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Dr. Lonny R. Harrison

Name

[Harrison, Dr. Lonny R.]
  • Associate Professor of Russian, Modern Languages

Biography

Dr. Harrison is Associate Professor of Russian and Section Head of Critical Languages and International Studies (CLIS) in the Department of Modern Languages. He specializes in 19th-century Russian literature and culture with wider interests in 20th-century Russian literature, media, mass culture, and philosophy. His research takes an interdisciplinary approach to the works of Fyodor Dostoevsky, incorporating Russian and European trends in literature, psychology, and the history of ideas. Dr. Harrison's book Archetypes from Underground: Notes on the Dostoevskian Self was published in May 2016 by the Wilfrid Laurier University Press. Other teaching and research interests include Russian cinema, translation studies, and digital pedagogies.

Author interview on the College of Liberal Arts newsroom blog: https://utalibartsnews.wordpress.com/2016/07/11/a-chat-with-lonny-harrison-on-his-new-book-about-the-dostoevskian-psyche/

Professional Preparation

    • 2008 Ph.D. in Russian LiteratureThe University of Toronto
    • 1999 M.A. in Slavic Languages and LiteraturesThe University of Toronto
    • 1995 Bachelor of Arts in English (History),  Simon Fraser University

Appointments

    • Sept 2010 to Present Assistant Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Sept 2007 to Aug 2010 Visiting Assitant Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2006 to June 2007 Lecturer in Russian
      DePauw University

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Sept 2016 to Present Modern Languages Association (MLA)
    • Nov 2007 to Present South Central Modern Languages Association (SCMLA)
    • Apr 2005 to Present American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages (AATSEEL)
    • May 2004 to Present Canadian Association of Slavists (CAS)

Awards and Honors

    • Sep  2015 College Of Liberal Arts Outstanding Teaching Award sponsored by College of Liberal ArtsUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan  2012 Supplementary Faculty Research Grant sponsored by Charles T. McDowell Center for Critical Languages And Area Studies
    • Jan  2008 The University of Texas Professional Development Summer Mini-Grant sponsored by The University of Texas

Research and Expertise

  • Primary Fields

    Life and Works of Fyodor Dostoevsky

    19th and 20th-Century Russian Literature

    19th-Century Philosophy and History of Ideas

    Russian and Soviet Cinema and Mass Culture

  • Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL)

    Intercultural communication and collaboration for use in distance learning and other technology-enhanced language learning.

Publications

      Journal Article 2017
      • "The Suffering Games: De Quincean Prodigality and Self-Production in Fyodor Dostoevsky's Igrok (The Gambler)." Dostoevsky Journal 18 (2017): 1-25.

        {Peer Reviewed }
      2017
      • "Apostate of the Natural School: Dostoevskys Narrative of Cognitive Truth in The Double." South Central Review 34.1 (Spring 2017): 1-31.

        {Peer Reviewed }

      Journal Article 2013
      • "The Numinous Experience of Ego Transcendence in Dostoevsky." Slavic and East European Journal 57.3 (Fall 2013): 388-402.

        {Journal Article }
      2013
      • "Reasonable to Ridiculous: The Inward Gaze of the Modern Self in Dostoevskii and Vladimir Odoevskii." Canadian Slavonic Papers 55.3-4 (September-December 2013): 343-363.

        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 2011
      • Review of Russian Orientalism: Asia in the Russian Mind from Peter the Great to the Emigration, by David Schimmelpenninck van der Oye. Slavic and East European Journal 55.3 (Fall 2011): 494-96.
        {Book Review }

      Book Review 2010
      • Review of The Odd Man Karakozov: Imperial Russia, Modernity, and the Birth of Terrorism, by Claudia Verhoeven. Slavic and East European Journal 54.1 (Spring 2010): 184-86.
        {Book Review }
      2010
      • Review of Febris Erotica: Lovesickness in the Russian Literary Imagination, by Valeria Sobol. Canadian Slavonic Papers 52, Nos. 3-4 (September-December 2010): 477-78.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 2004
      • Translation of "Saints' Lives in the Publications of Tolstoy: The Logic Behind His Choice of Subjects," by Anna Grodetskaia. Tolstoy Studies Journal XVI (2004): 1-17.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 2002
      • Translation of "Russian Thinkers on Lev Tolstoy," review by L. D. Gromova-Opul'skaia. Tolstoy Studies Journal XV (2002): 117-121.
        {Book Review }

Presentations

    • October  2014
      "The Suffering Games: Self-Production and Prodigality in De Quincey and Dostoevsky"

      South Central Modern Languages Association

    • October  2013
      "Dostoevsky's Types and Archetypes"

      South Central Modern Languages Association

    • July  2013
      "Intercontinental Russian-English Workshop"

