: Invited to present on the intersection of social robotics and theatre at the College of Business, Accounting Departments’ CPE Day at University of Texas at Arlington on Aug. 11th, 2016.

        Guest Speaker: National Robotics Week at University of Texas Research Institute (UTARI). A collaboration between College of Liberal Arts (CoLA), Department of Theatre Arts, and UTARI. I began work with UTARI collaborating and developing the human interaction for the Baxter Robotic unit for human interaction during National Robotics Week. Invited ten Theatre Arts undergraduate students to UTARI to interact with the Baxter Robot for National Robotics Week. Over 600 local middle and high school students came through UTARI for National Robotics Week that day and participated in the interactions between the theatre arts students and Baxter the robot. April 2016.

        Collaborator: Invited by David Hanson of Hanson Robotics presentation, “SXSW Interactive” in Austin, Texas. Invitation given to increase possible collaboration between Hanson Robotics and Dr. Greer’s emotional work in social robotics. March 14th, 2016

        Panelist: Invited Research Discussant/Panel member.  Fixed: The Science Fiction of Human Enhancement. Interdisciplinary panel. Invited by the Director of Disabilities Minor at University of Texas at Arlington to participate on a panel with UTA faculty John Bricout, associate dean of the School of Social Work, and Janet Morrow, disabilities studies adjunct professor. Moderated discussion and talk back after a viewing of the film, March, 2015.

        MEDIA

        August 2017 – CoLA College of Liberal Arts Annual Magazine. “This report about the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Texas at Arlington spotlights achievements within the college during the last year. There is no better illustration of the talent among our students and mentorship by our faculty and staff, then the example of…interacting with a Shakespeare-intoning robot.” Elizabeth Cawthon, Dean. CoLA.
        http://www.uta.edu/libarts/_downloads/CoLAMagazine/CoLAMagazine_WebEdition.pdf

        August 2017 – Brookdale Senior Living Solutions; Technology and Innovation Section by Andrew Smith. NAO takes a bow: Meet the robot engaging seniors in the arts. Meet NAO (pronounced “now”), an adorable two-foot-tall robot who captured the hearts of residents at Brookdale Arlington in Texas. These residents met NAO when they participated in an innovative study conducted by an interdisciplinary team from the University of Texas at Arlington’s Department of Theatre Arts, School of Social Work, and University of Texas-Arlington Research Institute (UTARI) in Fort Worth. The study titled Shakespeare and Robots: Examining the impact of a theater intervention on psychological well-being in older adults, set out to change the human-to-human model of participatory arts. “The goal of the trial was to see if a theatre arts intervention with a human-robot model would be successful in promoting the well-being of an older adult,” said Dr. Julienne Greer, assistant professor of theatre arts at UTA. For three weeks, eight Brookdale residents spent an hour each week reciting Shakespeare with NAO. NAO recited the first 12 lines of Sonnet 18 (“Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?”) with all the drama of a professional actor and then asked the residents to complete the last two lines. While some residents were hesitant at first, the response was overwhelmingly positive. “Based on the data from our study, findings suggest that there was a significant increase in engagement and a significant decrease in depression,” said Dr. Greer. “We learned that social robots are poised to become viable collaborative companions in places like Brookdale.” The poetry performance was just the beginning of NAO’s interaction. The robot can shake hands, accompany seniors on a walk, perform Tai Chi and tell stories. The versatility was a hit with residents…NAO is a perfect example of how something that seems so simple (a Shakespeare reciting robot) can significantly improve quality of life. It also demonstrates that seniors, just like the rest of us, get excited and engaged with novel technologies.

        https://www.brookdale.com/en/brookdale-life/blogs/2017/08/nao-takes-a-bow-meet-the-robot-engaging-seniors-in-the-arts.html

        June 2017 – Dallas Morning News review of performance King o’ the Moon. Touching family tale with contemporary reverberations. “The mom, Ellen Pazinski (Julienne Greer) honors his spirit and keeps an income by running the family tavern…the fine cast shows off the playwrights deft blend of humor and pathos.”

        https://www.dallasnews.com/arts/theater/2017/06/18/touching-family-tale-contemporary-reverberations-king-o-moon-circle-theatre

        June 2017 – Theatre Jones review of performance King o’ the Moon. Moon Beams. “Julienne Greer returns to play mother Ellen Pazinski for the third time, and she’s the show’s anchor. Her Ellen is steady and smart, a woman who raised four difficult children and doesn’t think life can surprise her. She’s a widow now, and runs the tavern with help from her husband’s best friend. David H.M. Lambert’s Walter is the ultimate nice guy, touching and funny in his attempts to get closer to Ellen and her prickly kids.”

        http://www.theaterjones.com/ntx/reviews/20170620105834/2017-06-21/Circle-Theatre/King-O-the-Moon

        June 2017 – Star-Telegram review of performance King o’ the Moon. King o’ the Moon captures America in 1969. “As was so often the case in the 1960s, the Pazinskis are all on journeys of their own. Ellen (Julienne Greer), the widow who heads the family, is coping with three grown children who are entering adulthood through different doors, and a mentally challenged son, Georgie, who will always be a child… Greer’s performance is so easy and smooth that the high quality of her work runs the risk of going unnoticed.”

