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Dr. Luanne T Frank

Name

[Frank, Dr. Luanne T]
  • Associate Professor, English
  • Assoc Prof, English

Biography

        Luanne Thornton Frank is a native speaker of English, born and reared in the United States.  She holds an AB in English from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where she was Phi Beta Kappa, Valkyries (a UNC women's honor society comparable to Mortar Board), and Order of the Old Well (a UNC honor society), and named Outstanding Senior Woman.  She also holds MAs in Library Science and Comparative Literature from Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, where she published on public attitudes toward librarianship; and a Ph. D. in Germanic Languages and Literatures from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where her dissertation was a Jungian study of the works of Heinrich von Kleist.  Married to Ted Earl Frank (d. 1984), she joined the University of Texas at Arlington faculty in 1969, co-chaired a national conference on Literature and the Occult in 1973 (keynote speaker: Joseph Campbell), co-translated and introduced Emil Staiger's Basic Problems of Poetics (Penn State UP, 1990), and chaired an international conference entitled The Female Principle in 2000.  Her scholarly and teaching interests are 18th-21st-century Western literatures and theory, with an emphasis on continental philosophy.  

Professional Preparation

    • 1962 M.A. in Compartive LiteratureEmory University
    • 1970 Ph.D. in Germanic Languages and LiteraturesUniversity of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    • 1957 M.A. in A. M. Library ScienceEmory University
    • 1955 A.B. in EnglishUniversity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Appointments

    • Jan 1974 to Jan 2016 Associate Professor, Dept of Engish
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1970 to Jan 1974 Assistant Professor, Dept of Englsh
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1969 to Jan 1970 Assistant Professor of German, Dept of Foreign Languaes
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1963 to Jan 1968 Teaching Fellow I & II
      University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
    • Jan 1960 to Jan 1961 Reference Librarian
      University of Florida, Gainesville
    • Jan 1957 to Jan 1959 Assistant Dean of Women
      University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Memberships

  • Professional
    • 2005 to Present North Texas Philosophical Association  Representative at Large, 2010-date
    • 2010 to 2011 International Semiotic Society
    • 1996 to 2004 National Women’s Studies Association
    • 1978 to 2002 German Society for Semiotics
    • 1978 to 2000 International Semiotic Society
    • 1974 to 1999 Literature and Alchemy Association  Secretary, 1975-date
    • 1974 to 1999 Literature and Alchemy Association  Chairman, Association Meeting, MLA, 1977
    • 1974 to 1999 Literature and Alchemy Association  Chairman, Association Meeting, MLA, 1976
    • 1974 to 1999 Literature and Alchemy Association  Respondent, Association Meeting, MLA, 1979
    • 1968 to 1995 Modern Language Association of America  Chair, The failure of the New Linguistics Seminar, 1975 (appointed).
    • 1968 to 1995 Modern Language Association of America   Chair, Alchemy and Literature Seminar, 1975.
    • 1990 to 1994 Rhetoric Society of America
    • 1973 to 1990 International Society for Germanic Languages and Literatures
    • 1980 to 1989 International Herder Society
    • 1980 to 1987 Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association  Chairman, German I, 1981
    • 1980 to 1987 Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association  Secretary, German I, 1983
    • 1980 to 1987 Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association  Chairman, German I, 1984
    • 1971 to 1987 South Central Modern Language Association  Chairman, German II, 1983
    • 1971 to 1987 South Central Modern Language Association  Chairman, German II, 1982
    • 1971 to 1987 South Central Modern Language Association  Secretary, German II, 1981
    • 1971 to 1987 South Central Modern Language Association  Chairman, German II, 1974
    • 1971 to 1987 South Central Modern Language Association  Secretary, German II, 1973
    • 1973 to 1980 International Comparative Literature Association
    • 1975 to 1975 Pacific Northwest Foreign Languages Association
  • Membership
    • Jan 2014 to Present Society for Phenomenology and Media
    • Jan 2013 to Present Society for Phenomenolgy and Media
    • 2010 to Present Executive Committee:Dallas Area Heidegger Study Group
    • 2007 to Present Dasein: Dallas Area Heidegger Study Group
    • 2003 to Present American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies/East Central
    • Apr 2006 to Apr 2006 Respondent (oral delivery of written response) to B. Hinkley paper on Heidegger’s Realism, North Texas Philosophical Association Conference, NTSU Denton
    • Aug 1976 to Aug 2000 American Semiotics Society, Chair, Literature and Semiotics Section, 1976
    • May 1993 to May 1993 Rhetoric Society of America. Chair, Section entitled “Foucault and the Rhetoric of (Post) Modernity: A Contemporary Hermeneutic for All Seasons,” Minneapolis, Minnesota
    • 1975 to 1987 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Sudies/Southwest  Chair, Literature and Pseudoscience in the Eighteenth Century Seminar, Association Meeting, 1982
    • 1975 to 1987 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Sudies/Southwest  American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies/Southwest. Representative at Large, 1982
    • 1975 to 1987 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Sudies/Southwest  Chair, Section on Eighteenth-Century Language Theories, Association Meeting, 1984
    • 1973 to 1987 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
    • Jan 1982 to Jan 1982 Fifteenth Annual Comparative Literature Symposium, Texas Tech University. Discussant. Invited
    • 1973 to 1980 ACLA: American Comparative Literature Association Member, National Advisory Board (1986-88)
    • 1971 to 1977 American Association of Teachers of German
    • May 1976 to May 1976 University of Louisville Interdisciplinary Conference in Linguistics: Perspectives on Language.   Moderator: Language and Literature I
    • May 1976 to May 1976 University of Louisville Interdisciplinary Conference in Linguistics: Perspectives on Language  Moderator: Language and Literature II
    • Apr 1976 to Apr 1976 Twenty-ninth Annual Kentucky Foreign Language Conference, Lexington. German Literature section.
    • 1974 to 1975 College Conference of Teachers of English
  • Member
    • Jan 2013 to Present Society for Phenomenology and Media
  • Board Member
    • Jan 2014 to Present Society for Phenomenolgoy and Media
    • Jan 2013 to Present Society for Phenomenology and Media
  • Vice Presdent, 2010
    • 2005 to Present North Texas Philosophical Association

Awards and Honors

    • Aug  2006 Faculty Research Associate Appointment and Grant sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington Center for Mexican-American Studies
      Achievements:

      Reseach carried out, two papers presented.

    • May  1964 Delta Phi Alpha. sponsored by Department of German Languages and Literatures, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
      Achievements:

      Teach in the deprtment, engage in German studies

    • Aug  1963 University of Michigan Fellowship sponsored by The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
    • Jun  1954 Irene F. Lee Award sponsored by University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
      Achievements:

      For citizenship, scholarship, leadership, extra-curricular participation.

    • Jun  1954 Phi Beta Kappa sponsored by University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
      Achievements:

      See above

    • May  1954 Order of the Valkyries sponsored by University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
      Achievements:

      Chaired student orientation.  Served as liaison with the Office of the Dean of Women

    • Apr  1954 Order of the Old Well sponsored by University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
      Achievements:

      "Recognizes students and faculty members of high character who have demonstrated outstanding humanitarian service and whose service has gone uncompensated and unrewarded."

Research and Expertise

  • Research and Teaching

    Semiotics; Hermeneutics (emphasis: Heidegger); Literary Criticism and Theory

  • Comparative Literature

    Medieval, Renaissance, Enlightenment, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Centuries

  • German Literature

    Hamann, Herder. Kleist

  • Continental philosophy

    The thought of Martin Heidegger; the works of Heinrich von Kleist

Publications

      Journal Article Accepted
      • "Via Metaphysics or Heidegger's Ontology? Giving the Hand its Due."  JAC: Quarterly Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Rhetoric, Writing, Multiple Literacies, and Politics.  28pp. 

        {Journal Article }
      Published
      • "Heidegger's Digits: A Clarification," Proceedings of the Twenty-first Annual Society for Phenomenology and Media Conference March 2018, Akureyri, Iceland.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2018
      • "Heidegger's Alétheias, One or More? Proceedings of the Nineteenth Annual Society for Phenomenology and Media Conference, March 2017, Brussels.

        {Journal Article }
      2018
      • "Heidegger: ¿Aun otro inico mas?" En torno de una hermenéutica del sur: del cuerpo del texto a la textualidad de lo social. Actas de las V Jornadas Internacionales de Hermenéutica 2017, ed .Gastón G. Beraldi. (Buenos Aires: Ediciones Proyecto Hermenéutica 2018), 86-90.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2017
      •  Summary and assessment of 12 artcles in Goethe Yearbook (Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2016), in Eighteenth-Century Intelligencer  n.s., Vol. 31, no. 2, 2017: 44-51. 2017. Print.

        {Journal Article }
      2017
      • "Heidegger: One Alétheia or More?  Proceedings of the Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Society for Phenomenology and Media.  San Diego: Society for Phenomenology and Media, 2016.

        {Journal Article }
      2017
      • "Heidegger and the Parmenideans" (Parmenides scholars anti-Heideggerianism).  Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual international Conference of the Society for Phenomenology and Media, Puebla 2016. N.p.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2016
      • "Heidegger, National Socialism, and the History of Being."  Proceedings of the Society for Phenomenology and Media 3 (2016), 25-36.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2015
      • "Kleist's Phenomenological Nightmare: 'St. Cecilia or the Power of Music.'" Glimpse: Society for Phenomenology and Media 16 (2015), 33-40. 

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2014
      • "Heidegger and Kleist:  Reciprocal Illuminations."  Heidegger Jahrbuch 8: Heidegger und die Dichtung, ed. Alfred Denker, Holger Zaborowski, and Jens Zimmerman, pp. 193-204.  Freiburg: Karl Alber, 2014.

        {Journal Article }
      2014
      • “Vivifying Philosophy via Visual Media: Heidegger’s Parmenides. Glimpse: Society for Phenomenology and Media 15 (2014), 41-47.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2013
      • "Hamann, Herder, and Heidegger's Hermeneutics of Being." Acts of the International Hermeneutics Conference 2013. Selected Papers.  10pp.

        {Journal Article }

      Anthology Work/Essay 2012
      • Nietzsche is Said in Many Ways."  In Heidegger and Nietzsche, ed. Babette Babich, Holger Zaborowski, and Alfred Denker.  Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi, 2012. 240-251.

        {Anthology Work/Essay }

      Journal Article 2012
      • "Post-Structuralism Now. "  Journal of World Transformation, 2012.  30pp.

        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 2011
      • "Measuring America."  Review of The Passage to Cosmos: Alexander von Humboldt and the Shaping of America, by Laura Dassow Walls.  Chicago: U. of Chicago P, 2009. In Nineteenth-Century Contexts, 2011.  3 pp.

        {Book Review }

      Anthology Work/Essay 2011
      • "The Hermeneutic of Gods and Men in Heidegger's Parmenides."  Acts of the International Hermeneutics Conference, July 2011. Selected Papers. 10pp.

        {Anthology Work/Essay }

      Book Review 2010
      • Frank, Luanne. "Kleist's Passive Heroes." Review of Steven R. Huff, Heinrich von Kleist's Poetics of Passivity." Eighteenth-Century Intelligencer, N. S.  (September 2010), 35-39.

        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 2010
      • Frank, Luanne. "Heidegger, Captain Paul Watson, and the 'Look' of Leviathan". JAC: Rhetoric, Writing, Culture, Politics 2010, 30 (3-4): 583-617.

        {Journal Article }

      Anthology Work/Essay 2009
      • Frank, Luanne T. "Forms of Myth in Heidegger's Hermeneutic of Parmenides' Alétheia." Acts of the International Hermeneutics Conference, May 2009.  Selected Papers. (14pp.)  

        {Anthology Work/Essay }

      Book Review 2008
      • Frank, Luanne T. "Kant and the Philosophy of Biology." Review of Understanding Purpose: Kant and the Philosophy of Biology, by Philippe Huneman. The Eighteenth-Century Intelligencer, May 2008: 48-51.

        {Book Review }

      Book Review 2006
      • Frank, Luanne T. "Kant's Vale of Soul-Making."  Review of Kantian Virtue at the Intersection of Politics and Nature: the Vale of Soul-Making, by Scott Roulier (North American Kant Society Studies in Philosophy, vol. 7).  Rochester: U of Rochester P, 2004.  Eighteenth-Century Intelligencer N..S.  (September 2006): 33-37.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 2005
      • Frank, Luanne T. "No way Out: Kleist, Lisbon, and ‘Das Erdbeben in Chile.'" SVEC: Studies in Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century (2005): 265-281.

        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 2004
      • "Goethe's Eighteenth-Century Faith: Views from the Twentieth Century."  Review of On Goethe and Religion, ed. Paul E. Kerry.  Salt Lake City Utah: Brigham Young University, 2000.  In East-Central Intelligencer 18 (2), May 2004: 30-33.

        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 2003
      • "The Discourses of Humanity: Evolutions of 'discourse' through Foucault." Journal of the Conference on Global Transformation 3 (2003): 51-58.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2002
      • "Michel Foucault."  Journal of the Conference for Global Transformation 1 (2002): 24-32. Rpt. (publishers' permission) of "Michel Foucault" below (see under 2000).

        {Journal Article }

      Encyclopedia Entry 2001
      • "Herder, Johann Gottfried." Multicultural Writers from Antiquity to 1945: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook, ed Alba Amoia and Bettina L. Knapp.  Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2001. Pp. 164-167.

        {Encyclopedia Entry }
      2001
      • "Hofmansthal, Hugo von." Multicultural Writers from Antiquity to 1945: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook, pp. 177-182.  Ed. Alba Amoia and Bettina L. Knapp. Westport, Conn: Greenwood Press, 2001. 

        {Encyclopedia Entry }
      2001
      • "Rilke, Rainer Maria." Multicultural Writers from Antiquity to 1945: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook, pp. 164-167.  Ed. Alba Amoia and Bettina L. Knap. Westport, Conn: Greenwood Press, 2001.

        {Encyclopedia Entry }

      Essay 2000
      • "Michel Foucault."  Twentieth-Century Rhetorics and Rhetoricians: Critical Studies and Sources, pp. 169-184. Ed. Michael G. Moran and Michelle Ballif. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2000.

