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Maxine A Adegbola

Name

[Adegbola, Maxine A]
  • Associate Clinical Professor, College of Nursing and Health Innovation

Biography

Dr. Adegbola is developing a program of research  that focuses on assessment and management of recurrent acute and chronic pain. Dr. Adegbola is especially interested in culturally competent research methodologies and health promotion interventions aimed to improve the health of vulnerable populations, and reduce health disparities for those with chronic illnesses, such as sickle cell disease. Sickle cell disease is a global health problem that affects mostly individuals who are vulnerable and at risk for inadequate healthcare  especially in the area of  pain management.  I am also interested in exploring the role of genomics and genetic biomarkers in relation to recurrent acute and chronic pain. Despite emerging genomic discoveries, there have not been explorations of genomic predictors of chronic pain for individuals with sickle cell disease. Dr. Adegbola's  research interests are: chronic illnesses, chronic pain, health disparities, global health, minority health and sickle cell disease. In addition to translating research findings to impact clinical care provision, Dr. Adegbola is passionate about advocating for individuals with pain, and communicating the needs of these individuals to policy makers and stakeholders. A core mission of Dr. Adegbola's life and work is to improve the lives of individuals in pain,and offer holistic healthcare and improve quality of life for global populations.

Professional Preparation

    • 2012 Post Doctoral Fellowship in Pain and Associated SymptomsNational Institutes of Health: National Institute of Nursing Research
    • 2007 PhD in Nursing ResearchUTArlington
    • 1985 M.S.N. City University of New York, Hunter College
    • 1983 B.S.N. City University of New York, Hunter College
    • 1977 Diploma University of West Indies, school of nursing

Appointments

    • Aug 2015 to Present Associate Clinical Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington   Office of the President   Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs   College of Nursing and Health Innovation
    • Dec 2010 to June 2013 Nurse Researcher
      Baylor Health Care System   Baylor Research Institute
    • Aug 2008 to Aug 2015 Assist Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington   College of Nursing and Health Innovation
    • Jan 2002 to Jan 2012 Registered nurse
      All About Staffing
    • Aug 1998 to Dec 2005 Nursing Instructor & Team Coordinator
      El Centro College
    • Jan 1995 to May 1997 Home Care Nurse
      Infusion Services of North Texas
    • Jan 1992 to May 2002 Registered nurse
      American Nursing Services
    • Jan 1992 to May 1995 Registered nurse
      Medical City Hospital
    • Jan 1991 to Dec 1991 Home Care Nurse
      Kimberly Quality Care
    • Aug 1990 to July 2008 Nursing Instructor El Centro College
      El Centro College
    • Aug 1990 to July 2008 Nursing Instructor
      El Centro College
    • Jan 1990 to Dec 1997 Registered nurse
      Specialty Care Incorporated
    • Jan 1989 to May 1990 Adjunct Lecturer
      New York City Technical College
    • Mar 1988 to June 1990 Divisional Assistant Director of Nursing
      Long Island College Hospital   Critical Care
    • Mar 1987 to Mar 1988 Assistant Director of Nursing
      Long Island College Hospital
    • Mar 1985 to Mar 1987 Administrative Nursing Supervisor
      Coney Island Hospital
    • Jan 1983 to Mar 1985 Registered nurse
      Coney Island Hospital
    • Jan 1982 to Mar 1983 Registered nurse
      Cabrini Medical Center
    • Mar 1979 to Dec 1981 Registered nurse
      Kings County Hospital
    • Jan 1977 to Mar 1979 Registered nurse
      Black River Hospital

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Jan 2009 to Present American Pain Society
  • Other
    • Jan 1992 to Jan 1995 Medical City Hospital
    • Jan 1990 to Jan 1997 Specialty Care Incorporated
  • University
    • Jan 2008 to Present
    • Jan 1998 to Jan 2005 El Centro College
    • Aug 1990 to Jan 2008 El Centro College
  • Professional Society Activities
    • Jan 1979 to Present American Nurses Association (ANA)

Awards and Honors

    • Aug  2013 2013 Leadership and Mentoring [LMI] Fellow, American Association of Blacks in Higher Education sponsored by American Assocition of Blacks in Higher Education
      Description:

      Participated in LMI 2013. It is a great day at LMI!!

    • Jul  2013 Nurse Researcher of the Year sponsored by National Black Nurses Association
      Achievements:

      NURSE RESEARCHER OF THE YEAR

      “To recognize a nurse who has completed an outstanding research

      study and who has excellent potential to develop and implement a

      program of research that contributes to the well being and health care of

      minorities”

       

            

      Description:

      NURSE RESEARCHER OF THE YEAR

      “To recognize a nurse who has completed an outstanding research

      study and who has excellent potential to develop and implement a program of research that contributes to the well being and health care of minorities”

    • Jul  2013 Executive People on the Move sponsored by Dallas Business Journal Award Details
    • Jul  2013 Leadership and Mentoring Institute X sponsored by American Association of Blacks in Higher Education and Miles College
      Achievements:

      Completed one week institute

    • Jun  2013 Association of Black Nursing Faculty Lifetime in Nursing Education and Research awars sponsored by ABNF
    • May  2013 Faculty Fellows Service Learning Program 2012-2013 sponsored by Center for Community Service LearningStudent AffairsOffice of the Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsOffice of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
      Achievements:

      Completed the Faculty Fellows Service Learning Program

    • Sep  2007 The Ferne Kyba Endowed Fellowship-2007 sponsored by College of Nursing and Health InnovationOffice of the Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsOffice of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Oct  2006 Urban League Guild of Texas "21st Century Most Promising Leader in Healthcare" sponsored by Urban League Guild of Texas "21st Century Most Promising Leader in Healthcare"
    • May  2006 International Education Fee Scholarship Study Abroad sponsored by International Education Fee Scholarship Study Abroad
      Achievements:

      study abroad program

      Description:

      study abroad

    • Apr  2006 National Coalition of Ethnic Minority Nurses Association [NCEMNA] sponsored by NCEMNA

News Articles

    • July 2015 Sleep Quality, Pain and Self-Efficacy among Community Dwelling Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

      Abstract

      The aim of this paper was to report the findings of a study examining relationships among sleep, pain, self-efficacy, and demographic attributes of community-dwelling adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). Sleep difficulty has been self-reported among adults with chronic pain. Past studies have demonstrated that chronic pain results in sleep difficulties and other complications that threaten effective functioning. Community- dwelling adults with SCD are living longer and need to be evaluated for sleep quality, pain, and self-efficacy. Little is known about whether adults with SCD-related pain have disturbances in sleep and self-efficacy, and if these disturbances are affected by age and/or gender. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to examine the relationships among sleep, pain, self-efficacy, and demographic attributes among communitydwelling adults with SCD, and who use support services of state SCD Associations in the United States. For this secondary data analysis, the study was conducted from June, 2014 to December, 2014 and used a descriptive correlational design to analyze data from a primary study of a convenience sample of 90 subjects with SCD, who were 18 years of age and older. Linear regression was used to compute the relationship between dependent and independent variables. All measures were selfreported. It was found that gender did not significantly affect reports of sleep, pain, or self-efficacy. Self-efficacy accounted for direct relationships with sleep and inverse relationships with pain. Some individuals (16.7%) reported sleeping very well, however, the majority (83.3%) was not sleeping very well, and a greater number of individuals (93.3%) reported having some pain. Among adults with chronic SCD pain, self-efficacy is important in maintaining a stable quality of health. Future assessments, interventions, and research should include comprehensive sleep and pain evaluations, and measures to improve self-efficacy and sleep quality, as well as measures to decrease pain among community-dwelling adults with SCD.

      URI

      http://hdl.handle.net/10106/25167

Other Activities

    • Other Activites
      • June 2013 Installed as elected member of Board of Directors, Association of Black Nursing Faculty

Research and Expertise

  • Maxine Adegbola, PhD, RN, CNE, ANEF

    I am developing a program of research  that focuses on assessment and management of recurrent acute and chronic pain. I am especially interested in culturally competent research methodologies and health promotion interventions aimed to improve the health of vulnerable populations, and reduce health disparities for those with chronic illnesses, such as sickle cell disease. Sickle cell disease is a global health problem that affects mostly individuals who are vulnerable and at risk for inadequate healthcare management especially in the area of chronic pain management. In addition, I am interested in exploring the role of genomics and genetic biomarkers in relation to chronic pain. Despite emerging genomic discoveries, there have not been explorations of genomic predictors of chronic pain for individuals with sickle cell disease. My research interests are: chronic illnesses, chronic pain, health disparities, global health, minority health and sickle cell disease.

    In addition to translating research findings to impact clinical care provision, I am passionate about advocating for individuals with pain, and communicating the needs of these individuals to policy makers and stakeholders. A core mission of my life and work is to improve the lives of individuals in pain, and offer holistic healthcare and improve quality of life for global populations.

Publications

      Journal Article 2015
      • Sleep Quality, Pain, Self-Efficacy among Community-Dwelling Adults with Sickle Cell Disease. Journal of National Black Nurses Association vol 26, 11, p 15-21

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2013
      • Adegbola, M. (2013 editorial) Relevance of Service Learning to Nursing Education. The ABNF [Association of Black Nursing Faculty] Journal, 24:2, 39.