        http://www.star-telegram.com/living/article156977974.html

        April 2017 – The Shorthorn, UTA article, Students, Faculty meet Piebot. “Julienne Greer, theatre arts assistant professor, presented her humanlike robot, called PieBot at UTA’s iDAH speaker series…PieBot was built to eliminate human apathy toward robots and foster a sense of nurturing empathy, Greer said. Greer pulled froM different specialties, including from costume designers, programmers, and engineers. ‘Interdisciplinary isn’t just a buzzword, Greer said’”.

        http://www.theshorthorn.com/news/students-faculty-meet-piebot/article_9ed3b58c-1b0b-11e7-aa25-bf218a04f8f4.html

        April 2017 – CW33 article/video, To Bot or not to Bot: Meet the little robot who can perform Shakespeare! By Chris Skupien. “Here in the 21st century, robots are nothing new. But have you ever seen one recite a sonnet? ‘This robot is considered a social or companion robot…This is the robot that might be a friend and that is where the theatre methodology comes in.’”

        March 2017 – FOX15 article/video, MYFOXZONE, Robot Being Used to Help the Elderly. “A study is underway the University of Texas at Arlington to see if technology can give companionship to older adults…Dr. Julienne Greer is an assistant professor of Social Robotics and Performance – and she says previous studies have shown this type of interaction can help sharpen the minds and spirits of the elderly.’”

        http://www.myfoxzone.com/news/health/robot-being-used-to-help-the-elderly/416978351

        Feb. 2017 – CBS DFW CBS11 article/video. UTA Researchers Using Shakespeare & Robots to Help Seniors. “Dr. Julienne Greer, an Assistant Professor of Social Robotics and Performance, says they are using something called participatory arts to help robots interact with senior citizens…The content of the art is said to enhance a person’s cognitive skills, as well as offer companionship for older adults… ‘We want the older adults to feel engaged in an art form…we are very hopeful the same positive results that happen in human to human models will happen with a human to robot model.’”

        http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2017/02/27/uta-researchers-using-shakespeare-robots-to-help-seniors/

        Dec. 2016 – Star-Telegram by Sara Pintilie. Shall AI compare thee? UTA robot recites Shakespeare for science. Star-Telegram article/video initially requested by Dr. Vistap Karbhari, President of UT-Arlington.

        “University of Texas at Arlington’s Julienne Greer, assistant professor of theatre arts: social robotics and performance, wants to use NAO and Shakespeare to help older adults in a new interdisciplinary study. Interdisciplinary research can promote a new way to tackle a problem or a fresh approach to age-old questions. It can produce exciting and refreshing elements, like a Shakespeare-reciting robot. Greer’s study, when it begins in April, will have older adults listen as NAO recites the first 12 lines of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18, and the people will recite the last two lines. ‘The pilot date will support our long-term goal to develop a robotic platform that can promote social connectivity and decrease loneliness among older adults, the study says.’”

        http://www.star-telegram.com/opinion/opn-columns-blogs/other-voices/article120016593.html

        Dec. 2016 – Dallas Observer. The University of Texas at Arlington’s Theatre Department has a new student – a Robot by Pablo Arauz. “Nao the robot is a little over a month old, but can already recite poetry as if it feels passion… Greer is an assistant professor of theater and an actor. Her life’s work has been to study how humans interact with other humans, but recently she’s been exploring a whole new territory: How humans interact with machines and the experience involved in understanding this relationship – that’s right, a relationship with a machine. Her specialty is an interdisciplinary research area called theater and social robotics that explores how robots can reflect human emotion by applying traditional acting methods.” 

         http://www.dallasobserver.com/arts/the-university-of-texas-at-arlingtons-theater-department-has-a-new-student-a-robot-8987400

        Dec. 2016 – Dallas Innovates. UTA Theatre Prof Will Use Robot in Study on Human-Machine Connection. UTA professor Julienne Greer will use an autonomous humanoid robot in an upcoming study exploring the connection between humans and machines.

        https://dallasinnovates.com/uta-theater-prof-will-use-robot-in-study-on-human-machine-connection/

        Oct. 2016 - University of Texas at Arlington, Facebook post of unveiling of Nao with collaborator UTARI, Dr. Julienne Greer at The University of Texas at Arlington Theatre Arts Department and Kris Doelling, Research Scientist at UTARI unpack a new addition – the NAO (pronounced “now” robot) from Softbank/Aldebaran Robotics…It will be a key component for Dr. Greer’s interdisciplinary course, Robots, Digital Humanities and Theatre. https://www.facebook.com/UTAresearchinstitute/photos/pcb.1208605852534963/1208605765868305/?type=3

        Sept. 2016 - University of Texas at Arlington, interview with The Shorthorn newspaper, Robot pairs with sonnets to assist elderly by Matt Fulkerson. “If you can take the world’s greatest wordsmith-literary-poet-playwright and you can bring a robot in and they can play that scene, that’ll be incredible,” she said. (Greer)

        http://www.theshorthorn.com/news/robots-pair-with-sonnets-to-assist-elderly/article_74c49866-7f5b-11e6-8907-cfaea4359d90.html

        Aug. 2016 – NEWS RELEASE UTA Awards Four 2016 Inter-disciplinary Research Program (IRP 2016). UTA awarded grants for innovative ideas that address high-priority issues in society. I was granted one of only four awards University-wide for “Shakespeare and Robots: Examining the impact of a theatre intervention on the psychological well-being of older adults.”

        https://www.uta.edu/news/releases/2016/08/IRP%202016.php

        June, 2016 – Andrea Hektner.com. Repeat after me, robots are not humans. “Within her area of study, Greer dedicates herself to understanding all the facets underlining the many ways in which humans interact with one another…The interesting concept of Greer’s work is that humans must first understand humanity in order to to make way for the incoming generation of robots, which she argues can be achieved through the theatrical arts.” https://andreahektner.com/2016/06/20/repeat-after-me-robots-are-not-humans/

        April, 2016 – University of Texas at Arlington, Focus on Faculty Learning Luncheons. Invited to speak on the intersection of theatre and social robotics. April 20th, 2016.

