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Dr. Kenton Rambsy

Name

[Rambsy, Dr. Kenton]
  • Assistant Professor

Biography

Kenton Rambsy received his PhD (May 2015) and Masters in English (May 2012) from the University of Kansas. He is a 2010 Magna Cum-Laude, Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Morehouse College. He finished Morehouse as the top ranking scholar in the English department and received the distinction of being named the 2010 William Pickens Scholar. In 2008, he received a UNCF/Mellon-Mays Fellowship, and in 2009, he received Schomburg-Mellon Humanities Fellowship. Having served as a research assistant at both Vanderbilt University's Bishop Joseph Johnson Black Cultural Center in Nashville, Tennessee and Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History in Atlanta, Georgia. From 2012- 2014, Kenton served as the Program Academic Committee chair for the Association for the Study of Life and African American History (ASALH). Kenton specializes in African American short stories, social geographies, and digital humanities) text-mining, topic modeling, and mapping softwares).

Professional Preparation

    • 2015 PhD in English (African American Literature ),  The University of Kansas
    • 2012 Master of Arts in EnglishThe University of Kansas
    • 2010 Bachelor of Arts in English (Philosophy),  Morehouse College

Appointments

    • June 2014 to June 2014 Mapping the Future by Mining the Past: UNCF Mellon Summer Teaching and Learning Institute
      Morehouse College   Andrew Mellon Foundation
    • July 2013 to July 2013 Don’t Deny My Voice: Reading and Teaching African American Poetry
      University of Kansas   National Endowment for the Humanities
    • Oct 2012 to Dec 2014 Academic Program Committee Chair
      Association for the Study of African-African American Life and History (ASALH)
    • Aug 2010 to Aug 2015 Project Coordinator
      Project on the History of Black Writing (HBW)

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Jan 2013 to Present Modern Language Association (MLA)
    • Apr 2011 to Present College Language Association
    • May 2010 to Present Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society
    • Aug 2009 to Present Golden Key Honor Society
    • Aug 2008 to Present Sigma Tau Delta

Awards and Honors

    • Jun  2016 Schomburg-Mellon Summer Humanities Research Fellowship sponsored by Andrew Mellon Foundation Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
    • Sep  2012 Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Callaboratory (HASTAC) Fellowship sponsored by Duke University
    • Jun  2008 UNCF Mellon-Mays Undergraduate Fellowship sponsored by Andrew Mellon Foundation

News Articles

Publications

      Journal Article Forthcoming
      • “Text-Mining Short Fiction by Zora Neale Hurston and Richard Wright using Voyant Tools” College Language Association. Washington, DC: Howard University 

        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2014
      • “Literary Geotagging: Mapping Edward P. Jones’s black D.C., New Yorker Short Stories.” South Carolina Review. Clemson: Clemson University, 2014. 95-102. 

        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Chapter 2012
      •  “Understanding the Young Obama.” Critical Essays on Barack Obama: Re-affirming the Hope, Re-vitalizing the Dream. Melvin Rahming, ed. UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012. 

        {Peer Reviewed} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Courses

      • ENGL 3340-002 HISTORY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE

        In “Remixing the American Dream: History of American Literature,” we will explore a range of authors and works, both canonical and less well-known, illustrating the diversity of perspectives and kinds of writing produced in what is now the United States. Students will gain experience analyzing stylistics features of literary texts and making connections between a diverse cast of American artists. We will read the works of mainstream American writers alongside those who represent more marginalized perspectives, exploring shifting ideas of cultural identity and national belonging.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3347-002 TOPICS IN MULTICULTURAL LITERATURES

        “The Life and Times of S. Carter” places Jay Z’sThe Black Album (2003) in a broad African American literary continuum of autobiographical and semi-autobiographical works. In this course, we will use text-mining software to quantify linguistic and thematic trends between Jay Z’s albums and classic literary texts by writers such as Frederick Douglass, Richard Wright, Malcolm X, and Ralph Ellison. We will compile quantitative and qualitative datasets on Jay Z in order to produce thematic data visualizations, literary timelines, and a list of key terms, pinpointing intellectual and cultural components of rap music.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • AAST 3347-002 TOPICS IN MULTICULTURAL LITERATURES

        “The Life and Times of S. Carter” places Jay Z’sThe Black Album (2003) in a broad African American literary continuum of autobiographical and semi-autobiographical works. In this course, we will use text-mining software to quantify linguistic and thematic trends between Jay Z’s albums and classic literary texts by writers such as Frederick Douglass, Richard Wright, Malcolm X, and Ralph Ellison. We will compile quantitative and qualitative datasets on Jay Z in order to produce thematic data visualizations, literary timelines, and a list of key terms, pinpointing intellectual and cultural components of rap music.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3347-002 Greatest Beefs

        This course examines the intellectual history surrounding creative conflicts in African American artistic history. We will track creative conflicts ranging fro W.E.B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington, Richard Wright and Zora Neale Hurston, Martin Luther King and Malcolm X as well as examining contemporary battles by rap figures such Lil Kim and Nicki Minaj. In this class, we will use digital tools to uncover the underlying features of signifying and public debates by analyzing linguistic features and thematic characteristics of select figures. Specifically, we will analyze speeches, essays, and short compositions using text-mining software in order to extract information and create datasets about black literary figures.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3345-001 From Slavery to Hip Hop

        From Slavery to Hip Hop focuses on African American literary compositions produced over more than 150 years.  We will cover works by a wide range of writers and cultural figure, including Frederick Douglass, Zora Neale Hurston, Malcolm X, Toni Morrison, and Jay Z. Students will gain experience analyzing stylistics features of literary texts and making connections between a diverse cast of black artists. We will compile metadata on various black writers in order to produce thematic data visualizations, literary timelines, and a list of key terms, pinpointing intellectual and cultural components of African American literary art. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3345-001 Geo-coding Black Short stories

        “Geo-coding Black Short Stories” focuses on a range of texts by Charles Chesnutt, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Toni Cade Bambara, Edward P. Jones and others to examine the racial-spatial dimensions of African American short fiction. Students will use of quantitative data and text-mining software to create datasets that illuminate the significance of ‘black’ geography and corresponding thematic trends.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3347-002 The Life and Times of S. Carter

        “The Life and Times of S. Carter” places Jay Z’s self-described “four classic albums”—Reasonable Doubt (1996), The Blueprint (2001), The Black Album (2003), and Vol. 2 (1998)— in a broad African American literary continuum of autobiographical works. In this course, we will use text-mining software to quantify linguistic and thematic trends between Jay Z’s albums and classic literary texts by writers such as Frederick Douglass, Richard Wright, Malcolm X, and Ralph Ellison. We will compile metadata on Jay Z in order to produce thematic data visualizations, literary timelines, and a list of key terms, pinpointing intellectual and cultural components of rap music.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3345-001 AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE

        From Slavery to Hip Hop focuses on African American literary compositions produced over more than 150 years.  We will cover works by a wide range of writers and cultural figure, including Frederick Douglass, Zora Neale Hurston, Malcolm X, Toni Morrison, and Jay Z. Students will gain experience analyzing stylistics features of literary texts and making connections between a diverse cast of black artists. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-008 Empire State of Mind

        “Empire State of Mind” concentrates on a range of texts—novel excerpts, short stories, poems, and rap music—that present New York City as a focal point. Students will develop a sharper awareness of the importance of New York in African American artistic history and gain experience analyzing literary texts.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours