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Kathryn Hamilton Warren

Name

[Warren, Kathryn Hamilton]
  • Senior Lecturer, English

Biography

Kathryn Hamilton Warren is a Senior Lecturer and the Graduate Coordinator for the English Department. She earned her PhD and MA from the University of Texas at Austin, writing her Masters thesis Cabeza de Vaca’s 16th-century travel narrative, La Relación, while her dissertation, "American Callings," focused on representations of and engagements with humanitarianism in turn-of-the-century American literature. At the University of Virginia, from which she graduated with High Distinction, Kathryn wrote an Honors thesis on the poetry of Sylvia Plath. An academic with broad areas of interest, at UTA Kathryn teaches 19th- and 20th-century literature (both American and British), literary theory, and freshman composition. In her own writing, Kathryn explores such topics as empathy, ethics, and humanitarianism by drawing on the experience of teaching students to value and pay attention to literature. Her essays have appeared in the journal American Literary Realism, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Vox, and The Concord Saunterer.

Born in Mexico to American diplomats, Kathryn lived in Greece, Peru, and Costa Rica before completing high school and college in Virginia. She spent two years working at Oxford University Press in New York City but left to be a Peace Corps Volunteer to Togo just after September 11, 2001. After concluding her service, Kathryn lived in Guatemala, where her diplomat parents were assigned, before beginning graduate studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She now lives in the Oak Cliff area of Dallas with her family.

Professional Preparation

    • 2010 PhD in EnglishUniversity of Texas at Austin (UT)
    • 2006 MA in EnglishUniversity of Texas at Austin (UT)
    • 1999 BA in EnglishUniversity of Virginia

Appointments

    • June 2015 to Present Graduate Coordinator
      UTA English Department
    • Aug 2011 to Present Senior Lecturer
      UTA English Department
    • Jan 2010 to May 2011 Adjunct Professor
      UTA English Department
    • Aug 2008 to May 2009 Assistant Instructor
      UT English Department
    • Aug 2006 to May 2008 Assistant Instructor
      UT Rhetoric Department
    • Aug 2004 to May 2006 Teaching Assistant
      UT English Department
    • Sept 2001 to Dec 2003 HIV/AIDS educator
      US Peace Corps
    • July 1999 to Sept 2001 Assistant Editor
      Oxford University Press

Awards and Honors

    • Sep  2018 Honors College Outstanding Faculty Award sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington Honors College
    • Aug  2017 Regents' Outstanding Teaching Award sponsored by University of Texas System Board of RegentsUniversity of Texas Board of Regents
    • Apr  2017 Arlington Sunrise Rotary Club Professor of the Year for the Honors College sponsored by Arlington Sunrise Rotary Club
    • Sep  2016 COLA Outstanding Teaching Award for Faculty Outside the Tenure Stream sponsored by UTA College of Liberal Arts
    • Apr  2016 Provost's Award for Excellence in Teaching sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • May  2012 Freshmen Leaders on Campus (FLOC) Honoree sponsored by FLOC (Freshman Leaders on Campus) UTA
      Achievements:

      I taught FLOC students.

    • May  2009 English Department Outstanding Assistant Instructor sponsored by UT-Austin English Department
      Achievements:

      Based on materials I put together, a committee determined that I was that year's outstanding graduate student teacher.

News Articles

    • July 2014 Letter to the editor

      My letter to the editor of the New Yorker magazine in response to Jill Lepore's essay "The Disruption Machine" was published on July 7, 2014.

Research and Expertise

  • American literature from the 1830s the present, Romanticism and Transcendentalism, realism, reform writing, American pragmatism, empathy and literature

    My academic expertise and interest is in the field of American literary studies, particularly literature that stages, investigates, and interrogates various kinds of humanitarian interactions. I enjoy teaching courses in many different areas, however: American literature as well as British, African, and Indian; rhetoric and composition as well as literature; literary theory (especially race and gender theory) as well as rhet-comp.