        April 2016 – National Robotics Week at University of Texas Research Institute (UTARI) I begin work with UTARI collaborating and developing the human interaction for the Baxter Robotic unit for human interaction during National Robotics Week. On April 6, 2016, I brought ten Theatre Arts undergraduate students to UTARI to interact with the Baxter Robot for National Robotics Week. Over 600 local middle and high school students came through UTARI for National Robotics Week that day and participated in the interactions between the theatre arts students and Baxter the robot.

        Feb. 2016 – Fox News4ward, February 7th and 13th, 2016, Robots with Human Emotions, by Dan Godwin. “It may sound like science fiction, but more and more these days robots are exhibiting human qualities. And in many homes, they serve as companions for people. In this FOX 4Ward segment, Dan Godwin talks with Dr. Julienne Greer, a local expert who is helping guide that progress in a positive direction.”

        http://www.fox4news.com/news/fox-4-features/86482879-story

        Jan. 2016 – DISCOVERY.COM Discovery News Online, January 19, 2016, Why We Want Our Robots to Like Us, by Glenn McDonald. “Julienne Greer, a theater professor at the University of Texas at Arlington, has a unique insight into the issue of Human Robot Interaction, or HRI. In recent years, Greer and her students have worked directly with computer scientists and engineers in the U-T system, creating the new class Humans and Robots to explore the emerging emotional connections between people and machines. ‘My time spent in theatre arts seems to indicate that we are all wired to connect to empathetic human experiences, especially emotional experiences, and we feel the most 'like ourselves' when we do,’ Greer says.”

        http://news.discovery.com/tech/robotics/why-we-want-our-robots-to-like-us-160119.htm

        May 2015 – INQUIRY The Research Magazine for University of Texas at Arlington, Spring 2015, I, Robot, Engineers look to theatre techniques to create more responsive machines. “Performance, connection, and authenticity are the gold standard that should be hoped for in the creation of the relationship between humans and robots…We must be specific in programming robots to respond to, and eventually learn from, the human relationships they will be a part of.” (Greer)

        http://www.uta.edu/inquiry/spring15/faculty/i-robot.php

        March 2015 - University of Texas at Arlington, The Shorthorn newspaper released the story of the inter-disciplinary panel discussion titled Film spurs discussion about disabilities, human enhancement, Dr. Greer, discussant (see Panels). In response to a question regarding human enhancement through robotics and how that identifies humans; “All of my inequalities make me an incredibly unique person…I own being this age, going through my life, having the experiences I’ve had, and doing this wonderful art, which is all about finding the interesting, unique, quirky parts of being a human being.” (Greer)

        http://www.theshorthorn.com/news/film-spurs-discussion-about-disabilities-human-enhancement/article_a004f966-cd1f-11e4-b454-0bae11a94667.html

        Sept. 2015 - University of Texas at Arlington, on-air Interview for UTA News. Social robotics at UTA: “Buddy” and “Pepper” a social and an emotional robot acquired by Department of Theatre Arts for use in the classroom and innovative research.

        https://utanews.com/2015/09/14/dr-julienne-greer-interview/

        Sept. 2015 - University of Texas at Arlington, Live radio interview for College of Liberal Art’s 50th anniversary and welcome back event with UTA Radio, “UTA and The Department of Theatre Arts are incredibly forward-thinking. We’ve purchased a social robot for use in the classroom…How robots essentially ‘perform’ for humans and how humans emotionally respond to robots, is my primary research interest.” (Greer)

        Sept. 2015 - University of Texas at Arlington, interview with The Shorthorn newspaper, Theatre gets robot, which will appear in spring play by Sheliah Lindsey. “I believe robots are the future…They have so much potential. They can help keep the elderly in their homes longer. They can help children with disabilities.” (Greer)

        Dec. 2014 - University of Texas at Arlington, interview with The Shorthorn newspaper, Lecturer blends theatre arts, robotics by Hannah-Beth Floyd. “I think we’re already well past the point where humans and technologies interact,” Greer said. “Technology is a part of our life… (my work is essentially) taking decades of method work, performance technique, and using it to create the most authentic relationship between the human being and a robot.” (Greer)

        http://www.theshorthorn.com/news/lecturer-blends-theater-arts-robotics/article_85eeab54-7a76-11e4-8344-3f24595643ac.html