      Co-authored with Konstantin Shestakov, Omsk Law Academy

    • November  2012
      "'The Pernicious Effects of an Unbridled Imagination': The Heart and Mind Debate in Early Russian Realism"
    • October  2012
      "When Books Go Underground: Censorship and Media Control in Russia and the Soviet Union" October 2012.
    • March  2012
      "The Wisdom of Change: Themes of Self-Transformation in Dostoevsky and V.F. Odoevsky," March 2012.
    • April  2011
      "Dostoevsky's Gamble: Faith, Freedom, Madness, and Other Dangerous Games"
    • October  2010
      "Russian Sinology in the Nineteenth Century"
    • July  2010
      Guest Speaker: "Baritones & Beachballs"

      Video: http://blog.dallasopera.org/2010/08/

    • April  2009
      "Romantic Poetics, the Gothic, and the Doppelgänger Motif in Dostoevsky's Early Experiments in Form"
    • December  2008
      "Reasonable to Ridiculous: Ecstatic Vision and Inarticulacy in Vladimir Odoevsky and Fyodor Dostoevsky,"
    • November  2007
      "Latent Spiritual Dimensions of Dostoevsky's Underground Type,"
    • May  2006
      "Social and Moral Strivings of Dostoevsky's chinovnik Protagonist in Dvoinik (The Double)"
    • December  2005
      "The Moral Idea in Dostoevsky's The Double"
    • September  2004
      "V. N. Maikov and Dostoevsky: Maikov's Critical Analysis of The Double in Context"
    • June  2004
      "Some Philosophical Underpinnings of Dostoevsky's The Double"
    • September  1999
      "Language Issues in Multicultural Canada,"
  • Past
    •  
      "Dostoevsky's Types and Archetypes"

      South Central Modern Languages Association

  • Past
    •  
      "Dostoevsky's Types and Archetypes"

      Presentation of key concepts from my forthcoming book, Archetypes from Underground: Notes on the Dostoevskian Self, by Wilfrid Laurier Press in 2016.

  • Past
    •  
      "Going Global: Building International Networks for Critical Languages Programs"
      Globally Speaking: Preparing Students for Using Languages in the Global Workplace. Texas Language Center. UT Austin. April 22, 2017. Invited lecture.
  • Past
    •  
      "Making Critical Things Happen: Recruitment, Retention, and Curriculum Choices for Critical Languages at UTA.”
      South Central Modern Languages Association (SCMLA). Dallas, TX. November 3-5, 2016. 
  • Past
    •  
      "The 21st Century Zhivago: Reading Pasternak in the Metamodern Age"
      South Central Modern Languages Association (SCMLA). October 5-7, 2017, Tulsa OK.

Students Supervised

  • Undergraduate
    • Aug 2010
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      McNair Scholar Thesis: “Characteristrics of Lara as a Human Representation of an Axis Mundi: An Examination of the Symbolism and Mysticism in Boris Pasternak's Doctor Zhivago.” 

  • Undergraduate Honor's Thesis
    • Dec 2011
      thumbnail

      "One Day in the Life of Zachary Cureton: Study Abroad Experiences Compared to Alexander Solzhenitsyn's One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich"  

    • May 2009
      thumbnail

      “The Role of the Orthodox Church in Implementing Russian Foreign Policy Towards Ukraine.”

    • May 2008
      thumbnail

      “Nationalistic Tendencies in Modern Day Russia: Impact of Subculture on Contemporary Russian Society.”

Courses

      • RUSS 4304-1 Banned and Censored Works of Russian Literature

        Except for infrequent intervals of short-lived reforms, censorship was a consistent, if not always effective mechanism of state control over the arts and culture of Russia and the Soviet Union. This course examines selected works of Russian literature and media that were banned, censored or otherwise prohibited, from the Imperial through the Soviet periods. We will discuss the role of censorship in Russian cultural life in conjunction with a detailed analysis of some of the great works of political and cultural expression that flourished in spite of it.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4337-1 Banned and Censored Works of Russian Literature

        Except for infrequent intervals of short-lived reforms, censorship was a consistent, if not always effective mechanism of state control over the arts and culture of Russia and the Soviet Union. This course examines selected works of Russian literature and media that were banned, censored or otherwise prohibited, from the Imperial through the Soviet periods. We will discuss the role of censorship in Russian cultural life in conjunction with a detailed analysis of some of the great works of political and cultural expression that flourished in spite of it.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • GLOBAL 2301-001 Introduction to Global Issues

        In this course students engage with essential topics on global civilization and culture grouped around the categories of Equity, Peace, and Sustainability. Focus is on Human Rights and the multifaceted connections among nation states, non-governmental organizations, diverse ethnic, cultural and religious groups, and populations around the world. Through close study and analysis of geography, history, culture, religion, politics and government, and world economy, a major aim of the course is to understand the global world, along with its itinerant problems and potential solutions.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4362-1 RUSSIA AND THE SUCCESSOR STATES TODAY

        Russia Today” has a history at UTA: it is a course that has existed for over forty years and continues because students find that whatever their main areas of interest, Russia and Eurasia fascinate any who come into contact with it. That will become especially clear with our numerous speakers, all of whom are renowned specialists in their field, and the materials that both they and your instructors bring to the course. You have here the opportunity to become part of a decades-long academic family of alums who always have something in common. Russia is much more than just a singular country, language, or culture. Here we see it as a learning objective for critical analysis and intellectual discussion. You can and will learn here of science discoveries, economics, facts, and folk tales. What you will get out of it will be current research on many things “Russian,” and a sense of where the field is headed today, and how it interacts with other fields of inquiry. It is a course that will put you on a par with what students around the world learn about Russia and thus prepare you for a globalized curriculum and life-long learning experience. That, at least is what we seek. What you get out of it depends on what you will put into it!

