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Dr. Kimberly H Breuer

Name

[Breuer, Dr. Kimberly H]
  • Assistant Professor in Practice

Professional Preparation

    • 2004 Ph.D. in HistoryVanderbilt University
    • 1993 M.A. in HistoryUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • 1985 B.S. in Aerospace EngineeringUniversity of Texas at Austin (UT)

Appointments

    • Sept 2015 to Present Assistant Professor in Practice
      Department of History   University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2013 to Present Coordinator of First Year History and Online Learning
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2005 to Present Lecturer
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2005 to Jan 2005 Adjunct Instructor
      Tarrant County College/Southeast Campus
    • Jan 2001 to Jan 2004 Adjunct Instructor/Assistant Professor
      Tennessee State University
    • Jan 1998 to Jan 2001 Adjunct Instructor
      Volunteer State Community College
    • Jan 1994 to Jan 2001 Graduate Student/ Teaching Assistant/Instructor
      Vanderbilt University
    • Jan 1985 to Jan 1993 Senior Aircraft Structures Engineer
      Vought Corporation

Research and Expertise

  • Knowledge is Power, but Attitude is Everything: Religion and Evolution from the Other Side of the Lectern.

    A collaborative project with Patricia Kramer (Department of Anthropology, University of Washington) which seeks to determine if the teaching of evolutionary theory to current college anthropology students might be enhanced by the methods historians use to teach early human history andthe social history of evolutionary theory.Initial research presented at the Teaching Evolution and Promoting Quality Science Education symposium at the American Association of Physical Anthropologists Annual Meeting (April 2008)

  • Area of Research Interests

    Indian Politics and Religion in the Conquest Era (patterns of response (especially gendered response) among Indian political and religious leadership  to the arrival of Europeans).Indian empires and confederacies in Mesoamerica, the Eastern Woodlands and the Southwest (especially the Mayas, Powhatans, Iroquois, Algonquians and Puebloans).Comparative analysis of the practices of the three main European colonizing powers - Spain, France and England - toward Indian political and religious leadership.

  • Areas of Teaching Interest/Courses Taught
    American Indian History, Colonial Latin America, History of Mexico, Women and Gender in Latin America, World History, US Surveys, Online Education
  • Comparing the Use of Weekly Journals and Discussions to Improve Critical Thinking and Writing Skills in Face to Face and Online Courses
    An investigation into the effectiveness of weekly discussions and journals in teaching critical thinking and writing skills in the freshmen level US History survey across different modes of instruction (face to face, traditional online open to the resident student body, and Academic Partnerships online) and different assessment tools (written discussions only, written journals only, or written discussions and journals).  

Publications

      Book Review 2011
      • Rev. of Gender and the Mexican Revolution: Yucatecan Women and the Realities of Patriarchy, by Stephanie J. Smith. Bulletin of Latin American Research Vol. 30, No. 4 (October, 2011)
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2001
      • Book Review, The Lost Chronicles of the Maya Kings by David Drew, for H-LatAm.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2001
      • Book Review, The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, 1848: Papers of the Sesquicentennial Symposium, 1848-1998 by the Dona Ana County Historical Society, for Southwestern Historical Quarterly 105(1): 190-191.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2000
      • Book Review, Defiant Peacemaker:  Nicholas Trist in the Mexican War by Wallace Ohrt, for Southwestern Historical Quarterly 104(3): 492-493.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 1999
      • Book Review, Texas & Northeastern Mexico, 1630-1690 by Juan Bautista Chapa, edited with an introduction by William C. Foster, for Great Plains Quarterly 19(4): 299.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 1998
      • Book Review, Postconquest Coyoacan, Nahua Spanish Relations in Central Mexico, 1519-1650 by Rebecca Horn, for H-LatAm.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 1998
      • Four entries ("Mita," "Treaty of Utrecht (1713)," "Trelawney Town Maroons," "Amerinidian Slavery [Mesoamerica]") for the Historical Encyclopedia of World Slavery, Junius P. Rodriguez, ed.; ABC-CLIO, Santa Barbara, Calif., 1998.

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

Presentations

  • Past
    •  
      “Bridging Cultural Oceans to Create a New Continental Society: Indian and Spanish Cultural Exchange in Colonial Mexico.”
      Organizer and Panel Commentator, Annual Meeting of the Conference on Latin American History. San Diego. January.