        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Adegbola, M. (2013, editorial) Lessons Learned from Politics: Translate into Healthcare Delivery. The ABNF [Association of Black Nursing Faculty] Journal, 24:1, 3-4.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2013
      • Adegbola, M. (2013) Scholarly Tailgating Defined: The Giant Wind for Scholars and Scientists who wish to Succeed. The ABNF [Association of Black Nursing Faculty] Journal of Association of Black Nursing Faculty, 24:1, 17-20.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2012
      • *Adegbola, M., Barnes, D., Opollo, J., Herr, K., Gray, J., McCarthy, A. (2012) Voices of Adults Living with Sickle Cell Disease Pain. Journal of National Black Nurses Association, 23: 2, 16-23  
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2011
      • Adegbola, M. (2011). Genomics and Pain Research in Sickle Cell Disease: An explanation of heterogeneity? International Scholarly Research Network (ISRN)-Nursing, open access, Volume 2011, Article ID 672579, 6 pages, doi:10.5402/2011/672579. PMC3146762
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2011
      • *Adegbola, M. (2011) Spirituality, Self-efficacy and Quality of Life: Adults with Sickle Cell Disease, Southern On-line Journal of Nursing Research (SOJNR), 11 (1). PMC31377798
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2011
      • Adegbola, M. (2011). Taking Learning to the Learners: Using Audio Teleconferencing for Clinical Postconference and More, Journal of Creative Nursing 17:13,120-125. PMC35158003
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2011
      • Adegbola, M. (2011).Soar like Geese: Building Developmental Network Relationships for Scholarship. Nursing Education Perspectives, 32:1, 51-53. doi10.5480/1536-5026-32.1.51. PMID: 21473485
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2011
      • Adegbola, M. (2011). Using Lived Experiences of Adults to Understand Chronic Pain: Sickle Cell Disease, an Exemplar. I-manager’s Journal of Nursing, vol1, 3. NIHMS 370851, PMCID: PMC3398812
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Paper 2010
      • Adegbola, M. (2010). Spirituality augments quality of life: Adults with sickle cell disease. Paper presented at Presented at of 24th Annual conference of Association of Black Nursing Faculty, Paris, France ABNF.
        {Conference Paper} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Proceeding 2010
      • Adegbola, M. (2010). Integrating Biopsychosociospiritual Care for Adults with Sickle Cell (abstract). In Proceedings of 24th Annual conference of Southern Nursing Research Society. Austin, Texas:.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Refereed/Juried]
      2010
      • Adegbola, M. (2010). Scholarly Tailgating: Benefit for Scholars and Geese Travelling in the Same Direction. In Presented at the American Association of Blacks in Higher Education, 2010 Annual Conference. Atlanta, Georgia:.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Refereed/Juried]
      2010
      • Adegbola, M. (2010). Scholarly Tailgating: African American Doctoral Nursing Students Developing Strategic Global Networking Relationships (abstract). In Proceedings of 23rd Annual and scientific presentations of the Association of Black Nursing Faculty. Paris, France:.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Refereed/Juried]
      2010
      • Adegbola, M. (2010). Biopsychosociospiritual integrative approach for adults with sickle cell disease: Relationships among spirituality, self-efficacy, and quality of life (abstract). In 22nd Annual Conference of International Society of Nurses in Genetics 2009 (pp. pp. 275–279). Nursing and Health Sciences.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Refereed/Juried]
      2010
      • Adegbola, M. (2010). Spirituality augments quality of life: Adults with sickle cell disease (abstract). In Proceedings of 23rd Annual conference and scientific presentation of the Association of Black Nursing Faculty. Paris, France:.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Refereed/Juried]
      2010
      • Adegbola, M. (2010). Heterogeneity of Sickle Cell Disease: Gene Variants, What Pain! (abstract). In National Black Nurses 2010 Annual Institute and Conference. San Diego, California:.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2010
      • Adegbola, M. (2010). Nurses Collaborating with Cross Disciplinary Networks: Start to Integrate Genomics into Practice. Journal of National Black Nurses Association, 21:1, 45-47. PMID: 20857776
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2010
      • Adegbola, M. Nurses Collaborating with Cross Disciplinary Networks: Start to Integrate Genomics into Practice. Journal of National Black Nurses Association 2010, 21 (1), pp. 45-47.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]
      2010
      • *Adegbola, M. (2010). Biopsychosociospiritual integrative approach for adults with Sickle Cell Disease: Relationships among spirituality, self-efficacy, and quality of life [abstract].In 22nd Annual Conference of International Society of Nurses in Genetics, 2009.Nursing and Health Sciences 12:2, 276.doi 10.1111/j.1442-2018.2010.00527.x

        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Poster Abstract 2010
      • Adegbola, M. (2010, June). Scholarly Tailgating: African American Doctoral Nursing Students Developing Strategic Global Networking Relationships (abstract). Poster session presented at Presented at 24th Annual conference of Black Nursing Faculty, Paris, France.
        {Poster Abstract} [Refereed/Juried]
      2010
      • Adegbola, M. (2010). Integrating Biopsychosociospiritual Care for Adults with Sickle Cell. Poster session presented at Presented at 24th Annual conference of Southern Nursing Research Society, Austin, Texas.
        {Poster Abstract} [Refereed/Juried]

      Book Review 2009
      • "Can heterogeneity of Chronic Sickle Cell Disease Pain be Explained by Genomics?." Review of Biological Research for Nursing. 11, no 1, 2009: pp. 81-97. PMID19487302
        {Book Review} [Refereed/Juried]

      Conference Proceeding 2009
      • Adegbola, M. (2009). Using a Biopsychosociospiritual Model of Care for Adults with Sickle Cell (abstract). In Proceedings of 37th Annual Sickle Cell Disease Association of America, Inc. annual convention. Orlando, Florida:.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Refereed/Juried]
      2009
      • Adegbola, M. (2009). Integrative Biopsychosociospiritual Model of Care for Adults with Sickle Cell (abstract). In Proceedings of 22nd International Society of Nurses in Genetics. San Diego, California:.
        {Conference Proceeding} [Refereed/Juried]

