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Kenneth M Roemer

Name

[Roemer, Kenneth M]
  • Professor

Biography

KENNETH M. ROEMER (B.A., Harvard; M.A., Ph. D., Univ. of Pennsylvania), a Piper Professor of 2011, Distinguished Teaching Professor, and Distinguished Scholar Professor at the University of Texas at Arlington, has received four NEH grants to direct Summer Seminars and has been a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Fellow and a Visiting Professor in Japan. He has been a guest lecturer at Harvard and has lectured at twelve universities in Japan and in Vienna, Lisbon, Hong Kong, Montpellier, Dresden, and several cities in Italy, Brazil, Ireland, Canada, and Turkey. He was one of only three Americans selected to co-chair a seminar at the 2008 European Alpbach Forum in Austria. He is past President of the Society for Utopian Studies, founding Editor of Utopus Discovered, past Vice President and founding member of the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures (ASAIL), and past Chair of the American Indian Literatures and Late 19th- Early 20th-Century Divisions of the Modern Language Association (MLA). He has been Managing Editor of American Literary Realism (ALR) and Assistant Editor of American Quarterly. He serves on the Editorial Boards of Utopian Studies, SAIL, and ALR. He has served on the Advisory Board of PMLA and the Editorial Board of American Literature. His website Covers, Titles, and Tables:  The Formations of American Literary Canons in Anthologies, <www.library.uta/ctt> is the first website discussed in Martha L. Brogan’s A Kaleidoscope of Digital American Literature. This site was completely redesigned and enhanced in 2017. His articles have appeared in journals such as American Literature, American Literary History, Modern Fiction Studies, Technology and Culture, Studies in American Indian Literatures (SAIL), and Utopian Studies. MLA published his Approaches to Teaching Momadays The Way to Rainy Mountain(ed.); his Native American Writers of the United States (ed.) won a Writer of Year Award from Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers. He has written four books on utopian literature: The Obsolete Necessity: America in Utopian Writings (which was nominated for a Pulitzer in American History by the Editor of the NY Times/Arno Press Utopian Literature Collection), America as Utopia (ed.), Build Your Own Utopia, and Utopian Audiences: How Readers Locate Nowhere. Favorable reviews of his scholarly books have appeared in academic journals, as well as the Chronicle of Higher Education and the [London] Times Literary Supplement. His collection of personal narratives, verse, and photography about Japan is entitled Michibata de Deatta Nippon (A Sidewalkers Japan). His co-edited Cambridge Companion to Native American Literature won a Writer of the Year Award from Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers. In 2008 he received the Lyman Tower Sargent Distinguished Scholarship Award for lifetime achievement in scholarship, teaching, and service from the Society for Utopian Studies; in 2010 the Society named its teaching award after him. For nineteen years he has been a Faculty Advisor for the Native American Students Association at UT Arlington. In 2011 he was named a Piper Professor  (state-wide award), and he received one of the UT System’s Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Awards. In 2014 he was one of five UT System professors seleted for the UT System Academy of Distinguished Teachers. In 2017, the English Department added his name to the Deparmental Wall of Honor.

FOR INFORMATION ON PAPERS/PRESENTATIONS, COURSES BEFORE 2009, OFFICES HELD IN PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATINS, RADIO AND NEWSPAPER INTERVIEWS, AND NEWS ARTICLES, CONSULT THE COMPLETE VITA AT www.uta.edu/english/roemer/.  

SEE "OTHER SERVICE ACTIVITIES" IN THE SERVICE SECTION FOR INFORMATION ON COMMUNITY, DEPARTMENTAL, AND UNIVERSITY SERVICE.

FOR DOCTORAL STUDENTS SUPERVISED BEFORE 2004,  FOR MASTERS STUDENTS, AND FOR PEERS MENTORED, CONTACT ROEMER AT roemer@uta.edu.             

Professional Preparation

    • 1967 English - honorsHarvard University
    • 1968 M.A. in American CivilizationThe University of Pennsylvania
    • 1971 Ph.D. in American CivilizationThe University of Pennsylvania

Appointments

    • May 2011 to Present Piper Professor of 2011
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2005 to Present Distinguished Scholar Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1998 to Present Distinguished Teaching Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1995 to Present Faculty Advisor, Native American Student Asociation
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Sept 1982 to Present Professor of English
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1982 to Jan 1983 Visiting Professor
      Shimane (National) University Matsue, Japan
    • July 2008 to Aug 2008 Seminar Co-Director
      European Forum Alpbach
    • Jan 1985 to Jan 1992 Graduate Adivsor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1985 to May 1985 Program Director, SW American Indian Literature in Context
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Mar 1988 to Aug 1988 Visiting Professor
      International Christian University (ICU), Mitaka, Japan
    • Mar 1988 to Aug 1988 Senior Scientist Fellow
      Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
    • Sept 1974 to Aug 1982 Associate Professor of English
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Sept 1971 to Dec 1978 Managing Editor, American Literary Realism
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Sept 1971 to Aug 1974 Assistant Professor of English
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1975 to Jan 1977 Graduate School Assistant Dean
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1970 to May 1970 Graduate Teaching Assistant, American Civilization
      University of Pennsylvania
    • Jan 1969 to May 1970 Assistant Editor, American Quarterly
      The University of Pennsylvania
    • Sept 1967 to May 1970 Research Assistant, Veterinary Medicine, Immunology
      The University of Pennsylvania

Memberships

  • Professional
    • Apr 2011 to Present Phi Kappa Phi
    • Oct 1975 to Present Society for Utopian Studies, President (2002-2006)
    • Dec 1972 to Present Assoc. for the Study of American Indian Literatures, Founding Member, VP (1998)
    • Sept 1970 to Present Melville Society
    • Sept 1968 to Present Modern Language Assoc.: Publication, Teaching, People of Color Committees, Chair Am Indian Lit. Div.
    • Sept 1970 to Aug 2011 American Studies Association

Awards and Honors

    • Apr  2014 UT System Academy of Distinguised Teachers sponsored by University of Texas System (UT System)
    • Dec  2013 University Nominee for the UT System Academy of Distinguished Teachers sponsored by UT Arlington
    • Apr  2012 Graduate Dean's Award for Excellence in Mentoring Doctoral Students sponsored by Graduate Sschool, University of texas at Arlington
    • Aug  2011 UT Regents' Outstanding Teaching Award sponsored by University of Texas System (UT System)
      Achievements:

      Each UT System University nominates outstanding teachers who must compile an extensive portfolio demonstrating the impact of their teaching. Four from UT Arlington were selected in 2011.

    • May  2011 Piper Professor of 2011 sponsored by Minnie Stevens Piper Foundation
    • Oct  2010 Kenneth M. Roemer Innovative Course Design Award sponsored by Society for Utopian Studies
    • Oct  2008 Lyman Tower Sargent Distinguished Scholarship Award sponsored by Society for Utopian Studies
    • May  2008 (my second) Writer of the Year (Reference Category) sponsored by Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers
    • Apr  2007 Alicia Wilkerson Smotherman (inaugural) Award sponsored by College of Liberal ArtsOffice of the Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsOffice of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Mar  2005 Academy of Distinguished Scholars Award sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • Mar  2004 Distinguished Record of Research sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • Mar  2003 Outstanding Student Organization Advisor sponsored by The Department of Student Affairs, UT Arlington
    • Oct  1998 (my first) Writer of the Year Award (Reference Category) sponsored by Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers
    • Mar  1998 Academy of Distinguished Teachers Award sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • Dec  1991 Academic Specialist sponsored by USIA (United States Information Agency)
    • Mar  1988 Amparts Lectureship sponsored by USIA (Inited States InformationAgency)
    • Mar  1988 Chancellor's Outstanding Teaching Award sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan  1976 Pulitzer Prize Nomination sponsored by Author O. Lewis, Editor of the NY Times/Arno Press Utopian Literature Collection
    • Sep  1968 Four-Year Pre-Doctoral Fellowship sponsored by University of Pennsylvania
    • Sep  1963 Freshman and College Honorary Scholarships sponsored by Harvard University

Research and Expertise

  • Professional Specialties

    Research:  American indian literatures; Utopian literature (especially American)
    Teaching:  The above and American literature and culture; Inventive Modeling; autobiographical writing 

    Presentations: 112 Scholarly papers and presentations: 27 International; 69 National; 16 Regional; Approximately 165 Local Presentations

    FOR A COMPLETE LISTING OF PRESENTATIONS, ARTICLES, BIBLIOGRAPHIES, ESSAY REVIEWS, REVIEWS, WEBSITES, ELECTRONIC PUBLICATIONS, PUBLISHED COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, AUDIO TAPE, MANUAL, AND MISCELLANEOUS PUBLICATIONS, SEE THE COMPLETE VITA AT: www.uta.edu/english/roemer

    See also "About Me": "Biography" for further details. 

Publications

      Essay Accepted
      • "The Storyteller's Universe: Indigenous Oral Literatures." A Companion to American Literature, ed. Susan Balasco, Theresa Strouth Gaul, Linck Johnson, and Michael Soto. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley. Forthcoming.

        {Essay }
      Accepted
      • Response to “The Importance of Admitting that You Don’t Know,” by Neil Gray. Little Orange Book, electronic version. Austin: U of Texas P, 2019. [note]

        {Essay }
      Accepted
      • Response to “The Mirror Effect,’ by Brent Iverson. Little Orange Book, electronic version. Austin: U of Texas P, 2019. [note]

        {Essay }

      Journal Article Accepted
      • "Whitmans Song Sung the Navajo Way." Transmotion

        {Journal Article }

      Newsletter Article Published
      Essay 2016
      • "N. Scott Momaday." The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Postcolonial Studies. Digital Edition. Ed., Sangeeta Ray and Henry Schwartz. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2016. http://www.literatureencyclopedia.com/subscriber/tocnode.html?id=g9781444334982_chunk_g978144433498217_ss1-44>

        {Essay }
      2016
      • "Campus Carry." Fort Worth Star-Telegram [Letter to the Editor].4 Mar. 2016. 17A.
         

