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Marc Schwartz

Name

[Schwartz, Marc]
  • Professor
  • K-16 Mind, Brain and Education Chair
  • Director, Southwest Center for Mind, Brain and Education

Biography

Marc Schwartz is Professor of Mind, Brain and Education at the University of Texas at Arlington.  He is also director of the Southwest Center for Mind, Brain and Education at UTA. The center seeks to identify and support promising research agendas at the intersection of neuroscience and cognitive science to inform educational practice and leadership.

The Center is building a collaborative network of researchers, practitioners, and policy makers by offering a forum where ideas are welcomed and at the same time critically and rigorously examined with the tools and models emerging at the interface of education, cognitive science and neurosciences.

Professor Schwartz is a charter member of the International Mind, Brain and Education Society (IMBES), past vice president, and current president.  The mission of IMBES is to facilitate cross-cultural collaboration in biology, education and the cognitive and developmental sciences.  Dr. Schwartz is also an Associate Researcher in the Science Education Department at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). 

His research at the CfA focuses on how the dynamic enterprise of learning and teaching unfold in physics, chemistry, and biology education.  Here the challenges of coordinating complex ideas provide a rich context for exploring the difficulties that students and teachers face in understanding scientific concepts and the additional challenge that teachers face in helping students to construct these ideas so that they can take on personal meaning.

Professional Preparation

    • 1982 B.S. University of New Hampshire
    • 1983 M.Ed. in Science EducationUniversity of New Hampshire
    • 2000 Ed.D. in Learning and TeachingHarvard University
    • 1995 Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Education/Cognitive DevelopmentHarvard University

Appointments

    • Sept 2007 to Present Director-SW Center for Mind, Brain and Education
      University of Texas - Arlington
    • Jan 2007 to Present Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 1994 to Present Education Researcher/Research Associate
      Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
    • Jan 2003 to Jan 2007 Assist Professor
      McGill University
    • Jan 2001 to Jan 2003 Education Chair
      Harvard Graduate School of Education
    • Jan 2000 to Jan 2002 Lecturer
      Harvard Graduate School of Education
    • Jan 2000 to Jan 2002 Assistant Director of Mind, Brain and Education
      Harvard Graduate School of Education
    • Jan 1996 to Jan 2000 University Supervisor
      Harvard Graduate School of Education
    • Jan 1983 to Jan 1994 High School Science Teacher
      Winnacunnet High School
    • Jan 1982 to Jan 1983 Junior High School Math & Science Teacher
      Hampton Academy Junior High School

Memberships

  • Professional
    • Feb 2004 to Present International Mind, Brain and Education Society

News Articles

Publications

      Journal Article 2014
      • Schwartz, M.S. (2014).  “Khan Academy: The illusion of understanding.” Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks. 17(4), 67-79.

        {Journal Article}

      Journal Article 2013
      • Schwartz, M.S, Shapiro, I., & Gregory, B. (2013). “Confronting the need for conceptual change in pre-service science education.” Higher Education Studies. 3(5), 11-28.  

        {Journal Article}

      Monograph 2011
      • Schwartz, M.S., & Dawson, T. (2011). Standards & Assessment: The role of depth versus breadth in student success.  White Paper for the Texas Education Reform Foundation.
        {Monograph}

      Journal Article 2011
      • Schwartz, M.S. & Gerlach J. (2011b). “Guiding Principles for a Research Schools Network: Successes and Challenges. Mind, Brain and Education. 5(4), 172-179.
        {Journal Article}
      2011
      • Schwartz, M. S. & Gerlach, J. (2011a). The birth of a field and the rebirth of the laboratory school. Educational Philosophy and Theory, 43(1-2), 67-74.
        {Journal Article}

      Journal Article 2010
      • Doucerain, M. & Schwartz, M. S. (2010). Analyzing learning about the conservation of matter in students while adapting to the needs of a school. Journal of Mind, Brain and Education, 4(3), 112-124.
        {Journal Article}
      2010
      • Schwartz, M. S. (2010). Depth versus Breadth in Science Education. Science Education Review, 9(2), 48-49.
        {Journal Article}

      Book Chapter 2010
      • Schwartz, M. S. & Fischer, K. W. (2010). Interviewing: An insider's view to cognitive change" In M. Ferrari and L. Vuletic. In The Developmental Relations between Mind, Brain, and Education: Essays in Honor of Robbie Case (pp. 149-175). New York: Springer Publications.
        {Book Chapter}

      Journal Article 2009
      • Schwartz, M. S., Sadler, P. M., Sonnert, G., & Tai, R. (2009). Depth versus Breadth: How Content Coverage in High School Science Courses Relates to Later Success in College Science Coursework. Science Education, 93(5), 798-826.
        {Journal Article}
      2009
      • Schwartz, M. S. (2009). Cognitive development and learning: Analyzing the building of skills in classrooms. Mind, Brain and Education, 3(4), 198-208.
        {Journal Article}

      Journal Article 2008
      • Schwartz, M. S., Hazari, Z., & Sadler, P. S. (2008). Divergent Voices: Views from teachers and professors on pre-college factors that influence college success. Science Educator, 17(1), 18-35.
        {Journal Article}

      Journal Article 2007
      • Agung, S. & Schwartz, M. S. (2007). Students’ Understanding of Conservation of Matter, Stoichiometry and Balancing Equation in Indonesia. International Journal of Science Education, 29(13), 1679-1702.
        {Journal Article}
      2007
      • Schwartz, M. S. & Sadler, P. S. (2007). Empowerment in science curriculum development: A microdevelopmental approach. International Journal of Science Education, 29(8), 987-1017.
        {Journal Article}
      2007
      • Schwartz, M. S. (2007). Science Education for Everyday Life: Evidence-based practice (By: Glen S. Aikenhead). Review for McGill Journal of Education, 42(1), 159-162.
        {Journal Article}

      Journal Article 2006
      • Schwartz, M. S. & Fischer, K. W. (2006). Useful metaphors for tackling problems in teaching and learning. About Campus, 11(1), 2-9.
        {Journal Article}

      Book Chapter 2004
      • Schwartz, M. S. & Fischer, K. W. (2004). Building general knowledge and skill: Cognition and microdevelopment in science learning. In A. Demetriou and A. Raftopoulos. (Eds.), Cognitive developmental change: Theories, models, and measurement (pp. 157-185). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
        {Book Chapter}

      Journal Article 2003
      • Schwartz, M. S. & Fischer, K. W. (2003). Building vs. Borrowing: The challenge of actively constructing ideas. Liberal Education, 89(3), 22-29.
        {Journal Article}

      Conference Proceeding 2001
      • Schwartz, M. S. & Sadler, P. (2001). Goals and technology education: The example of design challenges. In Second AAAS Research in Technology Education Conference. Washington, DC:.
        {Conference Proceeding}

      Journal Article 2000
      • Sadler, P., Coyle, H., & Schwartz, M. (2000). Engineering competitions in the middle school classroom: Key elements in developing effective design challenges. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 9(3), 299-327.
        {Journal Article}

Presentations

    • June  2013
      International Mind, Brain and Education Society, Third Biennial Conference

      "Bringing Science and Practice Together:  Fostering Productive Interdisciplinary Dialogue in MBE.'  International Mind, Brain and Education Society, Third Biennial Conference, June 2-4, 2011.  San Diego, California.

    • June  2012
      Jean Piaget Society Conference
      "Measuring Children's Understanding of Scientific Concepts using Skill Theory." Jean Piaget Society Conference, May 31-June 2, 2012, Toronto, Canada.
    • May  2012
      European Association for Learning and Instruction: Educational Neuroscience Conference
      "Research and Practice in Educational Neuroscience."  European Association for Learning and Instruction: Educational Neuroscience Conference, May 24-26, 2012, London, England.
    • February  2011
      International Dyslexia Association
      "The Biology and Mental Activity of Learning."  Invited Presentation.  Brain Matters for Learning.  International Dyslexia Association, Feb. 11, 2011, Dallas, Texas.
    • January  2011
      First International Workshop for Educational Neuroscience
      Schwartz, M.S. (Jan 10, 2011). “The Anatomy of Learning and the Importance of Depth of Study.” Invited Presentation. First International Workshop for Educational Neuroscience, (January 9-11, 2011). East China Normal University, Shanghai, China.
    • April  2010
      Texas Education Reform Foundation
      Schwartz, M.S. (Apr 19, 2010). “Standards & Assessments: The role of depth versus Breadth in Student Success.” 2010 Summit – A Commitment to Excellence. Texas Education Reform Foundation. Houston, Texas
    • January  2010
      Center for Research, Evaluation & Advancement of Teacher Education 2010 Research Conference
      Schwartz, M.S. (Nov 15, 2010). “An Emerging Field (Mind, Brain and Education) informs a Promising Future- the Research Schools Network.” Accepted Presentation. Researching Teacher Preparation and Practice: Developing Effective Teachers for Texas. Center for Research, Evaluation & Advancement of Teacher Education 2010 Research Conference (November 15-16, 2010). Houston, Texas.
    • January  2009
      International Mind, Brain and Education Society, Second Bienniel Conference
      Schwartz, M.S. (May 29, 2009). “The Re-Emergence of the Research School.”  International Mind, Brain and Education Society, Second Bienniel Conference, (May 28-30, 2009). Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
    • January  2008
      National Network for Educational Renewal Conference: Looking to the past to inform the future.
      Schwartz, M.S. (Sept. 20, 2008). “The birth of a discipline and the rebirth of the laboratory school.” National Network for Educational Renewal Conference: Looking to the past to inform the future. (Sept. 19-21, 2008). Arlington, Texas.
    • January  2008
      Neuroeducation: New perspectives in teaching and learning.
      Schwartz M.S. (July 15, 2008).  “M-B-E: A paradigm for meeting educational challenges & building connections.” Invited Presentation. Neuroeducation: New perspectives in teaching and learning. Ettore Majorana Center for Scientific Culture, (July 14-16, 2008). Erice, Sicily.
    • January  2008
      Center for BrainHealth. University of Texas, Dallas
      Schwartz, M.S. (Oct 15, 2008). Microdevelopment: A Mind, Brain & Education perspective for exploring the dynamic interaction between maturation & learning. Center for BrainHealth.  University of Texas, Dallas.
    • January  2008
      Institute for Mind, Brain and Education. Harvard Graduate School of Education
      Schwartz, M.S. (Jun 30, 2008). “This is not on the test: Aligning the neuro and cognitive sciences and educational practice.” Institute for Mind, Brain and Education. Harvard Graduate School of Education. Cambridge, MA.
    • January  2007
      International Mind, Brain and Education Society, Inaugural Conference
      Schwartz, M.S. (Nov 1, 2007). “Mind, Brain and Education: The nature of human learning & how educational policy can profit from research.”  International Mind, Brain and Education Society, Inaugural Conference, (Nov 1-3, 2007). Fort Worth, Texas.
    • January  2005
      2nd Science Education Focal Point Meeting of the Inter American Network of Academies of Sciences, in association with the Royal Society of Canada
      Schwartz M.S. (Sept. 27, 2005).  “Intended vs. taught curricula: Science education in Quebec.” Invited Presentation. 2nd Science Education Focal Point Meeting of the Inter American Network of Academies of Sciences, in association with the Royal Society of Canada, (Sept. 26-27, 2005). University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
    • January  2005
      Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto
      Schwartz M.S. (Nov. 9, 2005). “Building vs. Borrowing: The challenges of constructing knowledge in science.” Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto. Ontario, Canada.
    • January  2005
      Indonesian Study Mission. McGill University
      Schwartz, M.S. (Mar. 24, 2005). “The Role of Science in Education.”  Invited presentation for the Indonesian Study Mission. McGill University. Montreal, Canada.
    • January  2004
      Learning and the Brain Conference
      Schwartz, M.S. (Nov. 12, 2004).  “Cognitive Science for Educators.” Invited Presentation. Learning and the Brain Conference, (Nov. 11-13, 2004). Cambridge, MA.
    • January  2004
      Useable Knowledge Conference
      Fischer, K.W., Schwartz, M.S., & Connell, M.W. (Oct. 7, 2004).  “Analyzing the building of skills in classrooms and neural systems.” Invited Paper and Presentation for the Useable Knowledge Conference, (October 6-8, 2004). Harvard Graduate School of Education. Cambridge, MA.
    • January  2004
      United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
      Schwartz, M.S. (June 8, 2004).  “The Challenges of Curriculum Development.” Invited Presentation for the State of Science and Technology in the World Conference, (June 7-9, 2004). United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).  Paris, France.
    • January  2004
      Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
      Schwartz, M.S. (July 7, 2004). "Other than the 'usual path': A microdevelopmental approach.  Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Cambridge, MA.
    • January  2004
      Consortium for Education, University of Texas, Arlington
      Schwartz, M.S. (Nov. 3, 2004). “Mind-Brain research: Searching for tools that benefit educators.” K-16 Consortium for Education, University of Texas. Arlington, TX.
    • January  2004
      University of Texas, Arlington
      Schwartz, M.S. (Nov. 2, 2004). “Other than the ‘usual path’: The nature of microdevelopment.” University of Texas. Arlington, TX.
    • January  2003
      Harvard Graduate School of Education
      Schwartz, M.S. (Mar. 30, 2003). "Microdevelopment: The case of Farmer Jones." Harvard Graduate School of Education. Cambridge, MA.
    • January  2003
      McGill University
      Schwartz, M.S. (Feb. 20, 2003). "The challenge of actively building knowledge." McGill University. Montreal, Canada.
    • January  2002
      32nd Annual Meeting of the Jean Piaget Society
      Schwartz, M.S. (June 8, 2002).  “The Impact of Skill Theory and Microdevelopment in Designing Science Curricula.”  Accepted Paper and Presentation for the 32nd Annual Meeting of the Jean Piaget Society, (June 5-9, 2002). Philadelphia, PA.
    • January  2002
      Singapore Education Delegation visiting Harvard University
      Schwartz, M.S. (Nov. 22, 2002). “What cognitive scientists have to say to educators.” Singapore Education Delegation visiting Harvard University. Harvard Graduate School of Education. Cambridge, MA.
    • January  2001
      American Association for the Advancement of Science
      Schwartz, M.S. & Sadler, P. (April 19, 2001).  “Goals and Technology Education: The Example of Design Challenges.”  Invited Paper and Presentation for the 2nd AAAS Research in Technology Education Conference, (April 19-20, 2001). American Association for the Advancement of Science. Washington, DC
    • January  1996
      American Association of Physics Teachers Annual Conference
      Sadler, P. & Schwartz, M.S. (August 12, 1996).  “Teaching middle school physical science using design challenges.” Accepted Presentation for the American Association of Physics Teachers Annual Conference, (August 12-13, 1996). University of Maryland. College Park, MD.

Courses

      • EDUC 5365-001 Theoretical Models in MBE

        This course is designed to help students connect cognitive science to instructional practice. Students examine the roles that cognitive models play in learning and in designing lessons and curricula. The cognitive models in this course are used to provide a framework for recognizing possible strategies for improving or re-designing curricula, as well as build lessons or interventions that fit their working context. Students are expected to take part in a prototype curriculum, analyze how it was constructed and to use their insights to build a modest curriculum over the course of the semester.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • EDUC 5364-001 EPISTEMOLOGY AND NEUROSCIENCE

        Epistemology and Neuroscience offers students the opportunity to explore the basic principles of reasoning and knowledge construction as well as their psychological and neurobiological underpinnings. Students compare and contrast the deductive and inductive methods consciously or unconsciously used in decision-making and belief-forming processes. The course also highlights the role of the frontal cortex and limbic system in how learners address and resolve questions and challenges in varying contexts. The goal of the course is to offer students the theoretical structures and critical strategies necessary for assessing their own work toward the completion of the program project as well as for analyzing the outcomes it generates.  The skills acquired in this course are widely transferrable and can help the student to become a better consumer and producer of pedagogical and scientific research.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • EDUC 5364-001 EPISTEMOLOGY AND NEUROSCIENCE

        Epistemology and Neuroscience offers students the opportunity to explore the basic principles of reasoning and knowledge construction as well as their psychological and neurobiological underpinnings. Students compare and contrast the deductive and inductive methods consciously or unconsciously used in decision-making and belief-forming processes. The course also highlights the role of the frontal cortex and limbic system in how learners address and resolve questions and challenges in varying contexts. The goal of the course is to offer students the theoretical structures and critical strategies necessary for assessing their own work toward the completion of the program project as well as for analyzing the outcomes it generates.  The skills acquired in this course are widely transferrable and can help the student to become a better consumer and producer of pedagogical and scientific research.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • EDUC 5365-001 Theoretical and Conceptual Models in MBE

        EDUC 5365 explores a small number of models from the cognitive sciences that are useful in creating or improving existing lessons and curricula.  Students explore these models as a means to understand how they influence the learning and teaching process as well as how they compare to explicit and implicit models they currently use to make curricular and teaching decisions. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • EDUC 5360-001 INTRODUCTION TO MIND, BRAIN, AND EDUCATION

        Introduction to Mind Brain and Education (MBE) explores a number of important themes in the field of MBE, include the meaning of development and learning, the models and technical tools used by cognitive and neuroscientists and a cross section of major educational issues being addressed (e.g., dyscalculia, dyslexia, attention deficits, emotional development, etc.).  Although the range of themes explored in this course can only provide a brief view into each, the courses primary goal is to provide a platform for later courses in the MBE program as well as revealing the complexity of integrating three major disciplines into one field of study and research. 

        Students will also have a limited opportunity to explore the anatomy and physiology of the brain with technological tools, investigate the extent to which the cognitive neurosciences can inform educators, and consider how findings from the cognitive and neurosciences can impact educational practice. 

        Each class will include some balance of lecture, discussion, and activities. A major focus of the course is for students to commit themselves to the discussions and activities to challenge as well as support their own understanding.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • EDUC 5364-001 EPISTEMOLOGY AND NEUROSCIENCE

        This course explores issues at the intersection of neuroscience, the theory of knowledge, and education.  We look at the basic strategies we use to acquire knowledge (e.g., deductive and inductive reasoning, perceptual observation, theory generation and testing) and consider how the brain supports these processes. Among other topics, we explore the complex relationship between emotion and reasoning, the role of the frontal cortex in decision making and data interpretation the use of evolutionary considerations in neuroscience and the theory of knowledge, the nature of scientific theories, and the basic concepts of mind, consciousness, and representations.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • EDUC 5360-001 INTRODUCTION TO MIND, BRAIN, AND EDUCATION
        This introductory course explores the themes central to the field of Mind Brain and Education (MBE) as seen through the perspectives of educators, cognitive scientists and neuroscientists. Major themes include the meaning of development and learning, the models and technical tools central to this field and a cross section of major educational issues being addressed (e.g., dyscalculia, dyslexia, attention deficits, emotional development, etc.).
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • EDUC 5360-001 INTRODUCTION TO MIND, BRAIN, AND EDUCATION
        Students will explore and integrate seven themes central to the emerging
        field of Mind, Brain and Education (MBE). The course expands on the themes by
        exploring the perspectives that cognitive and neuroscientists have on development,
        their conceptual and technical tools and several specific educational issues they face
        (e.g., dyscalculia, dyslexia, attention deficits, role of emotions etc.). The themes
        function as layers students peel back to reveal the complexity of integrating three
        major disciplines into one field of study. Exploring the nature of each layer also
        offers students the opportunity to explore (in a limited but focused manner) the
        anatomy and physiology of the brain, the degree to which cognitive neuroscience
        can inform educators, and how educators might integrate findings from cognitive
        science, neuroscience and educational practice into sound pedagogies. Course
        success depends on student involvement in discussions and activities as lectures
        play a smaller role in this course.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • EDUC 5395-001 Designing Classroom Research
        In this course, students will develop their own classroom educational research project. Their designed study will be based in the literature in their educational field and focus on classroom research questions and problems that will inform teaching practices. In this course, students will develop an individual research problem statement, argue the significance of the problem, complete a written literature review and logical chain of reasoning related to the stated problem, write specific research questions to investigate the problem in educational settings, and design a research study (methodology) that will effectively investigate their research questions. Students design a research study that shows promise for improving education, written as the first three chapters of a scholarly classroom action research project. Prerequisite: EDUC 5394. For M.Ed.T. students, this course is to be taken in the final semester of the masters' degree program. For M.Ed. students, this course is to be taken in the semester just prior to the final semester of the masters' degree program, and in the semester immediately preceding EDUC 5397.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • EDUC 5360-001 INTRODUCTION TO MIND, BRAIN, AND EDUCATION
        Students will explore and integrate five themes central to the emerging
        field of Mind, Brain and Education (MBE): development as seen by cognitive
        scientists and neuroscientists; the conceptual and technical tools used in
        MBE; and specific educational issues (e.g., dyscalculia, dyslexia, attention
        deficits, role of emotions etc.).  The five themes function as layers
        students peel back to reveal the complexity of integrating three major
        disciplines into one field of study. Exploring the nature of each layer also
        offers students the opportunity to explore (in a limited but focused manner)
        the anatomy and physiology of the brain, the degree to which cognitive
        neuroscience can inform educators, and how educators might integrate
        cognitive science and educational practice into sound pedagogies.  Course
        success depends on student involvement in discussions and activities as
        lectures play a smaller role in this course.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • EDUC 5390-002 SELECTED TOPICS IN EDUCATION
        Students will explore and integrate five themes central to the emerging
        field of Mind, Brain and Education (MBE): development as seen by cognitive
        scientists and neuroscientists; the conceptual and technical tools used in
        MBE; and specific educational issues (e.g., dyscalculia, dyslexia, attention
        deficits, role of emotions etc.).  The five themes function as layers
        students peel back to reveal the complexity of integrating three major
        disciplines into one field of study. Exploring the nature of each layer also
        offers students the opportunity to explore (in a limited but focused manner)
        the anatomy and physiology of the brain, the degree to which cognitive
        neuroscience can inform educators, and how educators might integrate
        cognitive science and educational practice into sound pedagogies.  Course
        success depends on student involvement in discussions and activities as
        lectures play a smaller role in this course.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2009
      • EDUC 5390-002 SELECTED TOPICS IN EDUCATION
        Students will explore and integrate five themes central to the emerging
        field of Mind, Brain and Education (MBE): development as seen by cognitive
        scientists and neuroscientists; the conceptual and technical tools used in
        MBE; and specific educational issues (e.g., dyscalculia, dyslexia, attention
        deficits, role of emotions etc.).  The five themes function as layers
        students peel back to reveal the complexity of integrating three major
        disciplines into one field of study. Exploring the nature of each layer also
        offers students the opportunity to explore (in a limited but focused manner)
        the anatomy and physiology of the brain, the degree to which cognitive
        neuroscience can inform educators, and how educators might integrate
        cognitive science and educational practice into sound pedagogies.  Course
        success depends on student involvement in discussions and activities as
        lectures play a smaller role in this course.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2009