Courses

      • HIST 2301-004 History of Civilization

        A survey of significant developments prior to 1500 in world history exploring the achievements and experiences of great civilizations, major historical figures and epochs, important ideas and religions, and factors of continuity and change. Emphasis is given to the development of world religions and the cultural exchanges and encounters of the worlds peoples.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2302-002 History of Civilization since 1500

        Major trends in world civilization since 1500 such as industrialism,nationalism, imperialism, socialism, and the more complex problems and conflicts of the 20th century. Emphasis is paid to the emergence of a global civilization and interactions among the world’s peoples through mass migration, imperial expansion, trade and cultural exchange. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 4365-001 History of Spain and Portugal

        The cultural, political and economic history of the Iberian Peninsula from ancient times. The medieval epoch; the Catholic Church; the overseas empires of Spain and Portugal, and their artistic achievements. The monarchist ideal, as well as political ideologies such as liberalism, Marxism, anarchism, and fascism. In this course section, emphasis will be paid to Medieval Iberia (Muslim, Christian, and Jewish Iberia), the Age of Iberian Empires, and the Spanish Civil War.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-002 History of Civilization before 1500

        A survey of significant developments prior to 1500 in world history exploring the achievements and experiences of great civilizations, major historical figures and epochs, important ideas and religions, and factors of continuity and change. Emphasis is given to the development of world religions and the cultural exchanges and encounters of the worlds peoples. 

      • HIST 2302-001 History of Civilization

        Major trends in world civilization since 1500 such as industrialism, nationalism, imperialism, socialism, and the more complex problems and conflicts of the 20th century. Emphasis is paid to the emergence of a global civilization and interactions among the world’s peoples through mass migration, imperial expansion, trade and cultural exchange. 

      • HIST 2301-001 History of Civilization before 1500

        This course surveys significant developments prior to 1500 in world history. It explores the achievements and experiences of great civilizations, emphasizing major historical figures and epochs, important ideas and religions, and factors of continuity and change. Emphasis is given to the development of the worlds religions and the cultural exchanges and encounters of the worlds peoples. The course provides a foundation for understanding our heritage and shared values, and introduces students to the historical forces that have shaped todays world. This course is student centered, employs active learning, and provides opportunity for interaction with subject matter, the instructors, and your fellow students.

        Please note that this is an experimental course section. Dr. Breuer (History Department) and Mr. Dellinger (of the UTA LINK Lab) are researching some innovative online learning practices in this course. We will be giving you an opportunity to provide feedback to help us tweak the course as the semester progresses. You will be able to choose your own path through this course (within certain constraints) and we will provide you with instructor suggested pathways and guidance along the way. This is not a “read the book and take a high-stakes test” type of online course. We will be trying out some interesting tech (don’t worry, we will be giving you step-by-step instructions along the way in addition to one-on-one support as needed) as well.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2302-002 History of Civilization since 1500

        Major trends in world civilization since 1500 such as industrialism, nationalism, imperialism, socialism, and the more complex problems and conflicts of the 20th century. Particular emphasis is paid to the emergence of a global civilization and interactions among the world’s peoples through mass migration, imperial expansion, trade and cultural exchange.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-004 History of Civilization

        This course surveys significant developments prior to 1500 in world history. It explores the achievements and experiences of great civilizations, emphasizing major historical figures and epochs, important ideas and religions, and factors of continuity and change. Particular emphasis is given to the development of the world's religions and the cultural exchanges and encounters of the world's peoples. The course provides a foundation for understanding our heritage and shared values, and introduces students to the historical forces that have shaped today's world. This course is student centered, employs active learning, and provides opportunity for interaction with subject matter, the instructors, and your fellow students.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2302-002 History of Civilization since 1500

        Major trends in world civilization since 1500 such as industrialism, nationalism, imperialism, socialism, and the more complex problems and conflicts of the 20th century. Particular emphasis is paid to the emergence of a global civilization and interactions among the world’s peoples through mass migration, imperial expansion, trade and cultural exchange.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 4368-001 History of Mexico

        This course covers more than three millenia of Mexican history, from ancient indigenous civilizations to the present.  Particular emphasis is given to the pre-Hispanic and colonial periods and the development of Mexican society through religious and cultural exchanges.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MAS 4368-001 History of Mexico

        This course covers more than three millenia of Mexican history, from ancient indigenous civilizations to the present.  Particular emphasis is given to the pre-Hispanic and colonial periods and the development of Mexican society through religious and cultural exchanges.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-701 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, 1865 TO PRESENT

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States since 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical thinking skills.  