        {Essay }
      2016
      • "Reverse Assimilation: Native Appropriations of Euro-American Conventions." The Routledge Companion to Native American Literature. Ed. Deborah Madsen. New York: Routledge, 2016. 390-401.

        {Essay }

      Journal Article 2016
      • "Naming Native (Living) Histories: Erdrich's Plague of Names." Studies in American Fiction 43.1 (2016). 115-35.

        {Journal Article }

      Essay 2015
      • "Letters Regarding Gun Rights." Fort Worth Star-Telegram [letter to the editor]. 15 Feb. 2015: 12B.

        {Essay }
      2015
      • " 'I'm Looking through You'' (to Build Resistance to Manipulation)." The Little Orange Book: Short Lessons in Excellent Teaching. Austin: Tower Books-U of Texas P, 2015. 122-24.

        {Essay }
      2015
      • "Teaching Innovation through Immitation?" The Little Orange Book: Short Lessons in Excellent Teaching. Austin: Tower Books-U of Texas P, 2015. 81-83.

        {Essay }
      2015
      • "Teach Selective Lying." The Little Orange Book: Short Lessions in Excellent Teaching. Austin: Tower Books- U of Texas P, 2015. 65-67.

        {Essay }

      Book Review 2014
      • "That Dream Shall Have a Name: Native Americans Rewriting America." Studies in American Indian Literatures 26.4 (Winter 2014): 78-82.

        {Book Review }

      Essay 2014
      • "N. Scott Momaday" [reprinted headnote and selections]. The Heath Anthology of American Literature, 7th ed., Vol E. Ed. Paul Lauter. Boston: Wadsworth-Cengage, 2014. 3259-68.

        {Essay }
      2014
      • "A Sustainable 'port in the storm': Whitehawk." Fronteras 23 (Fall 2014): 6-8.

        {Essay }

      Essay 2012
      • "Despite Cold and Confusion, Casting a Vote." New York Times 8 Nov. 2012: A20 [Letter to the Editor]

        {Essay }

      Journal Article 2012
      • ""It's Not A Poem. It's My Life: Navajo Singing Identities." Studies in American Indian Literatures NS 24.2 (2012). 84-103

        {Peer Reviewed }
      2012
      • "Making Do: Momaday's Survivance Ceremonies." Studies in Ameican Indian Literatures NS 24.4 (2012) 77-98.

        {Peer Reviewed }

      Book Review 2011
      • Writing Indian, Native Conversatins, by John Lloyd Purdy. Studies in American Indian Literatures 23.3 (2011): 132-36.
        {Book Review }
      2011
      • Ammons and Paik. ""Brave New Words" and "From Utopia to Apocalypse"." . American Literature March 2011: 223-225.
        {Book Review }

      Essay 2011
      • "Building the Utopian Face of King Camp Gillette." Building Expectation: Past and Present Visions of the Architectural Future. Ed.Nataniel Robert Walker. Providence: David Winton Bell Gallery, Brown Univresity, 2011. 8-9.
        {Essay }

      Journal Article 2011
      • "They Talk, Who Listens: Audience in American Indian Literatures - The Erdrich Example." Reception: Text, Reader, Audience 3 (2011): 1-33.

        {Peer Reviewed }
      2011
      • "Elephant or Chameleon: Simms & Anthologies" [co-author: Bethany Shaffer]. Simms Review  19. 1-2 (Summer / Winter) 2011: 100-08.

        {Peer Reviewed }

      Poetry 2010
      • "The Road" (poem) Utopis Discovered (newsletter). April 2010. 4.
        {Poetry }

      Essay 2010
      • "N. Scott Momaday." (revised entry] The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Vol.E. Ed. Paul Lauter, et al. Sixth Edition. Boston: Wadsworth, 2010. 2282-91
        {Essay }

      Book Chapter 2010
      • "Paradise Transformed: Varieties of Ninteenth-Century Utopias." The Cambridge Companion to Utopian Literature. Ed. Gregory Claeys. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. 79-106.
        {Book Chapter }

      Book Review 2010
      • ""Future West" and "Scare Tactics"." . American Literature 2010: 23-25.
        {Book Review }
      2010
      • ""Indian Who Bombed Berlin," by Raph Salisbury. American Indian Culture and Research Journal 34.4 (2010): 119-121.

        {Book Review }

      Book Chapter 2008
      • Roemer, Kenneth M. "Placing Readers at the Forefront of Nowhere: Reception Studies and Utopian Literature." American Reception Study: Reconsiderations and New Directions. Ed. James Machor and Philip Goldstein. NY: Oxford UP, 2008. 99-118.
        {Book Chapter }

      Book Chapter 2007
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "More Aliens Transforming Utopia: The Futures of Reader Response and Utopian Studies." Utopia Method Vision: The Use Value of Social Dreaming. Eds. Moylan, Tom and Raffaella Baccolini. Oxford: Peter Lang-Ralahine Utopian Studies Series, 2007. 131-58.
        {Book Chapter }

      Popular Press Article 2006
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Shutting Themselves In." The New York Times Magazine 29 Jan. 2006: 10.
        {Popular Press Article }

      Book Review 2005
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Astrofuturism: Science, Race, and Visions of Utopia in Space, by De Witt Douglas Kilgore. American Literature 2005: 646-648.
        {Book Review }
      2005
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Astrofuturism: Science, Race, and Visions of Utopia in Space, by De Witt Douglas Kilgore and Politics, Persuasion, and Pragmatism: A Rhetoric of Feminist Utopian Fiction, by Ellen Peel. American Literature 77 2005: 646-48.

        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 2005
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The Multi-Missionary Eleanor Roosevelt of American Indian Literatures." Studies in American Indian Literatures, Series 2 17.2 (2005): 101-05.
        {Journal Article }

      Book 2005
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Eds. Roemer, Kenneth and Joy Porter. The Cambridge Companion to Native American Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2005.
        {Book }

      Popular Press Article 2004
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "A New York Story." The New York Times 3 Jul. 2004: A30.
        {Popular Press Article }

      Journal Article 2004
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "'A Touching Man' Brings Aacqu Close." Studies in American Indian Literatures, Ser. 2 16.4 (2004): 68-79.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2004
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The Kiowa-Matsue Connection: Teaching Japanese Identity with Native American Litera- ture." Crossing Oceans: Reconfiguring American Literary Studies in the Pacific Rim. Ed. Noelle Brada-Williams and Karen Chow. Hong Kong: Hong Kong UP, 2004. 79-89.
        {Book Chapter }
      2004
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "N. Scott Momaday." Encyclopedia of the Great Plains. Ed. David J. Wishart. Lincoln: U of Nebraska P, 2004. 485-86.
        {Book Chapter }

      Book 2003
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Utopian Audiences: How Readers Locate Nowhere. Amherst: U of Massachusetts P (Distributed by Johns Hopkins U P Fulfillment Service. Nominated by U Mass Press for the MLA James Russell Lowell and ASA John Hope Franklin Prizes. (See essay review by Tom Moylan, Science-Fiction Studies 31.2 (2004): 421-28.), 2003.
        {Book }

      Book Chapter 2003
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Eyewitness to Utopia: How Illustrations Reconstruct Nowhere." Millennial Perspectives: Lifeworlds and Utopias. Ed. Brigitte Georgi-Findlay and Ulrich Mohr. Heidelberg: U of C Winter Vrelag, 2003. 55-98.

        {Book Chapter }

      Book Review 2003
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of The Diaries of Adam & Eve Translated by Mark Twain, by Mark Twain. Utopian Studies 14.2 2003: 213-14.

        {Book Review }

      Popular Press Article 2002
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "English Professor Reflects on Service Learning Experience at Harvard." UTA Service Matters 2002.
        {Popular Press Article }

      Book Chapter 2002
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "What Future Readers Will See in Bellamy's Looking." Revising the Legacy of Edward Bellamy (1850-1898): American Author and Social Reformer. Ed. Toby Widdicombe and Herman S. Preisner. Lewiston: Edwin Mellon P, 2002. 487-97.
        {Book Chapter }

      Book 2002
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Michibata de Deatta Nippon: Matsue, Haan, Hiroshima [Literal translation: Japan Encountered at the Roadside; Literary translation: A Sidewalker's Japan; subtitle: Matsue [City], [Lafacdio] Hearn, and Hiroshima]. Tokyo: Sairyusha (Part of this translation was selected as a finalist for the 1995 Koizumi Yakumo Cultural Prize.), 2002.
        {Book }

      Book Review 2001
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Higher Ground: From Utopianism to Realism in American Feminist Thought and Theory, by Sally L. Kitch. American Literature 2001: 656-57.
        {Book Review }
      2001
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Scraps of the Untainted Sky: Science Fiction, Utopia, and Dystopia, by Tom Moylan. Utopian Studies 2001: 347-50.
        {Book Review }

      Popular Press Article 2001
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Canons on the Web." Department of English Newsletter 2001: 4.
        {Popular Press Article }

      Anthology Work/Essay 2000
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "N. Scott Momaday Home Page." An Anthology of Modern American Poetry (Discussed in Cary Nelson and Stephen Watts Office Hours: Activism and Change in the Classroom. New York: Routledge, 2004. 183). Eds. Nelson, Cary. New York: Oxford UP, 2000.
        {Anthology Work/Essay }

      Popular Press Article 2000
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Reading the Sidewalks of Matsue (Revised version selected for electronic and magazine syndication by David Wallis)." Here 2000: 31-33.
        {Popular Press Article }

      Journal Article 2000
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "[Note on Reading] Acts of Reading, Acts of Life." A "feature" section of the MLA Web site (2000).
        {Journal Article }
      2000
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "[Comments on Utopian literature and on Utopia on the Internet]." Utopia: The Search for the Ideal Society (New York Public Library exhibit) (2000).
        {Journal Article }
      2000
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "[Untitled Note for the Special Millennium Issue]." PMLA 115 (2000): 2040.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2000
      • Roemer, Kenneth. ""A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court", "The Harrad Experiment", "The Human Drift"." A Dictionary of Literary Utopias. Ed. Vita Fortunati and Raymond Trousson. Paris: Honoré Champion Éditeur, 2000. 137-38, 265.
        {Book Chapter }

      Book Review 1999
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of The American Life of Ernestine L. Rose, by Carol A. Kolmerten. Utopian Studies 1999: 272-74.
        {Book Review }

      Popular Press Article 1999
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The Tales Tables (of Contents) Tell." Heath Anthology of American Literature Newsletter 1999: 4-6.
        {Popular Press Article }
      1999
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Word Power: A Professor's Journeys through Native American Literatures." UTA Magazine 1999: 20-21.
        {Popular Press Article }
      1999
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The NEH Seminar." Department of English Newsletter 1999: 2-3.
        {Popular Press Article }

      Encyclopedia Entry 1999
      • Roemer, K. (1999). "Utopia," "Bellamy," "Donnelly," and "Sheldon" entries. In Stephen R. Serafin (Eds.), Encyclopedia of American Literature (pp. 85, 285). New York: Continuum.
        {Encyclopedia Entry }

      Journal Article 1999
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Silko's Arroyos as Mainstream: Processes and Implications of Canonical Identity." Modern Fiction Studies ((Lead article in special issue). Updated and condensed version in Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony: A Case Book. Ed. Allan Chavkin. New York: Oxford UP, 2002. 223-39) 45.1 (1999): 10-37.
        {Journal Article }

      Anthology Work/Essay 1998
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "N. Scott Momaday / The Way to Rainy Mountain Homepage." Heath Anthology of American Literature. Eds. Lauter, Paul, et al. Boston: Houghton, 1998.
        {Anthology Work/Essay }

      Book Review 1998
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Utopianism and Radicalism, by Francis Robert Shor. Utopian Studies 1998: 318-20.
        {Book Review }

      Book 1997
      • Eds. Roemer, Kenneth. Native American Writers of the United States (Collected and edited 43 essays). Detroit: Bruccoli Clark Layman-Gale Research, 1997.
        {Book }

      Journal Article 1997
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "A Retro-Prospective on Audience, Oral Literatures, and Ignorance." Studies in American Indian Literatures 9 (1997): 17-24.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 1996
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Tribal Secrets, by Robert Allen Warrior. American Literature 1996: 273-74.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1996
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Utopian Literature. Empowering Students, and Gender Awareness." Science-Fiction Studies 23 (1996): 393-405.
        {Journal Article }

      Popular Press Article 1995
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The Effects of White Hawks and Mountains in the Classroom." Department of English Newsletter 1995: 10-11.
        {Popular Press Article }

      Encyclopedia Entry 1995
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "N. Scott Momaday." A Companion to American Thought. Ed. Richard Fox and James T. Kloppenberg. Cambridge: Blackwell, 1995. 464-66.
        {Encyclopedia Entry }

      Journal Article 1995
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Native American Women and Violence: Fiction, Critical Perspectives, Narrative Transformations." Journal of Contemporary Thought 5 (1995): 97-117.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 1994
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of 36 Views of Mount Fuji, by Cathy N. Davidson. Dallas Morning News 14 August 1994: 10J.
        {Book Review }
      1994
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Manifest Manners, by Gerald Vizenor. American Literature 1994: 871-72.
        {Book Review }
      1994
      • ""Indian Lives"." , by Hertha Wong and Greg Sarrus.American Quarterly 46, 1994: 81-91.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1994
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Contemporary American Indian Literature: The Centrality of Canons on the Margins." American Literary History 6 (1994): 583-99.
        {Journal Article }
      1994
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Alpha & Omega: Oklahoma & Yomega(shima)." Paintbrush 21.41 & 42 (1994): 103-05.
        {Journal Article }
      1994
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Experiencing Navajo Nightway Ceremonies in Arizona." Fronteras 3.1 (1994): 2-3.
        {Journal Article }
      1994
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Returning the Gift of Identity: A Gathering Celebrating Rainy Mountain 's Legacy." Paintbrush 21.41 & 42 (1994): 27-41.
        {Journal Article }
      1994
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The Nightway Questions American Literature." The Nightway Questions American Literature 66 (1994): 817-29.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 1994
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Teaching Indian Literature." The Dictionary of Native American Literature. Ed. Andrew Wiget. New York: Garland, 1994. 347-52.
        {Book Chapter }

      Book Review 1993
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Sáanii Dahataal/The Women Are Singing, by Luci Tapahonso. American Indian Quarterly 1993: 430-31.
        {Book Review }

      Encyclopedia Entry 1993
      • Roemer, K. (1993). Elizabeth Cook-Lynn (Second Ed. Gretchen Bataille and Laurie Lisa. New York: Routledge, 2001. 73-75). In Gretchen Bataille (Eds.), Native American Women: A Biographical Dictionary (pp. 62-63). New York: Garland.
        {Encyclopedia Entry }

      Book Chapter 1993
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Ancient Children at Play -- Lyric, Petroglyphic, and Ceremonial." Critical Perspectives on Native American Fiction. Ed. Richard F. Fleck. Washington, D. C.: Three Continents P, 1993. 99-113.
        {Book Chapter }

      Book Review 1991
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Do We Really Need Another Utopian Count?." Rev. of British and American Utopian Literature, by Lyman Tower Sargent. Science-Fiction Studies 1991: 129-31.
        {Book Review }
      1991
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Ancestral Voices. Great Plains Quarterly 1991: 132-33.
        {Book Review }
      1991
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Ancient Child, by N. Scott Momaday. American Indian Quarterly 1991: 269-71.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1991
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Dissensus Achieved, Apologies Offered, and a Hinge Proclaimed: A Response to the Responses." Utopian Studies 2.1 & 2 (1991): 59-62.
        {Journal Article }
      1991
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The Heuristic Powers of Indian Literatures: What Native Authorship Does to Mainstream Texts." Studies in American Indian Literatures, Ser. 2 3.2 (1991): 8-21.
        {Journal Article }
      1991
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The Talking Porcupine Liberates Utopia: Le Guin's "Omelas" as Pretext to the Dance." Utopian Studies 2.1 & 2 (1991): 6-18.
        {Journal Article }

      Anthology Work/Essay 1990
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "N. Scott Momaday." The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Vol. 2. Eds. Lauter, Paul, et al. Lexington: Heath, 1990. 2038-48.
        {Anthology Work/Essay }

      Book Review 1990
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Brotherly Tomorrows, by Edward K. Spann. American Historical Review 1990: 1274.
        {Book Review }
      1990
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Utopian Studies II, by Michael S. Cummings and Nicholas Smith. Utopian Studies 1990: 130-36.
        {Book Review }
      1990
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of The Voice in the Margin, by Arnold Krupat. Studies in American Indian Literatures Ser. 2 1990: 24-29.
        {Book Review }

      Book Review 1989
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Bellamy Bibliographied, by Richard Toby Widdicombe. Science-Fiction Studies 1989: 238-40.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1989
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The Post-Industrial Utopians, by Boris Frankel." Technology and Culture 30 (1989): 174-75.
        {Journal Article }
      1989
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The Literary Domestication of Utopia: There's No Looking Backward Without Uncle Tom and Uncle True." American Transcendentalist Quarterly NS 3 (1989): 101-22.
        {Journal Article }
      1989
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Reconstructing the American Canon: Decline, Rebirth, Signifying Sound and Fury: Part 1." Rising Generation (Tokyo) 1 (1989): 12-17.
        {Journal Article }
      1989
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Reconstructing the American Canon: Decline, Rebirth, Signifying Sound and Fury: Part 2." Rising Generation (Tokyo) (1989): 20-24.
        {Journal Article }

      Popular Press Article 1989
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The Study of American Indian Literature Can Illuminate the Classics in New Ways." Chronicle of Higher Education 12 Jul. 1989: B1-B2.
        {Popular Press Article }
      1989
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Making Indian Literatures Fit." Heath Anthology of American Literature Newsletter 1989: 5-6.
        {Popular Press Article }

      Book Chapter 1989
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Domestic Nowheres & Androgynous Voices: The Sentimental Origins of Looking Backward." Utopia e Modernita: Teorie e prassi utopiche nell' eta moderna e postmoderna. Ed. Giuseppa Saccaro Del Buffa and Arthur O. Lewis. Rome: Gangemi, 1989. 641-54.
        {Book Chapter }

      Book Chapter 1988
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Getting 'Nowhere' Beyond Stasis: A Critique, a Method, and a Case." Looking Backward, 1988-1888: Essays on Edward Bellamy. Ed. Daphne Patai. Amherst: U of Massachusetts P, 1988. 126-46.
        {Book Chapter }
      1988
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Perceptual Origins: Preparing American Readers to See Utopian Fiction." Utopian Thought in American Literature. Ed. Arno Heller, et al. Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag, 1988. 7-24.
        {Book Chapter }

      Book 1988
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Approaches to Teaching Momaday's The Way to Rainy Mountain (Wrote Pt . 1 & Pt. 2 Introd. (1-24); collected and edited 17 essays and an interview (145-52); appendices, works cited, index (153-72)). New York: Modern Language Assn., 1988.
        {Book }

      Book Review 1988
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Prescriptions for Readers (and Writers) of Utopias." Rev. of Reader in a Strange Land. Science-Fiction Studies 1988: 88-93.
        {Book Review }
      1988
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Edward Bellamy, by Nancy Snell Griffith. American Literary Realism 1988: 95-96.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1988
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Bellamy at 100: How Readers Were Created to Create Utopia." Bulletin of the Center for American Studies of the University of Tokyo 11 (1988): 83-88.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 1987
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Re-forming Reform: As History, Method, and Philosophy." Rev. of Reform in America, by Robert H. Walker. American Quarterly 1987: 296-300.
        {Book Review }
      1987
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Back to Malachi, by Robert J. Conley. Wicazo Sa Review 1987: 39-40.
        {Book Review }

      Conference Proceeding 1987
      • Roemer, K. (1987). Utopian Studies 1. In Kenneth Roemer and Gorman Beauchamp. (Eds.), (pp. 197). Lanham: University P of America:.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Book Review 1986
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of The Utopian Novel in America, by Jean Pfaelzer. American Literature 1986: 132-34.
        {Book Review }
      1986
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Dreams and Visions, by Charles J. Rooney, Jr. American Literature 1986: 132-34.
        {Book Review }

