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Kate Holliday

Name

[Holliday, Kate]
  • Assoc Prof, School of Architecture (Old)

Biography

Kate Holliday is an architectural historian whose research and teaching focuses on the built environment in American cities.  Her background is in architecture, art history, and environmental studies and she brings this interdisciplinary approach to the classroom and to her writing.  Since joining UTA in fall of 2007 she has published two books, Leopold Eidlitz: Architecture and Idealism in the Gilded Age (W. W. Norton, 2008) and Ralph Walker: Architect of the Century (Rizzoli, 2012).  She has lectured widely on her work in public venues like the 92nd Street Y and the Skyscraper Museum in New York, as well as at universities and conferences from Havana to Zurich.

She is currently at work on several projects, including a history of telephone buildings since the invention of commercial telephone service by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876 and an examination of the postwar boom in architecture in the suburban landscape of Dallas and Fort Worth in the 1960s and 1970s. Her current research on telephone buildings is featured in the new short film "Urban Giants: The Telecom Palaces of Ralph Walker," which can be viewed on Vimeo here.

As founding director of the David Dillon Center for Texas Architecture, she established the annual Dillon Symposium, which brings together scholars and experts from across disciplines to discuss issues related to urban problems in north Texas. In 2017, the Dillon Center is partnering with the Dallas Festival of Ideas to promote public conversation about equity and design in Dallas.  The Centers growing Oral History of Texas Architecture Project serves as a repository for the memory of the design profession in the region.

Dr. Holliday also serves on the editorial board for Columns magazine, the AIA Dallas quarterly publication and is a member of the Board of Directors for Historic Fort Worth, a non-profit dedicated to promoting the value of historic preservation. In the past, she served on the State Board of Review for the Texas Historical Commission's National Register programs between 2009 and 2015 was also a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Architectural Education. Her work has been supported by grants from the Hagley Library, the Nasher Foundation, the Rose Family Foundation, and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.

Professional Preparation

    • 1991 BA in Art and Environmental StudiesWilliams College
    • 1994 MA in Art HistoryUniversity of Texas at Austin (UT)
    • 2003 PhD in ArchitectureUniversity of Texas at Austin (UT)

Appointments

    • Sept 2013 to Present Associate Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington   Office of the President   Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs   College of Architecture, Planning and Public Affairs
    • Jan 2007 to Aug 2013 Assist Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington   School of Architecture
    • Aug 2006 to May 2007 Visiting Assistant Professor
      Southwestern University   Sarofim School of Fine Arts   Department of Art and Art History
    • Jan 2004 to Aug 2006 Lecturer
      University of Texas at Austin (UT)   School of Architecture

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Jan 2015 to Present Society for the History of Technology
    • Jan 2013 to Present do.co.mo.mo
    • Sept 2000 to Present Society of Architectural Historians
    • Sept 1997 to Present College Art Association

Awards and Honors

    • Mar  2015 Henry Belin Dupont Research Grant sponsored by Hagley Library and Research Center
    • Oct  2008 Best Book Award sponsored by SESAH (Southeast Chapter, Society of Architectural Historians) Award Details
      Description:

      SESAH (Southeast Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians) annual book award presented to Leopold Eidlitz: Architecture and Idealism in the Gilded Age

    • Sep  2008 Architecture monograph award sponsored by Victorian Society in America, Metropolitan Chapter Award Details
      Description:

      2008 book award presented to Leopold Eidlitz: Architecture and Idealism in the Gilded Age

    • Jun  1991 Phi Beta Kappa sponsored by Williams College
      Description:

      Gamma Chapter of Massachusetts

News Articles

Research and Expertise

  • Architectural history

    Areas of focus:  American architecture and cities of the 19th and 20th centuries. Current research focuses on infrastructure, telecommunications, and architecture, as well as issues of local history, social justice, and urban growth in Dallas-Fort Worth. Book projects underway include:

    Telephone City: Architecture, Glamour, and the Bell Monopoly, a book exploring the creation of a national system of telephone buildings by the Bell Telephone monopoly between the first telephone call in 1876 and the breakup of the Bell system in 1984

    In Service of Good Design: David Dillon on Texas Architecture, an edited collection of articles by the late David Dillon, architectue critic for the Dallas Morning News.

Publications

      Popular Press Article 2014 2014
      Conference Paper 2014
      Journal Article 2014
      • "Place and the City Biography: Between the Local and the Universal in the Sun Belt." Invited review essay for Journal of Urban History 40 (July 2014): 792-798.  Works reviewed include Harvey Graff, The Dallas Myth (2010); Wanda Rushing, Memphis and the Paradox of Place: Globalization in the American South (2009); James B. Crooks, Jacksonville: The Consolidation Story, from Civil Rights to the Jaguars (2004); and Robert Kerstein, Politics and Growth in Twentieth-Century Tampa (2001).

        {Review essay} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2012
      • Kathryn E. Holliday, "Beginnings and Endings: Phoebe Stanton on Pugin's Contrasts," Journal of Architectural Education 65, n.2 (April 2012): 107-117.

        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book 2012
      Book Review 2012
      • Kathryn E. Holliday, review of Wayne Craven, Gilded Mansions: Grand Architecture and High Society (W. W. Norton, 2008), Winterthur Portfolio 46, n.1 (Spring 2012).

        {Book Review} [Refereed/Juried]

      Exhibition 2012
      Conference Paper 2012
      • The Water Gardens of Fort Worth: Competing Models of Patronage (April 2012). Society of Architectural Historians annual meeting, Detroit, Michigan.

        {Conference Paper} [Refereed/Juried]

      Exhibition 2010
      • HLW125, an exhibit celebrating the 125th anniversary of the HLW firm from 1885 to 2010. New York Center for Architecture, October 2010.  Exhibition consultant.
        {Exhibition} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2010
      • Holliday, Kate. Review of Henry Austin: In Every Variety of Architectural Style, by James F. O'Gorman. Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 69, no 2, June, 2010: 282-83.

        {Book Review} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2009
      • Holliday, Kate. "Unraveling the Textile in Modern Architecture: Guest Editor's Introduction." Studies in the Decorative Arts XVI, no 2 (2009): 2-6.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2009
      • Holliday, Kate. "Whose City Hall Is It? Architecture and Identity in New Orleans." Journal of Urban Design 14, no 3 (2009).
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2009
      • Holliday, Kate. "Walls as Curtains: Architecture and Humanism in Ralph Walker's Skyscrapers of the 1920s" in special theme issue, Unraveling the Textile in Modern Architecture." Studies in the Decorative Arts XVI, no 2 (2009).
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book 2008
      • Holliday, Kathryn E. Leopold Eidlitz: Architecture and Idealism in the Gilded Age. New York: W. W. Norton, 2008.
        {Book} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2007
      • Holliday, Kate. "The Architecture Profession and the Public: Leopold Eidlitz's 'Discourses Between Two T-Squares'." Journal of Architectural Education 61, no 1 (2007): 32-43.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2006
      • "'Build More and Draw Less': The AIA and Leopold Eidlitz's Grand Central School of Architecture." Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 65, no 3 (2006): 378-401.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2006
      • Holliday, Kate. "Humanism and Modernism: The Curtain Wall Metaphor in the Work of Ralph Walker." pinakotheke 22-23 (2006): 48-56.

        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2006
      • Holliday, Kate. "Adolf Cluss, Architect: From Germany to America," exhibition review Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives, Washington, D.C." Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 65, no 4 (2006): 646-48.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

Presentations

    • June  2017
      Urban Giants: Telephone Buildings and the Rise of the Bell Monopoly
      Keynote for the Art Deco Society of New York annual meeting
    • April  2017
      State of the City Address, Dallas Festival of Ideas
      Provided the introductory address for the Physical City discussion at the Dallas Festival of Ideas, April 29, 2017, Dallas Convention Center. The Festival is sponsored by the Dallas Morning News and the Dallas Institute for the Humanities.
    • March  2017
      Vertical Expansion: Telephone Infrastructure and Density in the Urban Market
      Presented as part of the Ten and Taller symposium at the Skyscraper Museum, New York City.
    • March  2017
      The Concrete Museum
      Workshop for the Fort Worth Museum of Modern Art docents
    • January  2017
      Architecture and Memory in Dallas - Fort Worth
      Lecture delivered in conjunction with the Hermanns Lecture Series organized by the UTA Department of English
    • November  2016
      Equitable City: Forces of Division in Dallas History

      Keynote for the Dallas Festival of Ideas Community Forum, Physical City track, Dallas Center for Architecture, November 15, 2016.

    • September  2016
      Flying Saucers, Catwalks, and Craters: A History of the Future in Fort Worth

      Samuel Benton Cantey, III Memorial Lecture, Historic Fort Worth, Fort Worth Community Arts Center, September 22, 2016.

    • November  2015
      Architecture and Water

      AIA Fort Worth Design Talk

    • October  2015
      Architecture and Water

      Education Department, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

    • April  2014

      Panelist, “Research-based Design Practice,” Dallas Architecture Forum (29 April 2014). Moderated by Brad Bell.

    • March  2014

      The Modernism of Sprawl: The Case of DFW (14 March 2014). do.co.mo.mo National Symposium, Houston, Texas.

    • February  2014

      AIA Fort Worth Sundance Square discussion panel (26 February 2014).

      Panel moderator with speakers including David Schwarz, FAIA, Michael Bennett, FAIA, and Edward P. Bass. Van Cliburn Recital Hall, Fort Worth.

    • November  2013

      Understanding Museum Architecture: Then & Now (13 November 2013). Design Talk, Fort Worth Center for Architecture, AIA Fort Worth.

    • November  2013

      Writing About Architecture (8 November 2013). With Mark Lamster. Texas Society of Architects annual convention, Fort Worth Convention Center.

    • October  2013

      Mid-Century Modern in Dallas (26 October 2013). Preservation Dallas Fall Home Tour Symposium, Kalita Humphreys Theater.  

    • September  2013

      DFW Piece by Piece: Using Maps to See the City Grow (28 September 2013). Texas Map Society Fall Meeting, De Golyer Library, Southern Methodist University, Dallas. 

    • September  2013

      Public Space, Materiality, and Experience in the Fort Worth Art Museums (23 September 2013). Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth.

    • July  2013
      Texas Architecture, Texas Towns: Telling the Story of Place (2013). Texas Municipal League, Schieffer School of Journalism, TCU.
    • June  2013
      Building an Urban Giant: AT&T Long Lines in New York (June 3, 2013). Talk for Open House New York event at 32 Avenue of the Americas.
    • April  2013
      Manhattan Calling: The Telephone, Marketing, and Modern Architecture in New York(April 12, 2013). Society of Architectural Historians annual meeting, Buffalo, New York.
    • March  2013
      Ralph Walker: Art Deco and Collaboration (March 16, 2013). 12th Art Deco World Congress, Havana, Cuba.
    • February  2013
      The AIA and the Settings for Architecture Education, 1857 and 1957(February 9, 2013). "Architecture Education Goes Outside Itself: Crossing Borders, Breaking Barriers," PennDesign Conference, University of Pennsylvania,
    • November  2012
      How Do Cities Grow?(November 14, 2012). Joint GIS Day and Focus on Faculty lecture series, University of Texas at Arlington.
    • October  2012
      Cycles of Memory: 125 Years of Context(October 26, 2012). "Design Across the Spectrum, Architecture in Context,"Historic Preservation Symposium, Texas Tech University, Lubbock.
    • April  2012
      Architecture Criticism Today (April 26-27, 2012). Symposium coordinator for inaugural David Dillon Symposium, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas.

      Inaugural David Dillon Symposium. Keynote speaker: Paul Goldberger, 7pm April 26, 2012, Dallas Museum of Art. Symposium speakers: Scott Cantrell, Thomas Fisher, Stephen Fox, Paul Goldberger, Christopher Hawthorne, Alexandra Lange, Benjamin Lima, Stephen Sharpe, 11am-5pm, Nasher Sculpture Center

    • April  2012
      The Water Gardens of Fort Worth: Competing Models of Patronage (April 2012). Society of Architectural Historians annual meeting, Detroit, Michigan.
    • February  2012
      Writing O'Neil Ford(Febuuary 18, 2012). Trinity University symposium"O'Neil Ford and the Future of Trinity University," San Antonio.
    • October  2011
      The Critic's Role: Judgment, Architecture, and Building the Good City(2011). Dallas Architecture Forum panel discussion.

      Panelist, Dallas Architecture Forum panel discussion, held at the Dallas Center for Architecture, 25 October 2011.

    • September  2011
      Telephone City: Rediscovering a Typology (2011).

      Corgan Associates, Dallas, Texas, 6 September 2011.

    • April  2011
      Reading the Sketchbook of JNB de Pouilly: Imagining Antebellum New Orleans (2011). Society of Architectural Historians annual meeting.

      Conference paper for April 2011 annual meeting, New Orleans.

    • March  2011
      African American Architecture in Dallas: Past Present Future (2011). Symposium coordinator.

      Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, Texas, 26 March 2011. Symposium explored both historic and contemporary issues in African American architecture. A morning session examined the career of William Sidney Pittman, Texas's first African-American architect; an afternoon session explored contemporary practice and the role of NOMA.  Speakers included Richard Dozier (Tuskegee University), Katherine Seale (Preservation Dallas), Marvin Dulaney (University of Texas at Arlington), Marsha Prior (Geo-Marine), Darrell Fitzgerald (Fitzgerald Collaborative), Michael Johnson (Johnson McKibben), Clyde Porter (Dallas County Community College District).

    • October  2010
      Leopold Eidlitz: New York Architecture in the Gilded Age

      Victorian Society Metropolitan Chapter, New York, 12 October 2010.

    • October  2010
      Ralph Walker and the Making of 1 Wall Street(2010). Skyscraper Museum, New York.

      Public lecture, Skyscraper Museum, New York, 25 October 2010. 1 Wall Street (1929-31) epitomized Ralph Walker's concept of “humanism,” a modern approach to the integration of hand-craft and machine work, expressed inside and out in the building’s rippling curtain walls and dramatically draped interior spaces.

    • April  2010
      Shopping Texas Style: EG Hamilton, Omniplan, and Northpark Center

      Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, Texas, 30 April 2010.  Symposium focused on Hamilton's and Omniplan's designs for Northpark Shopping Center, originally opened 1965 as well as concepts of commercial architecture theory and practice in postwar America.  Co-sponsored by the Oral History of Texas Architecture Project and the Dallas Architecture Forum. Venue generously provided by the Nasher Sculpture Center.

    • April  2010
      Anxiety and Judgment: The Architecture Competition as Locus of Resistance (2010).Society of Architectural Historians annual meeting.

      Paper to be delivered for session "Architecture in Competition" at the Society of Architectural Historians annual meeting, Chicago, Illinois, April 2010.

    • April  2009
      Frank Welch and The Birthday: What Does It Mean to Make a Regional Modernism in Texas?(2009). Symposium coordinator.

      Symposium coordinator.  Dallas Center for Architecture, 24 April 2009.  Co-sponsored by the Dallas Architecture Forum and the Dallas Center for Architecture.

    • February  2009
      Leopold Eidlitz: First American Jewish Architect (2009). Book talk at the 92nd Street Y, New York.

      Paper delivered at the Bronfman Center for Jewish Life, Biography of a Jewish Life lecture series, 19 February 2009. 

    • June  2008
      The Architect as Politician: Ralph Walker and the UIA (2008).Paper delivered for session "Postwar I" at the international conference sponsored by the European Architectural History Network, the Society of Architectural Historian
    • April  2008
      'Mongrel' Architecture (2008).Paper presented for a public symposium, "The Allegheny Courthouse in Context," celebrating the 120th anniversary of the opening of the building by H. H. Richardson.

       University of Pittsburgh, Department of the History of Art and Architecture, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, April 18, 2008.

    • April  2008
      "Women in the Wings: Addressing the Importance of the Periphery"(2008). Co-chair, Society of Architectural Historians annual meeting.

      Society of Architectural Historians annual meeting, Cincinnati, Ohio, April 24, 2008.

    • April  2007
      A Copiousness of Invention: Influence and Collaboration in the Eidlitz and Richardson Firm(2007). Society of Architectural Historians annual meeting.

      Paper for session "Reconsidering the Brown Decades [and after]: New Discoveries and Revised Historiography in American Architecture, 1870-1905."   Society of Architectural Historians annual meeting, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 14 April 2007.

    • September  2006
      Unraveling the Textile in Modern Architecture

      Session Chair, Society of Architectural Historians, southeast chapter annual meeting, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, 28 September 2006.

    • February  2006
      The Curtain Wall Metaphor in the Work of Ralph Walker (2006). College Art Association annual meeting.

      Paper delivered for session "'The Principle of Dress': Theories of the Textile in Art History."  College Art Association annual meeting, Boston, Massachusetts, 25 February 2006.

    • March  2005
      Competing Colonialisms: French, Spanish, and American Territories in Nineteenth Century Post-Colonial New Orleans(2005). Society of Architectural Historians annual meeting.

      Paper delivered for session "Colonial Urbanism and Postcolonial Perspectives." Society of Architectural Historians annual meeting, Vancouver, British Columbia, 7 April 2005.

    • February  2003
      Architects in New York City, 1865-1930(2003). Session discussant, College Art Association, New York.

      Session Discussant. College Art Association annual meeting, New York, 21 February 2003.

    • February  2002
      Defining the Architectural Profession: The American Architect and Building News and the New York State Capitol Controversy

      Paper delivered for session "Architecture Periodicals in Practice and as History." College Art Association annual meeting, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 22 February 2002.

  • Projects

    • 2013
      • Nov 2013 to Nov 2013 Exploratory Research Grant
        Grant supports one week of research in the Hagley Library and Museum to determine if further, prolonged research in Hagley collections is warranted.  
        Role: Other PI: Not Specified

    Support & Funding

    This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
      • June 2009 to May 2010 Ralph Walker: Humanism and Modernism sponsored by  - $10000
      • June 2002 to Aug 2002 Leopold Eidlitz: Origins in Prague, Vienna, and Munich sponsored by  - $4000

    Courses

        • LARC 5312-001 HISTORY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

          This course introduces major works and approaches in landscape design from the sixteenth century to the present in both western and non-western cultures.  While we define landscape design broadly, to incorporate the breadth of cultural landscapes, we will focus primarily on designed work, from small domestic gardens, to estates, city parks, national parks, corporate campuses, and regional plans as well as themes central to Texas.  We will consider changes in the profession that continually redefine the scope of landscape design, including the influence of city planning, sustainability, and broader ecological thinking.

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 4353-001 HISTORY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

          This course introduces major works and approaches in landscape design from the sixteenth century to the present in both western and non-western cultures.  While we define landscape design broadly, to incorporate the breadth of cultural landscapes, we will focus primarily on designed work, from small domestic gardens, to estates, city parks, national parks, corporate campuses, and regional plans as well as themes central to Texas.  We will consider changes in the profession that continually redefine the scope of landscape design, including the influence of city planning, sustainability, and broader ecological thinking.

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 5307-001 Life of Cities

          In the 1960s urban critic Jane Jacobs published The Death and Life of Great American Cities, a book based on her observations of what worked and what did not in the making of neighborhoods and public space.  As the title suggests, she wrote in a period in which she saw cities in jeopardy, dying because of thoughtless urban renewal strategies.  This course will ask students to focus on the “life” of cities by looking at a series of urban projects in major world cities, all of which were designed in the past 100 years to rejuvenate, rebrand, or reposition the city, often redressing issues of social and environmental justice as well.  The course is designed especially for architecture students to encourage thinking about buildings, art, and public space in context as part of a larger cultural and historical fabric.  We will look most closely at Los Angeles, Paris, Rome, New York, New Orleans, Detroit, Tokyo, and Mexico City.

          This year, the course will have a special focus on two interrelated ideas: how city halls and public art can work together to create a healthy urban political and public life.  Students will participate in field trips to Dallas, Fort Worth, and Arlington and research, analyze, and develop online exhibits on city halls and associated town squares in the north Texas region.  Students will also join a “research group” that focuses either  on issues of public art or resiliency and pursue an independent research project that will result in a paper & presentation – other formats may be negotiated with permission of the professor.

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • LARC 5324-001 Life of Cities

          In the 1960s urban critic Jane Jacobs published The Death and Life of Great American Cities, a book based on her observations of what worked and what did not in the making of neighborhoods and public space.  As the title suggests, she wrote in a period in which she saw cities in jeopardy, dying because of thoughtless urban renewal strategies.  This course will ask students to focus on the “life” of cities by looking at a series of urban projects in major world cities, all of which were designed in the past 100 years to rejuvenate, rebrand, or reposition the city, often redressing issues of social and environmental justice as well.  The course is designed especially for architecture students to encourage thinking about buildings, art, and public space in context as part of a larger cultural and historical fabric.  We will look most closely at Los Angeles, Paris, Rome, New York, New Orleans, Detroit, Tokyo, and Mexico City.

          This year, the course will have a special focus on two interrelated ideas: how city halls and public art can work together to create a healthy urban political and public life.  Students will participate in field trips to Dallas, Fort Worth, and Arlington and research, analyze, and develop online exhibits on city halls and associated town squares in the north Texas region.  Students will also join a “research group” that focuses either  on issues of public art or resiliency and pursue an independent research project that will result in a paper & presentation – other formats may be negotiated with permission of the professor.

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 4307-001 Life of Cities

          In the 1960s urban critic Jane Jacobs published The Death and Life of Great American Cities, a book based on her observations of what worked and what did not in the making of neighborhoods and public space.  As the title suggests, she wrote in a period in which she saw cities in jeopardy, dying because of thoughtless urban renewal strategies.  This course will ask students to focus on the “life” of cities by looking at a series of urban projects in major world cities, all of which were designed in the past 100 years to rejuvenate, rebrand, or reposition the city, often redressing issues of social and environmental justice as well.  The course is designed especially for architecture students to encourage thinking about buildings, art, and public space in context as part of a larger cultural and historical fabric.  We will look most closely at Los Angeles, Paris, Rome, New York, New Orleans, Detroit, Tokyo, and Mexico City.

          This year, the course will have a special focus on two interrelated ideas: how city halls and public art can work together to create a healthy urban political and public life.  Students will participate in field trips to Dallas, Fort Worth, and Arlington and research, analyze, and develop online exhibits on city halls and associated town squares in the north Texas region.  Students will also join a “research group” that focuses either  on issues of public art or resiliency and pursue an independent research project that will result in a paper & presentation – other formats may be negotiated with permission of the professor.

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 5315-001 Museums: History Culture Design

          The late twentieth century saw an incredible explosion in the design and building of museums, for art, science, history, education and myriad other purposes. For architects, this has brought a new status to the museum as a commission, one that is widely held to be a prestigious public and artistic statement.  From the Centre Pompidou in 1977 to the Guggenheim Bilbao in 1991, the sensational qualities of museum architecture as “spectacle” have become institutionalized in the past decades. Projects in our own backyard, like Fort Worth’s new Piano Pavilion at the Kimbell or Dallas’s Nasher Sculpture Center, engage this design focus on museums as critical statement about avant-garde aesthetics and their value to contemporary cities.

          This course seeks to provide a larger cultural and historical context for the current interest in museum design and the associated rise of arts districts and cultural districts.  By situating our understanding of museums in their historical etiology and understanding how the museum has evolved as a collecting and public institution, we can be better prepared to approach and critique the bumper crop of contemporary museum designs.  The museum is a relatively young phenomenon, one in a rapid state of flux, and its architecture is a forceful index of its value to local and world culture.

          Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 4315-001 Museums: History Culture Design

          The late twentieth century saw an incredible explosion in the design and building of museums, for art, science, history, education and myriad other purposes. For architects, this has brought a new status to the museum as a commission, one that is widely held to be a prestigious public and artistic statement.  From the Centre Pompidou in 1977 to the Guggenheim Bilbao in 1991, the sensational qualities of museum architecture as “spectacle” have become institutionalized in the past decades. Projects in our own backyard, like Fort Worth’s new Piano Pavilion at the Kimbell or Dallas’s Nasher Sculpture Center, engage this design focus on museums as critical statement about avant-garde aesthetics and their value to contemporary cities.

          This course seeks to provide a larger cultural and historical context for the current interest in museum design and the associated rise of arts districts and cultural districts.  By situating our understanding of museums in their historical etiology and understanding how the museum has evolved as a collecting and public institution, we can be better prepared to approach and critique the bumper crop of contemporary museum designs.  The museum is a relatively young phenomenon, one in a rapid state of flux, and its architecture is a forceful index of its value to local and world culture.

          Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 5307-001 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ART SEMINAR

          In the 1960s urban critic Jane Jacobs published The Death and Life of Great American Cities, a book based on her observations of what worked and what did not in the making of neighborhoods and public space.  As the title suggests, she wrote in a period in which she saw cities in jeopardy, dying because of thoughtless urban renewal strategies.  This course will ask students to focus on the “life” of cities by looking at a series of urban projects in major world cities, all of which were designed in the past 100 years to rejuvenate, rebrand, or reposition the city, often redressing issues of social and environmental justice as well.  The course is designed especially for architecture students to encourage thinking about buildings, art, and public space in context as part of a larger cultural and historical fabric.  We will look most closely at Los Angeles, Paris, Rome, New York, New Orleans, Detroit, Tokyo, and Mexico City.

          This year, the course will have a special focus on two interrelated ideas: how city halls and public art can work together to create a healthy urban political and public life.  Students will research, analyze, and develop online exhibits on city halls and associated town squares in the Dallas-Fort Worth region.  Students will also join a “research group” that focuses either  on issues of public art or resiliency and pursue an independent research project that will result in a paper & presentation – other formats may be negotiated with permission of the professor.

          Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • LARC 5324-001 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ART SEMINAR

          In the 1960s urban critic Jane Jacobs published The Death and Life of Great American Cities, a book based on her observations of what worked and what did not in the making of neighborhoods and public space.  As the title suggests, she wrote in a period in which she saw cities in jeopardy, dying because of thoughtless urban renewal strategies.  This course will ask students to focus on the “life” of cities by looking at a series of urban projects in major world cities, all of which were designed in the past 100 years to rejuvenate, rebrand, or reposition the city, often redressing issues of social and environmental justice as well.  The course is designed especially for architecture students to encourage thinking about buildings, art, and public space in context as part of a larger cultural and historical fabric.  We will look most closely at Los Angeles, Paris, Rome, New York, New Orleans, Detroit, Tokyo, and Mexico City.

          This year, the course will have a special focus on two interrelated ideas: how city halls and public art can work together to create a healthy urban political and public life.  Students will research, analyze, and develop online exhibits on city halls and associated town squares in the Dallas-Fort Worth region.  Students will also join a “research group” that focuses either  on issues of public art or resiliency and pursue an independent research project that will result in a paper & presentation – other formats may be negotiated with permission of the professor.

          Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 2304-001 HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN II

          This course surveys major buildings in world architecture from 1750 to the present, a period in which the institutions of modern democracy and the technologies of the industrial revolution radically changed the world and architecture along with it. The goal is for students to gain an understanding of the ways architecture and urbanism reflect the enormous social, economic, geographic, and technological changes that have shaped the design of buildings and cities across the past 250 years. While we focus most closely on the western tradition, it is a central concern of this course to examine the rich architectural heritage of other global cultures.  By looking at buildings from remote times and places, we can deepen our understanding of those in our own time and place as well. 

          Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 4307-001 The Life of Cities

          In the 1960s urban critic Jane Jacobs published The Death and Life of Great American Cities, a book based on her observations of what worked and what did not in the making of neighborhoods and public space.  As the title suggests, she wrote in a period in which she saw cities in jeopardy, dying because of thoughtless urban renewal strategies.  This course will ask students to focus on the “life” of cities by looking at a series of urban projects in major world cities, all of which were designed in the past 100 years to rejuvenate, rebrand, or reposition the city, often redressing issues of social and environmental justice as well.  The course is designed especially for architecture students to encourage thinking about buildings in context as part of a larger cultural and historical fabric.  We will look at Los Angeles, Paris, Rome, New York, New Orleans, Detroit, Tokyo, and Mexico City.

          This year, the course will have a special focus on the idea of the city hall as a space that allows a healthy urban political and public life to develop.  Students will research, analyze, and develop online exhibits on city halls in the Dallas-Fort Worth region.  Students will also choose a city hall in a world city outside the US to study for comparison and to include in their final research presentation. This course provides credit for students pursuing the ESST minor.

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 5307-001 The Life of Cities

          In the 1960s urban critic Jane Jacobs published The Death and Life of Great American Cities, a book based on her observations of what worked and what did not in the making of neighborhoods and public space.  As the title suggests, she wrote in a period in which she saw cities in jeopardy, dying because of thoughtless urban renewal strategies.  This course will ask students to focus on the “life” of cities by looking at a series of urban projects in major world cities, all of which were designed in the past 100 years to rejuvenate, rebrand, or reposition the city, often redressing issues of social and environmental justice as well.  The course is designed especially for architecture students to encourage thinking about buildings in context as part of a larger cultural and historical fabric.  We will look at Los Angeles, Paris, Rome, New York, New Orleans, Detroit, Tokyo, and Mexico City.

          This year, the course will have a special focus on the idea of the city hall as a space that allows a healthy urban political and public life to develop.  Students will research, analyze, and develop online exhibits on city halls in the Dallas-Fort Worth region.  Students will also choose a city hall in a world city outside the US to study for comparison and to include in their final research presentation. This course provides credit for students pursuing the ESST minor.

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • LARC 5312-001 History of Landscape Architecture

          This course introduces major works and approaches in landscape design from the sixteenth century to the present in both western and non-western cultures.  While we define landscape design broadly, to incorporate the breadth of cultural landscapes, we will focus primarily on designed work, from small domestic gardens, to estates, city parks, national parks, corporate campuses, and regional plans as well as themes central to Texas.  We will consider changes in the profession that continually redefine the scope of landscape design, including the influence of city planning, sustainability, and broader ecological thinking.  This course provides credit for those pursuing the Sustainability Minor at UTA.  

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 4353-001 History of Landscape Architecture

          This course introduces major works and approaches in landscape design from the sixteenth century to the present in both western and non-western cultures.  While we define landscape design broadly, to incorporate the breadth of cultural landscapes, we will focus primarily on designed work, from small domestic gardens, to estates, city parks, national parks, corporate campuses, and regional plans as well as themes central to Texas.  We will consider changes in the profession that continually redefine the scope of landscape design, including the influence of city planning, sustainability, and broader ecological thinking.  This course provides credit for those pursuing the Sustainability Minor at UTA.  

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • HONR-AR 4303-002 History of Landscape Architecture

          This course introduces major works and approaches in landscape design from the sixteenth century to the present in both western and non-western cultures.  While we define landscape design broadly, to incorporate the breadth of cultural landscapes, we will focus primarily on designed work, from small domestic gardens, to estates, city parks, national parks, corporate campuses, and regional plans as well as themes central to Texas.  We will consider changes in the profession that continually redefine the scope of landscape design, including the influence of city planning, sustainability, and broader ecological thinking.  This course provides credit for those pursuing the Sustainability Minor at UTA.  

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 4307-001 The Life of Cities

          In the 1960s urban critic Jane Jacobs published The Death and Life of Great American Cities, a book based on her observations of what worked and what did not in the making of neighborhoods and public space.  As the title suggests, she wrote in a period in which she saw cities in jeopardy, dying because of thoughtless urban renewal strategies.  This course will ask students to focus on the “life” of cities by looking at a series of urban projects in major world cities, all of which were designed in the 20th century to rejuvenate, rebrand, or reposition the city.  We will look at Los Angeles, Paris, New York, New Orleans, and Mexico City asking questions about what role architecture plays in creating social and political culture in the city.

          This year, the course will have a special focus on the idea of the city hall as a space that allows a healthy urban political and public life to develop.  Students will research, analyze, and develop online exhibits on city halls in the Dallas-Fort Worth region.  Students will also choose a city hall in a world city outside the US to study for comparison and to include in their final research presentation. 

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 4353-001 History of Landscape Architecture

          This course introduces major works and approaches in landscape design from the sixteenth century to the present in both western and non-western cultures. While we define landscape design broadly, to incorporate the breadth of cultural landscapes, we will focus primarily on designed work, from small domestic gardens, to estates, city parks, national parks, corporate campuses, and regional plans as well as themes central to Texas. We will consider changes in the profession thatcontinually redefine the scope of landscape design, including the influence of city planning, sustainability, and broader ecological thinking.

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • HONR-AR 4303-002 History of Landscape Architecture

          This course introduces major works and approaches in landscape design from the sixteenth century to the present in both western and non-western cultures. While we define landscape design broadly, to incorporate the breadth of cultural landscapes, we will focus primarily on designed work, from small domestic gardens, to estates, city parks, national parks, corporate campuses, and regional plans as well as themes central to Texas. We will consider changes in the profession thatcontinually redefine the scope of landscape design, including the influence of city planning, sustainability, and broader ecological thinking.

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 5307-001 The Life of Cities

          In the 1960s urban critic Jane Jacobs published The Death and Life of Great American Cities, a book based on her observations of what worked and what did not in the making of neighborhoods and public space.  As the title suggests, she wrote in a period in which she saw cities in jeopardy, dying because of thoughtless urban renewal strategies.  This course will ask students to focus on the “life” of cities by looking at a series of urban projects in major world cities, all of which were designed in the 20th century to rejuvenate, rebrand, or reposition the city.  We will look at Los Angeles, Paris, New York, New Orleans, and Mexico City asking questions about what role architecture plays in creating social and political culture in the city.

          This year, the course will have a special focus on the idea of the city hall as a space that allows a healthy urban political and public life to develop.  Students will research, analyze, and develop online exhibits on city halls in the Dallas-Fort Worth region.  Students will also choose a city hall in a world city outside the US to study for comparison and to include in their final research presentation. 

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • LARC 5312-001 History of Landscape Architecture

          This course introduces major works and approaches in landscape design from the sixteenth century to the present in both western and non-western cultures. While we define landscape design broadly, to incorporate the breadth of cultural landscapes, we will focus primarily on designed work, from small domestic gardens, to estates, city parks, national parks, corporate campuses, and regional plans as well as themes central to Texas. We will consider changes in the profession thatcontinually redefine the scope of landscape design, including the influence of city planning, sustainability, and broader ecological thinking.

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 2304-001 History of Architecture 2: Architecture in the Modern World, 1750-present

          This course surveys major buildings in world architecture from 1750 to the present, a period in which the institutions of modern democracy and the technologies of the industrial revolution radically changed the world and architecture along with it. The goal is for students to gain an understanding of the ways architecture and urbanism reflect the enormous social, economic, geographic, and technological changes that have shaped the design of buildings and cities across the past 250 years. While we focus most closely on the western tradition, it is a central concern of this course to examine the rich architectural heritage of other global cultures.  By looking at buildings from remote times and places, we can deepen our understanding of those in our own time and place as well. 

          Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 4315-001 Museums: History, Culture, Design

          The late twentieth century saw an incredible explosion in the design and building of museums, for art, science, history, education and myriad other purposes.  For architects, this has brought a new status to the museum as a commission, one that is widely held to be a prestigious public and artistic statement.  From the Centre Pompidou in 1977 to the Guggenheim Bilbao in 1991, the sensational qualities of museum architecture as “spectacle” have become institutionalized in the past decades.  Projects in our own backyard, like Fort Worth’s new Piano Pavilion at the Kimbell or Dallas’s Nasher Sculpture Center, engage this design focus on museums as critical statement about avant-garde aesthetics and their value to contemporary cities.

          This course seeks to provide a larger cultural and historical context for the current interest in museum design.  By situating our understanding of museums in their historical etiology and understanding how the museum has evolved as a collecting and public institution, we can be better prepared to approach and critique the bumper crop of contemporary museum designs.  

          Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 5315-001 Museums: History, Culture, Design

          The late twentieth century saw an incredible explosion in the design and building of museums, for art, science, history, education and myriad other purposes.  For architects, this has brought a new status to the museum as a commission, one that is widely held to be a prestigious public and artistic statement.  From the Centre Pompidou in 1977 to the Guggenheim Bilbao in 1991, the sensational qualities of museum architecture as “spectacle” have become institutionalized in the past decades.  Projects in our own backyard, like Fort Worth’s new Piano Pavilion at the Kimbell or Dallas’s Nasher Sculpture Center, engage this design focus on museums as critical statement about avant-garde aesthetics and their value to contemporary cities.

          This course seeks to provide a larger cultural and historical context for the current interest in museum design.  By situating our understanding of museums in their historical etiology and understanding how the museum has evolved as a collecting and public institution, we can be better prepared to approach and critique the bumper crop of contemporary museum designs.  

          Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 5304-001 History of Architecture 2: Architecture in the Modern World, 1750-present

          This course surveys major buildings in world architecture from 1750 to the present, a period in which the institutions of modern democracy and the technologies of the industrial revolution radically changed the world and architecture along with it. The goal is for students to gain an understanding of the ways architecture and urbanism reflect the enormous social, economic, geographic, and technological changes that have shaped the design of buildings and cities across the past 250 years. While we focus most closely on the western tradition, it is a central concern of this course to examine the rich architectural heritage of other global cultures.  By looking at buildings from remote times and places, we can deepen our understanding of those in our own time and place as well. 

          Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 4307-001 The Life of Cities

          Often in the history of architecture we view buildings as isolated objects divorced from the fabric of their 
          surroundings. In “The Life of Cities,” we will look at a series of world cities by situating their architecture in 
          context, with a particular focus on public space and the impact of 20th century modernism and postmodernism on city fabric. We will begin by exploring a range of ideas about how we experience cities and how media impacts 
          our expectations for urban experiences, then move to discussing specific theories and methods for analyzing 
          change in architectural and urban history. 

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • LARC 5312-001 Landscape Architecture: History and Historiography

          This course introduces major works and approaches in landscape design from the sixteenth century to the present in both western and non-western cultures.  While we define landscape design broadly, to incorporate the breadth of cultural landscapes, we will focus primarily on designed work, from small domestic gardens, to estates, city parks, national parks, corporate campuses, and regional plans as well as themes central to Texas.  We will consider changes in the profession that continually redefine the scope of landscape design, including the influence of city planning, sustainability, and broader ecological thinking. 

          This course is designed especially for graduate students in landscape architecture. It therefore emphasizes questions of research methodology and places emphasis on writing skills as preparation for thesis.  We will follow the traditional chronology of the history of landscape architecture, shown clearly in the course textbook, but we will also pursue a broader thematic approach to history that provides tools for analysis and research.  The scope of historical inquiry broadened and become more complex during the twentieth century, growing from questions of style and formalism to include themes of social history, patronage, and economics that are crucial for understanding the role the landscape architecture plays in society.  

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 2304-001 History of Architecture II, 1750 to the present

          This course surveys major buildings in world architecture from 1750 to the present, a period in which the institutions of modern democracy and the technologies of the industrial revolution radically changed the world and architecture along with it. The goal is for students to gain an understanding of the ways architecture and urbanism reflect the enormous social, economic, geographic, and technological changes that have shaped the design of buildings and cities across the past 250 years. While we focus most closely on the western tradition, it is a central concern of this course to examine the rich architectural heritage of other global cultures. By looking at buildings from remote times and places, we can deepen our understanding of those in our own time and place as well.

          Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 2304-001 HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN II
          This course surveys major buildings in world architecture from 1400 to the present. While we focus most closely on the western tradition, it is a central concern of this course to examine the rich architectural heritage of other major global cultures. The goal is for students to gain an understanding of the ways architecture and urbanism reflect the social, economic, geographic, and technological environment. By looking at buildings from remote times and places, we can deepen our understanding of those in our own time and place as well.
          Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus 1 Link
        • ARCH 4315-001 Nature and American Architecture

          This course examines the many roles that the idea of nature has played in the making of American architecture: from ideas about the land itself to the ways that nature provides a fundamental order for design. We begin by exploring the ways that the vast wilderness contributed to a distinctly American culture and continue to explore contemporary debates about sustainability.  Major themes discussed include organic architecture; the impact of regionalism; the science and humanism of nature; and back-to-nature counterculture.  We will consider American patterns of urbanism, suburbanization, and sprawl and the ways the represent conflicting ideas about our natural landscape.

          The course meets once per week on Tuesday afternoon and the format is heavily geared toward discussion. Weekly readings from theory and history will ground those discussions. Students will lead discussions, write short reviews of local buildings/places, and work on a semester long research project. The course requires two local field trips during our regular class meeting time, one on the theme of "Water" in Fort Worth and the other on "Land" in Dallas.

          Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
        • ARCH 4315-001 Life of Cities

          Life of cities: Modernism in context
          ARCH 4315 / 5315, Fall 2011
          T/Th 1-2:20
          Course description
          Often in the history of architecture we view buildings as isolated objects divorced from the fabric of their surroundings. In The Life of cities, we will look at a series of world cities by situating their architecture in context, with a particular focus on the impact of 20th century modernism and postmodernism on city fabric. We will explore ideas about how we experience cities, how architecture can respond to urban settings, how ideal cities should be built, and how cities create a sense of place and cultural identity. Our focus on architecture will be supplemented by theories of map-making, the influence of film and literature, and information flows in the digital age. We will look at one city a week during the semester including DFW, Rome, London, Paris, New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, New Orleans, Mexico City, and Tokyo.

          Across the semester we will also create an online DFW Hypercity with the support of the Map Collection and GIS Librarian in the UTA Main Library. Each student will be responsible for one digitized map layer of our hypercity, and we will use georeferencing/GIS to link the historical layers represented by maps to a contemporary base layer. For examples of other hypercities and georeferenced historical maps see: http://www.hypercities.com or http://gis.uta.edu/texastimemachine After the semester end, DFW Hypercity will be made interactive and available to the public through the UTA Library webpage.

          Course format
          On Tuesday there will be a lecture, on Thursday discussion of readings relating to the city and theoretical consctructs of urbanism. Twice during the semester we will have a three hour meeting on Tuesday afternoon for training/workshops related to creating our Hypercity (Thursday class will be cancelled those weeks).

          Assignments / evaluation
          1) Weekly reading and discussion questions due on Thursdays
          2) Hypercity project: georeferenced map layer
          3)Reyner Banham Loves DFW (small project)
          4) World city presentation/paper: due in last weeks of semester

          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
        • ARCH 4315-001 Museums: History, Culture, Design

          The late twentieth century saw an incredible explosion in the design and building of museums, for art, science, history, education and myriad other purposes. For architects, this has brought a new status to the museum as a commission, one that is widely held to be a prestigious public and artistic statement. From the Centre Pompidou in 1977 to the Guggenheim Bilbao in 1991, the sensational qualities of museum architecture as “spectacle†have become institutionalized in the past decades. Projects in our own backyard, like Fort Worth’s new Museum of Science or Dallas’s Nasher Sculpture Center, engage this design focus on museums as critical statement about avant-garde aesthetics and their value to contemporary cities. This course seeks to provide a larger cultural and historical context for the current interest in museum design. By situating our understanding of museums in their historical etiology and thinking about how the museum has evolved as a collecting and public institution, we can be better prepared to approach and critique the bumper crop of contemporary museum designs. The museum is a relatively young phenomenon, one in a rapid state of flux, and its architecture is a forceful index of its value to local and world culture.

          Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
        • ARCH 4315-531 The Life of Cities
          This course is dedicated to understanding the history of cities with a particular eye toward how their architecture and their spaces contribute to a sense of cultural identity and place.Across the course of the semester, we will examine 6 of the great world cities --Rome, London, Paris, Mexico City, New York, Los Angeles – and apply the lessons we learn about buildings and neighborhoods to examining a fascinating city we can view first-hand: Fort Worth.

          The course will begin with an examination of general theories of city viewing and development, and then proceed to more specific histories of places.Our focus, as we move from city to city, will be the impact of modernization on approaches to urban architecture.We will look primarily at buildings and urban plans, but will also interweave film, literature, and poetry associated with place into our journeys.

          Throughout the semester, we will make site visits to Fort Worth and students will draft a series of reports evaluating neighborhoods, individual buildings, parks, and landscapes within the city.These reports will require primary research in local archives and records and will form the nucleus of a new AIA guide to Fort Worth architecture.This is a wonderful opportunity to create a product that will have a life beyond the classroom.The research and writing skills learned in the course can be applied to work in preservation, adaptive reuse, heritage tourism, and journalism, amongst many other fields.

           To enroll in the course, students must commit to attending class meetings at various neighborhood locations in Fort Worth.The course meets once per week and enrollment is limited to twenty.Students from other departments are welcome to enroll with permission of the instructor.

          COURSE READINGS:
          LeGates and Stout, eds., The City Reader
          Donald Olsen, The City as a Work of Art
          Carol Roark, Fort Worth and Tarrant County: A Historical Guide
          Course reader 

          COURSE EVALUATION:
          Group project, 20%:Groups of 3-4 students will draft a neighborhood survey.
          Individual projects, 60%:Each student will write a brief building history and bibliography for 4-5 buildings or sites.
          Participation, 20%:Attendance at field trips, participation in class discussion.


          Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2008
        • ARCH 4315-001 Theories of the Avant-Garde
          This course will examine the idea of the avant-garde as it relates to architectural production in the modern era, from about 1880 to the present. Beginning with the modernist impulse to reject precedent and "make it new" by creating new styles and forms in the late nineteenth century and continuing with sometimes radical re-envisioning of the purpose of architecture throughout the twentieth century, architecture has struggled with its often opposing roles as a popular art, embraced by the masses, or as a revolutionary cultural force. Modern architecture has viewed itself as a utopian enterprise with the potential to change society, thus placing architects at the cutting edge of social, artistic, and technological change.  How true is this paradigm? Do architects, through visionary buildings, schemes, and theories push boundaries? Is an antagonistic relationship with the status quo necessary for architectural production? Students will be encouraged to develop their own stance based on readings from cultural theory and architecture theory that will inform our discussions of buildings, cityscapes, and art throughout the semester.
          Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2008

    Service to the Community

    • Elected
      • Jan 2017 to  Present Board of Directors, Historic Fort Worth

        Board meets monthly to provide guidance for Historic Fort Worths mission to preserving Fort Worth’s unique historic identity through stewardship, education and leadership in its historic architecture and neighborhoods.

      • Sept 2009 to  Dec 2015 State Board of Review, National Register Programs, Texas Historical Commission

        Board meets three times yearly to review nominations to the National Register of Historic Places.

    Service to the Profession

    • Appointed
      • July 2011 to  Present Editorial Board, Columns Magazine, AIA Dallas

        Meet four times yearly to provide editorial input

      • June 2009 to  May 2012 Editorial Board, Journal of Architectural Education, American Collegiate Schools of Architecture

        Board meets twice a year to provide editorial and policy guidance.

      • Nov 2017 to  Present Events Committee, AIA Fort Worth

        Committee meets monthly to plan events that connect AIA Fort Worth to its membership and to the general public.

    Service to the University

    • Appointed
      • Sept 2012 to  Dec 2012 Futures Team, Office of the Provost

        Benchmarking and office organization

      • June 2013 to  Present Honors College Advisory Committee

        Faculty committee to advise on Honors College issues

      • Jan 2014 to  May 2014 Dean's Periodic Review committee

        5-Year Review committee, Office of the Provost

      • Jan 2014 to  Apr 2014 SoA / SUPA Integration Team

        Office of the Provost

      • Apr 2014 to  Oct 2014 CAPPA Dean Search Committee

        Search for founding dean of the newly integrated college to be formed by the integration of the School of Architecture and the School of Urban and Public Affairs. Office of the President.

      • Mar 2015 to  Feb 2016 CAPPA Associate Dean Search Committee

        Faculty committee

      • Sept 2015 to  Feb 2016 School of Architecture Director Search Committee

        Committee of faculty, students, and members of the profession
         

      • Dec 2016 to  June 2017 Faculty Search Committee in Landscape Architecture

        Chair, search committee for program director and assistant professor.

    • Elected
      • Sept 2013 to  Present Committee on Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity, School of Architecture

        Chair, 2013-2015 and 2016 to present.

      • Sept 2013 to  Aug 2015 Subcommittee on Honors and Awards, School of Architecture

        Chair, 2013-15

      • Sept 2013 to  Present Subcommittee on Promotion and Tenure, School of Architecture

        Chair, 2014-16; Chair-elect, 2013-14.

      • Sept 2013 to  Aug 2014 Subcommittee on Events and Exhibits, School of Architecture

        .

      • Sept 2008 to  Aug 2013 Academic Standards Committee, School of Architecture

        .

      • Sept 2007 to  Apr 2008 New Faculty Search Committee

        .

      • Sept 2016 to  Present Curriculum Committee, School of Architecture

        Chair, Fall 2016 - present

    • Volunteered
      • Mar 2010 to  Mar 2012 Faculty judge, ACES

        Annual Celebration of Excellence by Students -- student research presentation judge, Spring 2010, 2011, 2012

    Other Service Activities