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Kenyon Zimmer

Name

[Zimmer, Kenyon W]

Biography

Kenyon Zimmer is an Associate Professor of History, whose research and teaching focuses on immigration, work, and radicalism in the United States and in transnational perspective.

Professional Preparation

    • 2002 BA in American Studies & Creative WritingBennington College
    • 2005 M.A. in HistoryUniversity of Pittsburgh
    • 2010 Ph.D. in HistoryUniversity of Pittsburgh

Appointments

    • Aug 2016 to Present Associate Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington   Department of History
    • Aug 2010 to Aug 2016 Assistant Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington   Department of History
    • Aug 2009 to May 2010 Lillian B. Lawler Graduate Fellow
      University of Pittsburgh
    • Aug 2007 to May 2009 Teaching Fellow
      University of Pittsburgh
    • Aug 2006 to July 2007 Graduate Research Assistant, Italian Exiles Project with Professor Donna Gabaccia
      University of Pittsburgh
    • Aug 2003 to May 2006 Teaching Assistant
      University of Pittsburgh

Memberships

  • Professional
    • Aug 2014 to Present Immigration and Ethnic History Society
    • Aug 2011 to Present Organization of American Historians
    • June 2011 to Present Labor and Working-Class History Association
    • June 2009 to Present American Historical Association
  • Affiliate
    • June 2010 to Present North American Anarchist Studies Network

Awards and Honors

    • Apr  2014 Outstanding Teaching Award sponsored by UTA College of Liberal Arts
    • Aug  2009 Lillian B. Lawler Fellowship sponsored by University of Pittsburgh
    • May  2008 History Graduate Student Teaching Award sponsored by University of Pittsburgh
    • Jan  2008 Grant-in-Aid sponsored by Immigration History Research Center, University of Minnesota
    • Aug  2007 Andrew Mellon Predoctoral Fellowship sponsored by University of Pittsburgh
    • Jun  2007 C. Y. Hsu Summer Research Fellowship sponsored by University of Pittsburgh
    • Jun  2006 Steiner Summer Internship for Yiddish Studies sponsored by National Yiddish Book Center
    • Jun  2002 Barbara Wertheimer Prize sponsored by New York Labor History Association
    • Aug  2001 George Watt Award sponsored by Abraham Lincoln Brigade Archives

News Articles

Research and Expertise

  • Interests and Areas of Study

    The transnational history of migration, radical movements, labor, and race and ethnicity, with a focus on the Gilded Age and Progressive Era.

Publications

      Book Forthcoming
      • Red Exiles: America’s Political Deportees in a Revolutionary World, 1917-1939

        {Book}
      Forthcoming
      • We Are All Illegal: The Hidden History of American Immigration

        {Book}

      Anthology Work/Essay 2017
      • “A Cosmopolitan Crowd: Transnational Anarchists, the IWW, and the American Radical Press,” in Wobblies of the World: A Global History of the IWW, edited by Peter Cole, David Struthers, and Kenyon Zimmer (Pluto Press)

        {Anthology Work/Essay}
      2017
      • "Introduction," coauthored with Peter Cole and David Struthers, in Wobblies of the World A Global History of the IWW (Pluto Press)

        {Anthology Work/Essay}
      2017
      • “At War with Empire: The Anti-Colonial Roots of American Anarchist Debates Over World War I,” in Anarchism 1914-1918: Internationalism, Militarism, and War, ed. Matthew Adams and Ruth Kinna (Manchester University Press, 2017)

        {Anthology Work/Essay}
      2017
      • “Saul Yanovsky and Yiddish Anarchism in the Lower East Side,” in Radical Gotham: Anarchism in New York City from Schwabs Saloon to Occupy Wall Street, edited by Tom Goyens (University of Illinois Press)

        {Anthology Work/Essay}

      Book Review 2017
      • Review of In Defiance of Boundaries: Anarchism in Latin American History, edited by Geoffrey de Laforcade and Kirwin Shaffer, Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas 14:2

        {Book Review}

      Book 2017
      • Wobblies of the World: A Global History of the IWW, co-edited with Peter Cole and Dave Struthers (Pluto Press)

        {Book}

      Newsletter Article 2017
      Encyclopedia Entry 2016
      • “Anarchism,” in Dictionary of American History, Supplement: America in the World, 1776 to the Present (Charles Schribner’s Sons)

        {Encyclopedia Entry}

      Journal Article 2016
      • "The Other Volunteers: American Anarchists and the Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939," Journal for the Study of Radicalism 10, no. 2 (Fall 2016)

        {Journal Article}

      Book Review 2016
      • Review of Working-Class Radicals: The Socialist Party in West Virginia, 1898-1920, by Frederick A. Barkley, Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas 12, no. 2

        {Book Review}
      2016
      • Review of Anarchist Immigrants in Spain and Argentina, by James A. Baer, Pacific Historical Review 85, no. 4

        {Book Review}

      Book 2014
      • Co-editor with Patryk Babiracki, Cold War Crossings: International Travel and Exchange across the Soviet Bloc, 1940s-1960s (Texas A&M Press)

        {Book}

      Journal Article 2014
      • "Transatlantic History: Locating and Naming an Emergent Field of Study," Traversea 3 (2014)

        {Journal Article}

      Book Review 2014
      • Review of The Haymarket Conspiracy: Transatlantic Anarchist Networks, by Timothy Messer-Kruse. Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas 11:1 (Spring 2014)

        {Book Review}

      Anthology Work/Essay 2014
      • "Positively Stateless: Marcus Graham, the Ferrero-Sallitto Case, and Anarchist Challenges to Race and Deportation," in Moon-Ho Jung, ed., The Rising Tide of Color: Race, State Violence, and Radical Movements across the Pacific (University of Washington Press)

        {Anthology Work/Essay}
      2014
      • "A Golden Gate of Anarchy: Local and Transnational Dimensions of Anarchism in San Francisco, 1880s-1930s," in Constance Bantman and Bert Altena, eds., Reassassing the Transnational Turn: Scales of Analysis in Anarchist and Syndicalist Studies (Routledge; second edition, PM Press, 2017)

        {Anthology Work/Essay}

      Encyclopedia Entry 2013
      • "Syndicalism and Anarchism of Migrants." Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration, edited by Immanuel Ness, Wiley-Blackwell (2013)

        {Encyclopedia Entry}

      Book Review 2013
      • Review of Sweatshops at Sea: Merchant Seamen in the World's First Globalized Industry, from 1812 to the Present, by Leon Fink. Journal of Social History (Spring 2013)

        {Book Review}

      Book Review 2012
      • Review of Italian Immigrant Radical Culture: The Idealism of the Sovversivi in the United States, 1890-1940, by Marcella Bencivenni. Altreitalie 44
        {Book Review}

      Monograph 2012
      • Co-author with Mario Gianfrate, Michele Centrone, tra vecchio e nuovo mondo: Anarchici Pugliesi in difesa della libertá spagnola [Michele Centrone, Between the Old World and the New: Apulian Anarchists in Defense of Spanish Freedom] (SUMA Editore, 2012)

        {Monograph}

      Encyclopedia Entry 2011
      • “Merison, Jacob.” The International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest, 1500-Present, edited by Immanuel Ness, Blackwell (online edition)
        {Encyclopedia Entry}

      Book Review 2011
      • Review of Living the Revolution: Italian Women's Resistance and Radicalism in New York City, 1880-1945, by Jennifer Guglielmo. Left History 15, no 1

        {Book Review}

      Encyclopedia Entry 2010
      • "Propaganda by the Deed." The International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest, 1500-Present, edited by Immanuel Ness, Blackwell (online edition)
        {Encyclopedia Entry}

      Book Review 2009
      • Review of Union-Free America: Workers and Antiunion Culture, by Lawrence Richards.Business History Review 83, no 4
        {Book Review}

      Journal Article 2009
      • Zimmer, Kenyon. "Premature Anti-Communists? American Anarchism, the Russian Revolution, and Left-Wing Libertarian Anticommunism, 1917-1939." Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas 6, no 2 (2009): 45-71.

        {Journal Article}

Presentations

    • April  2018
      Deporting Subversion: Toward a Global History of the United States’ First Red Scare
      European Social Science History Conference
    • January  2018
      Red Exiles: America’s Political Deportees in a Revolutionary World, 1917-1939
      Dallas Area Society of Historians
    • August  2017
      Everything You Know about Immigration is Wrong
      Public talk at Tarrant County College, sponsored by the Historical Underground 
    • October  2016
      Eugene V. Debs and the Election of 1912: Making Sense of American Socialism
      Part of Humanities Texass The Election of 1912 and Its Contemporary Significance: Pivotal U.S. Elections: Then and Now
    • October  2015
      Anti-Imperialism at War: The Anticolonial Roots of American Anarchist Debates Over World War I

      European Social Science History Conference

    • July  2015
      Anarchist Alliances: Transnational and Multiethnic Radicalism in San Francisco, 1889-1940

      Labor and Working- Class History Association/Working-Class Studies Association Annual Conference

    • March  2015
      Anarchist Interventionism: American Anarchism and the Spanish Civil War

      North American Anarchist Studies Network Annual Conference

    • April  2014
      Anarchist, Informant, Fascist, or American? Self-Representation and the Many Faces of Ludovico Caminita

      European Social Science History Conference

    • February  2014
      'Their Cause is Ours': The Mexican Revolution as Transnational Anarchist Revolution

      Illustrating Anarchy and Revolution: Mexican Legacies of Global Change

    • June  2013
      Rereading American Syndicalism: The Immigrant Anarchist Press of Paterson, New Jersey, and the Unknown History of the Industrial Workers of the World

      Labor and Working-Class History Association Annual Conference

    • May  2013
      L'Era Nuova: Italian Anarchists, the IWW, and the Hidden History of the 1913 Silk Strike

      Paterson Silk Strike Centennial Conference

    • March  2013
      Southern Borderlands/Global Borderlands: Foreign Anarchists and Syndicalists and the Mexican Revolution

      Southern Labor Studies Annual Conference

    • October  2012
      The Bastards of All Nations: Anarchism, Immigration, and the American Nation

      North American Labor History Conference

    • April  2012
      Local, National, and Global Histories of Anarchism: The Case of San Francisco, 1881-1940

      European Social Science History Conference

    • January  2012
      'One Big Union' in Paterson: Italian Anarchism, the IWW, and the Silk Strike of 1913 Reexamined

      American Historical Association Annual Conference

    • May  2011
      The International Anarchist Group of San Francisco and the Ferrero-Sallitto Case, 1927-1940

      Race, Radicalism, and Repression on the Pacific Coast and Beyond conference

    • February  2011
      'Yiddish is My Homeland': A Transnational History of Jewish-American Anarchism, 1880s-1930s

      North American Anarchist Studies Network Conference

    • April  2010
      Yiddish- and Italian-Language Anarchism in America: Divergent Models of Diasporic Radicalism

      European Social Science History Conference

    • January  2010
      Alternatives to Working-Class Whiteness? Race and Cosmopolitanism in Italian-American Anarchism, 1890s-1930s

      American Historical Association Annual Conference

    • June  2009
      Anarchism and Syndicalism in the Russian Revolution: Reassessing Avrich's Work in Light of Recent Historiography

      Working Class Studies Association Annual Conference

    • June  2008
      Current Historical Research in Working-Class Migration and Radicalism

      Pacific Northwest Labour History Association and Labor and Working-Class History Association conference

    • March  2008
      Beyond the Melting Pot, the Patria, and Zion: Immigrant Anarchist Identities in the United States, 1886-1939

      Annual Meeting of the Organization of American Historians

Projects

  • 2017
    • Jan 2017 to Present Anarchist Newspapers and Periodicals, 1872-1940

      Lead researcher for an online GIS project and part of the University of Washington’s “Mapping American Social Movements Through the 20th Century” website

      Role: Principal Investigator PI: Kenyon Zimmer
  • 2015
    • Jan 2015 to Present IWW Newspapers 1906-1946

      Lead researcher for an online GIS project and part of the University of Washingtons “Mapping American Social Movements Through the 20th Century” website

      Role: Principal Investigator PI: Kenyon Zimmer

Students Supervised

  • Doctoral
    • Present
      thumbnail
      Ph.D. dissertation supervisor
    • Present

      Ph.D. dissertation adivsor

    • Present
      Ph.D. dissertation supervisor
    • Aug 2017
      Ph.D. dissertation committee member
    • July 2017
      Ph.D. dissertation advisor
    • July 2017
      Ph.D. dissertation advisor
    • Aug 2016

      Ph.D. dissertation advisor

    • May 2016

      Ph.D. dissertation advisor

  • Master's
    • Present
      thumbnail
      MA Portfolio committee member
    • May 2017
      MA Portfolio committee chair
    • Apr 2017
      thumbnail
      MA Portfolio committee member
    • Apr 2016
      MA Portfolio committee member
    • May 2014

      M.A. thesis committee member

    • May 2013

      M.A. portfolio committee member

    • Nov 2012
      MA Capstone committee member

Collaborators

    • thumbnail
      Duration : May 2013 to May 2014
      Co-editor on the anthology Cold War Crossings: International Travel and Exchange across the Soviet Bloc, 1940s-1960s
    • thumbnail
      Duration : May 2015 to Jan 2018
        Co-editor on the anthology Deportation in the Americas: Histories fo Exclusion and Resistance
    • thumbnail
      Duration : Mar 2016 to Present
      Co-editors on the volume Wobblies of the World: A Global History of the IWW
    • thumbnail
      Duration : Feb 2015 to Present
        Collaborators on the Digital Humanities project “Mapping American Social Movements Through the 20th Century," hosted by the University of Washington (http://depts.washington.edu/moves/index.shtml)

Courses

      • HIST 6302-001 Migration History

        This colloquium is an introduction to the study and historiography of migrations to (and from) the Americas, from 1800 to the present. Covering a broad span of time, regions, migrant groups, and approaches, readings will focus on influential works and innovative case studies. Students will engage with this scholarship in order to explore the various theories, models, debates, and methodologies within migration history and related fields.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5349-001 Introduction to Transatlantic History

        This course is designed to introduce students to the broad outlines of Transatlantic History, covering the period from 1492 to the present. It focuses on scholarship that examines the interconnected, transnational histories of Europe, Africa, and the Americas. Students will read and discuss seminal texts in Atlantic and Transatlantic History, as well as new research and historiographical debates.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-007 History of the United States since 1865

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States since 1865. Special attention will be given to the struggles of different groups to define what concepts like freedom, equality, and democracy meant, and who should enjoy them. This course is designed to help students understand the ways in which the past continues to influence American society, and to develop students’ ability to critically interpret the significance of historical change and conflict.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 6361-001 Transatlantic History Research Seminar: Transnational Networks

        This research seminar will focus on methodological and historiographical approaches to investigating and writing about the transnational networks through which people, ideas, and capital moved within the modern Atlantic World. Students will begin by examining the “network” as a conceptual and theoretical model, and studying several examples of historical works that trace transatlantic networks of migrants, businesses, and/or political movements. They will then formulate and undertake their own research projects informed by the ideas and methodologies of historical network analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5349-001 Introduction to Transatlantic History

        This course is designed to introduce students to the broad outlines of Transatlantic History, covering the period from 1492 to the present. It focuses on scholarship that examines the interconnected, transnational histories of Europe, Africa, and the Americas. Students will read and discuss seminal texts in Atlantic and Transatlantic History, as well as new research and historiographical debates.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3345-001 Immigration in United States History

        Immigration to the United States from the arrival of European colonists to the present. This class examines different forms of migration-- voluntary and involuntary, temporary and permanent, legal and illegal--and explores the similarities and differences between the experiences of various immigrant groups. Particular attention will be paid to the shifting definitions of race, ethnicity, and citizenship, and the impact of immigrants on society and politics in the United States.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-004 Introduction to Historical Methods

        This course introduces students to the practice and craft of writing original historical scholarship. Students will learn how to locate and interpret primary sources, how to construct an original argument based on those sources, and how to write an historical narrative and analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3373-001 U.S. Economic History, 1860-Present

        This course extends from the Civil War and the rise of manufacturing, the labor movement, and consumerism to the rise of globalization and neoliberalism. It examines the growth of corporate power, regional development, government regulation of the economy and labor, as well as the causes of, and responses to, economic inequality and crises.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-001 HIST 1312-001 History of the United States since 1865

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States since 1865. Special attention will be given to the struggles of different groups to define what concepts like “freedom,” “equality,” and “democracy” meant, and who should benefit from them. This course is designed to help students understand the ways in which the past continues to influence American society, and to develop students’ ability to critically interpret the significance of historical change and conflict.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-004 HIST 1312-004 History of the United States since 1865

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States since 1865. Special attention will be given to the struggles of different groups to define what concepts like “freedom,” “equality,” and “democracy” meant, and who should benefit from them. This course is designed to help students understand the ways in which the past continues to influence American society, and to develop students’ ability to critically interpret the significance of historical change and conflict.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5361-001 Transatlantic Labor and Working-­Class History, 1800s-­2000s

        This course will familiarize students with the last two decades of scholarship in the field of transnational labor history in a transatlantic context (broadly conceived), focusing on the period from approximately 1840 to the turn of the twenty-first century. Topics will include the cultures, social relations, institutions, and political movements of laboring people that moved across or transcended national borders. Readings will cover topics including the transition to “free labor,” class recomposition, labor migration, capital mobility, working-class consumption, and transnational labor radicalism.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3346-001 Radicalism in Modern America

        This course examines the various movements that, following the Civil War, sought to radically alter the political and economic structure of the United States. The questions we will explore include: What were the similarities and differences between radical ideologies like anarchism, syndicalism, socialism, communism, and Black Power? What did these groups want and how did they hope to achieve their goals? What circumstances gave rise to radicalism, and who was attracted to it? What impact have these movements had on American society, and how do they continue to influence it today?

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 6302-001 Colloquium on Migration and Settlement in the Americas

        This colloquium is an introduction to the study and historiography of migrations to (and from) the Americas, with a focus on transatlantic migrations. Covering a broad span of time, regions, migrant groups, and approaches, readings will focus on key works and innovative case studies. Students will engage with this scholarship in order to explore the various theories, models, debates, and methodologies within migration history and related fields.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3345-001 Immigration in United States History

        Immigration to the United States from the arrival of European colonists to the present. This class examines different forms of migration--voluntary and involuntary, temporary and permanent, legal and illegal--and explores the similarities and differences between the experiences of various immigrant groups.  Particular attention will be paid to the shifting definitions of race, ethnicity, and citizenship, and the impact of immigrants on society and politics in the United States.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5349-001 Introduction to Transatlantic History

        This course is designed to introduce students to the broad outlines of Transatlantic History, covering the period from 1492 to the present. It focuses on scholarship that examines the interconnected, transnational histories of Europe, Africa, and the Americas. Students will read and discuss seminal texts in Atlantic and Transatlantic History, as well as new research and historiographical debates.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3373-001 US Economic History, 1860-Present

        This course extends from the Civil War and the rise of manufacturing, the labor movement, and consumerism to the rise of globalization and post-industrial society. It examines the growth of corporate power, regional development, government regulation of the economy and labor, as well as the causes of, and responses to, economic inequality and crises.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 4388-003 Radicals and Revolutionaries in Modern American History

        This course examines the various movements that, following the Civil War, sought to radically alter the political and economic structure of the United States. The questions we will explore include: What were the similarities and differences between radical ideologies like anarchism, syndicalism, socialism, communism, and black power? What did these groups want and how did they hope to achieve their goals? What circumstances gave rise to radicalism, and who was attracted to it? What impact have these movements had on American society, and how do they continue to influence it today?

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours

Service to the Community

  • Volunteered
    • Mar 2013 to  Mar 2013 Presenter, Teaching American History, Project HOPE, Fort Worth Independent School District

      "The Great Depression and the Second World War"

    • June 2011 to  June 2011 Presenter, Teaching American History, Dallas Independent School District

      "The Presidency and the Politics of Immigration"

    • June 2011 to  June 2011 Workshop Co-leader, Teaching American History, Dallas Independent School District

      "Using Online Archival and Primary Documents"

    • Aug 2010 to  Aug 2010 Presenter, Teaching American History, Project HOPE, Fort Worth Independent School District

      "Immigration in Urban America"

Service to the Profession

  • Volunteered
    • June 2012 to  Present Book review co-editor

      Altreitalie: International Journal of Studies on Italian Migrations in the World

    • June 2012 to  May 2013 External book manuscript reviewer

      University of Florida Press

    • June 2011 to  Oct 2011 External book proposal reviewer

      Routledge, Critical Moments in American History series

    • June 2010 to  Sept 2010 External article reviewer

      Labor: Studies in Working-Class Studies of the Americas

    • June 2008 to  May 2009 Conference Planning Committee

      Class Matters: Working Class Studies Association Annual Conference, Pittsburgh, PA

    • Apr 2015 to  June 2015 External book proposal reviewer

      Routledge, Critical Moments in American History sieries

    • Mar 2015 to  Mar 2015 External article reviewer

      Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas

    • July 2015 to  Aug 2015 External chapter reviewer

      Essays in Anarchism and Religion

    • May 2015 to  July 2015 External article reviewer

      Italian American Review

    • Aug 2014 to  Sept 2014 External article reviewer

      Capital & Class

    • Apr 2013 to  June 2013 External book manuscript reviewer

      Westview Press

Service to the University

  • Appointed
    • Aug 2012 to  Dec 2016 Faculty Advisor

      Transatlantic History Student Organization

    • Aug 2011 to  Aug 2013 Committee Chair

      Professional Development Committee

    • Aug 2011 to  Aug 2012 Committee Member

      Scheduling Committee

    • Aug 2011 to  Aug 2012 Committee Member

      Legal History Search Committee

    • Aug 2010 to  Aug 2017 Committee Member

      Webb Lecture Committee

    • Aug 2010 to  Aug 2012 Committee Member

      Curriculum Committee

    • Aug 2010 to  Aug 2011 Committee Member

      Phi Alpha Theta Committee

    • Sept 2014 to  Aug 2016 Committee Member

      Adjunct Teaching Committee

    • Aug 2013 to  Sept 2014 Member

      Professional Development Committee

  • Elected
    • Jan 2017 to  Present Advisor

      Ph.D. Advisor for the Department of History

    • Aug 2017 to  Present Member

      Tenure and Promotion Committee

Other Service Activities

  • 2016-2017
    • Feb 2017 Organizing Committee Member

      Organizing Committee member and moderator for “Borders, Boundaries, and Barriers: Expansive Thinking and Global Solutions,” a day-long event hosted by UTA for local high school students as part of the Festival of Ideas Global Institute