      Book Review 1985
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Alternative America, by John L. Thomas. American Literary Realism 1985: 258-62.
        {Book Review }
      1985
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Looking Backward, by R. Jackson Wilson. American Literary Realism 1985: 258-62.
        {Book Review }
      1985
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Technological Utopianism in American Culture, by Howard Segal. American Literary Realism 1985: 282-85.
        {Book Review }
      1985
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Utopian Literature in the Pennsylvania State University Libraries." . Jr. Resources for American Literary Study 1985: 72-75.
        {Book Review }
      1985
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Occasional brief notice reviews." . American Literary Realism 1985.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1985
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Technology, Culture, and Utopia: Gillette's Unity Regained." Technology and Culture 26 (1985): 560-70.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 1984
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Bibliographical Guide to the Study of the Literature of the U. S. A., by Clarence Gohdes and Sanford E. Marovitz. American Literary Realism 1984: 296-97.
        {Book Review }
      1984
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Fifteen American Authors Before 1900, by Earl N. Harbert and Robert A. Rees. American Literary Realism 1984: 296-97.
        {Book Review }
      1984
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Authoritarian Socialism in America, by Arthur Lipow. CLIO 1984: 185-88.
        {Book Review }
      1984
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Reading the Fire, by Jarold Ramsey. Centennial Review 1984: 259-61.
        {Book Review }
      1984
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of A Branch of California Redwood, by William Oandasan. Explorations in Sights and Sounds 1984: 61-63.
        {Book Review }
      1984
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Wounds Beneath the Flesh. Studies in American Indian Literatures 1984: 105-07.
        {Book Review }
      1984
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Interpreting the Indian, by Michael Castro. American Indian Culture and Research Journal 1984: 65-69.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1984
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Inventive Modeling: Rainy Mountain 's Way to Composition." College English 46 (1984): 767-82.
        {Journal Article }
      1984
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Utopian Studies: A Fiction with Notes Appended." Extrapolation 25 (1984): 318-34.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 1984
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Utopian Fiction." Bibliographical Guide to the Study of the Literature of the U. S. A. 5th ed. Ed. Clarence Gohdes and Sanford E. Marovitz. Durham: Duke UP, 1984. 153.
        {Book Chapter }

      Popular Press Article 1983
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Brief journalistic essays (Ft. Worth Star Telegram, Arts Supl. 1 May 1985: 3.)." Shimane U News Sep. 1983: 34-35.
        {Popular Press Article }
      1983
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "How the Local Community Network System Helped an American Family." The Japan Times 12 Oct. 1983: 11.
        {Popular Press Article }

      Book Chapter 1983
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Bear and Elk: The Nature(s) of Contemporary American Indian Poetry." Studies in American Indian Literature. Ed. Paula Gunn Allen. New York: Modern Language Assn., 1983. 178-91.
        {Book Chapter }
      1983
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Looking Backward : Popularitat, Einflub und vertraute Entfreundung." Literarisch Utopien von Morus bis zur Gegenwart. Ed. Klaus L. Berghahn and Ulrich Seeber. Konigstein: Athenaum, 1983. 146-62.
        {Book Chapter }
      1983
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Mixing Behaviorism and Utopia: The Transformations of Walden Two." No Place Else: Explorations in Utopian and Dystopian Fiction. Ed. Eric Rabkin, et al. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1983. 125-46.
        {Book Chapter }
      1983
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Native American Oral Narratives: Context and Continuity." Smoothing the Ground: Essays on Native American Oral Literature. Ed. Brian Swann. Berkeley: U of California P, 1983. 39-54.
        {Book Chapter }

      Poetry 1983
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "In Thanksgiving." 1983. 250.
        {Poetry }

      Journal Article 1983
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Contexts and Texts: The Influence of Looking Backward." Centennial Review 27 (1983): 204-23.
        {Journal Article }
      1983
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Japanese Ways to Rainy Mountain: An Approach to Teaching English Composition in Japan." Memoirs of the Faculty of Law and Literature [Shimane University, Japan 6 (1983): 75-101.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 1982
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "American Literature and Language, by Donald N. Koster." . American Literary Realism 1982: 286-87.
        {Book Review }
      1982
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The South Corner of Time." . American Indian Culture and Research Journal 1982: 122-28.
        {Book Review }
      1982
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The Oxford Book of American Literary Anecdotes." . American Literary Realism 1982: 141-43.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1982
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "H. G. Wells and the 'Momentary Voices' of a Modern Utopia." Extrapolation (1982): 117-37.
        {Journal Article }

      Book 1981
      • Roemer, Kenneth. America as Utopia (Collected and edited 24 essays and contributed). New York: Burt Franklin, 1981.
        {Book }
      1981
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Build Your Own Utopia: An Interdisciplinary Course in Utopian Speculation. Washington: University P of America, 1981.
        {Book }

      Book Review 1981
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Utopia: Alphabetized, Analyzed, Edited, and Listed." . American Literary Realism 1981: 122-34.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1981
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "News Center: Utopian Studies." Alternative Futures 4.1 (1981): 178-89.
        {Journal Article }
      1981
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Checklist of Recent Utopian Studies." Alternative Futures 4.2-3 (1981): 232-49.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 1980
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Darkness in Saint Louis Bearheart, by Gerald Vizenor. American Indian Culture and Research Journal 1980: 187-91.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1980
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Using Utopia to Teach the 80s: A Case for Guided Design." World Future Society Bulletin 14.4 (1980): 1-5.
        {Journal Article }
      1980
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Perception and Imagination: A Note on Seven Arrows." Studies in American Indian Literatures 4 (1980): 46-47.
        {Journal Article }
      1980
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "News Center: Utopian Studies." Alternative Futures 3.3 (1980): 95-124.
        {Journal Article }

      Popular Press Article 1979
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The Agony and the Entropy Amplified." Harvard Magazine 1979: 8.
        {Popular Press Article }
      1979
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The Road to Utopia? (introduction)." Prism Mar. 1979: 7, 11-12.
        {Popular Press Article }

      Lecture/Speech 1979
      • Kenneth Roemer. American Indian Folklore. Audio Tape Lecture. Deland: Everett/Edwards. 1979.
        {Lecture/Speech }

      Book Review 1979
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Window-shopping for Utopia." Rev. of Utopia, by Ian Tod and Michael Wheeler. Alternative Futures 1979: 116-20.
        {Book Review }
      1979
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of In Time and Place, by Floyd C. Watkins. American Indian Quarterly 1979: 195-97.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1979
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Eyewitness to Utopia: Illustrations in Utopian Literature." Prospects: An Annual of American Culture Studies 4 (1979): 355-64.
        {Journal Article }
      1979
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "News Center." Alternative Futures 2.2 (1979): 103-26.
        {Journal Article }
      1979
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "News Center." Alternative Futures 2.4 (1979): 117-24.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 1978
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of American Indian Fiction, by Charles R. Larsen. La Confluencia 1978: 61-62.
        {Book Review }
      1978
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Then Badger Said This, by Elizabeth Cook-Lynn. Studies in American Indian Literatures 1978: 55-58.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1978
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "News Center." Alternative Futures 1.3-4 (1978): 117-24.
        {Journal Article }
      1978
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "News Center." Alternative Futures 1.1 (1978): 105-17.
        {Journal Article }

      Poetry 1978
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Mission San Jose, One View." 1978. 18.
        {Poetry }

      Book Review 1977
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of America in Modern European Literature, by Richard Ruland. American Historical Review 1977: 61-62.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1977
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Bear and Elk: The Nature(s) of Contemporary Indian Poetry." Journal of Ethnic Studies 5.2 (1977): 69-79.
        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 1976
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Archie, Jughead and Herman." Melville Society Extracts 25 (1976): 15-16.
        {Journal Article }
      1976
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Survey Courses, Indian Literature, and The Way to Rainy Mountain." College English 37 (1976): 619-24.
        {Journal Article }

      Book 1976
      • Gillette, King Camp. Eds. Roemer, Kenneth. The Human Drift (Introd. and Text). Delmar: Scholars' Facsimiles & Reprints, 1976.
        {Book }
      1976
      • Roemer, Kenneth. The Obsolete Necessity: America in Utopian Writings, 1888-1900 (Nominated for a Pulitzer by Arthur O. Lewis) (Currently distributed by Bell and Howell Information and Learning.). Kent: Kent State UP, 1976.
        {Book }

      Journal Article 1975
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Edward Bellamy." American Literary Realism 8 (1975): 191-98.
        {Journal Article }
      1975
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Utopia and Methodology: Uses of Fiction in American Studies." Social Science Journal [formerly Rocky Mountain Social Science Journal] 12 (1975): 21-28.
        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 1974
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "'Utopia Made Practical': Compulsive Realism." American Literary Realism 7 (1974): 273-76.
        {Journal Article }
      1974
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The Heavenly City of the Late 19th-Century Utopians." Journal of the American Studies Assn. of Texas 4 (1974): 5-17.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 1974
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of The Temptations of Big Bear, by Ruth Wiebe. World Literature Written in English 1974: 261-65.
        {Book Review }
      1974
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Voices of the Plains Cree, by Edward Ahenakew. World Literature Written in English 1974: 261-65.
        {Book Review }
      1974
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of "Victorians Abed" Purity Crusade, by David J. Pivar. American Studies 1974: 101-03.
        {Book Review }

      Popular Press Article 1974
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "A Few Old and New American [Indian] Poems." Prism Feb. 1974: 12-14.
        {Popular Press Article }

      Journal Article 1973
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "The Yankee(s) in Noahville." American Literature 45 (1973): 434-37.
        {Journal Article }
      1973
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "1984 in 1894: Harben's Land of the Changing Sun." Mississippi Quarterly 26 (1973): 29-42.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 1972
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Selected annotations for "Bret Harte," by Linda D. Barnett." . American Literary Realism 1972: 231, 235.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1972
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "Sex Roles, Utopia and Change: The Family in Late Nineteenth-Century Utopian Literature." American Studies 13.2 (1972): 33-47.
        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 1971
      • Roemer, Kenneth. "American Utopian Literature (1888-1900): An Annotated Bibliography." American Literary Realism 4 (1971): 227-54.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 1970
      • Roemer, Kenneth. Rev. of Custer Died for Your Sins, by Vine Deloria, Jr. American Quarterly 1970: 273.
        {Book Review }

Projects

  • 2013
    • July 2013 to Present “ ’as she named them / they appeared': Erdrich’s Multiplicity of Names”
      Article Submitted.
      Role: Other PI: Kenneth Roemer
    • July 2013 to Present [America: A Literary Anthology]. General Ed, Paul Lauter. Hyderabad, India: Cambridge UP. Under contract.
      Designed for Asia. Lauter and I and 16 Asian and Asian American scholars constitute the Editorial Board. I helped choose selections, and wrote the Introduction for American Indian Oral literatures, 22 headnotes for oral literature selections and 10 author headnotes.  Forthcoming 2015.
      Role: Other PI: Paul Lauter
    • July 2013 to Present In My Father's House: The Wanna Bes Who Already Were, Not Really
      Creative non fiction / memoir.
      Role: Other PI: Kenneth Roemer
  • 1978
    • Oct 1978 to Present The Whitehawk Community, A History
      Study of a sustainability comminuty in North Texas
      Role: Other PI: Kenneth Roemer

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • Sept 2010 to Dec 2010 Faculty Development Leave (competitive) sponsored by  - $45000
    • Jan 2010 to Aug 2010 Anthologies Web Site sponsored by  - $10000
    • Jan 1972 to Jan 2010 15 Small Grants for Research and Travel 1972- 2010 sponsored by  - $1000
    • Nov 2009 to Nov 2009 President's Sustainability Grant for Southern Ute Bio-Fuel Technology Program sponsored by  - $500
    • Sept 1999 to Dec 1999 Faculty Development Leave (Competitive) sponsored by  - $35000
    • Jan 1992 to Jan 1998 Four Summer Seminars for Teachers, American Indian Literatures, Director sponsored by  - $250000
    • Mar 1988 to Aug 1988 Senior Scientist Fellow sponsored by  - $3000
    • Mar 1986 to Mar 1986 Travel Grant to Italy sponsored by  - $500
    • Mar 1985 to May 1985 Southwestern American Indian Literature in Context, Director sponsored by  - $5000
    • Jan 1977 to Jan 1978 IMPACT Innovative Teaching Grant sponsored by  - $2000
    • Mar 1885 to Apr 1885 Southwestern American Indian Literature in Context, Director sponsored by  - $5000

Other Research Activities

  • 2013
    • Additional Information
      • July 2013 Covers, Titles, and Tables: The Formations of American Literary Canons (digital archive)

        Contains more than 1000 scanned and searchable pages of tables of contents and selected covers, from American literature anthlogies and selected histories from 1829 to the present. This is the first web site featured in Marth L. Briogan's A Kaleidoscope of Digital American Literature (2005), published by the Council on Library Information Sources and the Digital Library Foundation.

Live Performances

  • 2004
    • Apr 2004 The Sacred in The Mundane

      Solo Reader's Theater: Performance of Tosamah's sermon from N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn

      Undermain Theater, Dallas, TX

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1997
    • Oct 1997 The Night They Killed Vaudeville II

      Various acts, Creative Artts and School adult community theater production

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1991
    • Oct 1991 Moby-Dick, readers theater, principal role UT Arlington

      Ishmael

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1989
    • Oct 1989 The Bridge Is Out, principal role

      Igor in Creative Arts and School adult community theater production

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1988
    • Oct 1988 Happily Ever, Supporting role

      Pied Piper in Creative Arts and School adult commnity theater production

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1986
    • Mar 1986 Mikado, principal role

      The role of Pish Tush in the Arlington Opera Association production of Gilbert and Sullivan's Mikado

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1984
    • Oct 1984 Egad What a Cad, principal role

      Role of the cad, Creative Arts Theater and School adult community theaterproduction 

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1982
    • Oct 1982 Happily Ever, supporting role

      Pied Piper in Creative Arts and School adult community theater production

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Recordings

  • 2015
  • 2010
    • July 2010 American Indian Literatures, MLA's What's the Word radio series

      A selective discussion of American Indian literature including the power of spoken words for the Modern Language Association's What's the Word radio series aired on NPR stations

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1998
    • Aug 1998 Invented Societies, MLA's What's the Word radio series.

      Discussion of Utopian societies including Bellamy's utopia in Looking Backward (1888) for the Modern Language Association's What's the Word radio series; aired on NPR stations.

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1979
    • Oct 1979 American Indian Folklore

      An audiotape survey of American Indian oral narative types and functions in cultural contexts. Published by Evereet/Edwards (Deland, FL)

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Exhibitions

  • 1985
    • Mar 1985 Southwestern American Indian Literature In Context

      The Program included exhbitions in Arlington at the Fielder Museum (objects, books) , the Arlington Public Library (photography), the UTA Library (three exhibits: portraits, books, photography), and selected public schools (artwork by children) . March - May 1985. 

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1997
    • Sept 1997 Utopias Exhibit Board, Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris; NY Public Library

      Advosory capacity on books to select for the exhibit in Paris and New York, 1997-2001

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Other Creative Activities

  • 2010
    • Editorial Activity
      • Sept 2010 Editorial Board, Studies in American Indian Literatures

        2010 - present

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 2007
    • Editorial Activity
      • Sept 2007 Advisory Board, PMLA

        2007-2010

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 2002
    • Other Activities
      • Jan 2002 Creative Non-Fiction, Poetry. Photograhy

        1978 - present

        For example: Michibata de Deatta Nippon (A Sidewalker's Japan). Tokyo: Sairyushy, 2002. Finalist n the Koizumi Cultural Prize. [prose, poetry, photography]

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1993
    • Editorial Activity
      • Sept 1993 Editorial Board, American Literature

        1993-1996

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1990
    • Editorial Activity
      • Jan 1990 Contributing Editor, Heath Anthology of American Literture

        1990 - present

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1989
    • Editorial Activity
      • Sept 1989 Editorial Board, Utopian Studies

        1989 - present

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1986
    • Other Activities
      • Oct 1986 Cantor, Guitarist

        St. Rita Catholic Church, Ft. Worth, 1986 - present

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1976
    • Other Activities
      • Mar 1976 Choir Co-Director

        From 1979-1986, Unversity Catholic Community church, UT Arlington

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1975
    • Editorial Activity
      • Oct 1975 Editor, Utopus Discovered

        Newsletter; 1975-1981, 1986-88

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
  • 1971
    • Editorial Activity
      • Sept 1971 Managing Editor, American Literary Realism

        1971- 1978;  Book Review Editor 1971-1986.

        [Refereed/Juried]
  • 1969
    • Editorial Activity
      • Sept 1969 Assistant Editor, American Quarterly

        1969-70

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      • Sept 1969 Assistant Editor, American Quarterly

        Assistant Editor, American Quarterly, University of Pennsylvania

        [Refereed/Juried]

Students Supervised

  • Doctoral
    • Present

      I am chair of her Doctoral Committee; dissertation: concepts of religion in the fiction of Loise Erdrich. Ms. Becker is the chair of a high school English Department

    • May 2017
      thumbnail
      Science, Narrative, and the Female Body in Femnst Medical Fiction
    • May 2017
      I am chairing his Doctoral Committee; dissertation: the impact of 9/11 on dystopian fiction. He is Director of the Writing Center at UT Arlington.
    • May 2012

      I chaired his Doctoral Committee; dissertation: concepts of humor in selected contemporary American Indian novelists. He accepted a full-time teaching position at Ursuline Academy in Dallas.

    • May 2009

      I chaired her Doctoral Committee: dissertation: American utopias written by women - 1920-1965. She accepted a tenure-track Assistant Professor position at Aurora University. She has published several articles and is working on a book.

    • May 2009

      I was chair of her Doctoral Committee; dissertation: the concept of voice in contemporary American Indian poetry. She is an Associate Professor of English and Foreign Languages at Southwestern Assemblies of God University.

    • May 2008

      I was his Doctoral Committee chair: dissertation: the concept of home in American Indian fiction.  He has published at least one article based on a dissertation chapter.  He accepted a tenure-track Assistant Professor position at Eastern New Mexico University. 

    • May 2008

      I chaired her Doctoral Committee: dissertation: representation of whites in American Indian literature. She is now a Senior Professor at DeVry University in Dallas. She has recently editied a book.

    • Dec 2007

      I was chair of her Doctoral committee: dissertation on American Indian women's autobiography. She was offered a tenure-track Assistant Professor position at the University of the Virgin Islands. She declined for family reasons and now teaches and has developed online classes for DePaul University

    • Dec 2004

      I was chair of his Ph.D. Committee: dissertation on existentialism and American Indian fiction. He was offered and accepted a tenure-track position (Tennessee Temple University)

  • Undergraduate
    • May 2005

      In his acknowledgment section to Schuyer's Monster: A FAther's Journey with His Wordless Daughter (New York: St.Matin's Press, 2008), he claims that my writing course "lit a fire" that convinced him to bevome a writer.

Collaborators

    • thumbnail
      Duration : Oct 1986 to July 1987

      Professor Beauchamp was my primary collaborator for editing Utopian Studies 1, a conference proceedings published by University Press of America (1987). He is Associate Professor Emeritus at the University of Michigan.

    • thumbnail
      Duration : Jan 2001 to May 2005

      Professor Porter was my co-editor for The Cambridge Companion to Native American Literature (2005). She is a Professor at the University of Hull, England.

    • thumbnail
      Duration : Jan 2001 to Present

      Professor Lauter is the General Editor of an anthology of American literature being developed for Asia and to be published by the branch of Cambridge UP in Hyderabad, India. He contacted me to be on the Editorial Board because of my previous scholarship and my work with Professor Naoki Onishi to plan an anthology for Japan. I wrote the general introduction to American Indian oral narratives, 22 headnotes to the oral narratives section, and 10 author headnotes.The Board consists of Professor Lauter and me and 16 Asian and Asian American scholars. Progress toward publication has been slow. Professor Lauter has an endowed peofessorship at Trinity College, Hartford, CT.