        In the period from the Russian Revolution of 1917 to the death of Joseph Stalin in 1953, the purpose, value, and influence of the arts underwent a major reevaluation in the U.S.S.R. The object of this course is to examine the ways in which Russian artistic expression responded (and contributed) to the abrupt change of political context brought about by the Russian Revolution. A major focus will be the symbols, stories, rituals and ideologies that defined the experience of ‘building socialism’ in the early decades of the Soviet Union. Seminar and readings will be conducted in English. Russian majors and minors will do some course readings and assignments in Russian. 

        This course is cross-listed with HIST 4362-001 and POLS 4362-001.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4303-1 Propaganda and Ideology in Soviet Art and Literature

        In the period from the Russian Revolution of 1917 to the death of Joseph Stalin in 1953, the purpose, value, and influence of the arts underwent a major reevaluation in the U.S.S.R. The object of this course is to examine the ways in which Russian artistic expression responded (and contributed) to the abrupt change of political context brought about by the Russian Revolution. A major focus will be the symbols, stories, rituals and ideologies that defined the experience of ‘building socialism’ in the early decades of the Soviet Union. Seminar and readings will be conducted in English. Russian majors and minors will do some course readings and assignments in Russian. 

        This course is cross-listed with ENGL 3306-001 and HONR-LA 4303-004

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3306-1 SOVIET AND POST-SOVIET LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION

        In the period from the Russian Revolution of 1917 to the death of Joseph Stalin in 1953, the purpose, value, and influence of the arts underwent a major reevaluation in the U.S.S.R. The object of this course is to examine the ways in which Russian artistic expression responded (and contributed) to the abrupt change of political context brought about by the Russian Revolution. A major focus will be the symbols, stories, rituals and ideologies that defined the experience of ‘building socialism’ in the early decades of the Soviet Union. Seminar and readings will be conducted in English. Russian majors and minors will do some course readings and assignments in Russian. 

        This course is cross-listed with RUSS 4303-001 and HONR-LA 4303-004

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • LA 4303-4 Propaganda and Ideology in Soviet Art and Literature

        In the period from the Russian Revolution of 1917 to the death of Joseph Stalin in 1953, the purpose, value, and influence of the arts underwent a major reevaluation in the U.S.S.R. The object of this course is to examine the ways in which Russian artistic expression responded (and contributed) to the abrupt change of political context brought about by the Russian Revolution. A major focus will be the symbols, stories, rituals and ideologies that defined the experience of ‘building socialism’ in the early decades of the Soviet Union. Seminar and readings will be conducted in English. Russian majors and minors will do some course readings and assignments in Russian. 

        This course is cross-listed with RUSS 4303-001 and ENGL 3306-001.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4301-1 Selected Russian Authors

        Detailed reading and analysis of selected Russian writers such as Alexander Pushkin, Nikolai Gogol, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Leo Tolstoy, Ivan Turgenev and Anton Chekhov. Their works are compared in the light of urgent social, political, literary and philosophical questions of their day. May be repeated as topic varies. No prerequisites. Students majoring in Russian read some texts in the original. Taught in English. Satisfies the core curriculum requirement for literature. Cross-listed with ENGL 3301-001.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3301-1 SELECTED RUSSIAN AUTHORS

        Detailed reading and analysis of selected Russian writers such as Alexander Pushkin, Nikolai Gogol, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Leo Tolstoy, Ivan Turgenev and Anton Chekhov. Their works are compared in the light of urgent social, political, literary and philosophical questions of their day. May be repeated as topic varies. No prerequisites. Students majoring in Russian read some texts in the original. Taught in English. Satisfies the core curriculum requirement for literature. Cross-listed with RUSS 4301-001.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4302-1 Russian and Soviet Cinema

        This course surveys the Russian cinematic tradition from its origins through the first decades following the disintegration of the USSR. Special attention is paid to avant-garde film and theory of the 1920s; the totalitarian aesthetics of the 1930s-40s and the ideological uses of film art; the “New Wave” of the 1950s-60s; contemporary cinema in post-Soviet Russia, and cinema as a medium of cultural dissent and witness to social change. No prior knowledge of Russian language or culture is required for Interdisciplinary students. Russian majors and minors complete coursework in Russian. Films are in Russian with English subtitles. The course is taught in English, with additional instruction in Russian for students of the language. Cross-listed with ENGL 3306-001.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3306-1 Russian and Soviet Cinema