        {Essay }

      Journal Article 2000
      • “Michel Foucault.” Twentieth-Century Rhetorics and Rhetoricians: Critical Studies and Sources, pp. 169-184.  Ed. Michael G. Moran and Michelle Ballif. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 1993
      • 'Mud Crab’ or Dire Consequence.” CRCA Texas Artists Series Publications

        August 1993

        {Journal Article }

      Essay 1993
      • " 'Mud Crab' or Dire Consequence." CRCA Texas Artists Series Publications, August, 1993.

        {Essay }

      Book 1991
      • Staiger, Emil. Basic Concepts of Poetics [Grundbegriffe der Poetik, 1942], translated by Marianne Burkhard and Luanne T. Frank, with an introduction by Luanne T. Frank.   College Park: Penn State University Press, 1991.

        {Book }

      Essay 1991
      • "Three Silented Figures: Uncovering a Coverup."  In Realms of Rhetoric: Phonic, Grahic, Electronic, pp. 243-269.  Ed. Victor J. Vitanza and Michelle Ballif.  Arlington, Texas: Rhetoric Society of America, 1991.

        {Essay }

      Journal Article 1991
      • "Three Silented Figures:  Uncovering a Coverup." In Realms of Rhetoric:  Phonic, Graphic, Electronic, pp. 243-269.  Ed. Victor J. Vitanza and Michelle Ballif.  Arlington, Texas:  Rhetoric Society of America

        {Journal Article }

      Essay 1990
      • "Rezeptionsgeschichte in Herder and Jauss: A Retrospective Reading." In Re-discovering Herder, pp. 125-177.  Ed. Wulf Koepke and Richard Critchfield. New York: Camden House, 1990. 

        {Essay }

      Journal Article 1990
      • Rezeptionsgeschichte in Herder and Jauss: A Retrospective Reading." In Re-discovering Herder, pp. 125-177. Ed. Wulf Koepke and Richard Critchfield.  New York:  Camden House

        {Journal Article }

      Essay 1988
      • “ 'Art as Semiotic Fact': A Re-examination of the Social Dimensions of Herder's Aesthetics in his Philosophy of History."  In Eighteenth-Century Aesthetics Theories, pp. 103-145. Ed. Richard Critchfield and Wulf Koepke. New York: Camden House, 1988.

        {Essay }
      1988
      • "Herder, Mukarovsky, and the History of Semiotics."  In Semiotic Theory and Practice, pp. 269-278.  Berlin: deGruyter, 1988.

        {Essay }

      Journal Article 1988
      • "Herder, Mukarovsky, and the History of Semiotics. In Semiotic Theory and Practice, 269-278.  Berlin: deGruyter

        {Journal Article }
      1988
      • “ 'Art as Semiotic Fact': A Re-examination of the Social Dimensions of Herder's Aesthetics in his Philosophy of History." In Eighteenth-Century Aesthetics Theories, pp. 103-145.  Ed. Richard Critchfield and Wulf Koepke.  New York:  Camden House

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 1987
      • Frank, Luanne. "Criticism and the Meaning of Writing."  Pre-Text 8.3-4 (1987): 185-194.

        {Journal Article }
      1987
      • "Criticism and the Meaning of Writing."  Pre-Text 8(3-4 Fall-Winter, 1987): 185-194.

        {Journal Article }

      Essay 1982
      • "Herder and the Maturation of Hamann's Metacritical Thought: A Chapter in the Prehistory of the Metakritik."  In Johann Gottfried Herder: Innovator Through the Ages, pp. 157-185.  Ed. Wulf Koepke. Bonn: Bouvier, 1982.

        {Essay }

      Journal Article 1982
      • "Herder's Essay on the Origin of Language: Forerunner of Contemporary Views in History, Aesthetics, Philosophy." Forum Linguisticum 7, no. 1 (Aug. 1982): 15-26.

        {Journal Article }
      1982
      • "Herder's Essay on the Origin of Language : Forerunner of Contemporary Views in History, Aesthetics, Philosophy." Forum Linguisticum 7, no. 1 (Aug. 1982), pp. 15-26.

        {Journal Article }
      1982
      • "Herder and the Maturation of Hamann's Metacritical Thought: A Chapter in the Prehistory of the Metakritik." In Johann Gottfried Herder: Innovator Through the Ages, pp. 157-185.  Ed. Wulf Koepke.  Bonn: Bouvier

        {Journal Article }

      Book 1977
      • Frank, Luanne T,. ed. Literature and the Occult: Essays in Comparative Literature.  Arlington: The University of Texas, 1977.

        {Book }

      Book Review 1976
      • Frank, Luanne. "The Mythic Image, by Joseph Campbell." Thought (1976): 250-251.

        {Book Review }

      Essay 1975
      • "The 'Gott der Erde': New Key to Kleist's Penthesilea." Internationale Kongressberichte: Akten des 5.  Kongresses der Internationalen Vereinigung für Germanische Sprach und Literaturwissenschaften.  Ed. Leonard W. Forster and Hans-Gert Roloff. Jahrbuch für Internationale Germanistik, Series A, vol. 2, pp. 241-48. Bern:  Herbert Lang, 1975.

        {Essay }

      Journal Article 1975
      • "The 'Gott der Erde':  New Key to Kleist's Penthesilea."  Internationale Kongressberichte: Akten des 5.  Kongresses der Internationalen Vereinigung für Germanische Sprach und Literaturwissenschaften.  Ed. Leonard W. Forster and Hans-Gert Roloff.  Jahrbuch für Internationale Germanistik, Series A, vol. 2, pp. 241-48.  Bern:  Herbert Lang

        {Journal Article }

      Essay 1974
      • “ ‘The Strangest Love Scene in World Literature' (the Dismemberment of Achilles in Kleist's       Penthesilea): A Reassessment." In Proceedings of the Pacific Northwest Conference on Foreign Languages, volume 25, pp. 236-41. Ed. Walter C. Kraft.  Corvallis: Oregon State University, 1974.

        {Essay }

      Journal Article 1974
      • “ ‘The Strangest Love Scene in World Literature' (the Dismemberment of Achilles in Kleist's Penthesilea):  A Reassessment." In Proceedings of the Pacific Northwest Conference on Foreign Languages, volume 25, pp. 236-41. Ed.  Walter C. Kraft.  Corvallis: Oregon State University

        {Journal Article }

      Book 1973
      • Frank, Luanne T. and Emery E. George, eds. Husbanding the Golden Grain: Studies in Honor of Henry W. Nordmeyer. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, 1973.

        {Book }

      Essay 1973
      • "Kleist's Achilles: 'Hilfskonstruktion' or Hero?" In Husbanding the Golden Grain: Studies in Honor of Henry W. Nordmeyer, edited by Luanne T. Frank and Emery E. George. Ann Arbor:  The University of Michigan Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, 1973.

        {Essay }

      Journal Article 1973
      • "Kleist's Achilles:  'Hilfskonstruktion' or Hero?"  In Husbanding the Golden Grain: Studies in Honor of Henry W. Nordmeyer, ed. Luanne T. Frank and Emery E. George. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 1963
      • "A Scale to Measure Librarians' Attitudes to Toward Librarianship." Journal of Education for Librarianship 4 (Summer, 1963): 15-26.

        {Journal Article }
      1963
      • "A Scale to Measure Librarians' Attitudes to Toward Librarianship. Journal of Education for Librarianship 4 (Summer, 1963): 15-26.

        {Journal Article }

Presentations

    • October  2018
      Quintessential Love in Heidegger.
      Identifies passages in Martin Heidegger's Parmenides not previously recognized as a type of love identifiable as quinessential.
    • March  2018
      Heidegger's Digits: A Clarification
      An examination and refutation of a recent scholarly artical anathematizing Martin Heidegger by intentionally misreading his understanding of the human hand and thus calling into question Heidegger’s path of thinking and his groundbreaking attempts to answer philosophy's great question, a path that  Derrida has called "a long and continuous meditation on the hand."
    • July  2017
      Heidegger: ¿Aún otro inicio más?
      In his Contributions to Philosophy (composed 1936-38) Heidegger argues the existence in Western philosophy of two beginnings, that of metaphysics on one hand and his own on the other (that of Being and Time), but by the time of his Parmenides (Winter semester 1942-43), he recognizes the Pre-Socratics as having constituted a beginning in their own right, making the total of Heideggers "beginnings" three.
    • March  2017
      Heidegger's One Alétheia or More?
      Argues for the recognition, by Heidegger, of a single bona fide Alétheia, rather than the three identified by Thomas Sheehan in his Making Sense of Heidegger (2014), two of which are but subordinate modes of revealing.
    • March  2016
      Heidegger and the Parmenideans

      Parmenides scholars' anti-Heideggerianism

    • October  2015
      "Heidegger's Beginnings: Two or Three?"
      Describes and argues for Heidegger's recognitions of three, rather than two, "beginnings."
    • March  2015
      "Heidegger, National Socialism, and the History of Being"

      Traces the content and historical context of Heidegger's anti-Roman diatribe in Winter Semester 1942-43 and suggests his denunciations, here, of Nazism two years before war’s end, (when he is not yet accused of complicity), confer credibility on his post-war claims of disaffection. 

    • October  2014
      "Heidegger's God II"
      Bearing the title of an earlier study, this altogether new paper examines and attempts to answer, in part, the question of whether "Heidegger ever really tells us what Being is," and does so via Heidegger's discussions of alétheia in his Parmenides.
    • March  2014
      "Kleist's Phenomenological Nightmare, 'St. Cecilia and the Power of Music.'"
      A reading of Heinrich von Kleist's "St. Cecila and the Power of Music" as a phenomenological nightmare--including a never previously identified link between this tale and a Caravaggio painting of a madonna and child (with, as in the story, a foot of the madonna's resting on a stool with dragon's feet) held in Dresden's Zwinger collection of old masters and almost certainly encountered there by Kleist when he daily viewed the paintings during a visit to Dresden in 1802.
    • July  2013
      "Hamann, Herder, and Heidegger's Hermeneutics of Being"

      The great advance in the hermeneutics of Being in the West takes place, as is well known, in Heidegger’s Being and Time. But key insights fundamental to his argument in that work, insights that underlie and pave the way for comments articulated by Heidegger in his introduction there, will not have originated with Being and Time. Neither, in his work earlier, will they have received their first elaborations.  Instead, one finds ideas closely similar to Heidegger’s in content and wording almost a century and one-half earlier, in the comments of two late eighteenth-century thinkers with whose work he was closely familiar. 

    • March  2013

      " Vivifying Philosophy via Visual Media: Heidegger's Parmenides."

      One could suppose phenomenology, in its concern with what shows up, to be a fertile field for enhancement via contemporary media, and yet philosophy, where phenomenology situates itself, may be one of the last disciplines to avail itself of the enlargements of awareness offered by the media’s visual possibilities. Unmistakably this has to do with philosophy’s intimate attachment to the word. The present proposal nonetheless demonstrates the potential of visual media for the enhancement of philosophy, doing so via a crucial philosophical text, Martin Heidegger’s Parmenides.

    • April  2012

      'Giving Heidegger"s Hand its Due.'  Thirtieth North Texas Heidegger Symposium

      This is a newly re-thought, a sharpening, deepening, and doubling in length of the consideration of the theme broached in the May, 2011 paper presented at the Heidegger Research Group in Messkirch, Germany.

    • December  2011

      'Hamann"s Possible Influence on Heideggerian Temporality.'

      “The question of time and who control[s] it,” “the pivotal issue of the twenty-first century,” implies and contains the related, basic question of who is to control the century’s understanding of time and thus the apprehensions of ourselves, our politics, our cultures, to which such an understanding shows the way. The work of Martin Heidegger is crucial here as is the question of possible influences on the understandings he arrives at.

    • July  2011

      'The Hermeneutic of Gods and Men in Heidegger"s Parmenides.  International Hermeneutics Conference, Buenos Aires, July 2011.

      Even after the massive achievement of Being and Time, Martin Heidegger is convinced that more needs to be said about the nature of Dasein in its relation to its world,  But even after completing a study of animals’ world relations (1929-30) in order to compare them to humans’, he has yet to provide an adequate account of Dasein. After a decade he undertakes another comparison, now between humans and higher beings, deities, though without linking this comparison to earlier efforts. In the Parmenides (1942-43) he views humans across the roles and capacities of gods, Greek gods, finding resemblances rather than differences, as he had in the case of animals.

    • May  2011

      'Heidegger"s Hand Revisited.'  Fifth Biennial Conference of the Heidegger Research Group, Messkirch, Germany, May 2011. 

      This is a dispute with an article on Martin Heidegger, an article that finds him responsible for providing a justification for those who argue for a structural superiority to animals on the part of humans and use this to support their claim of humans’ right to world domination.

    • May  2011

      'Postmodern Worlds and Realities' (90 min.). Conference for Global Transformation, San Francisco, May 22, 2011. Invited & financed (no stipend).

      Introduction to a wide range of prominent proto-poststructuralist and poststructuralist texts and their contemporary meaning, as well as a requested handout bibliography of these and other related texts.

    • April  2011

       * 'The Reciprocal Gaze.' Zoosemiotics and Animal Representation Conference,. International Assn for Semiotic Studies, Tartu, Estonia, April 2011.

      An examination of the possibilities for a semiotics of the reciprocal gaze between animals and humans as such possibilities are suggested by those humans reporting human-animal encounters in which such a gaze has appeared to play an important, even a crucial, role. The chief emphasis here: bears.

    • November  2010

      'The Use and Misuses of Theory: Heinrich von Kleist and the Heideggerians I: Gerhard Fricke.'  International Conference on Philosophy and Letters, Buenos Aires, November, 2010.  Invited.

      Considered an interpretive breakthrough, and important enough to be published in the US in German, Gerhard Fricke's Gefühl und Schicksal bei Heinrich von Kleist of 1929 is the most heralded piece of 20th-century Kleist criticism. Examination reveals its heavy dependence on Heidegger's Being and Time of 1927 for its understandings of Kleist, though it refers to Being and Time in but a single, brief, innocuous footnote.

    • August  2010

      'A New Source in Visual Art [Caravaggio] for Aspects of the Abbess in Kleist"s ‘St. Cecilia and the Power of Music."'  Sixth International Congress on Memory and the Imagination.  University of the West Indies, Trinidad.  August, 2010.

      A Caravaggio located on Kleist's path to the Raphael he reports on located in the Old Masters Galleries of Dresden's Zwinger offers suggestions toward understanding the controversial Abess in Kleist's Cecila narrative.