Publications

      Journal Article 2017
      • Warren, Kathryn Hamilton. “Taking Thoreau to Texas.” The Concord Saunterer Vol. 25 (2017): 153-6.

        {Journal Article }

      Essay 2017
      Book Review 2017
      • Warren, Kathryn Hamilton. Review of Carolyn L. Karchers A Refugee from His Race: Albion W. Tourgée and His Fight against White Supremacy (UNC Press, 2016). The Journal of American History (June 2017)

        {Book Review }

      Book Review 2014
      • Warren, Kathryn Hamilton. Review of Julia F. Irwin's Making the World Safe: The American Red Cross and a Nation's Humanitarian Awakening (Oxford UP, 2013). The Journal of American History (June 2014)

        {Book Review }

      Book Review 2012
      • Warren, Kathryn Hamilton. Review of Susan Harris's God's Arbiters: Americans in the Philippines, 1898-1902 (Oxford UP, 2011). Church History (Dec. 2012).
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 2011
      • Warren, Kathryn Hamilton. "Empathetic Persuasion in Albion Tourgee's A Fool's Errand." American Literary Realism 44.1 (Fall 2011): 46-67. Print.
        {Journal Article }

Presentations

    • March  2018
      The Private Humanities
      My paper was part of a roundtable titled “Cultivating a Climate for Civic Action and Hope: What Our C19 Scholarship Can Teach Us”
    • November  2017
      Creating Legacies of Interventionist Pedagogy: Sites of Inquiry, Modes of Action
      I chaired this panel featuring scholars Todd DeStigter, June Howard, Sarah Robbins, David Schaafsma, and Darren Tuggle.
    • April  2017
      The Troubling Use of Empathy in To Kill a Mockingbird
      A lecture delivered to students in the Honors College on April 13, 2017.
    • November  2015
      Scout Grows Up

      A talk at the Irving Public Library devoted to Go Set a Watchman, Harper Lee's newly discovered and published novel, and To Kill a Mockingbird.

    • October  2015
      Teaching Life Writing: A Roundtable Discussion

      Along with Peggy Kulesz, Kenneth Roemer, and Bethany Shaffer, I was part of a roundtable discussion on teaching life writing. The roundtable was the fourth panel in the annual Hermanns Symposium sponsored by the English Department and organized by Dr. Desiree Henderson. This year's topic was "Writing American Lives: From Diary and Memoir to Twitter and Comic Books."

    • October  2014
      Mockingbirds, Justice, and Race: A Conversation

      Panel discussion on Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird

    • October  2014
      The Troubling Politics of a Beloved Book: Revisiting Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird

      Invited lecture at North Lake College

Projects

  • 2014
    • Sept 2014 to Present Essay series

      I am working on a series of essays that connect American literature and pedagogy to questions relevant to public life. The essays are written for a general audience.

      Role: Principal Investigator PI: Kathryn Warren

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • Aug 2009 to May 2010 Graduate School Continuing Fellowship sponsored by  - $6000
    • Aug 2009 to Dec 2009 Presidential Excellence Fellowship sponsored by  - $6000

Other Research Activities

  • 2017
    • Summer Scholar
      • June 2017 NEH Summer Institute "Transcendentalism and Reform in the Age of Emerson, Thoreau, and Fuller"

        Received funding from the NEH to participate in a two-week institute studying Transcdentalism in Concord, MA, during the month of June, 2017.