      • HIST 2301-002 History of Civilization before 1500

        This course surveys significant developments prior to 1500 in world history. It explores the achievements and experiences of great civilizations, emphasizing major historical figures and epochs, important ideas and religions, and factors of continuity and change. Particular emphasis is given to the development of the world's religions and the cultural exchanges and encounters of the world's peoples. The course provides a foundation for understanding our heritage and shared values, and introduces students to the historical forces that have shaped today's world. This course is student centered, employs active learning, and provides opportunity for interaction with subject matter, the instructors, and your fellow students.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • HIST 2302-003 History of Civilization Since 1500

        Major trends in world civilization since 1500 such as industrialism, nationalism, imperialism, socialism, and the more complex problems and conflicts of the 20th century. Particular emphasis is paid to the emergence of a global civilization and interactions among the world’s peoples through mass migration, imperial expansion, trade and cultural exchange.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • HIST 4366-002 LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY: ORIGINS THROUGH INDEPENDENCE

        This course will introduce you to the social, political, and economic history of Latin America focusing on the period from 1250 to 1825.  Particular attention will be paid to the creation of colonial society and culture from Indian, Iberian, and West African roots. Other topics include the great pre-Iberian indigenous empires and confederacies, the Iberian military conquest, gender relations and the creation of an honor culture, the role of church and state, mining and the development of the colonial economy, and the political reforms and crises which brought about the wars of independence. Students will also learn how to analyze primary source documents and utilize historical geography as an analytical tool, conduct and curate research utilizing digital history resources, and be introduced to the elements of good digital storytelling.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-003 The United States 1607-1865

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States to 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical thinking skills.  Some course content will be delivered through Blackboard.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-004 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL RESEARCH

        This course introduces students to the practice of history.  In this class students will learn the historical craft through a study of general historiography, methods of historical investigation, and hands-on in-class workshops dedicated to the development of the methods and skills necessary to conduct historical research.  Students will learn how to formulate a viable research question, identify relevant primary and secondary sources, evaluate evidence, craft historical arguments, and present their research in both written and oral presentations.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3367-001 American Indian History

        The history of North American (modern Canada, the United States and Mexico) Indians from pre-history to the late 20th century, with particular focus on the period of initial European contact and the colonial period.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-004 HIST 1311, The United States before 1865

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States prior to 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical thinking skills. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 4388-005 Science and Technology in World History

        This course surveys science and technology in world history from the dawn of man to the information age and explores the scientific tradition in Asia, the Near East, the Americas and Europe.  We will examine the development of scientific theory and advances in the applied sciences (engineering, medicine, and technology), as well as their relationship to the ebb and flow of civilizations, the creation of culture, and the development of world views.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-006 History of the United States to 1865

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States before 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical thinking skills. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-700 US History to 1865

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States before 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical thinking skills. 

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-700 US History since 1865

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States since 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical thinking skills. 

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2301-004 Hist 2301-004

        This course surveys significant developments prior to 1500 in world history. It explores the achievements and experiences of great civilizations, emphasizing major historical figures and epochs, important ideas and religions, and factors of continuity and change.  Particular emphasis is given to the development of the world's religions and the cultural exchanges and encounters of the world's peoples. The course provides a foundation for understanding our heritage and shared values, and introduces students to the historical forces that have shaped today's world.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 2302-003 Hist 2302-003

        Major trends in world civilization since 1500 such as industrialism, nationalism, imperialism, socialism, and the more complex problems and conflicts of the 20th century.  Particular emphasis is paid to the emergence of a global civilization and interactions among the world’s peoples through mass migration, imperial expansion, trade and cultural exchange.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-011 Hist 1311-011

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States before 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical thinking skills. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-700 Hist 1312-700

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States since 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical thinking skills. 

      • HIST 1311-700 Hist 1311-700

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States before 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical thinking skills.  

      • HIST 1311-701 History of the US

        Academic Partnerships course

      • HIST 1312-701 History of US

        Academic Partnerships course

      • HIST 3367-001 Hist 3367-001

        The history of North American (modern Canada, the United States and Mexico) Indians from pre-history to the late 20th century, with particular focus on the period of initial European contact and the colonial period.