    • June  2010

      'The Interpretive Difference it Makes: Italian Masters [Raphael and Carlo Dolci] and Kleist"s St. Cecilia Novella.' Displaying Word and Image: Focus Conference, Intnat'l Assn for Word and Image, University of Ulster, Belfast, June 2010.

      Kleist's visits to the Zwinger's Gallery of Old Masters in Dresden suggest interpretations of aspects of his "St. Cecilia and the Power of Music" that extend beyond those provided by Rosmarie Puschmann's book on the historical contexts of this work.

    • April  2010

      'In What Direction Does Heidegger"s Alétheia Point?'  28th North Texas Heidegger Symposium, University of Texas at Dallas, April 2010.  Invited.

      Heidegger points with his Alétheia toward the Future via the Past, recovering for today understandings of deity (and related ways of Being) characteristic of Neolithic and Early Bronze Ages.

    • March  2010

      'Active and Passive in Heinrich von Kleist"s ‘Betrothal in Santo Domingo."' Conference on the Caribbean in Literature, University of Cartagena, Cartagena, Columbia, March 2010.

      This essay demonstrates that Kleist's chief male protagonist in this work belongs among the "passive heroes" described by Steven R. Huff in his book on Kleist's passive heroes.

    • May  2009

      'Forms of Myth in Heidegger"s Hermeneutic of Parmenides" Alétheia.'  International Hermeneutics Conference, Buenos Aires, May 2009.

      This paper notes, in his Parmenides, Heidegger's reliance on and implied respect for the ways of knowing of myth.

    • April  2009

      'What"s Form Got to Do With It?:  Being With Heidegger"s Parmenides. Twenty-seventh North Texas Heidegger Symposium, April 2009. U of Dallas.

      Examines formal structures characterizing Heidegger's Parmenides. Example: Vorausdeutung.

    • March  2009

      'In the Care of the Word, In the Care of Time: Heidegger"s Parmenidean Platforms.' Forty- second North Texas Philosophical Association Conference, NTSU Denton, Texas, March 2009. Invited.

      Examines the frequency and importance of Heidegger's incorporations of Parmenides' understandings into his own and the reluctance of Parmenides scholars who see Parmenides otherwise, to credit Heidegger's insights.

    • June  2008

      'Heidegger"s God.' Heidegger Research Group Fourth Biennial Conference, Albert Ludwig University, Freiburg/Messkirch (Germany), June 2008. Invited.

      Identifies Parmenides' Alétheia as Heidegger's deity of choice.

    • April  2008

      'Heidegger, Paul Watson, and the 'Look' of Leviathan.' Vice President"s address. Forty-first North Texas Philosophical Association Conference, NTSU, Denton, Texas, April 2008.  Invited.

      Reads Captain Paul Watson's experience with a whale, celebrated in the New Yorker, across Heidegger's displacement of Hegel's master-slave scenario by a different form of encounter grounded in "the look."

    • April  2008

      'A Page from the Possible Pre-History of Heidegger"s Being and Time.'  Twenty-Sixth North Texas Heidegger Symposium, U. of Dallas, Dallas, Texas, April 2008. Invited.

      Examines Heidegger's possible reliance on to-date unidentified forerunners occupied with Kant's first critique for certain crucial insights grounding his Being and Time.

    • April  2007

      'Other Beginnings: Scenes from the Lineage of Heidegger"s Parmenidean Aletheia."Twenty-Fifth North Texas Heidegger Symposium, Collin College, Frisco, Texas, April  2007.  Invited.

      Examination of the possible relation of Heidegger's Parmenidean Alétheia to other ancient female deities that could be considered part of her lineage.

    • April  2007

      'Introducing Olga Dondé: Provenance, Paintings, Resonances.' CMAS Research Associate"s presentation of research in connection with CMAS Grant. Center for Mexican-American Studies, UTA, April 3, 2007.

      Presentation of Dondé and her work: Biography, Paintings.

    • October  2006

      'Kleist and Goya: Artistic and Life Responses to Epistemological Conflict & Foreign Occupation.' American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (East/Central) Conference, Gettysburg, Penna. October 2006.

      Comparison of responses of Kleist and Goya to epistemological conflicts and foreign occupation.

    • June  2006

      'Heidegger and Kleist: Reciprocal Illuminations." Heidegger Research Group Biennial Conference, Albert Ludwig University, Freiburg/Messkirch (Germany), June, 2006.

      Parallels between Kleistian and Heideggerian ways of knowing and Being.

    • October  2005

      'The Abbess and the Dragon"s Claw: Another Look at Kleist"s St. Cecilia Novella.' East-Central American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 36th Annual Meeting, U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, October 2005.

      Possible identification of Kleist's Abbess via the serpent motif associated with Christian female saints.

    • April  2005

      'Heidegger"s Parmenidean Route to Alétheia.'  Twenty-fourth North Texas Heidegger Symposium, University of Dallas, April, 2005.

      A Tracing of Heidegger's Two Routes to Parmenidean Alétheia.

    • February  2005

      '"The One Generative Mother [sic] Womb": Nature in Herder"s Ideen der Philosphie der Geschichte der Menschheit.' De Bartolo Eighteenth-Century Conference, University of South Florida, Tampa, February, 2005.

    • November  2004

      'Cultural Antecedents of Alétheia in Heidegger"s Parmenides.' Philosophy and Literature Colloquium, Colby College, Waterville, Maine, November 15, 2004.

      Post Parmenidean, ancient Greek influences on meanings Heidegger attributes to Alétheia in his Parmenides.

    • October  2004

      'Die heilige Caecilie und der Gewalt der Musik" and the Kleistian Sublime.'  American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies/East Central Conference, Cape May, New Jersey, October, 2004.

      A reading of Kleist's St. Cecilia Novelle as an account of varied humans' resonses to the musical sublime.

    • May  2004

      'The Role of Nietzsche in Heidegger"s Parmenides.' Heidegger Research Group Second Biennial Conference, Albert Ludwig University, Freiburg/Messkirch (Germany), May 2004.

      Four levels of depths (foreground, surface, midground, background) at which Nietzsche plays roles in Heidegger's Parmenides

    • October  2003

      "No Way Out:  Kleist, Lisbon, and ‘Das Erdbeben in Chile."'  Plenary session speech (plenary theme:  The Lisbon earthquake, 250th anniversary).  Conference on Nature and Artistry (East-Central American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 34th Annual Meeting, University of Pittsburgh, Greensburg, Pa.), October, 2003. 

      A reading of Kleist's "Erdbeben" with special reference to the equivocations of certainty in the work deriving from Kleist's reading of Kant's first critique.

    • June  2003

      'The Silent Force of Feminism in the Paintings of Olga Dondé.'  Nationall Women"s Studies Association Conference, New Orleans, Louisiana, June, 2003.

      The feminist-erotic thematic of Dondé's paintings of Mexican vegetables and fruits

    • September  2002

      'The Discourses of Humanity: Evolutions of ‘Discourse" through Foucault.' Keynote address, Conference on Global Transformation: The Roles of Humanistic Discourse, San Francisco, California, September, 2002.  Invited.

      A scholarly paper for a mixed audience of non-humanistically-oriented disciplines, MDs (GPs & psychiatrists), computer engineers, business persons.

    • January  2000

      'Woman in the Eighteenth-Century Male Imaginary: The Case of Hamann.'  Thirty-Third Annual Texas Tech Comparative Literature Symposium, Lubbock, Texas, January, 2000.

      Johann Georg Hamann's focus on ancient Greek Baubo as a female ideal of surpassing importance.

    • January  1999

      Alétheia and the Unthought in Heidegger"s Parmenides. Conference on Philosophy and the Feminine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, January, 1999.

      I argue here that via his uncoverings of the potential meanings of Alétheia in his Parmenides Heidegger exemplifies the potential of what he calls "the unthought in [a] thinker's thought."

    • June  1998

       'The Unconcealment of the Feminine Divine in a Variety of Mexican Folk Art.' National Women"s Association Conference, Oswego, New York, June, l998.

      Argues the the split-tailed mermaids of Mexican folk art found on small Mexican fishing vessels and thought to promote a good catch to be derived from the Baubo figures brought to the new world by stone masons and situated high on a large handful of colonial cathedrals.

    • October  1997

      'What is the West Without, Without an Exhibitonistic Female?' University of Texas at Dallas Rhetoric Society Lecture, October, l997. Invited.

      Argues the potential enrichment to Western culture of emphasizing figures of female genertivity typically denigrated as "exhibitonistic.

    • June  1996

      'Quietly Reversing Islam: Potential Self-Determination Comes to Women on Pakistan"s Northwest Frontier.  National Women"s Studies Association Conference, Saratoga Springs, June, 1996.

      Illustrated talk focusing on the successful efforts of Ismaili Muslims to educate women.

    • May  1994

      The Rhetoric of Exhibitionism.' Rhetoric Society of America Conference, Norfolk, VA., May, 1994

      Discussion of this rhetoric and its demonstrable meaning in ancient Greek, Indian sub-continent, Western European, Irish, South American, and Mexican sacred and secular art.

    • March  1993

      'Thaná Lauhakaikul, ‘Mud Crab," and Glen Brown"s Relation as Critic to the Artist and his Artwork.'  CRCA Gallery Texas Artists Series, University of Texas at Arlington, March, l993. Invited.

      Examination and interpretive description of Thaná Lauhakaikul's art work, "Mud Crab," and commentary on Lauhakaikl's relation to critic Glen Brown.

    • May  1992

      'Freud Beyond Control: Female Sexuality and the Rhetoric of the Unconscious in The Interpretation of Dreams. Rhetoric Society of America Conference, Minneapolis, Minnesota.  May, l992.

      Freud's relation, beyond his control, to specific examples of female sexuality in his personal experience and their influence on The Interpretation of Dreams

    • March  1992
      “Lacan and Writing: The View From the End of the Road.” Forum on Lacan and Writing

      Lacan's relation to writing.

    • February  1992

      'Freud, Female Sexuality, and the Form of The Interpretation of Dreams. Symposium on Issues in Cultural Theory: Gender, Pedagogy, Psychoanalysis.  University of Texas at Arlington, February, l992.  Invited.

      Freud's relation to female sexuality as uncovered in his interpretation of Dreams and his correspondence with Wilhelm Fliess.

    • August  1990

      "Order and Meaning in Heinrich Khunrath's Macrocosm Emblem." Glasgow International Emblem Conference, Glasgow, Scotland, August, 1990.

      An interpretation of Khunrath's macrocosm emblem in his Amphiteatrum.

    • August  1990

      "On the Track of Heinrich Khunrath: Between Experience and Speculation." Renaissance National Traditions Conference, Glasgow, Scotland, August, 1990.

      An account of Khunrath's central emblem in his Amphiteatrum as a function of both his achemical experience and speculative alchemical theory.

    • May  1990

      "Three Silented Figures: Uncovering a Coverup." Rhetoric Society of America Conference, Arlington, Texas, May, 1990.

      Uncovering, exemplifying, and interpreting the West's centuries-long coverup of Baubo figures and their meaning.

    • April  1989

      "Heidegger and the Sign." Fifth International Congress of Semiotics, Barcelona & Perpignan, March-April, 1989.

      Heidegger's interpretation of traditional understandings of the sign's nature as evidenced in his Being and Time.

    • March  1988

      "The Paradox of Transparency in an Alchemical Text: Henirich Khunrath"s Philosophical Athanor." Popular Culture Association.  New Orleans, March, 1988.

      The incomprehensible nature of the transparent in Khunrath's Philosopical Athanor.

    • November  1987

      "Herder's 'Kraft,'  Harré's 'Power': An Eighteenth-Century 'Metaphysics' and a Twentieth-Century Theory of Science." Herder Today: An Interdisciplinary Conference (International Herder Society). Stanford University, November, 1987.

      A comparison of the understandings of the nature of force, or power, in the thought of an eighteenth- and a twentieth-century theoretician of the subject.

    • August  1987

      "Heinrich Khunrath"s Amphiteatrum Emblem as a Possible Source for an Image in Goethe's Faust I, ‘Nacht."'  International Conference on the European Emblem, Glasgow, August, 1987.

      Title is self-explanatory.

    • March  1986

      "Criticism and the Meaning of Writing." College Conference of Composition and Communication, New Orleans, March, 1986.

      Examines the importance of clear writing to contemporary criticism.

    • November  1985

      "The Aesthetics of Reception in Herder and Jauss: A Retrospective Reading." International Herder Society Conference, Monterrey, November, 1985.

      Parallels between Jauss and his predecessor, Herder, in the develdopment of Rezeptionsästhetik.

    • June  1984

      "Herder, Mukarovsky, and the History of Semiotics." Third Congress of the International Association for Semiotic Studies, University of Palermo, June, 1984.

      Herderian insights in the theory of Jan Mukarovsky.

    • March  1984

      "Herder's Language Theory Revisited."  South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference, Colorado Springs, March, 1984.

      Herder's Language Theory in the light of Post-Structuralist Thought.

    • March  1983

      "The Writings of Hamann's Conversion Period and the Conventions of Spiritual Autobiography." South Central Association for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference, Tempe, Arizona, March, 1983.

      Hamann as an emphatically Christian spiritual autbiographer.

    • October  1982

      "The Progress of J.G. Hamann's Language-Theoretical Discourse, 1781-1784." Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association Conference, Salt Lake City, October, 1982.

      Hamann's development as a modern language theorist.

    • October  1982

      "Language as History in Herder's Language-Theoretical Works and in His Ideen." Western Association for German Studies Conference, El Paso, Texas, October, 1982.

      Title is self-explanatory

    • July  1982

      "The Semiotics of the Alchemical Work of Art, with Special Reference to Heinrich Khunrath's Amphiteatrum sapientiae aeternae."  Symposium on Mystic Discourse, International Center for Semiotics and Linguistics, Urbino, Italy, July, 1982.

      A semiotics of the central image in Khunrath's Amphiteatrum.

    • April  1981

      International Center for Semiotics and Linguistics, Urbino, Italy, July, 1982.

      "Problems in the Early Criticism of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason." American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference, Washington, D.C., April, 1981.

      Early unheard criticisms of Kant's first critique.

    • March  1981

      "Herder's Aesthetics Prior to his Kalligone." South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference, Austin, Texas March, 1981.