Courses

      • ENGL 4330-001 WAYS TO RAINY MOUNTAIN Inventive Modeling: Autobiography / Creative Nonfiction

        GOALS / MEANS / ASSESSMENT

        1.  To improve writing ability: focus on creative nonfiction prose, especially narrative, descriptive, and autobiographical writing with an emphasis on gathering and integrating written and oral sources. (Note: some students have complemented their prose with poetry, graphics, and music.)

        2.  To help students enhance self-awareness by discovering relationships between listening, reading, and writing: focus on connections between stories and facts relating to family, community, and place.

        Means and assessment: study of N. Scott Momaday’s composition processes in the creation of The Way to Rainy Mountain (WTRM); an essay exam on these processes ; composing a personal version of WTRM.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-015 American Literature: Celebrating Identiy Formations

        This course is not an "introduction" to or "survey" of American Literature. (English 3340 is the survey.) Instead it introduces students to a chronological selection of significant American works that contributed to an on-going dialogue about defining American identities (i.e., the characteristics by/with which a person or group defines him/her/them self(ves) and or is recognized). This dialogue is often a fascinating index to important American cultural and aesthetic values. Despite the selectivity of the readings, the course examines a broad range of time periods, genres (oral literature, exploration accounts, letters, essays, autobiographies, poetry, and fiction), geographical areas, and perspectives shaped by different life stage, gender, class, and ethnic backgrounds.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-002 Introduction to Textual Analysis and Interpretation

        The Departmental goals/outcomes for this course are to prepare students to: (1) identify characteristics of literary genres (at least three); (2) recognize and understand critical and literary terms; (3) develop methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts; and (4) demonstrate a command of these methods and strategies in written work.

        The basic Departmental written requirements aimed at achieving and demonstrating the goals are: (1) a close reading of a text or a portion of a text; (2) an analyses of a text or portion of a text using an appropriate critical term or critical theory; and (3) a research paper that demonstrates a knowledge of criticism on the text selected and the ability to use (an) appropriate critical method(s) to construct a convincing interpretation of the text.

        To be more specific, in this course we will address the goals/outcomes in (1) class and group discussions; (2) assigned readings; (3) short answer exams drawn from Parker’s How to Interpret Literature, class discussions, and Internet definitions of literary terms; (4) three essay exams; and (5) the three short papers described below.

        What distinguishes this 2350 class from others offered in the Department? The selection and pairing of texts addresses the first goal in particular. We examine works of fiction, poetry, and life narrative (autobiography). In each case we begin by discussing a well-known American text that is routinely defined as a novel, poetry, or autobiography. I pair these texts with Native American texts that can also be defined as novels, poetry, or autobiography, but they challenge conventional ways of defining these genres. The pairings invite discussion about how readers, authors, editors, scholars, and publishers conceive of genres and about literary canon formation.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-015 American Literature: Celebrating Identity Formations

        This course is not an "introduction" to or "survey" of American Literature. (English 3340 is the survey.) Instead it introduces students to a chronological selection of significant American works that contributed to an on-going dialogue about defining American identities (i.e., the characteristics by/with which a person or group defines him/her/them self(ves) and or is recognized). This dialogue is often a fascinating index to important American cultural and aesthetic values. Despite the selectivity of the readings, the course examines a broad range of time periods, genres (oral literature, exploration accounts, letters, essays, autobiographies, poetry, and fiction), geographical areas, and perspectives shaped by different life stage, gender, class, and ethnic backgrounds. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3344-001 Shaping Lives: American Indian Life Narratives

        Autobiography is one of the most popular and most controversial forms of Native American literature. There are hundreds of compelling collaborative and single-authored narratives. There are also fake life stories, famous collaborative narratives (e.g., Black Elk Speaks), and misleading as-told-to collaborations between Native and non-Natives. Instead of emphasizing the collaborations, the course focuses on life narratives performed or written, primarily in English, by Native Americans in the 18th, 19th, and especially the 20th and 21st centuries. The focus invites questions about Native American writing: for instance, concepts of self that blur communal and individual boundaries, and negotiations between written and oral literature. The life narratives also raise issues relevant to all written creations of “lives”: for example: the selection, ordering, and interpretation of experiences; the intended audiences and presumed intentions of the author/performer; and the literary forms.  All these help to shape the “self” represented in the text. Form will be especially important to our discussions (hence the title “Shaping Lives.”)  We discuss the self defined in song, pictograph, and oral narrative; in Christian conversion and other forms of assimilation narratives; in blends of cultural history and natural history; in collaborations between two Natives; in collections of mythic recreations, non-fiction, fiction, poetry, and visual images (including photography). I also suggest the diversity of the literature by including personae as young as a six-year old and (almost) as old as a century, men and women from different Native Nations, eras, and regions; and narrative time-spans as broad as several centuries and as concentrated as a pregnancy and birth.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4349-001 WAYS TO RAINY MOUNTAIN Inventive Modeling: Autobiography / Literary Writing

        GOALS / MEANS /ASSESSMENT:

        1.  to improve students' writing ability:  focus on non-fiction prose, especially narrative, descriptive, and autobiographical writing (though some students have used poetry, photography, illustrations, and music), as well as skills related to gathering and integrating oral narratives and written historical sources;

        2.  to help students to see relationships between reading, writing, and self-discovery, especially the discovery of a written persona or voice:  focus on the connections between a ("factual" and storytelling) knowledge of place, family, and community and the development of a written voice.

        Means and assessment:  an intensive study of Momaday's THE WAY TO RAINY MOUNTAIN. After this study, students take an exam (see below for criteria) and then write their own versions of Momaday's book

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6333-001 Shapes of Utopia

        How do different forms of utopian expression affect the ways ideas about “better ways of being” [Levitas] are imagined and received? We begin with oral narratives and conclude with virtual utopias and multi-genre texts.  We examine myths, visions, dialogues, satires, a graphic novel version of a play, theme parks, intentional communities, fiction (including young-adult fiction), multi-genre texts, museum exhibitions, and web sites.  If possible, we will also visit the Whitehawk community.

         

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4330-001 Inventive Modeling: Ways to Rainy Mountain (Autobiographical Writing)

        In this course each student will create a written self – one that is communal as well as individualized.  We begin with an intensive study of the private and communal inventive and composition processes that lead to the creation of N. Scott Momaday’s The Way to Rainy Mountain.  Then, using a variety of his or her family, community, and regional written and oral sources and relevant characteristics of Momaday’s form, each student will create a collection of interrelated storytelling, historical, and personal narratives that reflect significant aspects of his or her identity.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4399-003 Utopian Literature

        The course begins in a rather traditional way, posing questions about how concepts of “utopia” and “utopian literature” have been defined and used by scholars and a variety of non-scholars as different as Confucius, Dostoyevsky, Mr. Rogers, and Oprah, and by offering a brief historical overview. Each major section of the course also uses a traditional organizational device: chronology.  This is appropriate. Utopian literature is a literature grounded in dialogue. Authors often respond to earlier writings. Hence to understand the context of a particular work, it is often useful to know what preceded it. Finally, the course’s focus on utopias of the “Western World” is also traditional. What makes this course different from other traditional surveys is its arrangement on a spectrum beginning with forms of expression that were not to be questioned and ending with utopias that question themselves. To be more specific, we begin with visions of better worlds that depend upon divine authority and then move on to utopias (religious and secular) that sometimes do allow alternative viewpoints (e.g., dialogue forms) but clearly imply that one alternative is much better than the others. We next examine satiric works that either present their vision of better worlds indirectly or ironically or even as frightening warnings that emphasize the dire extrapolations of the worst in the present.  The course concludes with discussion of utopias that offer representations of better worlds that suggest “answers” but also pose questions about alternative forms of utopia and even questions about the possibility of imagining utopia, while still maintaining that utopian speculation is a crucial means of understanding the past, present, and future.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6339-001 Literature as Told, Written, and Directed by American Indian Women

        GOALS (& MEANS)

        1.  To introduce students to several important texts, spoken, performed, written, and/or directed by American Indian women (readings, class discussions, films).  The emphasis will be primarily but not exclusively on written texts originally composed in English.  For authors who have written several book-length works, I selected titles that concentrated on women (e.g.:  Hogan's Solar Storms; Erdrich's Tales of Burning Love);

        2.  To introduce students to texts that represent a variety of historical periods and literary genres and to examine the importance of historical, cultural, and genre influences on the production and reception of the texts (readings, class discussions);

        3.  To foster critical examinations of gender, though our discussions of the texts will not be limited to gender (class discussions, exams);

        4.  To introduce students to “classic” and recent critical and theoretical articles related to the course (readings, class discussions);

        5.  To help students to develop critical writing and research skills (exams and paper);

        6.  To help students to develop oral discussion skills (class discussions, including group discussions/presentations).

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-014 American Literature: Celebrating Identity Formations

        “Celebrating Identity Formations” is not an "introduction" to or "survey" of American Literature. (English 3340 is the survey.) Instead it introduces students to a chronological selection of significant American works that contributed to an on-going dialogue about defining what it is to be an “American” (individual, group, national). This dialogue is often a fascinating index to important American cultural and aesthetic values. Despite the selectivity of the readings, the course examines a broad range of time periods, genres geographical areas, and perspectives shaped by different gender, class, ethnic, and generational backgrounds. By the end of the semester, students who have successfully completed the assignments should: (1) have a basic knowledge of eighteen significant American texts, and (2) have the ability to consider how various historical periods, literary forms, concepts of audience, environments, and personal, generational, economic, and cultural backgrounds have influenced how Americans imagine and communicate concepts of who they are. This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirements in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3344-001 Shaping Lives: American Indian Life Narratives

        Autobiography is one of the most popular and most controversial forms of Native American literature.  Fake life stories and misleading as-told-to autobiographies have captured and misled generations of readers.  Instead of emphasizing these works, the course, after a brief introduction to American Indian literatures, focuses on selected life narratives written in English and performed by American Indians, with the two exceptions:  a Navajo song in Navajo and the collaborative narrative, Black Elk Speaks.  The focus invites questions particular to Native American writing (for instance, concepts of self that blur communal and individual boundaries and negotiations between written and oral literature), as well as issues relevant to all written creations of “lives” – for example, how the selection, ordering, and interpretation of experiences and how literary form define the written self.  Form will be especially important to our discussions.  We discuss traditional song in Navajo, Christian conversion narratives, blends of cultural history, natural history and protest with autobiography, combinations of prose and poetry, fact and fiction, and of oral, written, and visual forms, and time frames as broad as the history of a people and as intense as one year of pregnancy and delivery.  At the conclusion of the course we examine the implications of using drama and film to express life narratives.   
          REQUIREMENTS:   Essays:  3 exams.  Papers:  One reader-response paper.   
          TEXTS:   Course packet (e.g, introductory overviews of the literature and Native American Studies; excerpts from 19th- through early-20st-century works: Apess, Winnemuca, Zitkala-Sa); The Blue Jay’s Dance (Erdrich), Black Elk Speaks (Neihardt - selections), Talking to the Moon (Mathews - selections), Storyteller (Silko - selections), Way to Rainy Mountain (Momaday), The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (Alexie)

      • ENGL 3344-001 Literature as Told, Written, and Directed by American Indian Women

        The course introduces students to oral narratives, autobiographies, poetry, fiction, plays, and films told, written, and directed, produced or acted by American Indian women. Although the focus is on the 20th and 21st centuries, the written selections begin in the 19th century and the performed stories date back hundreds, possibly thousands of years.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6333-001 Shapes of Utopia

        We examine the ways form shapes utopian expresion. We study oral, graphic,and electronic expressions of imaginary better and worse worlds, as well as films, communities, theme parks, and music.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-004 Introduction to Textual Analysis and Interpretation

        The Departmental goals for this course are to prepare students to: (1) identify characteristics of literary genres (at least three); (2) recognize and understand critical and literary terms; (3) develop methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts; and (4) demonstrate a command of these methods and strategies in written work.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-010 Celebrating American Identity Formation
        This course is not an "introduction" to or "survey" of American Literature. (English 3340 is the survey.) Instead it introduces students to a chronological selection of significant American works that contributed to an on-going dialogue about defining American identities (i.e., the characteristics by/with which a person or group defines him/her/them self(ves) and or is recognized). This dialogue is often a fascinating index to important American cultural and aesthetic values. Despite the selectivity of the readings, the course examines a broad range of time periods, genres (oral literature, exploration accounts, letters, essays, autobiographies, poetry, and fiction), geographical areas, and perspectives shaped by different life stage, gender, class, and ethnic backgrounds.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2329-013 American Literature.: Celebrating Identity Formation
        This course is not an "introduction" to or "survey" of American Literature. (English 3340 is the survey.) Instead it introduces students to a chronological selection of significant American works that contributed to an on-going dialogue about defining American identities (i.e., the characteristics by/with which a person or group defines him/her/them self(ves) and or is recognized). This dialogue is often a fascinating index to important American cultural and aesthetic values. Despite the selectivity of the readings, the course examines a broad range of time periods, genres (oral literature, exploration accounts, letters, essays, autobiographies, poetry, and fiction), geographical areas, and perspectives shaped by different life stage, gender, class, and ethnic backgrounds.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4313-001 20th-Century American Fiction
        Selective chronological examination of 20th Century American Literature with an emphasis on the creation of an appropriate form for the American novel, the importance of regional and racial diversity, and utopian, dystopian, and apocalyptic visions.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 5322-001 Reconstructing the American Literary Renaissance
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 3344-001 Native Fictions that Reconstruct American History
        No Description Provided.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 3344-001 Native Fictions that Reconstruct American History
        No Description Provided.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2329-013 American Literature.: Celebrating Identity Formation
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4330-003 Inventive Modeling: Autobiographical/Creative Writing

        No Description Provided.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4313-001 20th-Century American Fiction

        Selective chronological examination of 20th Century American Literature with an emphasis on the creation of an appropriate form for the American novel, the importance of regional and racial diversity, and utopian, dystopian, and apocalyptic visions.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-011 Celebrating American Identity Formation
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 6339-001 Literature Performed, Written, and Directed by American Indian Women
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 3344-001 Native Fictions that Reconstruct American History
        No Description Provided.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 3344-001 Native Fictions that Reconstruct American History
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4313-001 20th-Century American Fiction

        No Description Provided.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4399-003 Utopian Literature
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 3300-004 Build Your Own Utopia
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 6333-001 Shapes of Utopia
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 3344-001 Native Fictions that Reconstruct American History
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2009 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 3344-001 Native Fictions that Reconstruct American History
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2009 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 5326-001 American Civil War
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2009 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2350-001 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
        2350 prepares students for advanced undergraduate English Studies. The four primary goals of the course are to enable students to know and evaluate concepts of literary genre, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, to learn about and apply established interpretive methods, and to demonstrate a knowledge of relevant genre concepts, literary terms, and methods in written analyses of assigned readings.  To achieve the first goal, knowledge of genres, students will read works in poetry, fiction, and life narratives (autobiography).  A pair of texts represents each of these genres; one easily "fits" standard concepts of genre; the other, taken from Native American literature, questions genre definitions. Articles about genre will accompany these readings.  Selections from a handbook of literary concepts, from a collection of essays on critical theory, and from the MLA Handbook combined with short quizzes, essay exams, and three papers will address the first and the three other goals of the course.  The short Great Gatsby paper will concentrate on close readings; another short paper on fiction, poetry, or autobiography will require the application of an appropriate critical theory; the research paper, which can focus on any one of the texts assigned, will demonstrate students’ abilities to enter an interpretive conversation with relevant published criticism and scholarship.  
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2009 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 3344-001 Native Fictions that Reconstruct American History
        The focus is primarily on autobiographies/life narratives written in English , although we will also examine collaborative life narratives and life narratives in song, visuals, film and on the Internet. Issues examined: which events and characteristics are selected; how are they organized; what forms and conventions are used; how are they interpreted; what is the intended audience; what were the responses over time; how do the concepts of self and success differ from concepts of self and success in nonNative life narratives?
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2009 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 3344-001 Native Fictions that Reconstruct American History
        Examination of American Indian fiction since 1968
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2009 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4313-001 20th-Century American Fiction
        Examination to three issues is 20th-century American Fiction: form, race/region, utopia/dystopia
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2009 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4399-001 Mad Men, Possessed Women
        Examination of the definitions, nature and function of utopian literature including texts deemed sacred by particular cultures, unambiguous utopias, satiric utopias (including dystopias) and complex ambiguous utopias.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2009 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2350-001 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        The Departmental goals for this course are to prepare English students to: (1) identify characteristics of literary genres (at least three); (2) recognize and understand critical and literary terms; (3) develop methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts; and (4) demonstrate a command of these methods and strategies in written work.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2006 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
      • ENGL 4330-001 Advanced Creative Writing - Poetry

        GOALS / MEANS /ASSESSMENT: 1. to improve students' writing ability: focus on non-fiction prose, especially narrative, descriptive, and autobiographical writing (though some students have used poetry, photography, illustrations, and music), as well as skills related to gathering and integrating oral narratives and written historical sources; 2. to help students to see relationships between reading, writing, and self-discovery, especially the discovery of a written persona or voice: focus on the connections between a ("factual" and storytelling) knowledge of place, family, and community and the development of a written voice. * Means and assessment: an intensive study of Momaday's THE WAY TO RAINY MOUNTAIN, including examination of the composing processes. After this study, students will take an exam and then write their own versions of Momaday's book.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2006 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link

Other Teaching Activities

    • Courses Taught
      • Realty through the Utopian Looking Glass

        Co-taught seminar at the Euroipean Forum Alpach; I was one of only three American scholars invited to teach at the forum.

      • America as Utopia

        Upper division course at International Christian University, Mitaka Japan, taught from April through July

      • Am. Lit., Am. Indian Lit., Advanced Composition, English Conversation, Phonetics, Faculty Orientation to US Universities

        A series of courses beginning in September 1882 and continuing through September 1983 at Shimane (National) Unuversity, Matsue Japan. 

      • Inventive Modeling: The Way to Rainy Mountain

        Workshop for Reserve Teachers who teach First Nations students in Canada, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Service to the University

  • Other
    • Sept 1995 to  Present Major University Service: Faculty Advisor, Native American Student Association

      SELECTED UT ARLINGTON NATIVE AMERICAN STUDENTS ASSN. ACTIVITIES

      NASA was one of eight student organizations, including Yale University’s organization, featured in the Fall 2005 College Guide for American Indians published by Winds of Change; NASA received UTA’s 2012 Outstanding Contribution to the Greater Community by a Student Organization Award, the 2006 Outstanding Internat. / Cultural Students Org. Award and the 2005 Outstanding Advisor Award.

      Eighteen Annual Scholarship Benefit Powwows (1996-2012).  Dr. Hawthone, a Navajo Code talker, was a featured speaker for the 15th pow wow. Since 1998, NASA has awarded twenty-one scholarships; at present the scholarship is $1,100. Six Annual August Orientations (1997-2002): The President's Office supported this program, which up through 2002 was run by THUNDER Alliance. 

      Academic Conferences:  between 1997 and 2001, American Indian Science and Engineering Society Conventions.  One of the students' responsibilities has been to distribute information at a UTA booth.

      Past Film Showings with Presentations

                  1999:    Valerie Red Horse and her film Naturally Native:  the first feature-length film funded,                               directed, produced, cast, and written by Native Americans (1999)

                  2000     Steven Heape and Greg Howard and How to Trace Your Native American  Heritage

                  2006     Peggy Larney, DISD, moderator; In Whose Honor: American Indian Sports Mascots

                  2007     Smoke Signals

      2011     Neil Diamond, director, Reel Injuns

       Performances / Talks / Workshops / Exhibits for Native American Heritage Month

                  2012     1491s – Nationally recognized comedy-advocacy group

                  2011     Verbal Arts in Native American Languages (Linguistics Primary Sponsor)

                              State of Oklahoma Native Language, with Dr. Mary Linn (Linguistics Primary Sponsor)

                              Chickasaw Language Revitalization (Linguistics Primary Sponsor)

                              American Indian Mascots, with Peggy Larney, former Head of DISD Indian Programs

                  2010     This Is Not a Costume: American Indian Regalia (Dennis Wahkinney, MC)

                  2009     Algae Biofuels NOW (Southern Ute speakers); Growing with Tradition (Exhibit)

                  2008     Morgan Fawcett (Flutist & Speaker on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum; co-sponsor:                                          Multicultural Affairs)

                  2007     This Is Not a Costume: American Indian Regalia (dancers, drum, singers, speakers)

                  2006:    Billy Mills, Olympic Champion (co-sponsored with Multicultural Affairs)        

                  2005:    This Is Not a Costume: American Indian Regalia (speakers in regalia, singer)    

                  2004:    Kevin Locke Trio (co-sponsired with the UTA Baha'i Club

                  2003:    LeAnne Howe, Novelist, Screenwriter, Scholar

                  2002:    Ann Buse, culture, arts, crafts

                  2001:     LaCata Starr Brown, tracing Native heritage

                  2000:    Presentations by Marc Harrison (Urban Inter-Tribal Ctr. of Texas),

                              Carolyn Beartrack (American Indian Center, Euless). Joe Bohanon (Census Bureau)

                  1999:    Eugene Brown (NASA Elder), Kenneth Philp (UTA), Kenneth Roemer (UTA)

                  1998:    Presentations by Native American Inmates from a Mansfield Correctional                                              Institution

Other Service Activities

  • Uncategorized
    • Sep 1971 DEPARTMENT, UNIVERSITY, COMMUNITY SERVICE

      For Professional Service, see: "Creative Activities," especialy Editorial Activities and being President of the Society for Utopian Studies; and "About Me": Memberships (selected offices and committees)

      Department of English Committees

      American Literature (1971 - ; chair, 1977, chair, 1988 - 2000), Freshman Composition (1972-82, 1991-92), Self-Study (1973), Tenure and Promotion (1973-74, chair, 1985-86, chair, 1988-89, chair, 1991-92, chair, 1993-94, chair,1994-95; 1999-00; 2002-2003, chair, 2003-04; 2005-06), Committee on Graduate Studies (1976 - ; chair: 1977-78, chair, 1989-90, 1996-97), Search Committees (Rhetoric / Composition, 1982, American Literature, chair: 1987-89, 1993-94, Post-Doctoral Fellows, 1985-86, Rhetoric Director, 1990-91, Freshman Director, 1991-92, Three Faculty Positions, 1993-94, Rhetoric, 1998-99; American Literature, 2002-03; History of Rhetoric, 2003-04, Chair; Undergraduate Advisor, 2004; Two Rhetoric positions [interviewing], 2005-06), Hearing (chair, 1983-84), Chair's Advisory (1984-85, 1987-88, 1989-90, 1990-91, 1997-99, 2005-06), Katherine Anne Porter/Hermann Lecture Series (1983 - , chair, 1985-86, 1995-96), Curriculum (1984-87, 1991-92, 1996-98, 2001-02), Travel (1985-86, 1991-92, 1993-95), Sophomore Courses Committee (1987-88, 1994-95, chair, 2004-05; chair, 2005-06, ), CACTIP Readings Revision Committee (1988-89), Research Committee (1988-89, 1994-95, 1998- 2004, 2004-05, Chair, 2006-06, Chair), Shakespeare Scholarship Committee (1988-89), Chair Review (1989), GTA Committee (1989, 1993-94, 1995-96, 1999-2000; 2002-2004) ; Ad Hoc Ph.D. Proposal Committee, Co-Chair (Spring 1997), Departmental Program Review Committee, Chair (2001-2002); Post-Tenure Review Committee (2003-2004); SACS Review Committee , Chair (2006-07); Latino Literature Search Committee  2007-08); Sophomore Literature Comittee, Chair (2007 -  ); Departmental Program Review, Chair, (2008-09); Distiance Education Searcg Committee (2009), Doctoral Writig Subcommittee 2011-12); Committee on Assesment (2012-13)

      Interdepartmental / College / University Committees

      Major Continuing Service: Facuty Advisor: Native American Student Asociation (1995 -- present; 2010 - present co-advisor): annual pow wows since 1995; multiple fall and spring programs; scholarship program.

      Advisory Board, Faculty Development Resource Center (1973-84), Undergraduate Assembly (1973-82, 1990), Search for Art Historian Chair (1973), Piper Teaching Award (1975, 1984), Fulbright (1975, 1984), Fulbright Advisor for Graduate Students (1985-87), Thesis and Dissertation Guidelines (chair, 1975), Administrative Council (1975-77), Tri-Institutional Humanities (1975-80), Graduate Assembly Program Policy (1975-82), Graduate Studies Committee for the Humanities (1976 - , chair, 1980-82), Scholarly Publications (chair, 1977), International Student (1977), University Hearing Panel (1978-82, chair, 1979), Undergraduate Honors Program (1979 - 82), Department of Philosophy Tenure and Promotion (1979-82), University Long Range Planning (1983-85), Minority Cultures Collection / MultiCultural Collection Committee (1984 - 2003, chair, 1995-2003 [successful mural contest, 2000] ), University Self-Study Principal Committee on Faculty (chair, 1984-86), College of Liberal Arts Tenure and Promotion (1984-86, 1994-95, chair, 1995-96, 1999-01, chair, 2000-01), Faculty Senate (1986-87, Equity and Post-Tenure Review Committees, 1996-97, Student Services Committee and Nominating Committee 1997-98), Graduate Studies Committee for Interdisciplinary Studies (1987-, Chair, 2001 - ), Phi Beta Delta Internat. Honor Society (1987- 90), Nominating Committee, 1989), Editorial Board of Search (UTA research magazine, 1987-88), Ad-hoc Education Promotion Committee (1988), Advisory Board, Women and Minorities Research and Resource Center (1988-90), Liberal Arts FDL and Research Enhancement Committee (1989-90, 1990-91, 2004-2005, 2005-06), Chancellor's Teaching Award Committee (1989 - , chair, 1990); Center Fellow, Center for SW Studies (1991- ; Executive Committee, 1998-99, 2001-02), Liberal Arts Dean Search Committee (1993-94, 2001-02), Multicultural Grant Team (AACU Grant, 1995-96); Distinguished Lecture Series Program (1996 - 98); Consultant/Faculty, UTA Summer Advanced Placement Institute (1997); Faculty Advisor, Native American Students Assn., 1995 - ); Faculty Advisor, American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) UTA Chapter (1997 - ); Morris K. Udall Scholarship Faculty Contact (1997 - 99 ); College Interim Dean Committee (1998); Library Faculty Award Committee (1998); University Teaching Awards Committee for the Academy of Distinguished Teachers (1999 - ), Center for Mexican American Studies Search Committee, (2000-01), Faculty Service Learning Advisory Committee (2001 - ), Four Search Committees for the Communications Department, 2004-05, Distinguished Scholars Committee (reviewing research awards, 2006). Interdisciplinary Studies Search Committee --Two positions ( 2006-007, 2007-08; Universitu Hearig Committee (2007 -  ); College Teachig Awards Committee (2007 -  ); College T& P Committee (2009-10); Linguistics T & P Committee (2010-11); Honors College Advisor Search Committee (2012)

      Community

      Lectures and Presentations: Dallas Museum of Art and Dallas Public Library "Arts & Letters Live" series introduction of Sherman Alexie, 2001); Liberal Arts Commencement Addresses (Summer 1998, Spring 2005); presentation for the Chancellor’s Council Executive Committee (2005); UTA’s “Focus on Faculty Lecture“Finding the Sacred in the Mundane,” (2004) and approximately 120 lectures on utopian literature, American Indian literature, and the Japanese educational system to area schools, churches, and universities (e.g., in-service AISD, regional in-service classes, Jefferson Unitarian Church, elementary classes, SMU, TCU, UTD,Northwood ) and organizations (e.g., WordSpace PoetTalk, and Indian / Indian Program [Dallas], UTA Lecture Series, UTA Literary Gala, Texas Am.Indian Sesquicentennial Assn., Dist. 7 of the Texas Library Assn., YMCA, Wesley Foundation,, Boy Scouts, Borders Books, Barnes & Noble, THUNDER Alliance student orientation (a satewide American Indian educational organization).

      Co-director of University Catholic Community Folk Mass Choir (1979 - 86); Choir member, St. Rita's Catholic Church, 1986- ; Gospel Choir, 1998- )

      Community organizations: Dallas Harvard Club (1984 - ; student interviews, 1987- ), Marriage Encounter Team (1981 - 84 ), Creative Arts Theater and School Board of Directors (1985-86; Chair, Personnel Committee 1989-93; Chair, Public Relations, 1993-94; Vice President for Grants, 1994-95, Vice President for Education, 1996-2000) ; THUNDER Alliance member, 1997 - , Honorary Advisory Council Member 2001 -); Advisor for WordSpace (Dallas literary organization), 2002 - .

Administrative Appointment

  • 1985
    • Sept 1985 to Aug 1992 - Graduate Advisor (current title, Associate Chair), Department of English, University of Texas at Arlington
  • 1975
    • Sept 1975 to Aug 1977 - Assistant Dean, Graduate School, University of Texas at Arlington

Other Administration Activities

  • 2002
    • Uncategorized
      • Oct 2002 President, Society for Utopian Studies

        2002-2006

  • 1998
    • Uncategorized
      • Jan 1998 Vice President, Society for the Study of American Indian Literatures

        1998

  • 1991
    • Uncategorized
      • Jan 1991 Director of (four) National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminars

        Seminars for high school teachers and an international scholar: Voices Reaching Back Creating Anew [American Indian litertures]: 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998. Preparation began in 1991.

  • 1985
    • Uncategorized
      • Mar 1985 Director of Southwestern American Indian Literature in Context Program

        Planning began for the program in early 1984; the program was presented from March through May 1985: five exhibitions in a museum, public schools, and at UT Arlington [objects, portraits, photography, multi-media presentations, artwork by reservation children); four in-service classes; four films; seven lectures; and readings by Roxy Gordon, Paula Gunn Allen, and Leslie Marmon Silko