Courses

      • ENGL 2350-001 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        This course instills the skills of reading, analysis, and writing that are crucial to success as an English major by teaching students a variety of strategies for engaging with literary texts. Using those strategies, students will learn to make interpretive claims about texts that will be interesting and persuasive to the discourse community comprising scholars and students in the field of English Studies.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4336-001 TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE

        Transcendentalism and Reform: A Service-Learning Course

        Academic Content

        The Transcendentalists were a heterogeneous group of thinkers (some writers, some ministers, some educators) living in and around Concord, MA, in the mid-nineteenth century who believed in the power of the individual’s imagination to transform the world. While some, including Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, advocated the notion of change starting with the self (what they called “self-culture”), others, including Margaret Fuller, were more socially-minded, turning their attention to structures in the wider society that they believed ought to be altered. The Transcendentalists thus served as a kind of intellectual engine for a bevy of reform movements in the mid-nineteenth century, including reforms in education, abolition, women’s suffrage, and appreciation for and attention to nature. In this class we will learn about these movements by reading the literature written by people who devoted their lives and their considerable intellectual powers to changing the world, and thereby changing themselves—or is it changing themselves, and thereby changing the world? That’s a live question, one we’ll investigate this semester.

        Service-Learning Component

        At the same time as we read about these nineteenth-century reformers, you will become a twenty-first century reformer yourself because a requirement of this course is to work with one of three organizations in the wider Arlington community: H.O.P.E. Tutoring, the Arlington Public Library, or River Legacy Park. These organizations are devoted to two of the Transcendentalists’ primary reform areas: education and the environment. Do not mistake “service-learning” for community service. The word after the hyphen is as important as the word before it: your work in the community will be integrated into our course content, for it will provide a forum by which you can test out and investigate the ideas we’re learning about in class. Your writing assignments and classroom activities will be directly linked to the service you do.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4387-600 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE

        Who is crazy enough to say “thanks, but no thanks” to an endorsement from Oprah? Jonathan Franzen said as much when the tastemaker chose his novel The Corrections (2011) for her book club. Oprah expected him to be thrilled; Franzen was underwhelmed. He thought the honor a dubious one that might jeopardize his literary “street cred,” as the New York Times put it.

        This incident emblematizes a division in contemporary American literature between what is “popular” and what is “literary,” and it raises the question of whose voices count when it comes to assigning distinction. Debates over the American literary canon—a representative corpus of “the best” national literature—have been raging for decades, and they’re not over. In this course we’ll investigate the process of critical reception in the United States, reading both acclaimed works of literary fiction and a popular bestseller. We’ll listen in on conversations about literary merit taking place in the academy as well as in periodicals, newspapers, and online magazines. At the end of the course, students will weigh in knowledgably on the question of canonicity, adding their own voices to the ongoing conversation about what should matter when evaluating fiction.

        Fall - 8 Weeks - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3333-002 DYNAMIC TRADITIONS IN LITERATURE

        Dynamic Traditions is a new requirement for the English major that focuses on changes over time to a movement, genre, or motif. In this section well be studying Romanticism, a literary movement that began in Europe in the 18th century but persists--one could argue--to the present day. Romantics across time and geography share a belief in the power of the imagination, the importance of self-creation, the primacy of emotion and impulse over reason and restraint, and the idea that poetry can change the world. Our focus in this course will be on the British and American Romantics (the first and second waves of Romanticism in English, from the late eighteenth century to the late nineteenth). In our study of these figures and their writing, we will seek to discover commonalities and differences, influences and departures. We will conclude our course by investigating Romantic strands in contemporary art and culture.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3333-002 DYNAMIC TRADITIONS IN LITERATURE: Romanticism

        Dynamic Traditions is a new requirement for the English major that focuses on changes over time to a movement, genre, or motif. In this section well be studying Romanticism, a literary movement that began in Europe in the 18th century but persists--one could argue--to the present day. Romantics across time and geography share a belief in the power of the imagination, the importance of self-creation, the primacy of emotion and impulse over reason and restraint, and the idea that poetry can change the world. Our focus in this course will be on the British and American Romantics (the first and second waves of Romanticism in English, from the late eighteenth century to the late nineteenth). In our study of these figures and their writing, we will seek to discover commonalities and differences, influences and departures. We will conclude our course by investigating Romantic strands in contemporary art and culture.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4387-001 Contemporary American Literature