      Title is self-explanatory

    • March  1981

      "The Modernity of Herder's Essay on Language." Conference on Linguistics and the Humanities, University of Texas at Arlington, March, 1981.

      Title is self-explanatory

    • October  1980

      "Hamann and Herder on Reason and Language: A Dissenting View."  Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association, Denver, Colorado, October, 1980.

      Hamann's and Herder's early anti-metaphysical understanding of langauge.

    • March  1980

      "Rational Irrationalism in the Metakritik of Johann Gottfried von Herder."  South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference, Albuquerque, March, 1980.

      Title is self-explanatory

    • October  1979

      "Cosmos, Climate, and Culture in J.G. Herder's Ideas for the Philosophy of the Historyof Mankind." South Central Modern Language Association Conference, New Orleans, October, 1979.

      Herder's understandng of the effect of geography and climate on the development of culture as evidenced in his Ideen.

    • July  1979

      "Cohesion and Disjunction in the Literary Text." Second Congress of the International Association for Semiotic Studies, University of Vienna, July, 1979.

      The semiotics of cohesion and disjunmctiion in selected literary texts.

    • July  1978

      "The Semiotics of Prophecy in the Nibelungenlied." International Conference on Linguistics and Semiotics, Urbino, Italy, July, 1978.

      The sign-value and structural function of prophecy in the Nibelungenlied.

    • April  1978

      "Twenty-Seven Easy Lessons on How to Be King: The Forms of Didacticism in Wieland's Staatsroman and its Sources in Rousseau, Helvetius, and Others."  American Association for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference, Chicago, Illinois, April, 1978.

      Title is self-explanatory

    • December  1976

      "The Trouble With Eve: The Bypassing of Paradise in George MacDonald's Lilith." SCMLA Conference, New Orleans, December, 1976.

      George MaDonald's filling out the deficient archetypal feminine with a negative female deity missing in Christianity.

    • August  1976

      "A New Means of Assessing Validity in Interpretation." Semiotics Section, Eighth International Congress on Comparative Literature, Budapest, Hungary,  August, 1976.

      Description and exemplification of a resilient, anti-metaphysical interpretive procedure.

    • April  1976

      "Emancipation through the Muse: Wieland from Idris und Zenide to The GoldenMirror."  American Association for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, April, 1976.

      Enjoyable didacticism in two of Wieland's classically orientalizing works. 

    • August  1975

      "The 'Gott der Erde' in Kleist's Penthesilea:  New Key to the Work?"  International Society for Germanic Languages and

      Title is self-explanatory.

    • May  1975

      "Framework for Epic: Vorausdeutungen in the Nibelungenlied."  Tenth Conference on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, May, 1975.

      Charting the pattern of Vorausdeutungen in the German national epic.

    • April  1975

      "Integrity and Significance in George MacDonald's Lilith."  Regional Science Fiction Conference, University of Colorado at Denver, April, 1975.

      Argues the character of MacDonald's Lilith as occupying a borderland between fairy tale and science fiction.

    • October  1974

      "'The Strangest Love Scene In World Literature' (the Dismemberment of Achilles in Kleist's Penthesilea) Reassessed."  Pacific Northwest Foreign Languages  Conference, Spokane, 1974.

      By pointing to mythological precedents, argues against long conventional apprehensions of this scene's as unprecedented.

    • May  1973

      "Kleist's Achilles, True Counterpart for Penthesilea."  Twenty-sixth Annual Kentucky Foreign Languages Conference, University of Kentucky, May, 1973.

      Argues against understandings of Achihlles as a mere Hilfskonstruktion.

  • Past
    •  
      "Heidegger's God II"

      Bearing the title of an earlier paper, this altogether new study attempts to answer, in part, the question of whether "Heidegger ever really tells us what Being is."
       

  • Past
    •  
      “Hamann, Herder, and Heidegger’s Hermeneutics of Being.” International Hermeneutics Conference, Buenos Aires, July 2013.

      Potential roles of Hamann and Herder in Heidegger's presentation of his stance toward Descartes and Kant in Being and Time.
       

  • Past
    •  
      "Heideger's Beginnings, Two or Three?

      Describes Heidegger's three rather than two "beginnings"

  • Past
    •  
      "Kleist's Phenomenological Nightmare: 'St. Cecilia or the Power of Music.'"

      Kleist's "St. Cecilia" as a phenomenological nightmare

Projects

  • 1996
    • Dec 1996 to Jan 2014 The extant examples of Indian Female Deity Lajja Gauri

      Multiple self-financed trips to India to visit as many as possible of the Indian temple sites, museums, and university and Archaeological Survey of India collections holding the 153-and-counting images of the pre-Hindu indian female deity Lajja Gauri.  Earliest focus: Alampur temple complex (near Kurnool, & south of Hyderabad).

      Role: Principal Investigator PI: Luanne Frank
  • 2011
    • June 2011 to Aug 2011 Kleist in Dresden's Zwinger

      In June, 2011, after the May Heidegger conference (Messkirch), I flew self-financed to Dresden to visit Dresden’s great Zwinger to view two of the Caravaggios in its famous Gallery of Italian Masters and consult with its curator in order to validate my hypothesis that Kleist, during a several-weeks' stopover in Dresden enroute to Paris in 1801, viewed these paintings and incorporated images from them into his novella “St. Cecilia and the Power of Music.”  Subsequent correspondence with gallery curator.  This discovery could settle a longstanding debate in the Kleist scholarship about the meaning of one of the novella’s focal figures.

      Role: Principal Investigator PI: Luanne Frank
  • 2004
    • Aug 2004 to Aug 2006 Translation of Rosmarie Puschmann, Heinich von Kleists Cäcilien Erzählung: Kunst- und literarhistorische Recherchen, 1988.

      Puschmann, Rosmarie, Heinrich von Kleist's Cecilia Narrative: Researches in Art- and Literary-History, tr. Luanne T. Frank.  A translation of Heinrich von Kleists Cäcilien-Erzählung: Kunst- und literarhistorische Recherchen, 1988.  Unpublished MS, 2005-2006. Used as required text in English 4337, Fall, 2006, and announced for similar use for 3361, Fall 2011. For this 2011 course I translated 30 additional pages of to-date untranslated pertinent German scholarship.

      Role: Principal Investigator PI: Luanne Frank
  • 1999
    • Mar 1999 to Aug 2006 Feminist Images in the Paintings of Mexican Painter, Olga Dondé

       Multiple self-financed trips to Mexico City (one additional self-financed trip to Merida, for a one-man show of Olga Dondé's work at this, her birthplace) to interview Mexican Painter, Olga Dpndé, her family, friends, colleagues, art dealiers, and other contacts for a biographical account of her, her work, and her world.

      Role: Principal Investigator PI: Luanne Frank

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • Jan 2007 to Jan 2008 Paintings of Olga Donde sponsored by  - $1500
    • Aug 1999 to Mar 2000 Funding for The Female Principle Conference sponsored by  - $5000
    • Sept 1997 to Aug 1998 UTA English DEpartment Research Stipend sponsored by  - $500
    • Sept 1986 to Jan 1987 Faculty Development Leave sponsored by  - $6000
    • May 1983 to Sept 1983 Summer Research Grant sponsored by  - $700
    • Sept 1979 to May 1980 UTA Instructional Grant for Innovations in Teaching sponsored by  - $500
    • Sept 1972 to Aug 1973 Fellowship for Younger Humanists sponsored by  - $5000
    • Sept 1966 to Aug 1967 Horace H. Rackham Research Fellowship sponsored by  - $3000
    • Sept 1962 to June 1963 University of Michigan Fellowship sponsored by  - $1200
    • Sept 1960 to June 1961 Emory University Fellowship sponsored by  - $2000

Other Research Activities

  • 2009
    • Contemporary goddess events
      • Dec 2009 Myths of the Goddess

             As a means of broadening my experience of current interest in goddess traditions within and beyond the academy for my Lajja Gauri (pre-Hindu goddess) research and my Myth of the Goddess course, I participated in December 2009 in a (self-financed) South American goddess conference similar to those traditional in summer in Glastonbury, England and now taking place in Germany and Spain.  I was invited to present a program on Heidegger’s philosopher’s deity, Alétheia, at the December 2010 conference.  The dates conflicted with the final week of classes and I reluctantly declined.

  • 1996
    • Cultural and archaeological goddess research
      • Nov 1996 The Indian (sub-continent) goddess Lajja Gauri

        From 1996 through 1999, and self-financed, I traveled to India several times a year and, having been this on trips to the North and the South in the 1970s, not as a tourist but in ongoing attempts to view all of the 153 recorded examples of the initially pre-Hindu goddess Lajja Gauri in that country, a figure related to ancient Greek Baubo. I began by interviewing the head of the Archaeologial Survey of India, in Delhi, visited as many of the recorded sites as possible, both in museums (Madras, Calcutta, Bhuj, & others, as well as, en-route, London's British Museum) and in the field, and met and spoke with both university and Archaeological Survey of India personnel in Archaeological Survey museums, with local villagers, and with the discoverer of one of the Gauris still in worship, especially important because far from the usual geographies and because its temple is locally run and unknown even to the central temple administration of its state, Tamil Nadu. The outcomes: two scholarly papers read at conferences and mounting and fielding the conference The Female Principle, in 2000, which included a gallery show of life-sized photographs of Gauris as well as numerous carved, wooden figures characteristic in Mexican folk art apparently derived, via Europe's almost clandestine cathedral sculpture, from the Baubo noted.

  • 1995
    • Ismaili Islam's education of women
      • May 1995 The education of women by Ismaili Muslims

        In 1995 I made two self-financed trips to Pakistan's Northwest Territories to visit the schools, and a college, run by Ismaili Muslims (its leader: the Agha Kahn), a sect typically overlooked in the West. These schools were founded especially to educate girls and women, who are kept uneducated by Sunnis and Shias.  Outcome: two illustrated talks on this educational system, one at Skidmore College, one as a local community service.

  • 1987
    • Reearch on a Renaissance philosopher-physician-alchemist
      • Dec 1987 On the Track of Heinrich Khunrath

        Investigation, carried out in the Rare Book Room of the University of Wisconsin, in Glasgow libraries' alchemical holidings, and in the Bibliotheque Nationale (Paris) of the work of philosopher-physician-alchemist, Heinrich Khunrath, Leibartzt ("body doctor," i.e., personal physician) to Rudolph the Second, last emperor of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation.  Outcome: four conference papers on Khunrath, one including a theory concerning his probable influence on a major Western European literary figure.

Live Performances

  • 2011
    • June 2011 Answering a question on the meaning of Truth in Heidegger, San Francisco, May, 2011. Facebook video

      Response to question asked in Q & A period following lecture presentation on Post-Strucuralism, clandestinely recorded by an audience member and placed on Facebook

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Recordings

  • 2011
    • June 2011 Answering a question on the meaning of Truth in Heidegger, San Francisco, May, 2011. Facebok video

      Response to question asked in Q & A period following lecture presentation on Post-Strucuralism, clandestinely recorded by an audience member and placed on Facebook

      [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Students Supervised

  • Doctoral
    • Present

      Dissertation chair.  Supervise dissertation on Michel Foucault

    • Present

      Dissertation chair.  Dissertation on Chora in Euripides

Courses

      • ENGL 4356-001 Literary Criticism II

        Examines primary critics from theory's turn to romanticism (as theory) in the late nineteenth century in the work of Pater through the present, and may include such figures as Nietsche, Freud, Heidegger, Foucault, Derrida, and Lacan through post-Heideggerians such as Agamben, Badiou, and Marion.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4356-001 Literary Criticism II

        Examines primary Western critics from the turn of theory to romanticism in the late nineteenth century in the work of Pater through the present, and may include the work of Freud, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Foucault, Derrida, Lacan, Gadamer, and those who come after:  Agamben, Jean-Luc Nancy, and Marion.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-007 AMERICAN LITERATURE

        English 2329.007 is a course of selected readings in American Literature that give a rich and necessarily limited (“limited,” here, in the sense of a single-semester’s time) idea of the range and depth this literature has achieved in its brief existence--“brief” when compared with the temporal range of the largely-European literatures that ground American Lit, and that include Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, modern, and contemporary literatures.

                    This course features examples of four basic literary genres: epic (novel & short story, i.e., narrative fiction), drama, poetry, and essay. The essay, often more philosophical and/or political than “literary,” is represented more frequently in accounts of American Literature than in the older literatures. 

        One might best call this course a selection from among currently recognized examples of an American literary tradition. The course’s anthology is by any measure exceptional in its range and quality.

                    You, the students, are asked (nay required) to read the scheduled selections closely, attempting to understand, from a subjective point of view, what it “is,” or seems to “be,” that these selections are saying or trying to say—what point or points they are arguing. Also, and of most importance, to note your response to them and how they might or might not have become part of your “knowing.” The course’s emphasis on understanding is importantly an emphasis on your relating to a given assigned text first of all out of your subjective self, the most fundamental basis of even your objective understandings.

                    You’re asked to identify and explain what given selections mean to you and how and why—how they carry you forward, retard your progress, leave you uncertain and/or confused, enlighten you, and enlarge or otherwise alter who you “are,” or might be/become by expanding your (literary and other) horizons (“other,” here noting the course anthology’s attempt to include diverse disciplines under the rubric “literature”). You’re asked to recognize specific literary genres in your speaking and writing, and to write in ways, and with usages, currently accepted in English.

                    The course also includes a selection of much-used, theoretical/experiential ways of knowing now almost taken for granted--avenues to literary (or any humanistic) understanding--and includes writing assignments of four papers (three one-page ones plus the required signature assignment [see below]) making use of these “approaches” as means of generating or recognizing specific types of understandings.

                    The course also includes a scheduled mid-term and a final exam, all of the items on which will have been covered in class.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4355-001 Revolutionary Theories

        Revolutionary Theories: An examination and application of literary-critical theories effecting revolutions in literary understandings.

                    Anticipated outcomes: Students make the studied theories their own by writing one-page papers summarizing and applying each theory to a literary work of their choice.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4399-002 Senior Seminar: Heidegger

        The tradition of Western thought, guided for 2500 years by classical thinking deriving from Plato, established numerous ideals to which members of Western societies were expected to adapt their lives. Little explicit philosophical attention was paid to an individual’s developing, in addition, his or her own, individual self as a goal worth acknowledging or achieving. It was generally assumed that the needs of society and of the given person matched. (This is still, not incorrectly, assumed.)