      Poster Abstract 2009
      • Adegbola, M. (2009). Integrative Biopsychosociospiritual Model of Care for Adults with Sickle Cell. Poster session presented at Presented at 22nd International Society of Nurses in Genetics, San Diego, California.
        {Poster Abstract} [Refereed/Juried]
      2009
      • Adegbola, M. (2009, September). Using a Biopsychosociospiritual Model of Care for Adults with Sickle Cell. Poster session presented at Presented at 37th Annual Sickle Cell Disease Association of America, Inc. annual convention, Orlando, Florida.
        {Poster Abstract} [Refereed/Juried]
      2009
      • Adegbola, M. (2009, August). Biopsychosociospiritual Perspective: Caring for Adults with Sickle Cell Disease. Poster session presented at Presented at Sisters of the Academy Research Bootcamp, Auburn, Alabama.
        {Poster Abstract} [Refereed/Juried]
      2009
      • Adegbola, M. (2009, August). Chronic Pain Heterogeneity: Caring for Adults with Sickle Cell Disease. Poster session presented at Presented at Sisters of the Academy Research Bootcamp, Auburn, Alabama.
        {Poster Abstract} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2007
      • Adegbola, M. (2007). Relationship of Spirituality, Self-efficacy, and Quality of Life among Adults with Sickle Cell Disease (abstract). Proceedings of National Coalition of Ethnic Minority Nurse Associations (NCEMNA), San Antonio, Texas.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]
      2007
      • Adegbola, M. (2007). The Relationship among spirituality, Self-efficacy, and Quality of Life in Adults with Sickle Cell Disease. (Ph.D. dissertation, The University of Texas at Arlington, 2007) ProQuest Digital Dissertation, AAT 3289109
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2006
      • Adegbola, M. Spirituality and Quality of Life in Chronic Illness. The Journal of Theory Construction & Testing 2006, 10 (2), pp. 42-46.
        {Journal Article} [Refereed/Juried]

      Journal Article 2005
      • Adegbola, M., Burns, N., Rutherford, C. (2005). Self-Care and Sickle Cell Disease (Abstract). Proceedings of Crossing Borders, Fort Worth, Tx.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Presentations

    • July  2013

       Advancing Diversity in Nursing and Healthcare Delivery: Scholarly Tailgating, Your Move! 

      Podium presentation at the National Black Nursing Association [NBNA] Inc.  2013 Annual Institute and Conference, New Orleans, La.

    • October  2013

      Becoming a Nurse Scientist

      Podium presentation, Becoming a Nurse Scientist. Presented at Dallas PREP Career Awareness, Eastfield College, DCCCD, Dallas, Texas.

    • June  2013

      Chronic Pain Assessment and Use of Pain Scales: Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

      Presented to ABNF Inc. 26th Annual meeting and scientific conference, Los Angeles, Ca.

    • February  2013

      Lived experiences of adults with sickle cell disease and chronic pain: Voices untold

      Presented at SNRS 27th annual conference

    • July  2012

      'Nurses sit at the Table- The future is now!'

      'Nurses sit at the Table- The future is now!' Presented at the NBNA annual meeting and scientific conference

  • Past
    •  
      ' African American Participation in Genomic-Related Research: African American Nurses Take the Lead'
  • Past
    •  
      'Association of Pain Protective Haplotype with Varying Chronic Pain Trajectories: Adults with Sickle Cell Disease'
  • Past
    •  
      'Heterogeneity of Sickle Cell Disease: Gene Variants, What Pain!'
  • Past
    •  
      Becoming a Nurse Scientist
  • Past
    •  
      'Spirituality augments quality of life: Adults with sickle cell disease'
  • Past
    •  
      Scholarly Tailgating: African American Doctoral Nursing Students Developing Strategic Global Networking Relationships (abstract)
  • Past
    •  
      'Scholarly Tailgating: Benefit for Scholars and Geese Travelling in the Same Direction'
  • Past
    •  
      'Integrating Biopsychosociospiritual Care for Adults with Sickle Cell'
  • Past
    •  
      Integrative Biopsychosociospiritual Model of Care for Adults with Sickle Cell
  • Past
    •  
      'Using a Biopsychosociospiritual Model of Care for Adults with Sickle Cell'
  • Past
    •  
      'Biopsychosociospiritual Perspective: Caring for Adults with Sickle Cell Disease'
  • Past
    •  
      'Chronic Pain Heterogeneity: Caring for Adults with Sickle Cell Disease'
  • Past
    •  
      'Caring for adults with Sickle Cell Disease'
  • Past
    •  
      Relationships of Spirituality, Self-efficacy, and Quality of Life among Adults with Sickle Cell Disease
  • Past
    •  
      Strategic Networking and Scholarly Tailgate: Soar Global Developmental Relationship for Doctoral Nursing Students
  • Past
    •  
      'Sickle Cell Disease Now in the Genomic Era!'
  • Past
    •  
      'Networking: Building Relationships for Doctoral Students'
  • Past
    •  
      'Relationship of Spirituality, Self-efficacy, and Quality of Life among Adults with Sickle Cell Disease'
  • Past
    •  
      'La Participacion Afroamericana en la investigacion: Investigadores edificando confianza con afroamericanos Presentation at 5th congress of International de Linguística'
  • Past
    •  
      'African American Participation in Research: Researchers Building Trust with African Americans'
  • Past
    •  
      ' African American Participation in Research: Researchers Building Trust with African Americans'
  • Past
    •  
      'Sickle Cell Disease: Who cares?'
  • Past
    •  
      'Self-Care and Sickle Cell Disease. Presentation at Crossing Borders International Conference'
      Adegbola, M., Burns, N., Rutherford, C.
  • Past
    •  
      'Psychosocial and self-care needs of patients with Sickle Cell Disease'
      Adegbola, M., Burns, N., Rutherford, C.
  • Past
    •  
      'Lived Experiences of Adults with Sickle Cell Disease and Chronic Pain'
  • Past
    •  
      'Becoming a Nurse Scientist'
  • Past
    •  
      'Advocacy in Research to Decrease Health Inequities: African American Nurses Take the Lead, Advance Health'
  • Past
    •  
      'Chronic Pain in Adults with Sickle cell Disease: A Lived Experience Study'
  • Past
    •  
      'Healthy Communities through Access, Education, Research and Collaboration'
  • Past
    •  
      'Leading Practice and Research: Qualitative Inquiry of Sickle Cell Disease Chronic Pain'
  • Past
    •  
      'Epigenetics, Gene Expression and Chronic Pain'
  • Past
    •  
      'Genomics and Healthy People 2020: Personalization of Care'
  • Past
    •  
      'pedagogical Method to Connect, Engage and Communicate when Face-to-Face is Impractical'
  • Past
    •  
      'Lived Experiences of Adults with Sickle Cell Disease'
  • Past
    •  
      'Association of Pain Protective Haplotype with Varying Chronic Pain Trajectories among Adults with Sickle cell Disease'
       