        To tell a literary history is to impose a narrative on the past. We look back fifty or a hundred years and find coherence in periods that were heterogeneous and rife with contradiction to the people living through them. But without the benefit of hindsight, how do we gain perspective on literature written today? In this class we’ll read American literary fiction, non-fiction, and criticism published since 1987 in an effort to discover whether something other than a shared historical moment unites the varied works of fiction known as “contemporary” or “postmodern.” What, if any, thematic concerns, formal traits, or political projects do they share? A central question will be how writers represent gender dynamics and contend with it as a force that not only shapes their prose but also affects their reception. Perched as we are in the present, we have the advantage of investigating public sphere debates, dilemmas, and controversies about literature that are ongoing—and of weighing in on them before they ossify into neat literary histories. The writing you’ll do in this class will be directed to a more general, non-academic audience than is usually the case in a college classroom. If other literature classes prepare you to teach, give you a canonical grounding for future study, or train you for academia, this class will equip you to consider questions about contemporary literature that matter outside of the classroom.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4387-600 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE: Canon Formation in Contemporary American Fiction

        Who is crazy enough to say “thanks, but no thanks” to an endorsement from Oprah? Jonathan Franzen said as much when the tastemaker chose his novel The Corrections (2011) for her book club. Oprah expected him to be thrilled; Franzen was underwhelmed. He thought the honor a dubious one that might jeopardize his literary “street cred,” as the New York Times put it.

        This incident emblematizes a division in contemporary American literature between what is “popular” and what is “literary,” and it raises the question of whose voices count when it comes to assigning distinction. Debates over the American literary canon—a representative corpus of “the best” national literature—have been raging for decades, and they’re not over. In this course we’ll investigate the process of critical reception in the United States, reading both acclaimed works of literary fiction and a popular bestseller. We’ll listen in on conversations about literary merit taking place in the academy as well as in periodicals, newspapers, and online magazines. At the end of the course, students will weigh in knowledgably on the question of canonicity, adding their own voices to the ongoing conversation about what should matter when evaluating fiction.

        Fall - 8 Weeks - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3333-001 DYNAMIC TRADITIONS IN LITERATURE: Romanticism

        Dynamic Traditions is a new requirement for the English major that focuses on changes over time to a movement, genre, or motif. In this section well be studying Romanticism, a literary movement that began in Europe in the 18th century but persists--one could argue--to the present day. Romantics across time and geography share a belief in the power of the imagination, the importance of self-creation, the primacy of emotion and impulse over reason and restraint, and the idea that poetry can change the world. Our focus in this course will be on the British and American Romantics (the first and second waves of Romanticism in English, from the late eighteenth century to the late nineteenth). In our study of these figures and their writing, we will seek to discover commonalities and differences, influences and departures. We will conclude our course by investigating Romantic strands in contemporary art and culture.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4334-001 Jane Austen

        Jane Austen is widely considered to be a giant of world literature, her name invoked alongside those of Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Henry James, and Joseph Conrad when tracing the “great tradition” of the novel, as the prominent mid-twentieth-century critic F. R. Leavis described it. Though she has had her share of detractors (Mark Twain among them), Austen nevertheless is as canonical as they come. Like her predecessor in letters, William Shakespeare, she has not only been anointed by academics and critics, but by popular readers as well. Just as Shakespeare’s plays continue to be performed, as well as adapted and reimagined, Austen’s novels have a stubbornly enduring legacy. Critic Janet Todd proposes one reason that is the case: Austen was the first novelist to create characters modern-day readers continue to admire, identify with, and seek to emulate. The novelists Austen herself read and admired (e.g., Henry Fielding and Samuel Richardson) are now hardly ever read for pleasure. That twenty-first century readers continue to be enthralled by Austen is a testament to her endurance and—we might be tempted to say—to her transcendent, perhaps universal, appeal.