        The nineteenth century, however, witnesses a number of specific breakthroughs--in literature, politics, psychology, philosophy--toward recognition of the need of many humans “to become who they are” should this somehow fall outside the body of a society’s conventional requirements. But it remains for the twentieth century to produce a systematic account 1) of the potentially deleterious effects of failing to look beyond society’s directives and toward the fulfillment of one’s own possibilities, should these two differ, and 2) of what the means might be to become who one is. This account is Being and Time, the chief textual focus of this course and the grounding text of much cotemporary theory.

        Within two years of its publication, this book made its author the West’s most celebrated thinker. It continues to spawn legions of readers (literary and cultural critics, psychoanalysts, sociologists, preachers, priests, health professionals and others) who “let [themselves] learn” from it, as well as scholars of its method, one beauty of which is to avoid a methodology, avoid rules.  This is not a “how to” book.  The individual is left to the individual.

        This text’s grounding the literary critical movements of post-structuralism and deconstruction and influencing literary critical movements since, however, is its ticket to English departments, making it indispensable to their study of theory, rhetoric, and creative writing.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4346-001 Psychoanalysis and Literature

        is an introductory course in psychoanalysis a) with a view toward its applicability to the interpretation and/or creation of literature and the arts, and b) with emphasis on reading, understanding, and using texts by rather than about the two still-towering figures of psychoanalysis and certain of their “followers,” both literary and scholarly.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-007 AMERICAN LITERATURE

                    English 2329.007 is a course of selected readings in American Literature that give a rich and necessarily limited idea of the range and depth this literature has achieved in its brief existence--“limited,” here, in the sense of a single-semester’s time; “brief” existence: brief when compared with the temporal range of the largely-European literatures that ground American Lit, and that include Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, modern, and contemporary literatures.

                    This course features examples of four basic literary genres: epic (novel, short story, i.e., narrative fiction), drama, poetry, and essay. The essay, often more philosophical and/or political than “literary,” is represented here more frequently than in the older literatures. 

        One might best call this course a selection from among currently recognized examples of an American literary tradition. The course’s anthology is by any measure exceptional in its range and quality.

                    You, the students, are asked (nay required) to read the scheduled selections closely, attempting to understand, from a subjective point of view, what it “is,” or seems to “be,” that these selections are saying or trying to say—what point or points they are arguing. Also, and of most importance, to note your response to them and how they might or might not have become part of your “knowing.” The course’s emphasis on understanding is importantly an emphasis on your relating to a given assigned text first of all out of your subjective self and situation(s). These are in any case the basis of all, however objective, understandings.

                    You’re asked to identify and explain what given selections mean to you and how and why—how they carry you forward, retard your progress, leave you uncertain and/or confused, enlighten you, and enlarge or otherwise alter who you “are,” or might be/become by expanding your (literary and other) horizons (“other,” here noting the course anthology’s attempt to include diverse disciplines under the rubric “literature.”) You’re asked to recognize specific literary genres in your speaking and writing, and to write in ways, and with usages, currently accepted in English.

                    The course also includes a selection of much-used, theoretical/experiential ways of knowing now almost taken for granted--avenues to literary (or any humanistic) understanding--and includes writing assignments of four papers (three plus the required signature assignment) making use of these “approaches” as means of generating or recognizing specific types of understandings.

                    The course also includes a scheduled mid-term and an exam, all of the items of which will have been covered in class.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • ENGL 4399-002 Senior Seminar: Heidegger

        The tradition of Western thought, guided for 2500 years by classical thinking deriving from Plato, established numerous ideals to which members of Western societies were expected to adapt their lives. Little explicit philosophical attention was paid to an individual’s developing, in addition, his or her own, individual self as a goal worth acknowledging or achieving. It was generally assumed that the needs of society and of the given person matched. (This is still, not incorrectly, assumed.)

        The nineteenth century, however, witnesses a number of specific breakthroughs--in literature, politics, psychology, philosophy--toward recognition of the need of many humans “to become who they are” should this somehow fall outside the body of a society’s conventional requirements. But it remains for the twentieth century to produce a systematic account 1) of the potentially deleterious effects of failing to look beyond society’s directives and toward the fulfillment of one’s own possibilities, should these two differ, and 2) of what the means might be to become who one is. This account is Being and Time, the chief textual focus of this course and the grounding text of much cotemporary theory.

        Within two years of its publication, this book made its author the West’s most celebrated thinker. It continues to spawn legions of readers (literary and cultural critics, psychoanalysts, sociologists, preachers, priests, health professionals and others) who “let [themselves] learn” from it, as well as scholars of its method, one beauty of which is to avoid a methodology, avoid rules.  This is not a “how to” book.  The individual is left to the individual.

        This text’s grounding the literary critical movements of post-structuralism and deconstruction and influencing literary critical movements since, however, is its ticket to English departments, making it indispensable to their study of theory, rhetoric, and creative writing.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-004 Reading literature (and philosophy) for answers: "Who are you and what are your doing about it (--or not) ?"

        This course reads a selection of narrative and dramatic literary works each of which implicitly confronts us with the questions above, in the form of the works’ controlling interpretations. It views their characters’ understandings (i.e., interpretations) of themselves, and their interpretations of others and of situations in which they find themselves as indicators of where these characters (as well, implicitly, as ourselves) are “coming from” and thus as implicit indicators of aspects of their (and our) identity, sometimes called our “who.”

        It then looks at how interpretations, and indeed “knowing” itself, appear to be generated, and it reads excerpts from a major twentieth-century thinker, Martin Heidegger, whose work carries forward the contemporary view of the nature of this generativity, articulating the pattern in and/or across which it takes place, and developing it into an account of the nature of the entity ultimately responsible for the genesis of this knowing: ourselves--this word to be understood, generally speaking, as “the human being,” (though in what we read we shall not in fact see this made explicit).

        This thinker thus must ask the question, and he asks it, philosophically speaking (i.e., not psychologically or biologically speaking), of the nature of this entity, by inquiring into its “ways of being.” It was once known, and still necessarily conceives of itself chiefly as, the animal rationale (the rational animal). He gives it a more inclusive name: Dasein. In merely identifying this entity’s ways of being, this thinker points a direction for his reader. But he leaves it to the reader to ponder the question of whether or not, and/or to what extent, these ways describe the reader’s own ways, and which of them might best contribute to a life that can conform to a human’s sense of its “itselfness,” its “ownmost ownness” the now threadbare word in English being “authenticity.” The question that in his work confronts the reader, again and always implicitly, is whether, if this entity continues to look on itself primarily as the animal rationale, as to a large extent it must continue to--it also has the capacity, beyond the ratio, to live out what it might recognize as aspects of itself potentially existing on other, more fundamental levels, levels at which unrealized aspects of its itselfness, or authenticity, also dwell and can be realized and possibly articulated.

        (This thinker’s first and major work has enjoyed an influence difficult to measure.  One might call it culturally definitive in that it has left and continues to leave its mark on all of the humanities and certain of the sciences and technologies, to which it also addresses itself, not excluding physics but indeed excluding mathematics, though it is with a mathematician that it originated, early in the twentieth century. It will not be from this former mathematician’s texts, however [Edmund Husserl’s], that we shall be reading.)

        We shall, via canonical literary works and this thinker’s magnum opus, look at what might go to make up this “who,” with which we and the literature are concerned--the literature implicitly in its constructions of character and situation, we in our explicit concern for ourselves--and at what that freedom to be who we are may consist of that apparently factors into our authenticity.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6340-001 Metacritical Theory (Heidegger)

                                          Thumbnail Curse Description and Outcomes

        The tradition of Western thought, guided for 2500 years by classical thinking deriving from Plato, established numerous ideals to which all members of Western societies were expected to adapt their lives.  Little explicit philosophical attention was paid to an individual’s developing his or her own, individual self as a goal worth acknowledging or achieving. It was simply assumed that the needs of society and of the given person were identical. (This is still, to an extent, and not incorrectly, assumed.)

        The nineteenth century, however, witnesses several breakthroughs--in literature, politics, psychology, philosophy--toward recognition of the need of many humans “to become who they are” (rather than restrict themselves to fulfilling social prescriptions) and of the validity of fulfilling this need.  But it remains for the twentieth century to produce a systematic account 1) of the deleterious effects of failing to look beyond society’s requirements and toward the fulfillment of one’s own potential, and 2) of what the means might be to become who one is.  This account is Being and Time.

        Being and Time made its author, Martin Heidegger, the West’s most celebrated thinker within two years of its publication.  It has not only never gone out of print but continues to spawn legions of readers (literary and cultural critics, psychoanalysts, sociologists, preachers, priests, and others) who “let [themselves] learn” from it, as well as scholars of its method, the beauty of which is to avoid a methodology, avoid rules.  This is not a “how to” book.  The individual is left to the individual.

        This work, since it grounds the literary critical movements of post-structuralism and deconstruction, makes familiarity with it imperative for literary critics. This is its ticket to emphasis in programs that study literature and rhetoric, and thus that it represents the primary reading of this course.

        A part of a second, later Heidegger text, the Parmenides, also figures in the course, as do selections from the most recent, and exhaustive, reading of Heidegger to date--this by one of the three most influential Heidegger scholar-critics in the US (and probably the world), Stanford’s Thomas Sheehan.

        What these texts offer is examined by this course’s students and instructor, both in class and in writing, for its potential to provide understandings, first of all, directed toward the individual student’s own “becoming,” and, second, toward the understanding, via this and the course’s other two texts, of literary works of the student’s choosing.

        Given the close in-class readings the course’s students and instructor make of these texts, the written summaries of them that students write, and the relationships to personal and literary understandings students and instructor discover via these readings and summaries, course outcomes are expected to yield usable understandings of challenging theoretical texts and the demonstrated ability to read and write across them to these understandings

        Texts: see course schedule above.

        Papers: approx. five one-page papers.

        Quizzes: rare and announced.

         Final exam.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6340-001 Metacritical Theory (Heidegger)

                                   Thumbnail Course Description and Outcomes

        The tradition of Western thought, guided for 2500 years by classical thinking deriving from Plato, established numerous ideals to which all members of Western societies were expected to adapt their lives.  Little explicit philosophical attention was paid to an individual’s developing his or her own, individual self as a goal worth acknowledging or achieving. It was simply assumed that the needs of society and of the given person were identical. (This is still, to an extent, and not incorrectly, assumed.)

        The nineteenth century, however, witnesses several breakthroughs--in literature, politics, psychology, philosophy--toward recognition of the need of many humans “to become who they are” (rather than restrict themselves to fulfilling social prescriptions) and of the validity of fulfilling this need.  But it remains for the twentieth century to produce a systematic account 1) of the deleterious effects of failing to look beyond society’s requirements and toward the fulfillment of one’s own potential, and 2) of what the means might be to become who one is.  This account is Being and Time.

        Being and Time made its author, Martin Heidegger, the West’s most celebrated thinker within two years of its publication.  It has not only never gone out of print but continues to spawn legions of readers (literary and cultural critics, psychoanalysts, sociologists, preachers, priests, and others) who “let [themselves] learn” from it, as well as scholars of its method, the beauty of which is to avoid a methodology, avoid rules.  This is not a “how to” book.  The individual is left to the individual.

        This work, since it grounds the literary critical movements of post-structuralism and deconstruction, makes familiarity with it imperative for literary critics. This is its ticket to emphasis in programs that study literature and rhetoric, and thus that it represents the primary reading of this course.

        A part of a second, later Heidegger text, the Parmenides, also figures in the course, as do selections from the most recent, and exhaustive, reading of Heidegger to date--this by one of the three most influential Heidegger scholar-critics in the US (and probably the world), Stanford’s Thomas Sheehan.

        What these texts offer is examined by this course’s students and instructor, both in class and in writing, for its potential to provide understandings, first of all, directed toward the individual student’s own “becoming,” and, second, toward the understanding, via this and the course’s other two texts, of literary works of the student’s choosing.

        Given the close in-class readings the course’s students and instructor make of these texts, the written summaries of them that students write, and the relationships to personal and literary understandings students and instructor discover via these readings and summaries, course outcomes are expected to yield usable understandings of challenging theoretical texts and the demonstrated ability to read and write across them to these understandings

        Texts: see course schedule above.

        Papers: approx. five one-page papers.

        Quizzes: rare and announced.

         Final exam.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3361-001 History of World Literature I

        The present course focuses on close readings of masterpieces of “world”  literature that we understand as descriptive and determinative of who we, participants in and inhabitants of Western culture, are.  We thus look on them as indispensable to our understandings of ourselves, our society, and our systems of thought, and we include them them on our lists of must-reads if we’re to be familiar with our cultural-literary groundings.  We shall also examine a small handful of ways of reading these works that will let us identify the understandings that certain  literary-critical and psychological approaches can provide.  Abstractions aside, however, these works all tell good, gripping stories.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5380-001 TEXTUAL THEORIES OF CULTURE

        Close readings of Martin Heidegger's magnum opus, Being and Time and one of his later works, the Parmenides, and a reading and discussion of selected chapters of Thomas Sheehan's Making Sense of Heidegger: A Paradigm Shift.

      • ENGL 4371-002 ADVANCED ARGUMENTATION

        The present course (Advanced Argumentation), attempts to provide a modicum of understanding of the way arguments work by reading arguments that have made their way in the world and decisively altered the world they address.  It is designed from its outset to emphasize the subjective over the objective mode of understanding in approaching the notion of argument--that is, to recognize the importance of the relation of the student (potentially you) to what is read (a given argument); to emphasize that assessment of any argument is a function of this relation; and only then to view argument from a quasi-objective (a conceivably universal) standpoint.

                    To this end the course will read a few pages of a long-well-known work to bring alive, succinctly, the distinctions between the all-too-dry abstractions “subjective” and “objective” and the parallel though less dry “Romantic” and “Classic” as these ways of being and knowing split the world of discourse between them.  It will then read a similarly few pages of Aristotle (the West’s first instructor in the ways of argument).  Finally, as the body of the course proper, it will examine and discuss examples of five arguments--literary/art-critical, philosophical, psychoanalytical, and political--that have stood the tests of time in the real world. Written assignments are a one-page paper making use of the methods and insights of each of the five, as applied to a literary work of the student’s choice, and a five-page research paper including footnotes and a 5-item bibliographical list of secondary sources consulted.  This paper will be preceded by a preliminary statement of its topic, a preliminary list of its secondary sources, and two-sentence summaries of their argument.  

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours4 Documents
      • ENGL 4345-001 Topics in Critical Theory: Heidegger

        Thumbnail Course Description & Outcomes                  

        The tradition of Western thought, guided for 2500 years by classical thinking deriving from Plato, established numerous ideals to which all members of Western societies were expected to adapt their lives.  Little philosophical attention was paid to an individual’s developing his or her own, individual self as a goal worth acknowledging or achieving. It was simply assumed that the needs of society and of the given person were identical. (This is still, to an extent, and not incorrectly, assumed.)

        The nineteenth century, however, witnesses several breakthroughs--in literature, politics, psychology, philosophy--toward recognition of the need of many humans “to become who they are” (rather than become the fulfillment of a social prescription) and of the validity of fulfilling this need.  But it remains for the twentieth century to produce a systematic account 1) of the deleterious effects of failing to look beyond society’s requirements and toward the fulfillment of one’s own potential, and 2) of what it looks like to become who one is. 

        This twentieth-century account made its author, Martin Heidegger, the West’s most celebrated thinker within two years of its publication, and it has not only never gone out of print but continues to spawn legions of readers who would learn from it (literary and cultural critics, preachers, priests, psychoanalysts, and others) who would “let [themselves] learn” from it, as well as scholars of its method, the beauty of which is to avoid a methodology, avoid rules.  This is not a “how to” book.  The individual is left to the individual.

        This work, since it grounds the literary critical movements of post-structuralism and deconstruction, makes familiarity with it imperative for literary critics.  It thus represents the primary reading of this course.

        A part of a second, later Heideggerian text, the Parmenides also figures in the course.

        What these texts offer is examined by this course’s students, both in class and in writing, for its potential to provide understandings of literary works of the student’s choosing.  It is assumed that students will make such personal use of this key work’s contents, as they see fit.

        Given the close in-class readings the course’s students make of these texts, the written summaries of them that they write, and the relationships to literary understandings they discover via these readings and summaries yield the following as course outcomes: usable understandings of these difficult texts, and the demonstrated ability to read and write across them to these understandings 

        Texts: 

        Heidegger, Martin.  Being and Time, tr. John MacQuarrie and Edward Robinson.   New York: Harper, 1962 (Gn. 1927).

        Heidegger, Martin.  Parmenides, tr. André Schuwer and Richard Rojcewicz.  Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1992 (Gn. 1982).     

        Papers:  Approximately seven one-page papers.

        Quizzes. Occasional and announced.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4399-002 Senior Seminar: Mythology

        Thumbnail Course Description

        Plato has the honor early of denigrating myth in favor of the ratio; Descartes will share the honor; the Age of Reason will also assume that myth has run its course, is mere falsehood, useless, to be dispensed with.  Despite science’s & technology’s indifference or rejection, myth does not die. Already long recognized by some humanists (writers, literary critics, artists, theorists of art, anthropologists, students of religion, historians, psychologists, psychoanalysts) as foundational, culturally UN-displaceable, able to dissolve personal and social impasses, and, insofar as we know, indispensable to the human self, it increases in significance, recruiting from ever wider disciplinary arenas—ironically, now, philosophy (its former foe [see Heidegger’s Parmenides]) and even politics (see Blumenberg, Work on Myth) .

        When we as Westerners think, or think of, myth, we may typically think of “Classical” myth, that body of myth best-known from the Greece of Hesiod’s Theogony, Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, and the great Greek tragedians--the body of myth that inspires Freud’s Oedipus complex, in part inhabits the Jungian collective unconscious, generates innumerable literary works (a few examples are Joyce, Kafka, Mann), and provides bone and flesh for films (now potentially bona fide works of art) and television drama. Unquestionably, this body of myth grounds Western culture.  It is relatively recent, however, when viewed on a timeline extending from Paleolithic through Neolithic, Cretan, Bronze-Age, Mesopotamian, Egyptian, and Babylonian myth, which precede it and significantly inform it and us.  (We have yet to mention Celtic and Norse myth, also influential in the West, or Hindu myth, or crossed into the still more-distant Orient, nor will we find time to do so in the present course, focusing, rather, on the lineup of myth systems that feed most directly into Greek myth and the Christian religion (i.e., European culture).

        In order to gain an idea of the profound temporal depth at which familiar mythological motifs and/or patterns of action may be said to originate, and to familiarize ourselves with their geographical and ethnic context, we shall look at brief accounts of the earliest bodies of myth within our purview, most of which were dominated by female deities; briefly review classical myth and mythological motifs in Christianity; and acquaint ourselves with some of the most influential and representative of those students of myth who have revealed--and argued--the ongoing aliveness and indispensability (the use) of myth to contemporary thought and life (which is to say highly pre-determined, technological life) and to our personal understandings of who we are.

        4399, a capstone course, asks a 10-page research, or investigative, paper.  In order to “test the waters,” as it were, of various myth systems’ appeal for research in connection with literary (or other) works of art, students write a series of one-page papers exploring the possibilities for elucidating a literary work that given myth systems might provide. In this way, students can gain an idea, ahead of time, of the potential appeal, or lack of it, of a given myth system, or combination of systems, for the research they might wish to engage in.

        Papers: 

        Four One-page summaries of assigned chapters and possible applications.

        One ten-page research paper.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5300-001 Theory and Practice

         Thumbnail Course Description, Outcomes, & Texts

        The following is an introductory course in Literary Criticism and Theory.  It is designed to acquaint students with the range, depth, and variety of criticism and theory that have influenced literary studies most strongly since, and including, the late nineteenth century, and to acquaint or re-acquaint students with the conventions of the research paper.

        The course’s intentions are l) to guide students to an awareness of the work of specific critics and theorists; 2) to guide students to a recognition of the nature of the work of these critics’ and then to a close familiarity with it; and 3) to guide students to produce the sort of criticism that these critics and theorists have either themselves produced or have influenced.  That is, by the course’s end, students will have had the opportunity a) to become acquainted with selected critics/theorists through passive reading; b) to understand, through summarizing in writing, the major points made by the selected critics/theorists; c) to make use of--in writing, in one-page papers--these critics’/theorists’ methods as means of elucidating a literary work of each student’s choice; and d) to recognize and correct such infelicities of punctuation, grammar, style, and usage as their and their classmates’ papers expose.  One paper (# 9), which can run to five pages, functions as an abbreviated research paper.

                 Papers: Eight Xeroxed one-page papers & one multi-page, handwritten paper.

                 Exam.

        TEXTS  (PLEASE NOTE: Brackets [ ] surround assigned or optional readings.  Assigned readings come as PDFs or are on reserve.)

        Leitsch, Vincent B.  Norton Anthology of Criticism and Theory.  New York: Norton, 2010.

        Foucault, Michel.  The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences.  New York: Vintage, 1973. (Les Mots et les Choses, 1966).

        Freud, Sigmund.  The Interpretation of Dreams, tr. John Strachey.  New York: Avon, 1965 (Gn.Die Traumdeutung. 1900 [1899]).

        Baldick, Chris.  Oxford Concise Dictionary of Literary Terms.  Oxford: Oxford UP, 2004 (or another perhaps already in your possession)

        MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers.  New York: Modern Language Association, 2009 or

        Turabian, Kate.  Manual for Writers of Theses, Term Papers, and Dissertations.  Chicago: Chicago UP, 1996.

        [Auerbach, Eric. Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature.  Princeton:  Princeton UP, 1953.]

        [Bruss, Elizabeth.  Beautiful Theories.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1982.]

        [Keuls, Eva.  The Reign of the Phallus.  New York: Harper, l985.]

        [Lotman, Jurij and Boris Uspensky.  The Semiotics of Russian Culture.  Ann Arbor: U of Mich P 1972. ] 

        [Lovejoy, Arthur O. Preface & Chapters One & Two,  The Great Chain of Being.  Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1936.]

        [Neumann, Erich.  The Great Mother.  Princeton: Princeton UP, 1955.]

        [Pater, Walter.  “Botticelli,” pp. 46-53 in The Renaissance.  New York: Mentor, 1959 {1873}.]

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6340-001 Metacritical Theory (Heidegger, Foucault, Derrida)

        The present 6340 focuses on three still-contemporary thinkers indispensable to understanding the backgrounds and most invigorating currents of literary-cultural theory and criticism today: Martin Heidegger, Michel Foucault, and Jacques Derrida—Heidegger for grounding what, in the hands of his “children” (Foucault and Derrida), would become known in part as post-structuralism and deconstruction; Foucault for anchoring post-structuralism definitively; and Derrida for carrying it to the varied extremes and unpredictable and fruitful openings that repeatedly earn for him the label “obstreperous.”

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4356-001 Engl 4356-001

                   The present course is the second half of a once-required two-semester introduction to the sector of literary studies falling under the rubric of criticism and theory.  This sector became increasingly important in the twentieth century, to the point that, from earlier being but perfunctorily acknowledged and even scorned for threatening to displace literature itself as the chief focus of literary studies, it became recognized as indispensable, then required, first of graduate students only, then of undergraduates.  At UTA the undergraduate requirement initially took the form of a single survey course. Two are now required for English majors, as well as a third, 4399, focusing on a single theorist or set of theories.

                    The first half of the two-semester survey requirement offered by the present instructor moves relatively chronologically, focusing on the best-known of the methodologies that largely defined literary criticism from the end of the nineteenth through much of the twentieth century, such as impressionism (Pater), History of Ideas (Lovejoy), Freudian and Jungian psychoanalysis (Freud, and Neumann [on Jung]), semiotics (Saussure, Lotman, Uspensky), Marxist-derived theory (Lukacs, Jameson), hermeneutics (Gadamer via Palmer), and post-structuralism (Foucault).  Readings were a mixture of relatively “pure” theory on the one hand  (Pater, Freud) and applied theory on the other (Neumann, Lotman, Uspensky, Lukacs, Jameson, Gadamer, Foucault).

                    The present half of the two-semester sequence moves more strictly chronologically and, rather than view some methodologies as applied by the original theorists’ followers (the last of the lists above), focuses all but exclusively on the grounding theorists themselves--on what one might call “the theory behind the theory.”   Of course even the so-called grounding theorists have themselves been dependent on important, enabling forerunners (Hegel on Herder, Marx on Hegel, Jung on Freud, Heidegger on Nietzsche and Dilthey among others).  But they are still considered major grounding sites of burgeoning methodologies enabled by them and associated with their names.

        The theory behind the theory is almost inevitably philosophy, as the anthology for the course emphasizes with its inclusion of large-sized examples of the thinkers whose work is key to different streams of what comes after them.  Hume, for example, will, for our purposes at least, inaugurate a certain skepticism that will startle Kant and weave its way along underneath idealism to emerge in post-structuralism in the twentieth century; Burke will influence Kant and everyone thereafter who is interested in the beautiful as it relates to the sublime; Kant will enable phenomenology (Husserl) and thus the New Criticism, structuralism, and semiotics. Hegel (leaning on Herder) will inspire all later historicist thinkers whether spiritually or materially inclined, one of the most influential of these being Marx, as Marx will not fail to influence everyone after him concerned with the economic basis of literature, and so on down the line.

                    The way learning will take place in the course will be for us to read the assigned theorist at home before the date beside which the theorist’s name appears on the syllabus; then read as much as possible of the assigned material together in class, clarifying as much of it as possible; and thereafter at home summarize it briefly in our own words for 3/4 of a one-page paper, double-spaced, and using it to understand, in the final 1/4 of the same one-page paper, an aspect of a literary work of the student’s choice, to which it is applicable.  Each paper will be read aloud in class.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3361-002 Hist. of World Lit I: Classical and Renaissance

                                                          THUMBNAIL COURSE DESCRIPTION    

        The present course is designed 1) to acquaint the student with selected examples of the major works that make up the foundational texts of Western literature, from the Greek epic (in this case Homer’s Odyssey), the grounding for all Western epics thereafter, through the later, Latin epic (Virgil’s Aeneid), to the Medieval Italian epic (Dante’s Divine Comedy), and 2) to include, as well, examples of Classical drama (Aeschylus’s Agamemnon, and Euripides’ Medea).

                   The course is also designed to acquaint the student with a selection of the key literary-critical texts that have provided paths to understanding literary texts of all ages and traditions.

                    Students will write a series of one-page papers interpreting the literary works in terms of the literary-critical texts.

                    Tests:  Announced in-class paper and announced quizzes.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5300-001 Theory And Practice Of English Studies

                                           Tentative Thumbnail Course Description

                   The following is an introductory graduate course in Literary Theory.  It follows on two introductory undergraduate courses examining related material. Like those, it is designed to acquaint students with the range, depth, and variety of theories that have influenced literary studies most strongly since, and including, the late eighteenth and early and late nineteenth centuries, and to provide students an opportunity to acquaint or re-acquaint themselves with the conventions of the research paper.                

                   The course’s intentions are l) to direct students to the work of specific theorists; 2) to encourage students to recognize the nature of the work of these theorists and then to familiarize themselves closely with it; and 3) to provide students with an opportunity to produce the sort of criticism that these theorists have either themselves produced or have influenced.  That is, by the course’s end, students will have had the opportunity a) to become acquainted with selected theorists through passive reading; b) to understand, through summarizing in writing, the major points made by the selected theorists; c) to make use of--in writing, in long, one-page papers--these theorists’ methods as means of elucidating a literary work of each student’s choice; and d) to recognize and correct such infelicities of punctuation, grammar, style, and usage as their and their classmates’ papers may expose.  The final paper, which can run to five pages, functions as an abbreviated research paper.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5380-001 TEXTUAL THEORIES OF CULTURE

        Dear reader:You are certain to be bored by this description to the point of opening a vein. I would have been, at your stage of this game.The probable reason: key words here, until one reads Heidegger himself, strike one as dead, washed up, threadbare--as all but meaningless on the page or as empty noise when spoken--abstractions void of heart, feeling, imagination, life. One of the many attempts Heidegger succeeds at in writing his works, offering his courses, is to re-invest these words with the life that the philosophical tradition since Plato, in its search for absolutes, for something more stable and less concrete than life to rely on, had allowed to seep out of these words.

        But before we look at them: “Why Heidegger?”What brings this thinker, a philosopher and one of the twentieth century’s two most influential, to show up as an offering in departments of English? One answer: though he indeed stands on the shoulders of others who make him possible, Heidegger is himself a foundation for the radical changes that swept literary criticism and theory in the second half of the twentieth century and that persist there as central forces: post-structuralism, deconstruction, hermeneutics (to which latter we owe reader-response theory), environmentalism.He is thus a probable reason for philosophy’s having become a sine qua non for literary and cultural theorists. Foucault and Derrida, for example, and other prominent figures among “Heidegger’s children” are unthinkable without Heidegger, and in many ways remain inadequately understandable until read across him.Foucault, for example, names Heidegger as one of only “two experiences I have had.” If one knows Foucault, this is not nothing. (The other “experience” is Nietzsche.)In short, though he himself has roots in a long and varied tradition, Heidegger grounds contemporary criticism.

        The key words noted above, and now, still reluctant to be said without the depth and density of meaning and the susceptibility to time and change that Heidegger uncovers in them, are “Being” and “truth.” Heidegger’s magnum opus, Being and Time (BT, 1927) sets out to remove the chill of abstraction and relative unconcern that by his time had settled over the first of these words, and he succeeds, not by deriving it from a realm of time-less ideas, but by linking it indissolubly with time, and fragile man.And though Heidegger has focused on the second word since his earliest courses (1919), it is in the Parmenides (1942-43) that he achieves an understanding finally worthy of what he sees and has struggled toward adequately bringing to life in the word truth. The work is a stunning achievement of thinking.

        It is with this Parmenides, one of Heidegger’s most crucial texts after BT, that we begin this course, following it up with essays that seemed to tumble out of the late Heidegger with his focus on the Pre-Socratics, the import of whose insights, he saw, had been inadequately discerned by Plato and the long line of metaphysicians—purists all--who traced Plato’s steps and, with him, would dominate the thought of the West.It is Heidegger who, after two millennia, is at last able, where others whose voices had been choked off had failed, to mark a decisive, and lasting, break with this tradition.

        That the tradition is indeed metaphysical explains what may seem a certain focus in this course on metaphysics for metaphysics’ sake. (Note the prominence of the word in two of our titles).But precisely the contrary is the case.Heidegger assails metaphysics, its stasis and abstractions, from his beginning lectures, in which he astonishes his students by asserting, in early defiance: “world worlds” (for now we let this remain without comment) and by exposing the shallowness, the not-knowing, of subject-object thinking, which, he says “does not think.” Heidegger is an anti-metaphysician. (But not because he fails to understand and appreciate the metaphysical way of “knowing.”)

        The course includes examinations of some of Heidegger’s best-known, most influential, works and essays, and it also looks at early and late chapters of a now much-discussed course that has come into prominence relatively recently, possibly because of its late translation.

        For students who have not read Being and Time and wish to, we shall make special arrangements.

        Procedure:The course proceeds via at-home and in-class readings, followed by one-page papers, which are the basis of the course grade.

        Texts:Parmenides, Early Greek Thinking, What is Called Thinking, Introduction to Metaphysics, Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics, and On the Way to Language.The essays “Origin,” “Building, Dwelling,” and “What are Poets For?” are in Martin Heidegger, Poetry, Language, Thought. “Letter on Humanism” and “The Question According to Technology” will come as PDFs, unless students own Martin Heidegger, Basic Writings and/or Pathmarks, both of which contain the “Letter,” or the small volume entitled The Question Concerning Technology.

        Recommended:Martin Heidegger, Being and Time and Theodore Kisiel, the Genesis of Heidegger’s Being and Time.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-005 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        The following is an introductory course in the study of literature, with emphasis on Literary Criticism and Theory.It is designed to acquaint students with the range, depth, and variety of methodologies of criticism, grounded in theory, that have influenced literary studies most strongly since, and including, the late nineteenth century, and to acquaint or re-acquaint students with the conventions of the research paper. The course’s intentions are l) to guide students to an awarenessof the work of specific critics and theorists; 2) to guide students to a recognition of the nature of the work of these critics’ and then to a close    familiarity with it; and 3) to guide students to produce the sort of criticism that these critics and theorists have either themselves produced or have influenced. That is, by the course’s end, students will have had the opportunity a) to become acquainted with selected critics/theorists through passive reading; b) to understand, through summarizing in writing, the major points made by the selected critics/theorists; c) to make use of--in writing, in one-page papers--these critics’/theorists’ methods as means of elucidating a literary work of each student’s choice; and d) to recognize and correct such infelicities of punctuation, grammar, style, and usage as their and their classmates’ papers expose.One paper (# 7), which can run to five pages, functions as an abbreviated research paper.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 3300-002 Heidegger, Being and Time

        The tradition of Western thought, guided for 2500 years by classical thinking deriving from Plato, established numerous ideals to which all members of Western societies were expected to adapt their lives. Little philosophical attention was paid to an individual’s developing his or her own, individual self as a goal worth acknowledging or achieving. It was simply assumed that the needs of society and of the given person were identical. (This is still, to an extent not incorrectly, assumed.) The nineteenth century, however, witnesses several breakthroughs--in literature, psychology, philosophy--toward recognition of the need of many humans “to become who they are†(rather than become the fulfillment of a social prescription) and of the validity of fulfilling this need. But it remains for the twentieth century to produce a systematic account 1) of the deleterious effects of failing to look beyond society’s requirements and toward the fulfillment of one’s own potential, and 2) of what it looks like to become who one is. This twentieth-century account made its author the West’s most celebrated thinker within two years, and it has not only never gone out of print but continues to spawn legions of readers who would learn from it, and preachers, priests, and psychoanalysts who would “let learn†from it, as well as scholars of its method, the beauty of which is to avoid a methodology, avoid rules. This is not a “how to†book. The individual is left to the individual. This work, which, incidentally, also grounds the literary critical movements of post-structuralism and deconstruction, making familiarity with it imperative for literary critics, represents the primary reading of this course. What it offers is examined by students, in writing, for its potential to provide understandings of literary works of the student’s choosing. Text: Heidegger, Martin. Being and Time, tr. John MacQuarrie and Edward Robinson. New York: Harper, 1962. . Papers: Approximately seven one-page papers. Quizzes. Occasional and announced.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4356-001 Literary Criticism II
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2350-006 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2350-007 Intro to Texts
        The following is an introductory course in Literary Criticism and Theory.It is designed to acquaint students with the range, depth, and variety of criticism and theory that have influenced literary studies most strongly since, and including, the late nineteenth century, and to acquaint or re-acquaint students with the conventions of the research paper.

        The course’s intentions are l) to guide students to an awareness of the work of specific critics and theorists; 2) to guide students to a recognition of the nature of the work of these critics’ and then to a close familiarity with it; and 3) to guide students to produce the sort of criticism that these critics and theorists have either themselves produced or have influenced.That is, by the course’s end, students will have had the opportunity a) to become acquainted with selected critics/theorists through passive reading; b) to understand, through summarizing in writing, the major points made by the selected critics/theorists; c) to make use of--in writing, in one-page papers--these critics’/theorists’ methods as means of elucidating a literary work of each student’s choice; and d) to recognize and correct such infelicities of punctuation, grammar, style, and usage as their and their classmates’ papers expose.One paper (# 7), which can run to five pages, functions as an abbreviated research paper.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2350-006 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
        The following is an introductory course in Literary Criticism and Theory.  It is designed to acquaint students with the range, depth, and variety of criticism and theory that have influenced literary studies most strongly since, and including, the late nineteenth century, and to acquaint or re-acquaint students with the conventions of the research paper.
            The course’s intentions are
        To guide students to an awareness of the work of specific critics and theorists, To guide students to a recognition of the nature of the work of these critics and then to a close familiarity with it To guide students to produce the sort of criticism that these critics and theorists have either themselves produced or have influenced.  That is, by the course’s end, students will have had the opportunity To become acquainted with selected critics/theorists through passive reading; To understand, through summarizing in writing, the major points made by the selected critics/theorists; To make use of--in writing, in one-page papers--these critics’/theorists’ methods as means of elucidating a literary work or works of each student’s choice To recognize and correct such infelicities of punctuation, grammar, style, and usage as their and their classmates’ papers expose. 
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 3361-002 History of World Literature I
        The present course is designed
        To acquaint the student with selected examples of the major works that make up the foundational texts of Western literature, from the Greek epic (in this case Homer’s Odyssey), the grounding for all Western epics thereafter, through the later, Latin epic (Virgil’s Aeneid), to the Medieval Italian epic (Dante’s Divine Comedy) To include, as well, examples of Classical drama (Aeschylus’s Agamemmnon, and Euripides’ Medea).             The course is also designed to acquaint the student with a selection of the key literary-critical texts that have provided paths to understanding literary texts of all ages and traditions.
                     Students will write a series of one-page papers interpreting the literary works in terms of the literary-critical texts.
                     Tests:  Announced quizzes.

        TEXTS  [=on reserve]
        • Literature of the Western World, Vol 1, ed. Brian Wilkie and James Hurt.  Upper Saddle River, N. J., Prentice Hall, 2010
        • [Auerbach, Erich.  Mimesis.  Princeton, N. J.: Princeton UP, 1998]
        • Freud, Sigmund.  The Interpretation of Dreams, tr. James Strachey.  New York: Basic Books, 2010.
        • [Lovejoy, Arthur O.  The Great Chain of Being.  Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard UP, 1974]
        • [Neumann, Erich.  The Great Mother.  Princeton: Princeton UP, 1991]
        • [Pater Walter.  “Introduction,†“Botticelli,†“Conclusion,†in The Renaissance. New York: Oxford UP, 1990]

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 3300-001 TOPICS IN LITERATURE
        The present course focuses on a single, basic work, the Parmenides (the text of a Winter Semester, 1942-43 seminar), by Martin Heidegger, arguably the most prominent thinker of the twentieth-century West.  It was Heidegger’s aim to provide a grounding for Western thought, which, he felt, had, since Plato’s time, been developed from the top down, no foundation for it having been constructed, though such a foundation had begun to be pondered prior to Plato, in the work of the pre-Socratics (of which Parmenides was one), but thereafter overlooked.

        Heidegger’s magnum opus, Being and Time (1927; henceforth BT), concerns itself with one of the words that a grounded thinking must be as full and clear as possible in its understanding of, since it functions as thought’s ground:  “Being,†thus one of Western thought’s most basic--thus, for Heidegger, most important--concepts, but one exhaustively misunderstood by even the West’s greatest thinkers, as he points out early in BT. Heidegger pursues the meaning of this word relentlessly through the end of his life, in l976.

        Another such basic concept for thought is “truth†(closely related to Being), and it is with this word and its meaning for an understanding of Being (and thus the nature of human Being) that the Parmenides deals.  In the course of uncovering the meaning of the word truth, Heidegger offers a great deal of what he understands Being to include.  Both Being and truth, for Heidegger, have everything to do with language and its responsibility for constructing our understandings of the world, and, thus, for constructing the world “itself†(which is to say: our understandings of it).  The world, in part inherited by us as a construct, in part constructed by us in the medium of language, not incidentally includes us (i.e., we are our [or someone’s, or language’s] understandings of ourselves). With this understanding Heidegger’s often singleminded focus on the importance of language to the Being of man, an importance largely overlooked by traditional thought, but now an indispensable part of contemporary understanding (and understanding of understanding), becomes comprehensible.

        Without an understanding of Being, truth, and language, and their interrelations, according to Heidegger, one can not yet a) conceive of what being a human being is and means, much less b) do thinking (think understandingly, creatively).  The Parmenides brings us some distance in the direction of understanding what he might mean by this.  Far briefer than BT, it offers much that, though in different form, is contained in and implied by the earlier work, which it markedly extends (though it in some ways reverses).

        Because it focuses on truth’s and Being’s relation to language, of which the world, as we can know it and manipulate our knowing of it, consists, that is, because of human Being’s (and world’s) dependence on language, by means of which literature provides humanistic (as opposed to scientific) understandings of world and of ourselves (world’s inheritors, constructors, and constituents), this work provides  groundings for the study of literature as well as thought.  In the present moment of literary criticism and theory these understandings of the nature of truth and of Being are considered indispensable.  Derrida’s “there never was any perception,†for example, basic to an understanding of his thought, is a Heideggerian understanding.  But perhaps Foucault (remember here that Foucault was said to “have read everythingâ€) has said it all for our time: “Nietzsche and Heidegger: these are the two experiences I have had.â€
        Students will interpret a literary text of the student’s choice across the Parmenides:
                  Requirements:  Nine one-page papers and, possibly, occasional announced quizzes.


        TEXTS
        Heidegger, Martin.  Parmenides (1982).  Blooomington: Indiana University Press, 1992.
        [Optional] Heidegger, Martin.  Being and Time. New York: Harper, 1962.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2309-017 WORLD LITERATURE
        The present course is designed
        To acquaint the student with selected examples of the major works that make up the foundational texts of Western literature, from the Greek epic (in this case Homer’s Odyssey), the grounding for all Western epics thereafter, through the later, Latin epic (Virgil’s Aeneid), to the Medieval Italian epic (Dante’s Divine Comedy) To include, as well, examples of Classical drama (Aeschylus’s Agamemmnon, and Euripides’ Medea).             The course is also designed to acquaint the student with a selection of the key literary-critical texts that have provided paths to understanding literary texts of all ages and traditions.
                     Students will write a series of one-page papers interpreting the literary works in terms of the literary-critical texts.
                     Tests:  Announced quizzes.

        TEXTS  [=on reserve]
        • Literature of the Western World, Vol 1, ed. Brian Wilkie and James Hurt.  Upper Saddle River, N. J., Prentice Hall, 2010
        • [Auerbach, Erich.  Mimesis.  Princeton, N. J.: Princeton UP, 1998]
        • Freud, Sigmund.  The Interpretation of Dreams, tr. James Strachey.  New York: Basic Books, 2010
        • [Lovejoy, Arthur O.  The Great Chain of Being.  Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard UP, 1974]
        • [Neumann, Erich.  The Great Mother.  Princeton: Princeton UP, 1991]
        • [Pater Walter.  “Introduction,†“Botticelli,†“Conclusion,†in The Renaissance. New York: Oxford UP, 1990]
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 5360-001 English 5360: Contemporary Critical Theory: New Materialisms: Bodies, Environments, Agency.
        The present course focuses first on a single, basic work, Being and Time, by German philosopher Martin Heidegger, arguably the most prominent thinker of the twentieth-century West.  It was Heidegger’s aim, with this work and with the courses and works that preceded and followed it, to provide a grounding for Western thought, which, he felt, had, since Plato’s time, been developed from the top down, no foundation for it having been constructed, though such a foundation had begun to be pondered prior to Plato, in the work of the pre-Socratics, but thereafter left to lie inadequately developed.