        Nov. 2014 - University of Texas at Arlington, News Release UT Arlington Theatre Arts research provides insight into human behavior for scientists, engineers who build social robots by Bridget Lewis. News release was picked up by multiple science websites including; Phys.org, esciencenews.com, sciencenewsline.com, techsharx.com, cosmosmagazine.com, inas.in (Indo-Asian news service) as well as a Lithuanian news site, robotika.it (Menininkės įžvalgos pravers robotų kūrėjams). “The fascinating aspect of sensory (data) work is how it opens the imagination to the cognitive work our senses do all day, every day to connect us to our world. The subject becomes aware of new sensory stimuli, which in turn creates an emotional response.” (Greer)

        http://www.uta.edu/news/releases/2014/11/Greer-social-robotics.php

        Nov. 2014 – NDTV.com, The Future Awaits the Rise of Affectionate Robots. “A new study into a robot named Pepper who has been hailed as an emotionally responsive humanoid robot, can help scientists build more affection robots.” http://www.ndtv.com/offbeat/the-future-awaits-the-rise-of-affectionate-robots-703178

        Nov. 2014 – The Aurora Fox Arts Center. From STEM to STEAM, Theatre and Robots? “’Performing Arts’ and ‘Theatre’ hold a regular spot on lists like Forbes’ “The Ten Worst College Majors” and The Daily Beast’s “The Thirteen Most Useless Majors”. But Julienne Greer sees that changing…When Julienne Greer heard about the new “emotional” robots coming out of Japan (like Aldebaran’s Pepper) she was intrigued. These robots are designed to be in-home companions that can read people’s moods and respond appropriately…The take-away? An actress (with a Theatre degree) is successfully working with scientists to develop super cool technology. Looks like that major wasn’t so useless after all.”

        http://aurorafoxartscenter.org/cms/2014/11/25/from-stem-to-steam/

        Nov. 2014 – Cosmos Magazine, How to Make Robots More Like Humans. “Actor, producer and director Julienne Greer is helping engineers build more responsive robots…Part of her work involves categorizing behaviours and gestures and understanding how these gestures can create emotion in humans. Robot engineers may be able to apply these principles when programming robots… ‘Performance, connection and authenticity are the gold standard that should be hoped for in the creation of the relationship between humans and robots.’” https://cosmosmagazine.com/technology/how-to-make-robots-more-like-humans

        April 2014 A + C Acting in Texas: Julienne Greer at Circle Theatre. Interview with editor, Nancy Wozny of Arts and Culture Texas. Julienne Greer takes on the role of Juliana Smithton in Circle Theatre’s production of Sharr White’s, The Other Place. White chronicles the story of Smithton, a successful neurologist, who suffers from a devastating neurological event. “I used my early training (for characterization), which was a blend of both physical and more external representations…alongside internal or more emotionally behavioral choices.” (Greer)

        http://artsandculturetx.com/acting-in-texas-julienne-greer-at-circle-theatre/

        {Technical Report }

      Journal Article 2015
      • http://epress.lib.uts.edu.au/conferences/index.php/WICSR/WICSR2014/paper/viewFile/508/107

        {Journal Article }

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • Sept 2015 to Mar 2016 Awarded a Faculty Research Grant from the College of Liberal Arts, awarded September 2015. sponsored by  - $3400

Live Performances

  • 2016
    • Apr 2016 Equity Guest Actor in world premiere of Maverick Theatre Company's production, "Helios 24/7"

      Record of Research – Field Study in Creative and Performance-related fields for 2016

      Performer: Helios 24/7, Maverick Theatre Company, Arlington, TX. Performances on April 15, 17, 21, and 23, 2016. Lead performer, Judith Lees, in “Helios 24/7” by Dr. Natalie Gaupp, playwright-in-residence with UTA’s Department of Theatre Arts, Maverick Theatre Company. World premiere staging. “Helios 24/7” is an original play examining the impact of a future world in which sleep and dreams can be eradicated in human beings. As the principal character who chooses eradication, my character is forced to confront issues of ageism, and the repercussions which follow a sleepless life. The narrative of the play set in the future with direct connections to technology, the arts, and the humanities, directly complements my research interests in performance and human-robot interaction (HRI).

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 2014
    • May 2014 "THE OTHER PLACE" by Sharr White

      "The Other Place" by Sharr White was produced at Circle Theatre a SPT (small professional theatre) in Fort Worth, Texas. Circle Theatre is a mainstay of the Fort Worth Theatre landscape for decades and continues to bring the best of theatre to its audience. Julienne Greer performed in "The Other Place" in May, 2014. She was awarded best actress by Fort Worth Weekly and Best of Tarrant County area theatre by the Star-Telegram.

      [Refereed/Juried]

Other Creative Activities

  • 2013
    • Book publication
      • June 2013 Exploring Videogames: Culture Design and Identity

        The hard-copy publication of a paper titled Digital Companions: Analysing the emotive connection between players and NPC companions in videogame space. The paper was presented in Oxford, UK at the 3rd Global Conference: Videogame Cultures and the Future of Interactive Entertainment in 2011. This was an invited expansion of the original presented paper integrating and referencing the work of other participants in the conference. "The volume brings together perspectives on videogames and interactive entertainment from film and media studies, Russian studies, health, philosophy and human-computer interaction, among others. It includes theoretically and practically-informed explorations of the nature of games, their design and development, and their communities and culture." Edited by Nick Webber and Daniel Riha.