        Our task in this course is, first and foremost, one of attentive pleasure. Together we will read five of Austen’s novels (all but Sense and Sensibility) as well as a novella she wrote early in her career, Lady Susan. The purpose of our reading and conversation will be to acquaint you with the brilliant body of work by a woman you may know best, if you know her at all, through adaptation. We will approach Austen’s work from various critical and theoretical angles, including feminism, Marxism, historicism, narrative theory, postcolonialism, and the new formalism. In addition, we will examine six adaptations of her novels to the screen. Finally, in the eighteenth-century spirit of literature as a moral guide, you will be asked to apply the lessons of Austen’s fiction to your own lives.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4336-001 Self-Deternmination and the Struggle for Justice in African-American Literature

        Cross-listed with AAST 4350.

        In 2015 Ta-Nehisi Coates won the National Book Award for Between the World and Me, his searing analysis of what it means to be a black man in the United States. Written amidst the Black Lives Matter movement and sharing its concerns, the book received near-universal acclaim while at the same time provoking national soul-searching. This soul-searching was due, in no small part, to Coates’s excoriation of a country in which, as he puts it, “it is traditional to destroy the black body — it is heritage.”

        In this class we will take part in Coates’s project of national and personal self-examination. We’ll start with Between the World and Me and follow the threads of Coates’s arguments into the past, tracing African-American history through the words of Nat Turner, Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Charles Chesnutt, Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, James Baldwin, and Claudia Rankine. Our reading will offer a sustained look at the way black people have used writing as a vehicle for self-determination in a country that has been perverted, in Coates’s view, by its pursuit of a Dream that threatens to “plunder not just the bodies of humans but the body of the Earth itself.” As the class as a whole discusses and writes about our shared reading, students will conduct individual projects of reading and inquiry that will supplement and broaden our class discussions.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4336-001 Self-Deternmination and the Struggle for Justice in African-American Literature

        Cross-listed with AAST 4350.

        In 2015 Ta-Nehisi Coates won the National Book Award for Between the World and Me, his searing analysis of what it means to be a black man in the United States. Written amidst the Black Lives Matter movement and sharing its concerns, the book received near-universal acclaim while at the same time provoking national soul-searching. This soul-searching was due, in no small part, to Coates’s excoriation of a country in which, as he puts it, “it is traditional to destroy the black body — it is heritage.”

        In this class we will take part in Coates’s project of national and personal self-examination. We’ll start with Between the World and Me and follow the threads of Coates’s arguments into the past, tracing African-American history through the words of Nat Turner, Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Charles Chesnutt, Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, James Baldwin, and Claudia Rankine. Our reading will offer a sustained look at the way black people have used writing as a vehicle for self-determination in a country that has been perverted, in Coates’s view, by its pursuit of a Dream that threatens to “plunder not just the bodies of humans but the body of the Earth itself.” As the class as a whole discusses and writes about our shared reading, students will conduct individual projects of reading and inquiry that will supplement and broaden our class discussions.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-001 INTRODUCTION TO TEXTUAL ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        Contrary to popular belief, English Studies is not a field in which anything goes. Far from it—to be a literary scholar requires mastering a particular skill set and drawing on a common body of knowledge. But this shared knowledge has less to do with what one reads than with how one reads—and how one expresses her thoughts about that reading. Just as physicists have their lingo and economists have theirs, English Studies is a discipline with its own language, theories, methods, and conventions.

        This course is designed to introduce English majors and potential majors to the field by helping them to become fluent, so to speak, in the language practices that inform English Studies. In this course students will study several influential schools of literary criticism, learning how they developed in response both to each other and to theories in disciplines such as philosophy, history, and sociology. Students will practice applying the various critical theories to primary texts, both in class discussion and by writing papers through the lens of a specific theory. They will also learn to identify and employ the discursive conventions of literary scholarship as they practice reading challenging critical texts and doing research for their final paper, which requires entering into an ongoing conversation in the field. After completing this course, students will find their reading experience enriched by having learned the strategies for reading, thinking, and writing that make English Studies not a book club, but a profession.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4387-001 Contemporary Literature

        Cross-listed with WOMS 4392.