        Being and Time (henceforth BT), concerns itself centrally with one of the words that a grounded thinking must be as full and clear as possible in its understanding of, since it functions as thought’s ground:  “Being,†thus one of Western thought’s most basic--thus, for Heidegger, most important--concepts, but one inadequately understood, even by the West’s greatest thinkers, as he points out early in BT. Heidegger pursues the meaning of this word--thoughtfully--through the end of his life (l976).

        We shall read parts of BT as closely as a brief initial acquaintance permits us. This, only the most preliminary of acquaintances, may suggest many more encounters as worthwhile.

        We shall also look at a small number of Heidegger’s other well-known and influential works: Plato’s Sophist; the Parmenides; “What is Metaphysics?†and the introduction that follows this essay after twenty years: “The Way Back into the Ground of Metaphysicsâ€; “The Origin of the Work of Artâ€; and Part Two of What is Called Thinking? as well as a few (4.5) pages of Heidegger’s spoken words close to the end of his life.  Following the trajectory laid out by these works will allow us--more desultorily than systematically (since, necessarily, the trajectory proceeds a-chronologically)--to note, along with much else, Heidegger’s repeated focus on the theme of Truth and its relation to Being.  David Farrell Krell calls the word that Heidegger comes to prefer to “truth,†and the word “Being,†Heidegger’s two key concepts.  Heidegger’s focus on truth is already evident in a course of 1922; he devotes a number of pages to the theme in Being and Time and many more in a course he taught the year BT was published (1927), though he did permit publication of this course until 1975. (Its English translation, The Basic Problems of Pheomenology, somehow escaped the strictures placed on the Collected Works--the Gesamtausgabe--as a result of Heidegger’s wish that no indexes be permitted, and boasts a therefore especially welcome and an extraordinarily full index, with multiple entries under the word ‘truth.’) 

        The theme of truth finally finds its voice, culminates, only with the Parmenides of 1942-43--though, as we shall see, now under another name.  We shall also see that it is never far from the very forefront of Heidegger’s thinking.

        One entertains the hope that by the close of this course, we, its participants, will be almost ready to begin to read Heidegger. 

        His thought, like that of Freud and Marx, has spawned a legion of followers, among whom count, most prominently, Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida, and it has become one of contemporary literary criticism’s, and philosophy’s (not science’s) indispensable means of understanding the “human animal.† It might be interesting for you to know, though only in passing, that Georgio Agamben, now much mentioned in critical circles, participated in at least one of the seminars from which we take our several pages of Heidegger’s words from his last years.  These words are especially important in that the contents of all four of the seminars of the last of which these words were a part were intended to be summarized  and were summarized, by participants other than Heidegger.  It was Heidegger’s special request, however, in the case of this last seminar, that his words as he spoke them be included in addition to the usual seminar protocols.  He had of course spoken at each of the seminars, however.   This was not the first. It was him that the other participants had come to hear and be with.  That he would isolate a particular talk as he does this lends it a special significance.  Perhaps we will be able to see and understand what he is pointing to there.

        TEXTS:  Martin Heidegger, BEING AND TIME, PARMENIDES, PLATO'S SOPHIST, PATHMARKS

        Papers:  Five 1-page, single-spaced long-sheet, 12 pt.
        Grades:  The average of grades on papers.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus

Other Teaching Activities

    • Dissertation Committee Chair
      • April Kinkead

        Direct Ph. D. comps, supervise dissertation (two years): a Heideggerian interprtation of Black rhetoric/speech.

      • Jean Adeler

        Direct Ph. D. comps and supervise dissertation.  Dissertation: "On Jacques Lacan."

      • Robb Pocklington

        Direct Ph. D. comps and supervise dissertation. "The Chora in Euripides' Bacchae."

      • Anindyo Roy

        Direct Ph. D. comps and Ph. D. dissertation. Dissertation:" 'Precipitous Existence': The Idea of the Limit in Michel Foucault."

      • Dianne Pearman

        Submit questions for Ph. D. orals, evaluate Ph. D. orals, supervise early dissertation attempts.

      • Deborah Reese

        Direct PH. D. comps.

    • Dissertation Committee Member
      • Frank Garrett

        Dissertation reader/evaluator.  Examiner, Ph. D. Orals.  Reader, Dissertation: "Negative Hermeneutics and Translation: The Unworkable Poetry of Wislawa Szymborska." University of Texas at Dallas dissertation.

      • Diane Davis

        Submit questions for PH. D. comps, evaluate comps, evaluate Ph. D. dissertation on rhetoric.

      • Byron Hawk

        Submit questions for PH. D. comps, evaluate comps, evaluate Ph. D. dissertation, participate in Ph. D. oral exam. Ph.D. examination.  Dissertation: "On Vitalism: An Ethics, Politics, and Pedagogy of Decomposition."

      • Michelle Ballif.

        Submit questions for Ph. D. comps, evaluate comps, evaluate PH. D. dissertation on rhetoric, participate in Ph. D. orals. Dissertation: "Seducing Rhetoric: Gorgias, Nietzsche, Baudrillard, and the Woman with the Rhetorical Figure."

      • Thomas Rickert

        Submit questions for Ph. D. comps, evaluate comps, evaluate PH. D. dissertation on rhetoric, participate in Ph. D. orals.

      • Lisa Hill

        Submit questions for Ph. D. comps, evaluate comps, evaluate Ph. D. dissertation in rhetoric (I carried this one around India), participate in questioning in Ph. D. orals.

      • Cynthia Haynes-Burton

        Ph. D. dissertation: "In the Name of Writing: Rhetoric and the Politics of Ethos.:

      • Lynn Worsham

        Submit questions for Ph.D. comps, evaluate comps, evaluate dissertation, examine candidate in Ph. D. orals. Dissertation: "The Question of Writing Otherwise"

      • Lorie Goodman

        Submit questions for comps, evaluate comps, evaluate dissertation, act as examiner in orals.  Dissertation: "Writing Elsewhere: The Dispersal of the Word from Sound into Space."

    • MA Thesis Committee Chair
      • Rebecca Sabounchi

        Direct MA exams, supervise MA thesis on Freud and Lacan

Service to the Profession

  • Appointed
    • Aug 1985 to  Sept 2002 Modern Language Association bibliographer

      Analyze items pertaining to German literature, for entry into the MLA Bibliography for Literature.

    • Apr 2000 to  Dec 2000 Conductor of on-site PH. D. exam, School of Criticims and Theory, Cardiff University, Wales, U.K.

      Examine & evaluate Ph. D. dissertation and conduct Ph. D. orals based on it.

    • Aug 2002 to  Jan 2004 Book evaluator for University of Mighian Press

      Review book-length publication for re-publication

    • Aug 2003 to  Dec 2003 Manuscript Reviewer for SUNY Press, 2003

      Review book-length MS for publication potential

    • Sept 1975 to  Aug 1977 Reader: Frontiers: A Journal for Women's Studies. (University of Colorado.)

      Evaluate submitted articles for possible publication.

    • Aug 1975 to  Aug 1988 Editorial Board: Cauda Pavobis: A Newsletter for Alchemy and Literature.

      Review articles for possible publication.

    • Aug 1980 to  Aug 2004 Editorial Board: Pre-Text: A Journal of Rhetorical Theory.

      Consider plans for future issues.

    • July 2013 to  Present Editorial Board: Society for Phenomenology and Media

      Evaluate potential publications

    • Aug 1980 to  Dec 1980 Manuscript evaluator for University of Delaware Press

      service self-explanatory

    • Aug 1978 to  Aug 1980 National Science Foundation Project evaluator, Division of Social Sciences, Linguistics, and Semiotics.

      service self-explantory

Service to the University

  • Appointed
    • Aug 1970 to  Aug 1974 Formal Student Counseling and Advising for English Majors, UTA Dept of English

      Meet with students and discuss their programs of study

    • Mar 1971 to  Aug 1971 Direct MA thesis, Dept of Foreign Languages, UTA

      Counsel student and evaluate thesis work.

    • Aug 1957 to  Aug 1958 Assistant to the Dean of Women, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

      Counseling for all women students, supervision of women's student organizations, and of some sorority and dormitory operations

  • Volunteered
    • Aug 1999 to  Mar 2000 Organizer and Chairman, International Conference: The Female Principl: Eclipses and Re-Emergences.. Keynotes: Martha Nussbaum, Eva Keuls, Drucilla Cornell, Nancy Tuana

      From the conf. poster:  "This conference recognizes the suppression of femaleness as a primary meaning of Western and other cultures over a long period.  It seeks to identify, document, account for, and interpret the suppression of femaleness via the forms it takes from early periods to the present and to identify and describe newly developing practices that counter it. Supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, Texas.

    • Sept 1972 to  Mar 1977 Organizer and Co-Chair, Conference on Literature and the Occult, a Conference on Compartive Literature. Keynote speaker: Joseph Campbell

      Explored the roles of the occult in literature & edited a book of essays by selected participants. Supported by the Dept. of English, U. of Texas at Arlington

Other Service Activities

  • Uncategorized
    • Dec  Experience Evaluating Scholarship
      Manuscript Evaluator, Mosaic: A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature, 2011.
      Manuscript Evaluator, North Texas Philosophical Association Annual Conference, 2008, 2009, 2010
      Manuscript Evaluator, Purlieu, 2010.
      Manuscript Evaluator, SUNY Press, 2003.
      Book Evaluator, University of Michigan Press, 2002.
      Manuscript Evaluator, University of Delaware Press, 1980.
      National Science Foundation Project Evaluator, Division of Social Sciences:  Linguistics and Semiotics, 1978-1980.
    • Dec  Service
      Chair, "Foucault and the Rhetoric of (Post) Modernity:  A Contemporary Hermeneutic for All Seasons" Section, Rhetoric Society of America Meeting, Minneapolis, May 20, 1993.
      Chair, Literature and Semiotics Section, American Semiotics Society Meeting, Modern Language Association Meeting, 1976.
      Chair, Literature and Pseudoscience in the Eighteenth Century Seminar, American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies/Southwest, Association Meeting, 1982.
      Representative-at-Large, American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies/Southwest, 1982.
      Chair, Section on Eighteenth-Century Language Theories, Association Meeting, American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies/Southwest, 1984.
      Secretary, Literature and Alchemy Association, 1975-1978.
      Chairman, Literature and Alchemy Association Meeting, Modern Language Association Meeting, 1977.
      Chairman, Literature and Alchemy Association Meeting, Modern Language Association Meeting, 1976.
      Respondent, Literature and Alchemy Association Meeting, Modern Language Association Meeting, 1979.
      Chair, Alchemy and Literature Seminar, Modern Language Association Meeting, 1975.
      Chair, The Failure of the New Linguistics Seminar, Modern Language Association Meeting, 1975 (invited).
      Vice President, North Texas Philosophical Association, 2007-2011.
      Chairman, German I, Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association, 1981.
      Secretary, German I, Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association, 1983.
      Chairman, German I, Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association, 1984.
      Chairman, German II, South Central Modern Language Association, 1983.
      Chairman, German II, South Central Modern Language Association, 1982.
      Secretary, German II, South Central Modern Language Association, 1981.
      Chairman, German II, South Central Modern Language Association, 1974.
      Secretary, German II, South Central Modern Language Association, 1973.         
      Chair, German Literature section, Twenty-ninth Annual Kentucky Foreign Language Conference, Lexington, April 23, 1976.
      Moderator:  Language and Literature I, University of Louisville Interdisciplinary Conference in Linguistics: Perspectives on Language, May 6-8, 1976.
      Moderator:  Language and Literature II, University of Louisville Interdisciplinary Conference in Linguistics: Perspectives on Language, May 6-8, 1976.
      Moderator:  Semiotics, University of Louisville Interdisciplinary Conference in Linguistics: Perspectives on Language, May 6-8, 1976.
      Discussant, Fifteenth Annual Comparative Literature Symposium, Texas Tech University, January, 1982.
      Respondent (oral delivery of written response to) B. Hinkley paper on Heidegger’s Realism.  North Texas Philosophical Association, Annual Conference NTSU Denton, April, 2006.
    • Dec  University and Professional Service
      UTA, Department of English Graduate Studies Committee, Origination-2011.
      Committee to Rewrite English Department's Graduate Handbook 2010-2011.
      Chair, UTA Department of English Travel Committee, 2008-2009, 2009-2010, and 2010-2011: Calculate travel budget.
      Vice President, North Texas Philosophical Association, 2007-2008, 2008-2009, 2009-2010, 2010-2011.
      UTA Department of English, Counseling for English majors, 1970-74.
      Member, innumerable English Department committees, 1970-2007.
      University of Texas at Arlington, Long-Range Planning Committee.
      University of Texas at Arlington Parking Committee.
      UTA Department of English, Library Representative.
      Formal Student Counseling and Advising, University of North Carolina, Office of the Dean of Women, 1957-1958.
      Counseling for all women students, supervision of women's student organizations and of some sorority and dormitory operations, 1957-1958.
    • Dec  Service on Review Panels for Journals
      Editorial Board:  Pre/Text:  A Journal of Rhetorical Theory.  University of Texas at Arlington, 1980-current.
      Editorial Board:  Cauda Pavonis:  A Newsletter for Alchemy and Literature.  MLA Alchemy and Literature Association, 1975-1990.
      Co-Editor:  International Journal of Semiotics, 1978-1983.
      Editorial Board:  Purlieu.  2011-current.
      Reader:  Frontiers:   A Journal for Women's Studies.  University of Colorado, 1975-77.
    • Dec  Other Academic Service
      Conductor On Site Ph.D. exam, School of Criticisms and Theory, Cardiff University, Wales, U.K., December, 2000.
      Modern Language Association Bibliographer in German Literature. 1985-1997.