  • Past
    •  
      Time Management and Orgnization for Preceptors

      Adegbola, M. (Jan. 2016) Time management and Organization. Dallas Fort Worth Hospital Council     Preceptor Academy. Podium presentation

  • Past
    •  
      Time Management and Organization for Preceptors

      Adegbola, M. (Jan. 2016) Time management and Organization. Dallas Fort Worth Hospital Council     Preceptor Academy. Podium presentation

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • July 2012 to Present Prodromal Symptoms of Adults with Sickle Cell Disease Pain sponsored by  - $1000
    • Aug 2010 to July 2012 Pain and Associated Symptoms- Nurse Research Training [T32 NRI1147], Postdoctoral fellowship sponsored by  - $91188
    • Sept 2007 to Dec 2007 Relationship of Spirituality, Self-efficacy, Quality of Life among Adults with Sickle Cell Disease sponsored by  - $1000

Other Creative Activities

Students Supervised

  • Doctoral
    • Present

      Independent study- NUR6370-067

      At the completion of this course the student will be able to:

      1. Apply research knowledge by conducting a qualitative research project in collaboration with an experienced nurse researcher.
      2. Enhance interviewing techniques.
      3. Code, analyze, and interpret the meaning of data collected.
  • Undergraduate
    • Present

      Honors' thesis- Nur 3337

Courses

Other Teaching Activities

  • 2015
    • Teaching Philosophy
      • Aug 2015 Dr Adegbola's Philosophy on Teaching

        Summary of Teaching – Dr. Maxine Adegbola

        Statement on teaching

                    I want my students to become self-directed life-long learners, to reflectively and critically think, and be prepared to function as dynamic registered nurses practicing collaboratively with other disciplines in a constantly changing healthcare environment. By modeling active learning techniques and peer collaboration to students, they will become enriched, understand the needs of clients and participate in healthcare offerings to create life-changing health outcomes for individuals, families and special populations. To this end, my teaching philosophy supports respecting and empowering students, facilitating their professional development, and expecting and challenging their [students’] best efforts and performance to sensitively include real life needs of individuals being served within contemporary and social contexts.

                    My career as a registered nurse has spanned over 35 years, and includes over 24 years as a full time nurse educator. From 1990 to 2008, I served as a faculty member and Instructor at Dallas County Community College, specifically El Centro College. From 2008 to present, I serve as an Assistant Professor in the undergraduate nursing program, at the University of Texas at Arlington. With this undergraduate faculty appointment, I have didactic and clinical teaching and educator responsibilities. Prior to 1990 when I started at El Centro College, I was a clinician and service director in acute care hospitals where as a part of my leadership, I educated staff and students on safe patient care delivery.  With such an extensive nursing career I have had the opportunity to educate, teach and learn from hundreds of students in nursing. Since 2008, I taught core courses Leadership-Management, and Transition to Professional Nursing [Capstone], and Health Assessment.  Currently I teach the two core courses Leadership-Management, and Transition to Professional Nursing to graduating nursing students in the undergraduate nursing program.

        Philosophy of Teaching

                        My educational philosophy has evolved over time and is in response to my own experiences, growth and intellectual exchanges that included roles as a clinician, educator, and researcher. As a teacher, facilitator and nursing scholar, I deem it my duty to encourage active participation and critical thinking by students. It is the teacher’s responsibility to awaken thought, guide, clarify, promote scholarship, encourage dialogue, and facilitate collaborative discussion with members of multidisciplinary and multi-perspective thinking teams. My role as a facilitator extends to the promotion of the learning environment that encourages and fosters success. As a constructivist, the overarching philosophy entails active learning, using problem based learning, wherein learners are engaged and empowered to take responsibility for their increased knowledge and self-learning. Specifically, my philosophy is based on the following beliefs, that:

        Students yearn for opportunities to learn

        Educator creatively and deliberately encourages active and lifelong learning,   

        Educator has a duty to encourage active participation

        Students need to be stimulated and engaged in the process of learning.

        Teacher /learner commitmentis important

        The educator sets and maintains high academic standards

        The educator maintains competency and certification

                        Students yearn for opportunities to learn.

                     I believe the essence of the provocative statement ‘If the student is not learning, then the teacher is not teaching’, within context to be true. That is, the teacher has a duty and responsibility to facilitate student engagement, teaching-learning partnerships and effective learning, help learners become successful, yet there are contextual and mitigating situations that do not foster/enable a good outcome. I believe individuals can achieve their full potential when they follow the educational path, and it is the role of the teacher to encourage scholastic growth. The teacher should encourage student internalization of knowledge through contextual inquiry. For example, students will later apply concepts in meaningful ways for clinical translation. Students must be encouraged to move progressively towards mastery of material that can be accomplished by achieving established, specific goals and learning outcomes. The student must be encouraged to achieve and exceed these goals. To this end, there must be consistent formative assessment, feedback, and summative evaluations. Because mastery takes a great amount of time, effort, and intense practice, students must be implored to spend a great amount of time practicing and perfecting their craft and skills. Within the teaching –learning partnership the teacher/educator facilitates learning.

                    Educator crafts, deliberately and creatively presents and encourages active life-long learning.

                    The goal of education is to deliberately and creatively present activities that are crafted with intention to induce learning, and yet capitalize on unstructured situations. Additionally, I seize the moment, and creatively use the unstructured moment to achieve even greater, unplanned, unimaginable outcomes. Students’ learning appetites have to be whetted for lifelong learning and problem based learning that can have future applicability.

        Duty to encourage active learner participation 

                    As an educator and scholar, it is my duty to encourage students to actively participate, critically reason and to collaborate with members of multidisciplinary and multi-perspective thinking teams. I make an effort to present content in a variety of formats and to tailor the presentation for the learner by incorporating active learning strategies and presentation modalities. In the leadership-management and capstone courses, which are precepted by a manager or clinical expert, I maintain contact with students through weekly, group conference calls in addition to clinical facility visits. I require students to progressively articulate their thoughts in discussions, debates, and critique of research relevant to entry- level nursing. Students will get the latest information and valuable real-life knowledge that can be used immediately in the profession.

                        Students need to be stimulated and engaged in the process of learning.

                    I use the Socratic method of teaching and constantly ask questions rather than lecturing or presenting answers. Students are expected to come to class prepared and knowledgeable about relevant content. Instructional time is used to engage students in dialogue. When I use the Socratic Method, students are better able to grasp more concepts and think through scenarios. I experience great joy and satisfaction in watching students develop skills and competencies in nursing practice.

                        Foster and encourage teacher/learner connection

                        Interaction between teacher and learner is a very important and a powerful factor that I use in promoting learning. The interaction is reciprocally respectful and supportive. To accomplish educational projects and model working collaboratively with multidisciplinary and multicultural teams, I allow the students to work in small groups initially and then larger groups. Students learn valuable lessons from each other, such as diversity, collaboration and negotiation. These skills will translate into work habit experiences with multidisciplinary teams. Interaction with students also has positive outcomes in demonstrating caring. For example, learning students’ names within the first few weeks of the class helps to engage the student and fosters a caring educational environment. Additionally, students are valued as individuals collaborating as a group to provide appropriate healthcare decisions.

                    I am interested in the cognitive growth, academic skills of students, and repeated formative feedback throughout the course. I assess students’ abilities and learning throughout the semester, use assessment techniques such as ‘muddiest point’ and ‘one minute paper’. By assessing learning and teaching delivery concurrently with the teaching session there is immediate feedback so I am able to redirect my presentation to incorporate student’s needs. My diversified and hands-on approach helps students of culturally diverse backgrounds achieve academic success. These approaches also validate that individuals are important, and individuals’ needs are incorporated into the delivery to the group.

                        Sets and maintains high academic standards

                    Setting and maintaining high academic standards for my students and myself. I believe that high expectations encourage high achievement. This self-fulfilling prophecy or Pygmalion effect suggests that students are motivated by and respond to signals and cues sent by the educator. Student’s achievement and behavior are mirrors of my expectations of them. My role as an educator is dynamic and constantly evolving. I am a teacher who is also a learner. As I continuously learn from my students, I also continue to evaluate my performance with new information, adopt new ideas, and graft tips acquired from colleagues and other scholars. I keep abreast of innovative ways to deliver content and use technological strategies such as audio teleconferencing, simulated case studies and clinical skills demonstration in the simulation lab environment. When preparing students for simulation experiences, students are given the realities yet calmed by statements such as, be yourself, give excellent care as you would with a real/live patient.

        Maintain competency and certification as a nurse educator

                    I maintain competency and certification as a nurse educator, in addition to regular attendance at educational offerings, in Fall 2012, I was recognized for enduring and substantial contributions to nursing education and was inducted as a fellow into the National League for Nursing [NLN] Academy of Nursing Education [ANEF]. Additionally, annually I attend teaching-learning seminars and conferences and present educational research at national educational forums such as the American Association of Blacks in Higher Education [AABHE] and NLN programs. Summer 2013, I attended a week- long Leadership and Mentoring Institute sponsored by AABHE and participated in the faculty track offerings. During this week long, intensive program, I worked with seasoned educators and leaders in higher education. Also, in summer 2013 I was recognized by the Association of Black Nursing Faculty [ABNF] for significant contributions to nursing and to African American clients, and received the Lifetime Achievement in Education and Research award. I am a Certified Nurse Educator [CNE].

                    Additionally, I learn from master teachers on my campus, and voluntarily request feedback and evaluation from master colleagues who visit my class for peer evaluations.

        Innovative teaching methods developed or used

        Create experiences that are appropriate to the learning needs of students

                    I create experiences that are appropriate to the learning needs of students and make an effort to present content in a variety of formats. In my courses, I tailor the presentation for the learner, and incorporate different learning strategies. I use both traditional and technological tools while including research findings, visual learning aids, concept maps, role-play, games, case studies, and contemporary [topical] content and charts. For example with the Affordable Care Act, the new healthcare law, students are guided on the effects of how this new law will affect healthcare delivery and education. Additionally students are engaged in translation of research findings. Students critique topical research articles and propose how research findings can be incorporated into practice settings. Another area of using of topical and contemporary issues involves becoming familiar with the 2010 Institute of Medicine [IOM] report- Nurses Leading Change in Healthcare. Students are educated on the eight recommendations from the IOM report and they debate how these recommendations may be implemented. I facilitate active learning techniques and participation. Additionally, I include experts in delivering relevant, topical information. For example, a guest speaker from the Action Coalition policy arm of the Texas Nurses Association, visit with students via teleconference medium, to update them on coalition activities. As a facilitator, I scaffold learning and empower students to become active learners. With such dynamic and stimulating learning situations learners are able to critically think about issues they will face in the real world.

                    I use clinical case studies to meet students’ learning needs. Clinical case studies that include cases from my own practice and experience, as well cases from books and based on feedback and interaction with students are included in class delivery. Experiential activities help students actively learn. As a group, in person or via audio teleconference we discuss the students’ experiences in clinical and critically analyze situations. Students are expected to explore and present pros and cons to situations. This process also includes critical thinking, deliberately evaluating logical inquiry, reasoning, and ways of thinking.  Role Playing is used as a strategy to help students develop and prepare for expected roles as a nurse, who will collaborate with many healthcare providers and interact with patients, families and stakeholders. Such exercises help the students to practice and receive guidance regarding having difficult yet practical conversations with fellow employees, superiors, patients and others in healthcare. Dramatization helps students visualize pathways that patients may experience entering the healthcare system. In the leadership-management- capstone course, which is preceptored by a manager or clinical expert I keep in contact with students through weekly, group conference calls in addition to clinical facility visits.

        Uses evidence to support educational activities and provide opportunities for selected students to be involved in a faculty program of research. 

                    I utilize research findings, my own and those of other scholars to reflect current trends and share information with students. A part of my teaching blends significant research findings. I use findings from research on using audio teleconferences in post conference, incorporating service learning projects into clinical experiences, care of individuals with chronic pain and many other research findings to share state of the science evidences with students. I co-teach in lectures for students in a class size of 104 to 120 per semester, and supervise 10-12 clinical students. Additionally I teach a hybrid didactic course at the master’s level.

        Additionally, I have mentored undergraduate students, Masters’ completion students and PhD students on research projects that affect clinical outcomes.

        Undergraduate, masters and doctoral students are encouraged and supported to be involved in my program of research both through honor’s college and independent study courses. Details of these courses appear in the table below.

        My teaching background and clinical experiences are eclectic. I have been a registered nurse since 1977 and have occupied multiple roles as a clinician, supervisor, service director, leader, educator and nurse scientist. I have been teaching nursing students full time since 1990. The first 18 years of teaching were to those seeking an Associate Degree of Applied Science-Nursing. Since 2008, I have been educating students seeking a baccalaureate degree in nursing. In addition to mentoring and educating students, I have kept updated on clinical skills, remain certified in Advanced Cardiac Life Support [ACLS] and Basic Cardiac Life Support [BCLs], and utilize my clinical experience and skills in educating students. My clinical experiences, research activities, professional involvement and civic activism all shape my ability to share real life scenarios and relevant case studies for learning.

        Directs students’ scholarly inquiry (e.g. on projects, honors and masters theses, dissertations, preparing students’ works for publication) 

        As an educator and one who believes in mentoring, encouraging and recruiting potential nursing students for nursing and healthcare, since 2009, annually, I present on choosing Nursing Science & healthcare to junior high school [6-8th] grade who are in a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math [STEM] program. This time of sharing is one of the exciting events during the summer. The students are engaged; ask many relevant questions and are focused on careers in the field of science. For the summer 2013 session, I invited two senior nursing students to share the presentation with me. The STEM students bonded with the nursing students and this resulted in a dynamic presentation and students having an understanding of nursing from an individual who is currently preparing to be a nurse. Both the junior high and the university students gained tremendously from the experience. This sort of relationship building and professional sharing are examples of how I continue to remain engaged in the community, mentor, and foster exposure to potential students.

        Additionally, my responsibility includes mentoring students in the following: developing resumes, preparing elevator pitch speeches, preparing portfolios and preparing skills documents for employment. I participate in mock interviews, and use service learning projects to help capstone students recognize the importance of being civic minded and impacting the lives of individuals in the community.