        [Refereed/Juried]
    • Doctoral Dissertation
      • May 2013 AFFECTIVE CONNECTIONS: PERFORMANCE STUDIES, VIDEOGAMES, AND DIGITAL CHARACTERS

        This dissertation is an analysis of existing performance techniques from theatre and cinema studies re-contextualized to apply to the emerging affective bond between the gameplayer and a digital character in videogames. In this work a bridge is built between the disciplines of humanities and game studies by utilizing traditional performance techniques from theatre and film to enhance and enrich the emotional and affective nature of game play in videogames. The intention is to recognize the encompassing live-ness of the long-established performing arts and the excitement of the technology within the modern videogame in order to connect the best in both disciplines. It is the author's perspective that the affective bond between the gameplayer and the digital character in a game is as vital and essential to the experience of playing the game as the affective relationship between the performer and the audience in a play or film. Recently, videogame designers have become aware of the gameplayer’s increased interest in developing an emotional bond with the digital characters in videogames. This dissertation is designed to reinforce, expand, enhance, and intensify the emotional interaction between the player and the digital character through the application of specific performance techniques. Two schools of traditional performance technique are presented—Lee Strasberg’s method and Vsevolod Meyerhold’s biomechanics. Meyerhold’s performance technique stressed external physicalization, gesture, behavior, and avant-garde themes and movement to create emotion and authentic characterization in the performer. This external performance technique was created, developed, and best exemplified by Vsevolod Meyerhold and his work in biomechanics or physical theater in Russia in the 1890s. The Strasberg performance technique stresses internalized thoughts, psychological motivations and desires, personal memories, and naturalistic behavior and movement to create authentic emotive characterizations in the performer. Inner performance technique was created, developed, and best exemplified by Lee Strasberg and his work to create "the method" system in the United States in the 1920s. This dissertation utilizes aspects of both contrasting performance techniques to fully develop and present powerful emotive and affective bonds between a player and a videogame character referencing both the creators of the performances techniques as well as the developers, creators, and animators of videogames.

        [Refereed/Juried]

Peers Mentored

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    Duration : Dec 2016 to Present
    I performed a peer evaluation including pre and post meetings of a Script Analysis course in which Detra Payne was the instructor. Prof. Payne and I held several informal meetings to discuss strengths and weaknesses in the course and completed the required paperwork for the peer evaluation.

Courses

      • THEA 3314-001 VOICE AND MOVEMENT

        An intermediate course in vocal production and its integration with movement. Primarily focuses on articulation, breath support, and voice/movement interaction. Only Theatre Arts majors or minors may enroll. Prerequisite: Must be a Theatre Arts major or minor; permission of advisor.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 3351-001 ROBOTS, DIGITAL HUMANITIES, AND THEATRE

        Lecture and applied practices of the emerging emotional interaction between robots and humans utilizing theatrical methodologies. Course will emphasize human and robot interactions from interdisciplinary approaches including cultural, historical, sociological, health-care, performing arts and a people with disabilities framework.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 3351-001 ROBOTS, DIGITAL HUMANITIES, AND THEATRE

        Lecture and applied practices of the emerging emotional interaction between robots and humans utilizing theatrical methodologies. Course will emphasize human and robot interactions from interdisciplinary approaches including cultural, historical, sociological, health-care, performing arts and a people with disabilities framework.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 1307-002 ACTING I: BASIC TECHNIQUES

        Acting I: Basic Techniques. Study and exercise in fundamentals of the actor's craft utilizing the Stanislavski Method. Emphasis on the development of basic acting techniques including: characterization, objectives, beats, action, and script analysis. Performance requirements include improvisation, monologues, and scene study. Attendance at productions outside of the classroom may be required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 3351-001 ROBOTS, DIGITAL HUMANITIES, AND THEATRE

        A multi-disciplinary course exploring the emerging intersection of theatre and social robotics. A primary focus will be human-robot interaction (HRI) through a digital humanities perspective. From “Eliza" the simple computer program created by Joseph Weizenbaum in 1964, to “Pepper” the emotional companion robot in 2018, this course looks at the relational interactions that have formed and will form between humans and social robots. In addition to lecture and interactive research; collaborative and multi-disciplinary alliances will be formed with fields of study including UTARI (UTA Research Institute), engineering, social work, liberal arts, disabilities, interdisciplinary studies, and theatre arts.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 3314-001 VOICE AND MOVEMENT

        This course provides instruction for specialized training of the voice and the body for the performing artist. This class will connect the student’s voice and movement to imagery and text to increase the strength, flexibility, relaxation, and dynamic potential of the student’s instrument for the rigors of performance. Primary focus will include relaxation techniques, breath control, body awareness, the release of habitual patterns, and inter-connection of the voice and body for optimal communication. The class will cover techniques drawn from a wide variety of voice and movement pedagogies including Linklater, Method, Grotowski, and Viewpoints. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 181-002 Theatre Practicum

        Theatre Practicum is open to all students interested in theatre production at UTA. This may include scenic construction, scenic painting, props, publicity, lighting, costumes, sound, box office, and house management. Practicum is required for all theatre majors.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 3351-001 ROBOTS, DIGITAL HUMANITIES, AND THEATRE

        A multi-disciplinary course exploring the emerging intersection of theatre and social robotics. A primary focus will be human-robot interaction (HRI) through a digital humanities perspective. From “Eliza”, the simple computer program created by Joseph Weizenbaum in 1966, to “Pepper” the emotional companion robot in 2016, this course looks at the relational interactions that have formed and will form between humans and social robots. In addition to lecture and interactive research; collaborative and multi-disciplinary alliances will be formed with fields of study including UTARI (UTA Research Institute), engineering, social work, liberal arts, disabilities, interdisciplinary studies, and theatre arts.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 1303-001 Fundamentals of Presentation

        The fundamentals of vocal performance as it relates to effective oral communication. Students develop ideas for the purpose of communication and learn effective techniques for clarity of expression, ideas, and message while considering the effect on an audience. Theatrical communication techniques are one of several skill sets taught. Oral, aural, written, and visual literacy are all explored, with intense focus on oral presentation. This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in Communication.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 181-002 Theatre Practicum

        Theatre Practicum is open to all students interested in theatre production at UTA. This may include scenic construction, scenic painting, props, publicity, lighting, costumes, sound, box office, and house management. Practicum is required for all theatre majors.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 3351-001 ROBOTS, DIGITAL HUMANITIES, AND THEATRE

        A multi-disciplinary course exploring the emerging intersection of theatre and social robotics. A primary focus will be human-robot interaction (HRI) through a digital humanities perspective. From “Eliza” the simple computer program created by Joseph Weizenbaum in 1966, to “Pepper” the emotional companion robot in 2016, this course looks at the relational interactions that have formed and will form between humans and social robots. In addition to lecture and interactive research; collaborative and multi-disciplinary alliances will be formed with fields of study including UTARI (UTA Research Institute), engineering, social work, liberal arts, disabilities, interdisciplinary studies, and theatre arts.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • THEA 4393-001 Special Topics in Theatre: Voice and Movement

        This course provides instruction for specialized training of the voice and the body for the performing artist. This class will connect the student’s voice and movement to imagery and text to increase the strength, flexibility, relaxation, and dynamic potential of the student’s instrument for the rigors of performance. Primary focus will include relaxation techniques, breath control, body awareness, the release of habitual patterns, and inter-connection of the voice and body for optimal communication. The class will cover techniques drawn from a wide variety of voice and movement pedagogies including Linklater, Method, Grotowski, and Viewpoints. Prerequisite: permission of faculty. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 1303-002 FUNDAMENTALS OF PRESENTATION

        This course provides instruction in the fundamentals of vocal performance as it relates to effective oral communication.  Students develop ideas for the purpose of communication and learn effective techniques for clarity of expression, ideas, and message while considering the effect on audience. Theatrical communication techniques are one of several skill sets taught.  Oral, aural, written, and visual literacy are all explored, with intense focus on oral presentation.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 181-002 Theatre Arts Practicum

        Theatre Practicum is open to all students interested in theatre production at UTA. This may include scenic construction, scenic painting, props, publicity, lighting, costumes, sound, box office, and house management. Practicum is required for all theatre majors.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 181-002 Theatre Arts Practicum

        Theatre Practicum is open to all students interested in theatre production at UTA. This may include scenic construction, scenic painting, props, publicity, lighting, costumes, sound, box office, and house management. Practicum is required for all theatre majors.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 181-002 THEATRE PRACTICUM

        Theatre Practicum is open to all students interested in theatre production at UTA. This may include scenic construction, scenic painting, props, publicity, lighting, costumes, sound, box office, and house management. Practicum is required for all theatre majors.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 3351-001 ROBOTS, DIGITAL HUMANITIES, AND THEATRE

        A multi-disciplinary course exploring the emerging intersection of theatre and social robotics. A primary focus will be human-robot interaction (HRI) through a digital humanities perspective. From “Eliza” the simple computer program created by Joseph Weizenbaum in 1966, to “Pepper” the emotional companion robot in 2016, this course looks at the relational interactions that have formed and will form between humans and social robots. In addition to lecture and interactive research; collaborative and multi-disciplinary alliances will be formed with fields of study including UTARI (UTA Research Institute), engineering, social work, liberal arts, disabilities, interdisciplinary studies, and theatre arts.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 4393-002 HUMANS AND ROBOTS - Special Topics

        Lecture and applied practices of the emerging emotional interaction between robots and humans utilizing theatrical methodologies. Course will cover human and robot interactions from an interdisciplinary approach: cultural, historical, sociological, health-care, performing arts, and persons with disabilities framework.Lecture and applied practices of the emerging emotional interaction between robots and humans utilizing theatrical methodologies. Course will cover human and robot interactions from an interdisciplinary approach: cultural, historical, sociological, health-care, performing arts, and persons with disabilities framework.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 3311-001 DIALECTS IN PERFORMANCE

        The study and application of selected U.S. and International dialects. Emphasis will be on the analysis and execution of dialects; however, a high level of acting performance is expected. Prerequisite: THEA 1303 and permission of instructor

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 181-007 Theatre Practicum 0181

        Theatre Practicum is open to all students interested in theatre production at UTA. This may include scenic construction, scenic painting, props, publicity, lighting, costumes, sound, box office, and house management. Practicum is required for all theatre majors.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 181-007 Theatre Practicum 0181

        Theatre Practicum is open to all students interested in theatre production at UTA. This may include scenic construction, scenic painting, props, publicity, lighting, costumes, sound, box office, and house management. Practicum is required for all theatre majors.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 181-004 Theatre Practicum

        Theatre Practicum is open to all students interested in theatre production at UTA. This may include scenic construction, scenic painting, props, publicity, lighting, costumes, sound, box office, and house management. Practicum is required for all theatre majors.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 181-002 THEATRE PRACTICUM

        Theatre Practicum is open to all students interested in theatre production at UTA. This may include scenic construction, scenic painting, props, publicity, lighting, costumes, sound, box office, and house management. Practicum is required for all theatre majors.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 1303-002 FUNDAMENTALS OF PRESENTATION

        This course provides instruction in the fundamentals of vocal performance as it relates to effective oral communication.  Students develop ideas for the purpose of communication and learn effective techniques for clarity of expression, ideas, and message while considering the effect on audience. Theatrical communication techniques are one of several skill sets taught.  Oral, aural, written, and visual literacy are all explored, with intense focus on oral presentation. This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in Communication.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 4393-002 HUMANS AND ROBOTS: THE FUTURE IS HERE

        A multi-disciplinary course exploring human-robot interaction (HRI) and research. From “Eliza” the simple computer program created by Joseph Weizenbaum in 1966 to “Pepper” the emotional companion robot in 2015, this course will look at the relational interactions that have formed and will form between humans and social robots. In addition to lecture and interactive research, collaborative and multi-disciplinary alliances will be formed with field of study’s as diverse as UTARI (UTA Research Institute), engineering, psychology, social work, liberal arts, disabilities, interdisciplinary studies, and theatre arts.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 1303-001 VOCAL PERFORMANCE I: FUNDAMENTALS

        This course provides instruction in the fundamentals of vocal performance as it relates to effective oral communication.  Students develop ideas for the purpose of communication and learn effective techniques for clarity of expression, ideas, and message while considering the effect on audience. Theatrical communication techniques are one of several skill sets taught.  Oral, aural, written, and visual literacy are all explored, with intense focus on oral presentation. This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in Communication

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 3311-001 VOCAL PERFORMANCE II: DIALECTS

        This course is intended to instruct acting students in the application and performance of a variety of U.S. and international dialects, accents, and regionalisms. Portions of the class will be dedicated to exercises that improve vocal tone, timbre, and flexibility as well as a fundamental understanding of the actor’s breathing apparatus. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of dialect work with performance techniques. Although the focus will be on the analysis and execution of dialects, a high level of acting performance technique is expected and encouraged.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 181-001 THEATRE PRACTICUM

         Theatre Practicum is open to all students interested in theatre production at UTA. This may include scenic construction, scenic painting, props, publicity, lighting, costumes, sound, box office, and house management. Practicum is required for all theatre majors.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 181-002 Theatre Practicum

         Theatre Practicum is open to all students interested in theatre production at UTA. This may include scenic construction, scenic painting, props, publicity, lighting, costumes, sound, box office, and house management. Practicum is required for all theatre majors.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 181-001 Theatre Arts Practicum

        Theatre Practicum is open to all students interested in theatre production at UTA. This may include scenic construction, scenic painting, props, publicity, lighting, costumes, sound, box office, and house management. Practicum is required for all theatre majors.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 1300-001 First Year Seminar in Theatre Arts

        UT Arlington’s Freshman Seminar course is designed to assist first-year students in their transition to UT Arlington. The course is taught by Theatre Arts Department faculty and a student Peer Academic Leader (PAL). The Theatre Arts department also includes a conceptual narrative for the course, which is an overview of Comedy as a theatrical form. The classical Greek philosopher Plato (428-348 B.C.E.) defined comedy as any exhibition, which has a tendency to excite laughter.  However, what is it that makes one person laugh and another cringe with disgust? Comedy may not be defined as science, yet it does have its rules. This first year seminar will explore comedic forms and techniques.  Topics to be examined include: the mechanics of comedy, comedic genres, and iconic comic characters from the past and present.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 3308-001 Acting III - Acting for the Camera

        This is an advanced acting course; to acquire film and video performance technique; to teach the student the unique dynamics of the actor-camera relationship; and to help the student develop an understanding of how the actor functions in a production setting. Required prerequisites: 1303, 1307, and 2352; and permission of faculty. Talent, skill, acting technique, and professionalism will be graded at an advanced level.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 3311-001 Vocal Performance II: Dialects

        This course is intended to instruct acting students in the application and performance of a variety of U.S. and international dialects, accents, and regionalisms. Portions of the class will be dedicated to exercises that improve vocal tone, timbre, and flexibility as well as a fundamental understanding of the actor’s breathing apparatus. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of dialect work with performance techniques. Although the focus will be on the analysis and execution of dialects; a high level of acting performance technique is expected and encouraged.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 1343-001 Introduction to Theatre

        This course acquaints the student with major phases of theatrical activity and production research. It will consider in depth the contributions of the playwright, director, actors, designers, and others involved in the process of play production.  In addition to lectures and discussions, students in this course will also be required to attend one theatre performance outside of class.  During the course of the semester, students will complete an analysis paper on a theatrical performance, one group project, a design project, and several quizzes.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 181-001 Theatre Arts Practicum

        Theatre Practicum is open to all students interested in theatre production at UTA. This may include scenic construction, scenic painting, props, publicity, lighting, costumes, sound, box office, and house management. Practicum is required for all theatre majors.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 3308-001 Acting III - Acting for the Camera

        This is an advanced acting course to acquire film and video performance technique. Required prerequisites: 1303, 1307, and 2352; and permission of faculty. Talent, skill, acting technique, and professionalism will be graded at an advanced level.