        To tell a literary history is to impose a narrative on the past. We look back fifty or a hundred years and find coherence in periods that were heterogeneous and rife with contradiction to the people living through them. But without the benefit of hindsight, how do we gain perspective on literature written today? In this class we’ll read literary fiction[1], non-fiction, and criticism published since 1987 in an effort to discover whether something other than a shared historical moment unites the varied works of fiction known as “contemporary” or “postmodern.” What, if any, thematic concerns, formal traits, or political projects do they share? A central question will be how writers represent gender dynamics and contend with it as a force that not only shapes their prose but also affects their reception. Perched as we are in the present, we have the advantage of investigating public sphere debates, dilemmas, and controversies about literature that are ongoing—and of weighing in on them before they ossify into neat literary histories. The writing you’ll do in this class will be directed to a more general, non-academic audience than is usually the case in a college classroom. If other literature classes prepare you to teach, give you a canonical grounding for future study, or train you for academia, this class will equip you to consider questions about contemporary literature that matter outside of the classroom.

        [1] “Literary fiction” is the term given to works of so-called “serious” writing (i.e., usually not genres like science fiction, fantasy, romance, Westerns, mystery, comic books, etc., though sometimes literature in those genres makes the “literary” cut) that gets reviewed not only in Publisher’s Weekly or Kirkus, which are geared toward librarians, but in the few remaining national book reviews (in the New York Times, Washington Post, LA Times, The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, etc.) meant to attract the attention of readers themselves.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-002 American Mix Tape

        A mix tape takes songs off of the albums on which they first appeared and rearranges them so that something new emerges from the juxtaposition, and great songs are the building blocks of a great mix. In this course we’ll work our way through a mix tape of American literature, studying texts that are widely considered to be among the “greatest hits” of the American canon[1]. We’ll read cultural touchstones that have been reimagined for new generations, as F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby has; listen to the voices of literary celebrities who exploded convention to create something utterly original, the way Walt Whitman did; and contend with thinkers who questioned the social systems of their day, as did Henry David Thoreau and Frederick Douglass.  

        Our aim isn’t to reconstruct a history of American literature, but rather to listen to voices from the American past and consider not only how they were responding to their historical moment, but also how they speak to us in the present. Our reading schedule is organized by genre, moving from short stories to autobiography to poetry, and finishing with the novel. One course unit, “Literary Resonances,” pairs texts from different historical moments as illustrations of how writers across centuries respond to the same concerns—or, in some cases, how they respond directly to one another.

        The class will be run as a discussion, and commitment to a shared project of exploration and deep thinking will be insisted upon. Three short essays will allow you to practice the skills of close reading and analysis, while a midterm and final will test your ability to distinguish among the authors and analyze a specific passage. The final writing assignment, the Signature Assignment (assigned in every section of sophomore lit), asks that you relate the reading to a social issue, thus underscoring the relation between the literature we read and the world we live in.

        [1] I don’t consider our syllabus to be any kind of definitive statement on the greatest works of American literature, and neither should you. I am sure you could easily point out some glaring canonical omissions, and of course there is plenty of great American literature that isn’t canonical at all. But there’s only so much we can cover in a semester.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-016 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: HONORS

        In this Honors introduction to college reading and writing, students will study the fundamentals of rhetoric and writing through a semester-long examination of the way the rhetorical concept of “race” has been used to various ends throughout American history. The course emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4331-001 British Romantics