        This course surveys the Russian cinematic tradition from its origins through the first decades following the disintegration of the USSR. Special attention is paid to avant-garde film and theory of the 1920s; the totalitarian aesthetics of the 1930s-40s and the ideological uses of film art; the “New Wave” of the 1950s-60s; contemporary cinema in post-Soviet Russia, and cinema as a medium of cultural dissent and witness to social change. No prior knowledge of Russian language or culture is required for Interdisciplinary students. Russian majors and minors complete coursework in Russian. Films are in Russian with English subtitles. The course is taught in English, with additional instruction in Russian for students of the language. Cross-listed with RUSS 4302-001.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4362-1 Russia and the Successor States Today

        “Russia Today” is an inter-disciplinary class—drawing primary instructors from the Departments of Political Science, History, and Modern Languages—which prepares students to analyze the monumental changes that have and are taking place in the geopolitical space of the former Soviet Union (U.S.S.R.). This course includes an overview of the region’s geography, history, political development, Russian language and literature, and various facets of life in Russia and the former Soviet space including societal institutions and changes, economic forces, and political futures for this strategically important area. The course will be taught in English, but for Russian language credit, research will be done in the Russian language. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Offered as RUSS 4362, POLS 4362, & HIST 4362. Credit will be granted in only one department.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4304-1 Banned and Censored Works of Russian Literature

        An examination of selected works of Russian literature that were censored, banned or otherwise prohibited, from tsarist Russia through the Soviet period. The role of censorship in Russian cultural life, and the great works of literature that flourished in spite of it. No prerequisites. Students majoring in Russian read some texts in the original. Taught in English. Satisfies the core curriculum requirement for literature. Cross-listed with ENGL 4337.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4337-1 Banned and Censored Works of Russian Literature

        An examination of selected works of Russian literature that were censored, banned or otherwise prohibited, from tsarist Russia through the Soviet period. The role of censorship in Russian cultural life, and the great works of literature that flourished in spite of it. No prerequisites. Cross-listed with RUSS 4304

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 3304-1 Topics in Russian Language Study

        Topics in Russian Language Study provides an opportunity to practice speaking, listening, and written communication in Russian at an intermediate level, while building vocabulary and language structures. Multimedia and web conferencing make up a vital component of the course. One of the three class sessions per week is reserved for a virtual meeting with students and instructors at Omsk State University in Omsk, Russia, for active practice. The other two classes per week are spent preparing for the virtual meeting using the textbook В пути and other materials.    

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • GLOBAL 2301-1 INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL ISSUES

        In this course students will engage with essential topics on global civilization and culture grouped around the categories of Equity, Peace, and Sustainability. Focus is on the multifaceted connections among nation states, non-governmental organizations, diverse ethnic, cultural and religious groups, and populations around the world. Through close study and analysis of geography, history, culture, religion, politics and government, and world economy, a major aim of the course is to understand the global world, along with its itinerant problems and potential solutions.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4301-1 Selected Authors and Topics: Russian Short Stories

        This course is comprised of detailed reading and analysis of selected works by Alexander Pushkin, Nikolai Gogol, Mikhail Lermontov, Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Anton Chekhov and others. Their works are compared in the light of urgent social, political, literary and philosophical questions of their day. Readings are in Russian for CLIS Russian majors and Russian minors, and English for interdisciplinary students. Reading assignments should be completed prior to the class for which they are assigned. Students should be prepared to discuss them in connection with specific topics assigned by the instructor.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3300-1 Topics in Literature: Russian Short Stories

        This course is comprised of detailed reading and analysis of selected works by Alexander Pushkin, Nikolai Gogol, Mikhail Lermontov, Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Anton Chekhov and others. Their works are compared in the light of urgent social, political, literary and philosophical questions of their day. Readings are in Russian for CLIS Russian majors and Russian minors, and English for interdisciplinary students. Reading assignments should be completed prior to the class for which they are assigned. Students should be prepared to discuss them in connection with specific topics assigned by the instructor.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4362-1 Russia and the Successor States Today

        “Russia Today” is an inter-disciplinary class—drawing primary instructors from the Departments of Political Science and Modern Languages—which prepares students to analyze the monumental changes that have and are taking place in the geopolitical space of the former Soviet Union (U.S.S.R.). This course includes an overview of the region’s geography, history, political development, Russian language and literature, and various facets of life in Russia and the former Soviet space including societal institutions and changes, economic forces, and political futures for this strategically important area.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 3333-1 CONVERSATION AND TOPICS IN RUSSIAN CULTURE

        This course gives the opportunity to practice spoken and written Russian with the aid of multimedia while continuing to master core grammar and syntactical structures. Students use print, visual and audio materials to build vocabulary, especially those cultural references that make up much of colloquial speech in Russian. A major foucs of this special topics seminar is the use of technology and media tools for practicing and mastering Russian language skills and cultural knowledge. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4302-1 Russian and Soviet Cinema

