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Kathryn Rhoads

Name

[Dawson, Kathryn E]

Professional Preparation

    • 2014 Ph.D. in Education (Mathematics Education),  Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
    • 2007 M.A.T. in MathematicsTexas Christian University (TCU)
    • 2004 M.Ed. in Secondary EducationTexas Christian University (TCU)
    • 2004 B.A. in Mathematics (Spanish),  Texas Christian University (TCU)

Research and Expertise

  • Secondary Mathematics Teacher Education

    Mathematical knowledge and beliefs supporting high school mathematics teachers in instruction

  • Mathematical Problem Solving

    Assessing mathematical problem solving at the undergraduate level

Publications

      Journal Article 2017
      • Rhoads, K.,& Alvarez, J.A.M. (2017). Data modelling using finite differences. The Mathematics Teacher, 110, 709-713

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2016
      • Rhoads, K., & Weber, K. (2016). Exemplary high school mathematics teachers' reflections on teaching: A situated cognition perspective on content knowledge. International Journal of Educational Research, 78, ​1-12.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2015
      • Epperson, J.A.M., & Rhoads, K. (2015). Choosing high-yield tasks for the mathematical development of practicing secondary teachers. Journal of Mathematics Education at Teachers College, 6, 37-44.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2014
      • Fuller, E., Weber, K., Mejia-Ramos, J.P., Rhoads, K., Samkoff, A. (2014). Comprehending structured proofs. International Journal for Studies in Mathematics Education, 7(1), 1-32.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2013
      • de la Torre, J., Tjoe, H., Rhoads, K., & Lam, D. (2013). Conceptual and theoretical issues in proportional reasoning. International Journal for Studies in Mathematics Education, 6, 21-38.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2013
      • Rhoads, K., Samkoff, A., & Weber, K. (2013). Student teacher and cooperating teacher tensions in a high school mathematics teacher internship: The case of Luis and Sheri. Mathematics Teacher Education and Development, 15, 108-128.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2012
      • Mejia-Ramos, J.P., Fuller, E., Weber, K., Rhoads, K., & Samkoff, A. (2012). An assessment model for proof comprehension in undergraduate mathematics. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 79, 3-18. doi: 10.1007/s10649-011-9349-7

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2012
      • Rhoads, K., Samkoff, A., & Radu, I. (2012). Mentoring a mathematics student-teacher. The New Jersey Mathematics Teacher, 70, 17-22.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2011
      • Rhoads, K., Radu, I., & Weber, K. (2011). The teacher internship experiences of prospective high school mathematics teachers. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 9, 999-1022. doi: 10.1007/s10763-010-9267-7

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2011
      • Weber, K., & Rhoads, K. (2011). A review of Learning through teaching mathematics: Development of teachers’ knowledge and expertise in practice, [book by R. Leikin & R. Zazkis (Eds.)]. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 42, 521-527.

        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • June 2016 to Present Enhancing Explorations in Functions for Preservice Secondary Mathematics Teachers sponsored by  - $300000
    • Feb 2016 to Present Representational Connections in Algebraic Reasoning sponsored by  - $190000
    • Aug 2015 to Present Mathematical Problem Solving Item Development Project sponsored by  - $270518

Courses

      • MATH 1302-211 COLLEGE ALGEBRA

        This course is designed as preparation for higher level mathematics courses. Topics include the study of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical absolute value, logarithmic, and exponential functions, relations and inequalities; graphs, basic characteristics, and operations on functions; real and complex zeros of functions; graphing techniques; systems of equations and matrices. The use of mathematical software and calculators is required. See course syllabus for more details. Non-STEM (Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics) majors should enroll in MATH 1301, and Business majors should enroll in MATH 1315. Credit may be received for only one ofMATH 1301MATH 1302, or MATH 1315.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1302-311 COLLEGE ALGEBRA

        This course is designed as preparation for higher level mathematics courses. Topics include the study of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical absolute value, logarithmic, and exponential functions, relations and inequalities; graphs, basic characteristics, and operations on functions; real and complex zeros of functions; graphing techniques; systems of equations and matrices. The use of mathematical software and calculators is required. See course syllabus for more details. Non-STEM (Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics) majors should enroll in MATH 1301, and Business majors should enroll in MATH 1315. Credit may be received for only one ofMATH 1301MATH 1302, or MATH 1315.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 2330-001 Functions and Modeling