        This course provides an in-depth look at writers from the British Romantic period (arguably 1785-1830), a time in British letters marked by transformation. The Romantic period is defined by two revolutions: one failed (the French) and one successful (the industrial). Upon this historical stage, we will focus on the Romantic “big six” (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Keats), considering the way their poetry emerged in response and in opposition to the world around them. Searching for a Romantic sensibility beyond the genre of poetry, we will also read a revolutionary essay by Mary Wollstonecraft and novels by Mary Shelley and Jane Austen. The course will conclude with the 2009 film Bright Star, Jane Campion’s rendering of the relationship between John Keats and Fanny Brawne, after which we will consider in what ways Romanticism persists in the present. Throughout the course we will pursue the question of what unites all these so-called “Romantics” (a term that none of our authors embraced), examining their aesthetic principles and generic innovations.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2309-001 World Literature

        This course is one of three variants of national sophomore-literature offerings at UTA. Where the other two variants focus on British or American literature, this class will acquaint you with a selection of literary works by and about people from other parts of the world.

        Anyone tasked with teaching a course called “world literature” must make choices, and the choice I’ve made is to focus on fairly contemporary texts that deal with salient social issues. This is a course that explores what “world literature” looks like when people don’t stay put: when borders are porous; when immigrants live in the shadows in cosmopolitan cities; when migration, forced or chosen, changes the way people see themselves and their cultures. We will read and watch literary texts in six genres (the short story, poetry, the novel, the graphic novel, and film).

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirements in Language, Philosophy, and Culture.

        Summer - 5 Weeks I - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-700 AMERICAN LITERATURE

        This 8-week Distance Education course is being offered through a partnership with Academic Partnerships (formerly Higher Education Holdings). The course acquaints students with a variety of texts by U.S.-American writers.

        Spring - 8 Weeks - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-001 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-004 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-901 AMERICAN LITERATURE

        This 8-week Distance Education course is being offered through a partnership with Academic Partnerships (formerly Higher Education Holdings). The course acquaints students with a variety of texts by U.S.-American writers.

        Spring - 8 Weeks - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-702 AMERICAN LITERATURE

        This 8-week Distance Education course is being offered through a partnership with Academic Partnerships (formerly Higher Education Holdings). The course acquaints students with a variety of texts by U.S.-American writers.

        Spring - 8 Weeks - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-900 AMERICAN LITERATURE

        This 8-week Distance Education course is being offered through a partnership with Academic Partnerships (formerly Higher Education Holdings). The course acquaints students with a variety of texts by U.S.-American writers.

        Spring - 8 Weeks - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4387-600 Contemporary Literature: Canon Formation in American Fiction

        In this course we’ll investigate the process of critical reception in the United States, reading both acclaimed works of literary fiction and a popular bestseller. We’ll listen in on conversations about literary merit taking place in the academy as well as in periodicals, newspapers, and online magazines. At the end of the course, students will weigh in knowledgably on the question of canonicity, adding their own voices to the ongoing conversation about what should matter when evaluating fiction.

      • ENGL 2350-001 Introduction to Textual Analysis and Interpretation

        Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-002 Introduction to Textual Analysis and Interpretation

        Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3340-002 History of American Literature

        This course provides an overview of American literature from its beginnings as it is related to developments in American history and culture.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-700 American Literature

        This 8-week Distance Education course is being offered through a partnership with Academic Partnerships (formerly Higher Education Holdings). The course acquaints students with a variety of texts by U.S.-American writers.

      • ENGL 2329-701 American Literature

        This 8-week Distance Education course is being offered through a partnership with Academic Partnerships (formerly Higher Education Holdings). The course acquaints students with a variety of texts by U.S.-American writers.

      • ENGL 2350-001 Introduction to Textual Analysis and Interpretation

        Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3340-002 History of American Literature

        This course provides an overview of American literature from its beginnings as it is related to developments in American history and culture.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-001 Introduction to Textual Analysis and Interpretation

        Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors. The course schedule will be available the first day of class; the course policies and description are attached.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-002 Introduction to Textual Analysis and Interpretation

        Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors. The course schedule will be available the first day of class; the course policies and description are attached.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3340-002 History of American Literature

        This course provides an overview of American literature from its beginnings as it is related to developments in American history and culture. The reading schedule will be available on Blackboard by the first day of class; attached are the course policies and description.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-001 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
        Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors. The attached syllabus is for Section 001. The syllabus for Section 002 has a slightly different course schedule. If you are a student in Spring 2013, you can download your syllabus from the Blackboard site (accessible at elearn.uta.edu), which, be advised, is still under construction.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • ENGL 2329-001 American Literature
        This 8-week Distance Education course is being offered through a partnership with Academic Partnerships (formerly Higher Education Holdings). The course acquaints students with a variety of texts by U.S.-American writers.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • ENGL 2350-004 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
        Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • ENGL 2338-000 Technical Writing
        This course covers the processes of researching, drafting, designing, editing, and revising technical reports, proposals, instructions, resumes, and professional correspondence for specific audiences. I am teaching three different five-week sessions of it this semester through Academic Partnerships. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • ENGL 2329-015 American Literature
        This course is one of three variants of Sophomore Literature offered by UTA's English Department. Where the other two courses focus on British or world literature, this class will acquaint students with a selection of literature by U.S.-American writers.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • ENGL 2329-700 American Literature
        This 8-week Distance Education course is being offered through a partnership with Academic Partnerships (formerly Higher Education Holdings). The course acquaints students with a variety of texts by U.S.-American writers. I am teaching four sections of this course this spring (700, 701, 702, 703). They all have the same syllabus.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • ENGL 2350-005 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
        Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • ENGL 2350-003 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
        Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 1301-044 Honors Rhetoric and Composition I: Humanitarian Rhetoric

        In this introduction to college reading and writing, students will study the fundamentals of rhetoric and writing through the lens of humanitarianism. At the root of any “humanitarian†action—from a college graduate joining the Peace Corps to the United Nations delivering aid to Somalia—is an argument, a claim and set of reasons that persuade the actor to dosomething on behalf of another. How do those arguments work, and what do they accomplish? Analyzing and engaging in such arguments so that students improve their writing and critical thinking skills is the primary goal of this course.

        In the first unit, students will become acquainted with a basic rhetorical vocabulary. In the second unit, students will apply that vocabulary as they analyze and assess the writing by philosophers and historians who have argued for (and against) specific kinds of humanitarian action. Next, in units two and three, we will investigate historical instances where written and visual arguments had real-world effects by shifting American perspectives on poverty and development both abroad—in Southeast Asia in the 1950s—and at home—on Manhattan’s Lower East Side in the 1880s. In the fourth unit, we will consider how narrative forms such as film and creative non-fiction can foster a humanitarian ethos that makes an implicit argument for humanitarian engagement. The course will conclude with a unit on the ethically fascinating intersection between humanitarianism and celebrity culture. In the final weeks of the course, students will study a problem related to humanitarianism and enter the conversation themselves by composing their own argument to be shared with their peers in an oral presentation.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 2329-700 American Literature
        This 8-week Distance Education course is being offered through a partnership with Academic Partnerships (formerly Higher Education Holdings). The course acquaints students with a variety of texts by U.S.-American writers. I am teaching two sections of this course (700 and 701).

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 2329-700 American Literature
        This 15-week Distance Education course is being offered through a partnership with Academic Partnerships (formerly Higher Education Holdings). The course acquaints students with a variety of texts by U.S.-American writers.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 2329-701 American Literature
        This 8-week Distance Education course is being offered through a partnership with Academic Partnerships (formerly Higher Education Holdings). The course acquaints students with a variety of texts by U.S.-American writers. I am teaching two sections of this course (701 and 703).
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • ENGL 2329-007 AMERICAN LITERATURE
        This course (I am teaching sections 007 and 008 this spring; the syllabus is the same for both) is one of three variants of Sophomore Literature offered by UTA's English Department. Where the other two courses focus on British or world literature, this class will acquaint students with a selection of literature by U.S.-American writers.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011

Administrative Appointment

  • 2015
    • June 2015 to Present - Graduate Coordinator, UTA English Department