        This course surveys the Russian cinematic tradition from its origins through the first decades following the disintegration of the USSR. Special attention is paid to avant-garde film and theory of the 1920s; the totalitarian aesthetics of the 1930s-40s and the ideological uses of film art; the “New Wave” of the 1950s-60s; contemporary cinema in post-Soviet Russia, and cinema as a medium of cultural dissent and witness to social change. No prior knowledge of Russian language or culture is required for Interdisciplinary students. Russian majors and minors complete coursework in Russian. Films are in Russian with English subtitles. The course is taught in English, with additional instruction in Russian for students of the language. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4337-1 Russian and Soviet Cinema

        This course surveys the Russian cinematic tradition from its origins through the first decades following the disintegration of the USSR. Special attention is paid to avant-garde film and theory of the 1920s; the totalitarian aesthetics of the 1930s-40s and the ideological uses of film art; the “New Wave” of the 1950s-60s; contemporary cinema in post-Soviet Russia, and cinema as a medium of cultural dissent and witness to social change. No prior knowledge of Russian language or culture is required for Interdisciplinary students. Russian majors and minors complete coursework in Russian. Films are in Russian with English subtitles. The course is taught in English, with additional instruction in Russian for students of the language. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • GLOBAL 2301-1 INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STUDIES

        In this course students engage with essential topics on global civilization and culture grouped around the categories of Equity, Peace, and Sustainability. Focus is on the multifaceted connections among nation states, non-governmental organizations, diverse ethnic, cultural and religious groups, and populations around the world. Through close study and analysis of geography, history, culture, religion, politics and government, and world economy, a major aim of the course is to understand the global world, along with its itinerant problems and potential solutions.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 2313-22 Accelerated Russian III

        This course is intended as a second semester of introduction to the Russian language and culture. The course is designed to enable students to understand and communicate effectively in Russian at a novice level, and to master core grammatical and syntactical structures. The course will consist of classroom activites, readings, multmedia, quizzes, discussions, roleplay, and other active learning tasks.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 2314-22 Accelerated Russian IV

        See RUSS 2313, Accelerated Russian III

        RUSS 2313 and 2314 are a combined course of Accelerated Russian III & IV.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4393-1 Arlington Public Library Internship - Russian Collection

        Interns selected for this position will be assigned the following duties:

        Provide analysis of and reports about the existing library collection in Russian and East European languages and culture;

        Assist library staff with community outreach and help to research community needs in Russian;

        Provide relevant insights, data and documented research about what materials should be prioritized for acquisition.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4362-1 RUSSIA AND THE SUCCESSOR STATES TODAY

        “Russia Today” is an inter-disciplinary class—drawing primary instructors from the Departments of Political Science and Modern Languages—which prepares students to analyze the monumental changes that have and are taking place in the geopolitical space of the former Soviet Union (U.S.S.R.). This course includes an overview of the region’s geography, history, political development, Russian language and literature, and various facets of life in Russia and the former Soviet space including societal institutions and changes, economic forces, and political futures for this strategically important area.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 3391-1 CONFERENCE COURSE - Independent Study

        Continued study of cultural and linguistic issues in the translation of Russian and English language texts. Systematic development of advanced skills in localization and computer-aided translation and in using TMX/TBX (international standards for translation memory and terminology exchange) tools. Translation practice, individually and in translation teams, with increasingly longer and more specialized texts. Prepares localization and translation specialists for real-world careers in the language-services industry. May be repeated once. Prerequisite: RUSS 3310 with a grade of B or better.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 1442-22 Beginning Russian II

        See RUSS 1441, Beginning Russian I

        RUSS 1441 and 1442, Beginning Russian I&II are a combined course of intensive Russian.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4391-1 Intercultural Communication and Collaboration

        An introduction to Russian culture with a focus on intercultural communication and collaboration. The course will consist of online tutorials, readings, quizzes, discussions, and active learning tasks such as creating wikis and slideshow presentations. A major component will involve telecollaboration with native speakers of Russian at universities in Omsk, Russia.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 1441-2 Beginning Russian I & II

        An introduction to the Russian language and culture, intended for students with no previous knowledge of Russian. Using multimedia immersion in the culture and language of Russia and other Russian-speaking regions, the course is designed to enable students to understand and communicate effectively in Russian at a novice level. The course will consist of classroom activites, readings, quizzes, discussions, roleplay, and other active learning tasks. There are no prerequisites.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 3391-1 Intercultural Communication and Collaboration

        Co-enrolled by students at UTA and UTSA, this course focuses on intercultural communication and collaboration through speaking practice and active learning tasks. A major component of the course will involve telecollaboration with native speakers of Russian at universities in Omsk, Russia.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4301-1 Selected Russian Authors and Topics

        This course is comprised of detailed reading and analysis of selected works by Alexander Pushkin, Nikolai Gogol, Mikhail Lermontov, Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Anton Chekhov and others. Their works are compared in the light of urgent social, political, literary and philosophical questions of their day. Readings are in Russian for CLIS Russian majors and Russian minors, and English for interdisciplinary students. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4362-1 Russia and the Successor States Today

        This course is the core element of UTA's Russian/Eurasian studies program. It touches upon Russian life, politics, culture, history, and other key features as well as introduces you to the regions that surround Russia. Not only is the study of all things Russian exciting, it is considered "critical" in terms of modern-day policy; therefore, we expect to help you develop a high level of understanding and discourse beyond what might otherwise be considered introductory. We do this with a core group of three regular instructors, as well as numerous guest lecturers especially toward the end of the semester. 