        Students engage in explorations and lab activities designed to strengthen and expand their knowledge of the topics found in secondary mathematics. Students collect data and explore a variety of situations that can be modeled using linear, exponential, polynomial, and trigonometric functions. Activities are designed to have them take a second, deeper look at topics they should have been exposed to previously; illuminate the connections between secondary and college mathematics; illustrate good, as opposed to typically poor, sometimes counterproductive, uses of technology in teaching; illuminate the connections between various areas of mathematics; and engage them in serious (i.e., non-routine) problem solving, problem-based learning, and applications of mathematics. While there is some discussion of how the content relates to secondary mathematics instruction, the course primarily emphasizes mathematics content knowledge and content connections, as well as applications of the mathematics topics covered. This course is part of the UTeach program. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2425; C or better inSCIE 1101 or SCIE 1234 or concurrent enrollment.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1302-210 COLLEGE ALGEBRA

        This course is designed as preparation for higher level mathematics courses. Topics include the study of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical absolute value, logarithmic, and exponential functions, relations and inequalities; graphs, basic characteristics, and operations on functions; real and complex zeros of functions; graphing techniques; systems of equations and matrices. The use of mathematical software and calculators is required. See course syllabus for more details. Non-STEM (Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics) majors should enroll in MATH 1301, and Business majors should enroll in MATH 1315. Credit may be received for only one ofMATH 1301MATH 1302, or MATH 1315.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1302-310 COLLEGE ALGEBRA

        This course is designed as preparation for higher level mathematics courses. Topics include the study of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical absolute value, logarithmic, and exponential functions, relations and inequalities; graphs, basic characteristics, and operations on functions; real and complex zeros of functions; graphing techniques; systems of equations and matrices. The use of mathematical software and calculators is required. See course syllabus for more details. Non-STEM (Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics) majors should enroll in MATH 1301, and Business majors should enroll in MATH 1315. Credit may be received for only one ofMATH 1301MATH 1302, or MATH 1315.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 2425-201 CALCULUS II

        This course includes the study of applications of integration, techniques of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, sequences, and series.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 2425-202 CALCULUS II

        This course includes the study of applications of integration, techniques of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, sequences, and series.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1302-301 COLLEGE ALGEBRA

        This course is designed as preparation for higher level mathematics courses. Topics include the study of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical absolute value, logarithmic, and exponential functions, relations and inequalities; graphs, basic characteristics, and operations on functions; real and complex zeros of functions; graphing techniques; systems of equations and matrices. The use of mathematical software and calculators is required.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1302-300 COLLEGE ALGEBRA

        This course is designed as preparation for higher level mathematics courses. Topics include the study of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical absolute value, logarithmic, and exponential functions, relations and inequalities; graphs, basic characteristics, and operations on functions; real and complex zeros of functions; graphing techniques; systems of equations and matrices. The use of mathematical software and calculators is required.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • MATH 3301-001 FOUNDATIONS OF GEOMETRY

        This course will develop a foundation for geometry, including Euclidean and Non-Euclidean geometries. Course activities will emphasize problem solving in geometry as well as reading, writing, and communicating mathematical arguments in the context of geometry.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 2425-200 CALCULUS II

        This course includes the study of applications of integration, techniques of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, sequences, and series.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1301-008 CONTEMPORARY MATH

        This course covers material in a traditional algebra course together with real-world applications of mathematics. It develops problem-solving and critical thinking skills. Topics include the mathematics of dimensional analysis, mathematical logic, population growth, optimization, voting theory, number theory, graph theory, relations, functions, probability, statistics, and finance. The use of mathematical software and calculators is required.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • MATH 5342-001 Concepts and Techniques in Algebra

        This course will explore various perspectives on school algebra that have been put forth in the literature. This includes algebra as the study of functions and function relationships, algebra as the study of multiple representations with an emphasis on graphs, tables, and formulae, algebra as generalized arithmetic and quantitative reasoning, algebra as a language, and algebra as a formal mathematical system. This course will engage the students in using algebra to represent and analyze mathematical situations and will emphasize students’ conceptual understanding of the ideas central to algebra. In addition to providing mathematical content background for middle and secondary school teachers, this course will address strategies for implementing an instructional approach that emphasizes algebraic thinking.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 3301-001 FOUNDATIONS OF GEOMETRY

        This course will develop a foundation for Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, with connections to history. Course activities will emphasize problem solving in geometry as well as writing and communicating proofs in the context of geometry.  