        Note: Course syllabus, course requirements, assignments, projects, topics and grading criteria are subject to change and review by the instructor depending on instructor’s evaluation of class progress and comprehension of course material.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 1342-001 Theatre and Film Appreciation

        This course is a survey of the developments in the history of Western theatre and the history of film.  This course is designed to develop awareness of and appreciation for dramatic art as reflected in theatre and film and to increase the student's enjoyment and knowledge of drama and its historical, social, and cultural contexts. Although the first section of the course will be devoted to theatre and the second section will be devoted to film, a specific focus of this course is noting the similarities and differences between stage and film work and the adaptations that occur when one medium transforms work.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 1300-001 First Year Seminar in Theatre Arts

        This seminar course is an introduction to the first-year Theatre Arts student to the academic, social, and cultural rigors of University life. A portion of the course is dedicated to the mentoring of the upper-classmen student PAL (Peer Academic Leader). The majority of the class is the broad-based analysis of comedic genres. This first year seminar will explore comedic forms and techniques from Greek classicism to contemporary movements.  Topics to be examined include: the mechanics of comedy, comedic genres, and iconic comic characters from the past and present.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 3335-001 Dance for the Actor

        This course provides dance experience of the elementary level in ballet, jazz, and tap. This introduction to dance is an experiential course requiring the student’s participation in a daily movement class consisting of: warm up, center work, traveling patterns, dance combinations, improvisation, and composition. Emphasis is based on individual and group creative experience through dance exercises, improvisation, and composition. Dance elements of space, rhythm, and energy are explored. Dance and movement analysis, which consist of viewing live or video-taped performances, research, and self-study will be included in this course and constitute an equal portion of the curriculum.  Note: Since movement is an integral part of this class it is advisable that the student be in relatively good health. It is recommended that the student inform the instructor of any medical concerns and/or physician’s ongoing care that could affect the student’s participation and/or personal safety in the class.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 1342-003 Theatre and Film Appreciation

        This course is a survey of the developments in the history of Western theatre and the history of film.  This course is designed to develop awareness of and appreciation for dramatic art as reflected in theatre and film and to increase the student's enjoyment and knowledge of drama and its historical, social, and cultural contexts. Although the first part of the course will be devoted to theatre and the second part will be devoted to film, a specific focus of this course is noting the similarities and differences between stage and film work and the adaptations that occur when one medium transforms work into another.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 3311-001 Vocal Performance II - Dialects

        This course is intended to instruct acting students in the application and performance of a variety of U.S. and international dialects, accents, and regionalisms. Portions of the class will be dedicated to exercises which improve vocal tone, timbre, and flexibility as well as a fundamental understanding of the actor’s breathing apparatus. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of dialect work with performance techniques. Although the focus will be on the analysis and execution of dialects; a high level of acting performance technique is expected.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 1307-002 ACTING I

        This is an introductory level acting class for the theatre and is designed to introduce and illustrate the fundamentals of acting through exploration into the Stanislavski System of acting.  The student will study and practice warm-ups, physical and vocal awareness and expression, the Stanislavski System, theatre terminology, improvisation, and the performance and audition processes. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours2 Documents
      • THEA 3308-001 Acting III - Acting for the Camera

        This is an advanced acting course to acquire film and video performance technique. Required prerequisites: 1303, 1307, and 2352; and permission of faculty. Talent, skill, acting technique, and professionalism will be graded at an advanced level.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • THEA 1342-001 Theatre and Film Appreciation

        This course is a survey of the developments in the history of Western theatre and the history of film.  This course is designed to develop awareness of and appreciation for dramatic art as reflected in theatre and film and to increase the student's enjoyment and knowledge of drama and its historical, social, and cultural contexts. Although the first part of the course will be devoted to theatre and the second part will be devoted to film, a specific focus of this course is noting the similarities and differences between stage and film work and the adaptations that occur when one medium transforms work into another.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours

Service to the University

  • Appointed
    • Mar 2015 to  Present Discussant on an Interdisciplinary panel in regards to the film, "FIXED: The Science Fiction of Human Enhancement."

      A viewing of the documentary FIXED followed by an open interdisciplinary panel and audience discussion. The intersection of disabilities and human enhancement was discussed Tuesday in University Hall as a result of a partnership between the Women’s and Gender Studies program and the Office for Students with Disabilities.

    • Aug 2015 to  Present Interdisciplinarity In and Out of the Classroom - Faculty Orientation Fall 2015

      Dr. Julienne Greer. Invited to present on an Interdisciplinary Panel at the expanded new faculty orientation, August 2015, University of Texas at Arlington. Title of presentation: “Interdisciplinarity In and Out of the Classroom." How does a cross-disciplinary team come together? Join Drs. Anand Puppala, David Arditi and Julienne Greer for a discussion on music, robots, recycled materials, and actor training.

      Topics to include:

      Ways to make connections with faculty outside your discipline.

      Bringing an interdisciplinary perspective into your teaching.

      Working with students on interdisciplinary research and/or projects.