        This is a blended course.  We will typically meet in person for 2 hours per week and you will have other course content in Blackboard.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3367-001 American Indian History
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 2301-004 History of Civilization
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 2302-003 History of Civilization Since 1500
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 3300-001 Historical Methods
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 2302-001 History of Civilization
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1312-001 HIST 1312, The United States, 1865-Present
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 4368-001 History of Mexico
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • MAS 4368-001 History of Mexico
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 2301-001 History of Civilization before 1500
        No Description Provided.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1312-001 HIST 1312, The United States, 1865-Present
        No Description Provided.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1311-001 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865
        No Description Provided.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1312-001 HIST 1312, The United States, 1865-Present
        No Description Provided.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1311-001 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865
        This syllabus is for the Academic Partnerships online program ONLY.  It is for a generic start date.  You must see the course schedule for the instructor of record and the course module for specific start date information
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1312-001 HIST 1312, The United States, 1865-Present
        This syllabus is for theAcademic Partnerships online program ONLY It is a generic syllabus.  For the specific instructor see the Course Schedule, for start date specific information see the course module
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 3367-001 American Indian History
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1312-015 US History Since 1865
        ONLINE course
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1311-003 The United States 1607-1865
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 2301-002 History of Civilization before 1500
        This course is taught as World History
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 3367-001 American Indian History
        Representative North American Indian tribes from pre-history to the contemporary period. Special emphasis on tribal cultures, the impact of European contact, and the colonial and United States Indian policies.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1311-001 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865
        This syllabus is for the Academic Partnerships online program ONLY.  It is for a generic start date.  You must see the course schedule for the instructor of record and the course module for specific start date information
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1311-001 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865
        This syllabus is for the Academic Partnerships online program ONLY.  It is for a generic start date.  You must see the course schedule for the instructor of record and the course module for specific start date information
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1312-013 US History since 1865
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1311-009 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 2302-003 History of Civilization Since 1500
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 3300-001 Historical Methods
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 2301-001 History of Civilization before 1500
        ONLINE SYLLABUS
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 2301-001 History of Civilization before 1500
        ONLINE SYLLABUS
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 2301-001 History of Civilization before 1500
        ONLINE SYLLABUS
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 2302-002 History of Civilization since 1500
        Major trends in world civilization since 1500 such as industrialism, nationalism, imperialism, socialism, and the more complex problems and conflicts of the 20th century.  Particular interest is paid to the emergence of a global civilization and interactions among the world's peoples through mass migration, imperial expansion, trade and cultural exchange.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2009
      • HIST 1311-003 The United States 1607-1865
         An introduction to the political, socio-economic, and cultural history of the United States to 1865 with special emphasis on cultural and political development in the colonial period and early republic.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2009
      • HIST 4338-001 Spain & Amer
        An in-depth look at the creation of the Spanish empire in the Americas. The first part of the course consists of a survey of Maya, Aztec, Incan and medieval Spanish civilizations prior to the 16th century. This is followed by a discussion of the myths of the Spanish conquest and a comprehensive look, through both indigenous and Spanish documents, of the factors leading to the military subjugation of the indigenous polities by the Spaniards and the creation of the new Spanish imperial order. Finally, there is an exploration of the incomplete nature of the conquest. Native society not only survived Spanish invasion and demographic decline, but actively resisted, adapted or adopted elements of Spanish religion and culture to create a new colonial society. This subject is investigated through topical discussions of such issues as the role of women and people of mixed race, native elites as cultural go-betweens, religious syncretism, resistance through ¿theater,¿ and the role of disease.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2006
      • HIST 4338-001 Spain & Amer
        An in-depth look at the creation of the Spanish empire in the Americas. The first part of the course consists of a survey of Maya, Aztec, Incan and medieval Spanish civilizations prior to the 16th century. This is followed by a discussion of the myths of the Spanish conquest and a comprehensive look, through both indigenous and Spanish documents, of the factors leading to the military subjugation of the indigenous polities by the Spaniards and the creation of the new Spanish imperial order. Finally, there is an exploration of the incomplete nature of the conquest. Native society not only survived Spanish invasion and demographic decline, but actively resisted, adapted or adopted elements of Spanish religion and culture to create a new colonial society. This subject is investigated through topical discussions of such issues as the role of women and people of mixed race, native elites as cultural go-betweens, religious syncretism, resistance through ¿theater,¿ and the role of disease.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2006
      • HIST 1311-001 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865
        This course is a survey of U.S. history beginning with the arrival of Paleo Indians and ending with the Civil War. This course covers political, economic, religious, and social changes from earliest European colonization through 1865 with special emphasis on the colonial period and the various influences (English, Spanish, French, Dutch, African and Indian) which created America.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2005
      • HIST 1311-001 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865
        This course is a survey of U.S. history beginning with the arrival of Paleo Indians and ending with the Civil War. This course covers political, economic, religious, and social changes from earliest European colonization through 1865 with special emphasis on the colonial period and the various influences (English, Spanish, French, Dutch, African and Indian) which created America.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2005

Other Service Activities

  • Uncategorized
    • Dec  Director of History Distance Education
    • Dec  Course Designer for Online HIST 1312
      Online Course Designer
    • Dec  Participant - College and Career Readiness Initiative
    • Dec  Participant - UTA Teaching Circles

      Fall 2011        Teaching Large Classes

      2010-2011      Critical Thinking

      2008-2009Classroom Assessment Techniques

      2007-2008Assessing and Grading Student Learning