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 5341-001 CONCEPTS AND TECHNIQUES IN GEOMETRY

        This course will explore Euclidean and Non-Euclidean geometry, with connections to history. Geometric concepts will be introduced and explored through problems, and students will be expected to approach these with intuition, personal experiences, and reasoning. Activities will emphasize collaborative learning, classroom discourse, and written justifications and proofs. This course will also make connections to geometry instruction in secondary school.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1302-300 COLLEGE ALGEBRA

        This course is designed as preparation for higher level mathematics courses. Topics include the study of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical absolute value, logarithmic, and exponential functions, relations and inequalities; graphs, basic characteristics, and operations on functions; real and complex zeros of functions; graphing techniques; systems of equations and matrices. The use of mathematical software and calculators is required. See course syllabus for more details. Non-STEM (Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics) majors should enroll in MATH 1301, and Business majors should enroll in MATH 1315. Credit may be received for only one of MATH 1301, MATH 1302, or MATH 1315.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • MATH 1302-350 College Algebra

        This course is designed as preparation for higher level mathematics courses. Topics include the study of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical absolute value, logarithmic, and exponential functions, relations and inequalities; graphs, basic characteristics, and operations on functions; real and complex zeros of functions; graphing techniques; systems of equations and matrices. The use of mathematical software and calculators is required. See course syllabus for more details. Non-STEM (Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics) majors should enroll in MATH 1301, and Business majors should enroll in MATH 1315. Credit may be received for only one of MATH 1301, MATH 1302, or MATH 1315.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • MATH 1302-301 COLLEGE ALGEBRA

        This course is designed as preparation for higher level mathematics courses. Topics include the study of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical absolute value, logarithmic, and exponential functions, relations and inequalities; graphs, basic characteristics, and operations on functions; real and complex zeros of functions; graphing techniques; systems of equations and matrices. The use of mathematical software and calculators is required. See course syllabus for more details. Non-STEM (Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics) majors should enroll in MATH 1301, and Business majors should enroll in MATH 1315. Credit may be received for only one of MATH 1301, MATH 1302, or MATH 1315.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 1302-351 College Algebra

        This course is designed as preparation for higher level mathematics courses. Topics include the study of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical absolute value, logarithmic, and exponential functions, relations and inequalities; graphs, basic characteristics, and operations on functions; real and complex zeros of functions; graphing techniques; systems of equations and matrices. The use of mathematical software and calculators is required. See course syllabus for more details. Non-STEM (Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics) majors should enroll in MATH 1301, and Business majors should enroll in MATH 1315. Credit may be received for only one of MATH 1301, MATH 1302, or MATH 1315.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 5343-001 Concepts and Techniques in Probability and Statistics

        This course will focus on the following topics: (1) exploring data: descriptive statistics of situations involving one and two variables; (2) anticipating patterns: probability and simulation; (3) design of experiments and planning a study; and (4) statistical inference: confirming models. A graphing calculator and other appropriate technology will be used.

      • MATH 5376-001 Constructing Rational Number and Operations

        This course will address the meanings and representations of rational numbers and the development of computations on rational numbers from algorithms for whole numbers, including concrete models for operations on fractions and decimals. Discussion will include research on the learning and teaching of operations on rational numbers. Additional topics covered include divisibility tests and factoring. Assignments require interaction in K-8 field settings. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MATH 5342-001 Concepts and Techniques in Algebra

        This course will explore the various definitions of algebra in K-12 that have been put forth in the literature. This includes algebra as the study of functions and function relationships, algebra as the study of multiple representations with an emphasis on graphs, tables, and formulae, algebra as generalized arithmetic and quantitative reasoning, algebra as a language, and algebra as a formal mathematical system. This course will engage the students in using algebra to represent and analyze mathematical situations and will emphasize students’ conceptual understanding of the ideas central to algebra.  In addition to providing mathematical content background for middle and secondary school teachers, this course will address strategies for implementing an instructional approach that emphasizes algebraic thinking.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours