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Mark D Lamster

Name

[Lamster, Mark D]
  • ASSOC PROFESSOR OF PRACTICE, School of Architecture
  • Professor in Practice

Biography

Mark Lamster is the architecture critic of the Dallas Morning News and Professor in Practice at the University of Texas at Arlington School of Architecture. He is currently at work on a biography of the late architect Philip Johnson, to be published by Little Brown. A contributing editor to Architectural Review and Design Observer, his work has appeared in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Wall Street Journal, and many national magazines.

For more than a decade, Lamster served as an editor at Princeton Architectural Press, in New York. Prior to that, he was an editor at George Braziller, the distinguished publisher of illustrated books.

He is the author of numerous books, including Master of Shadows (2009), a political biography of the painter Peter Paul Rubens, andSpalding's World Tour (2006), the story of a group of all-star baseball players who circled the globe in the 19th century. His research papers from that book are available at the National Baseball Hall of Fame, in Cooperstown.

Professional Preparation

    • 1994 MA in Art HistoryTufts University
    • 1991 BA in Writing SeminarsThe Johns Hopkins University

Research and Expertise

  • Life and work of Philip C. Johnson

    Biographer of the late architect Philip C. Johnson, 1906-2005. 

Publications

Courses

      • ARCH 4311-101 What Makes a City

        This is a new golden age for the city. Cities drive economies, are centers of creativity and innovation, and are increasingly at the forefront of progressive policy in social and environmental issues. They have been discovered by a new generation attracted to a multi-cultural, urban lifestyle. And yet these same cities are still places of profound inequity faced with daunting challenges.

        This class is a critical exploration of the physical environment of the city, looking at a range of issues—mobility, housing, landscape, gentrification, sustainability, health—to understand how the built world shapes the way we live every day. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ARCH 5311-001 What Makes a City

        This is a new golden age for the city. Cities drive economies, are centers of creativity and innovation, and are increasingly at the forefront of progressive policy in social and environmental issues. They have been discovered by a new generation attracted to a multi-cultural, urban lifestyle. And yet these same cities are still places of profound inequity faced with daunting challenges.

        This class is a critical exploration of the physical environment of the city, looking at a range of issues—mobility, housing, landscape, gentrification, sustainability, health—to understand how the built world shapes the way we live every day. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ARCH 5311-001 Architecture on Screen

        How do the things we watch shape our perceptions of architecture and the city? How do the environments in film and on television frame our vision, shape character, and convey theme? How are architects and other design professionals portrayed? What do they suggest about changes in the physical and technological world in which we live. This course explores those questions and others through scree history, from the earliest films to contemporary television and digital productions. Themes will include the dystopian city, suburbia, the evolving depiction of modernism, architecture as documentary subject, and the history of the city on screen. Students will explore these questions and will have make their own short films. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ARCH 4311-101 Architecture on Screen

        How do the things we watch shape our perceptions of architecture and the city? How do the environments in film and on television frame our vision, shape character, and convey theme? How are architects and other design professionals portrayed? What do they suggest about changes in the physical and technological world in which we live. This course explores those questions and others through scree history, from the earliest films to contemporary television and digital productions. Themes will include the dystopian city, suburbia, the evolving depiction of modernism, architecture as documentary subject, and the history of the city on screen. Students will explore these questions and will have make their own short films. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ARCH 4395-004 Writing the CIty

        An intensive workshop that will focus the student’s ability to think and write critically about buildings, the city, and the urban landscape, and in the process develop their own point of view. Readings and site visits will promote thoughtful seeing and interpretation, with emphasis on architecture's role is shaping public space. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours1 Document