        This course will assist you in determining basic cause and effect in terms of social, economic, and political issues relating to a major element of global civilization.  Moreover, it will expose you to contradictions, predispositions, and conflict which are essential to the shaping of national and regional identities.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • GLOBAL 2301-1 INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STUDIES

        In this course students will acquire essential knowledge on global civilization and culture grouped around the following three topic categories: Equity, Peace, and Sustainability. Focus is on the multifaceted connections among nation states, non-governmental organizations, diverse ethnic, cultural and religious groups, and populations around the world. Through close study and analysis of geography, history, culture, religion, politics and government, and world economy, a major aim of the course is to understand the global world, along with its itinerant problems and potential solutions.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 3333-1 CONVERSATION AND TOPICS IN RUSSIAN CULTURE

        This course gives the opportunity to practice spoken and written Russian with the aid of cultural media while continuing to master core grammar and syntactical structures. Students use print, visual and audio materials to build vocabulary, especially those cultural references that make up much of colloquial speech in Russian. A major aim of the course is to develop oral proficiency and gain a strong foundation of Russian grammar and active vocabulary for use in everyday situations and interactions.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • MODL 5304-1 CURRENTS IN EUROPEAN AND LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURES AND THOUGHT

        This course is an examination of the mainstream genres and movements in European and Latin American literatures from the Medieval era to the present. The course features presentations by guest lecturers from the faculty in the Department of Modern Languages. We will examine particular literary movements from Humanism and Classicism to Romanticism, Realism, and Symbolism, and a few of the 20th century "isms," such as modernism, postcolonialism, and postmodernism. All lectures, readings, and assignments are in English; exceptions must be approved by the course coordinator.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4362-1 RUSSIA AND THE SUCCESSOR STATES TODAY

        Co-taught with Dr. Pete Smith (Distance Education) and Dr. Mark Cichock (Political Science)
        "Russia Today" is an interdisciplinary class which depicts and prepares students to analyze the monumental changes that have and are taking place in the geopolitical space of the former Soviet Union (U.S.S.R.). This course includes an overview of the region's geography, history, political development, Russian language and literature, and various facets of life and culture in Russia and the former Soviet space. Emphasis is placed on societal institutions and changes, economic and political forces for this strategically important area in global markets and geopolitical arenas.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4302-1 Russian and Soviet Cinema

        This course surveys the Russian cinematic tradition from its origins through the first decade following the disintegration of the USSR. Special attention is paid to avant-garde film and theory of the 1920s; the totalitarian aesthetics of the 1930s-40s and the ideological uses of film art; the â€"New Wave†of the 1950s-60s; contemporary cinema in post-Soviet Russia, and cinema as a medium of cultural dissent and witness to social change. No prior knowledge of Russian language or culture is required for Interdisciplinary students. Films are in Russian with English subtitles. The course is taught in English, with additional instruction in Russian for students of the language. Russian majors and minors complete their coursework in Russian.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 3304-1 Topics in Russian Language Study

        Topics in Russian Language Study provides an opportunity to practice oral speech, translation, and written communication in Russian, while building vocabulary and language structures. The use of multimedia technology for active language learning makes up a vital component of the course. One of the three classes per week is reserved for a virtual meeting via videoconference with students at Omsk Law Academy in Omsk, Russia, to practice spoken Russian, as well as translation and interpreting from Russian to English and English to Russian. The other two classes per week are spent preparing for the virtual meeting by studying cultural topics and vocabulary, practicing conversation in Russian, and preparing presentations.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 3333-1 CONVERSATION AND TOPICS IN RUSSIAN CULTURE

        This course gives the opportunity to practice spoken and written Russian with the aid of cultural media while continuing to master core grammar and syntactical structures. Students use print, visual and audio materials to build vocabulary, especially those cultural references that make up much of colloquial speech in Russian. A major aim of the course is to develop oral proficiency and gain a strong foundation of Russian grammar and active vocabulary for use in everyday situations and interactions.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4301-1 Selected Russian Authors

        Detailed reading and analysis of selected works by Alexander Pushkin, Nikolai Gogol, Ivan Turgenev, Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Anton Chekhov and others. Their works are compared in the light of urgent social, political, literary and philosophical questions of their day. Readings are in Russian for Russian majors (prerequisite: RUSS 2313/14), and English for interdisciplinary students (no prerequisites).

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4362-1 RUSSIA AND THE SUCCESSOR STATES TODAY

        Russia Today is a survey class that is designed to excite your imagination through lectures, research, films, web resources, and interactions with policy-makers and observers of Russia and Eurasia. This courseis the core element of UTA's Russian/Eurasian studies program. It touches upon Russian life, politics, culture, history, and other key features as well as introduces the regions that surround Russia. Learning objectives include a broad understanding of the primary means to analyze a part of the world whose significance extends from world politics and trade, to literature, philosophy and science, and to understand and address cause and effect in terms of social, economic, and political issues relating to a major element of global civilization.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4304-1 Banned and Censored Works of Russian Literature

        Except for infrequent intervals of short-lived reforms, censorship was a consistent, if not always effective mechanism of state control over the arts and culture of Russia and the Soviet Union. This course examines selected works of Russian literature and media that were banned, censored or otherwise prohibited, from the Imperial through the Soviet periods. We discuss the role of censorship in Russian cultural life in conjunction with a detailed analysis of some of the great works of political and cultural expression that flourished in spite of it.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
      • RUSS 4302-1 Russian and Soviet Cinema

        This course surveys the Russian cinematic tradition from its origins through the first decade following the disintegration of the USSR. Special attention is paid to avant-garde film and theory of the 1920s; the totalitarian aesthetics of the 1930s-40s and the ideological uses of film art; the "New Wave" of the 1950s-60s; and cinema as a medium of cultural dissent and witness to social change. Russian majors and minors complete coursework in Russian. However, the course is taught in English, all films have English subtitles, and no prior knowledge of Russian language or culture is required.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
      • RUSS 3333-1 CONVERSATION AND TOPICS IN RUSSIAN CULTURE

        This course gives the opportunity to practice spoken and written Russian with the aid of cultural media while continuing to master core grammar and syntactical structures. Students use print, visual and audio materials to build vocabulary, especially those cultural references that make up much of colloquial speech in Russian. A major aim of the course is to develop oral proficiency and gain a strong foundation of Russian grammar and active vocabulary for use in everyday situations and interactions.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
      • RUSS 4301-1 Selected Russian Authors

        This course comprises detailed reading and analysis of selected works by Alexander Pushkin, Nikolai Gogol, Ivan Turgenev, Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Anton Chekhov and others. Their works are compared in the light of urgent social, political, literary and philosophical questions of their day. Readings are in Russian for Russian majors and minors (prerequisite: RUSS 2313/14), and English for interdisciplinary students (no prerequisites).

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
      • RUSS 4362-1 RUSSIA AND THE SUCCESSOR STATES TODAY

        Co-taught with Dr. Pete Smith (Distance Education) and Dr. Mark Cichock (Political Science)
        "Russia Today" is an interdisciplinary class drawing instructors from the Departments of Political Science, History, and Modern Languages, which depicts and prepares students to analyze the monumental changes that have and are taking place in the geopolitical space of the former Soviet Union (U.S.S.R.). This course includes an overview of the region's geography, history, political development, Russian language and literature, and various facets of life in Russia and the former U.S.S.R. including societal institutions and changes, economic forces, and political futures for this strategically important area.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • RUSS 4303-1 Propaganda and Ideology in Soviet Art and Literature

        In the period from the Russian Revolution of 1917 to the death of Joseph Stalin in 1953, the purpose, value, and influence of the arts underwent a major reevaluation in the Soviet Union. The object of this course is to examine the ways in which Russian artistic expression responded (and contributed) to the abrupt change of political context brought about by the Russian Revolution. A major focus will be the symbols, stories, rituals and ideologies that defined the experience of 'building socialism' in the early decades of the U.S.S.R.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
      • RUSS 3310-1 LOCALIZATION AND TRANSLATION I
        Co-taught with Dr. Pete Smith (Distance Education), Dr. Lana Rings (Modern Languages) and Dr. Aimee Israel-Pelletier (Modern Languages)
        In this course, you will systematically explore the GILT (Globalization, Internationalization, Localization, and Translation) field, such topics as: multilingual computing, localization and globalization of software and ecommerce, machine-aided translation, machine translation, international integration of content, global workforce management, Unicode, multilingual quality management, TMX/TBX (international standards for translation memory and exchange), multilingual mobile devices, and international multicultural media. Prerequisites: Successful completion of FREN 2314, GERM 2314, RUSS 2314 or equivalent.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • PHIL 4391-1 UNDERGRADUATE CONFERENCE COURSE

        Co-taught with Dr. Ken Williford, Associate Professor and Chairman, Department of Philosophy.
        This course is a survey of the history of Russian thought from the end of the 18th Century to the end of the 19th Century. With a few very notable exceptions, Russian thinkers are little known outside of Russia, but they have played a very significant role in shaping Russian literature and political consciousnes. With an uncanny and fluid ability to float from the heights of metaphysical abstraction to very concrete social and human problems, Russian thinkers have made important contributions to the philosophy of history, the theory of social organization, the philosophy of religion, the foundations of psychology, the philosophy of language, logic and the philosophy of science. We study Enlightenment thinkers such as Novikov and Radishchev; Chaadaev and the emergence of the rift between the "Slavophiles" (represented by Kireevsky and Khomyakov) and the "Westernizers" (represented by Herzen and Belinsky); the Men of the 60's, Civic Critics and Nihilists (Chernyshevsky, Dobrolyubov, Pisarev) and Anarchists (Bakunin, Kropotkin); the philosophical and "existential" contributions of literary giants Turgenev, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. We also study the Hegelian background of 19th Century Russian thought and trace the lines of influence and reaction, throughout, between Russian philosophy and Western European philosophy during the buildup to the 1905 and 1917 revolutions.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours

Service to the Community

  • Other
    • June 2013 to  June 2013 Translator, US Army

      Translated official documents from Russian to English for US Army recruiting. 

    • Oct 2012 to  Oct 2012 Invited Speaker

      Forcus on Faculty: “When Books Go Underground: Censorship and Media Control in Russia.” Presenter for the UTA Central Library Banned Books Week. 

    • Mar 2011 to  Mar 2011 Invited Speaker

      “BORIS GODUNOV: The Russian Experience” at “Opera Insights,” Dallas Opera lecture series prior to production of Boris Godunov by Modest Mussorgsky. March 20, 2011.

Service to the Profession

  • Other
    • Sept 2010 to  Sept 2010 Peer Reviewer

      Peer reviewed a book proposal for Continuum Books, London, UK.

    • May 2015 to  May 2015 Peer Reviewer

      Peer reviewed an article for Canadian Review of Comparative Literature.

    • Mar 2011 to  Mar 2011 Introducer and Moderator

      Patryk Babiracki, “Seeds of Doubt: How Polish Peasants Toured Soviet Collective Farms, 1949-1952,”University of Texas-Arlington, 46th annual Webb Lecture Series. March 10, 2011. 

  • Volunteered
    • Oct 2015 to  Nov 2015 Panel Chair

      “Russian Language and Methodology.” South Central Modern Languages Association, Nashville, TN. October 31-November 3, 2015. 

    • Mar 2013 to  Mar 2013 Panel Chair

      “Service-Learning, Digital Pedagogy, and Visual Processing.” UTA MODL Cultural Constructions V: 21st Century Pedagogies. Department of Modern Languages Symposium, UT Arlington. March 1, 2013.

    • Nov 2012 to  Nov 2012 Panel Chair

      “Soviet Literature.” South Central Modern Languages Association, San Antonio, TX. November 8-10, 2012.

    • Apr 2011 to  Apr 2011 Panel Chair

      “War Zone Players: Dictators, Heros and Diverse Unsavory Types.” UTA MODL Cultural Constructions IV: War. Department of Modern Languages Symposium, UT Arlington. April 22, 2011. 

    • Oct 2010 to  Oct 2010 Panel Chair

      “New Frontiers in Russian Study Abroad and Literary Studies.” South Central Modern Languages Association, Ft. Worth, TX. October 28-30, 2010.

Service to the University

  • Appointed
    • July 2015 to  Present Section Head, Critical Languages and International Studies (CLIS)

      Supervised the degree programs in CLIS for six languages: Chinese, German, Russian (CLIS major & minor), Arabic, Korean, and Portuguese (CLIS minor)

      Supervised coordinators in each language

      Actively promoted the programs and recruited students to courses in the section

      Carried out day-to-day adminstrative operations for the section

      Liaised with the Modern Languages department chair and director of the McDowell Center for Critical Languages and Area Studies regarding operations of the CLIS section

    • Sept 2008 to  Present Betty and Roger Ruch Scholarship Committee

      Review and selection of awardees for the Critical Languages Study Abroad Scholarship.

    • Sept 2012 to  Present McDowell Center Awards Committee

      Review and selection of awardees for the McDowell Center Scholarship for Critical Languages.

  • Elected
    • Jan 2015 to  May 2015 REP/FDL Committee

      Reviewed and ranked applicants at the department and college level for Research Enhancement Program and Faculty Development Leave grants.

    • Oct 2009 to  Oct 2009 Fulbright Candidates Reviewer

      Reviewed dossiers and interviewed candidates for UT Arlington’s recommendations to the Fulbright Scholars competition.

  • Volunteered
    • Nov 2011 to  Nov 2011 HURCA Judge

      Adjudicated student research presentations at the Honors Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity symposium.

Other Service Activities

  • Participant
    • Aug 2012 Bridging the Gap through Standards and Technology: STARTALK Program for Russian Teachers
  • Department of Modern Languages
    • Aug 2014 Selected Department Service

      Section Head of Russian, Department of Modern Languages (2007 - present)

      Faculty Advisor, Russian Culture Society (2007 - present)

      Faculty Advisor, UT Arlington Delegation to Model NATO in Washington DC (Feb. 2009, 2010, & 2016)

      Study Abroad Coordinator and Faculty Advisor, UT Arlington - Voronezh State University, Voronezh, Russia (2008 - present)

      Foreign Language Curriculum Committee, Department of Modern Languages (2007 - present)