        I mentor students and professional nurses on and off my campus. I mentored honor college students and gave oversight to the development of their honors’ college thesis. Because my expertise is in pain assessment and management and care of adults with sickle cell disease, students have sought me out for mentorship in those areas. In addition to undergraduate mentoring, I have mentored Nursing PhD students through the dissertation process, a social work PhD student through dissertation and Masters’ completion projects. Additionally, I am sought out to mentor other students outside of the UTA campus. For example, an undergraduate student in nursing contacted me in 2011 and needed expert direction in planning and implementing a research study on children with sickle cell disease in Uganda, East Africa. The then student nurse completed her global studies project, graduated and in June, 2013 passed the NCLEX examination. I continue to mentor this neophyte nurse and emerging nurse leader.

        Advising activities

        I am available in person, by appointment and via email for advising students on an as needed basis. I advise students in my clinical group for leadership/management and capstone courses, and any other student in the college of nursing who needs professional direction. In addition to course work advising, I guide students with resume preparation and job interviewing skills. For graduating students, I conduct mock interview sessions and give students feedback on their performance. Additionally, I mentor Honors’ college students in the undergraduate program, masters’ completion project students, and doctoral students.  I have also advised undergraduate and doctoral students who have taken independent study courses. Additionally, I have supervised and worked with students on dissertation committees for PhD Nursing and Social Work students. I participate in the PhD open forums and the mentoring program for students during the semester. At these open house forums and monthly brown bag offerings I assist students in meandering the educational system and university expectations.

        Innovative teaching methods developed or used:

        I teach Leadership-Management and Transition into Professional Nursing  [Capstone], both core, 3 credit courses in the final semester of the Nursing Undergraduate program of study leading to a baccalaureate in Nursing [BSN]. I use engaging techniques in the classroom, clinical and for post clinical conferences. I have utilized audio teleconferences and students have given the feedback that they like the medium for group learning. During classroom presentations, I use an integrative approach that engages students in active participation and discussion. For preparation to the clinical area, clinical students are evaluated in the Smart Hospital using Objective Structured Clinical Examination [OSCE] guidelines. After the simulated experience, students are debriefed. Students have given feedback on the OSCEs’ simulation are very effective for preparing them for the clinical rotation. This teaching method helps the learner to understand the relevance of the information in improving the clinical care of patients, and how to critically think.

        Currently I am using service-learning techniques to help students understand the specific needs of members of the community from which the patients being cared for come from. One student remarked on the utility of being involved in non-traditional student roles to provide service to clients/patient, by “attending hospital wide meetings with my manager was helpful”. Using service learning as pedagogy help students identify patient needs and use skills to improve patient outcomes.

         With the nursing theory and science course, I use eclectic teaching strategies and discussions to help students develop skills that will form the foundation for postgraduate work and impact nursing practice. Students are involved in group discussion and interaction that foster learning and real life application. Additionally, I interweave evidence based strategies and practice into my courses to increase applicability and relevance for the student or professional nurse.

        Awards or other recognition for excellence in teaching

        I am a Certified Nurse Educator [CNE] and since 2012 was inducted as a fellow in the National League for Nursing [NLN], ANEF. In 2014, I also completed a Service Excellence fellowship at UTA. The service learning fellowship prepared me to use service learning as a teaching methodology. Additionally, I am recognized by peer teachers and professional organizations. In 2014 I was recognized by a national organization and awarded with the ABNF-lifetime in education and research award.

        I contribute to curriculum design, course development, and participation in teaching improvement –inter-rater reliability/rubrics for course and evaluative content relevant to assigned courses. I am interested in getting formative feedback during the semester, responding to students’ needs before the end of the course. Currently, and since fall 2013, I use the following grid as formative evaluation during the semester. In the past, this anonymous evaluation has been returned by 30 to 40% of the students. I encourage students to give anonymous feedback throughout the semester. The identified areas of concern are addressed during the semester. The goal of this intervention is to improve the end of semester evaluation response rate from 30-40% to 90% and greater. All security guidelines and anonymity will be attended to when students respond with paper format.

                    In addition to usual course work requirements, the final semester is hectic, content laden and demanding in terms of passing high stakes exams, readiness of portfolios, job applications, applying for graduation, and more. Students often express high levels of stress. My organized approach, calm and encouraging demeanor has helped students keep on track and methodically achieve expected benchmarks to successfully complete course requirements and graduate. Additionally, I offer real life tips, and approaches to incremental study and taking the National Council Licensure Examination [NCLEX]. I get messages of successfully passing NCLEX and “ you helped me to remain focused".                                                                                                                                                                                                                

Service to the Community

  • Volunteered
    • Dec 2012 to  Present Volunteer with Operation Care International, Dallas, provide healthcare basic needs, spiritual growth, and ongoing transitional support for homeless, hungry, lost, lonely indoduals in the city of Dallas

      Volunteer with Operation Care International, Dallas, provide healthcare basic needs, spiritual growth, and ongoing transitional support for homeless, hungry, lost, lonely indoduals in the city of Dallas

    • June 2009 to  Present Compassionate Professionals on Global Mission, short term mission

      Compassionate Professionals on Global Mission, short term mission

    • June 1992 to  Present Dallas Overcomers Church, Medical missions/communtiy outreach and Chilren's education

      Dallas Overcomers Church, Medical missions/communtiy outreach and Chilren's education

    • June 2011 to  Present Possibility Ministry - provide spiritual growth programs, basic needs for homeless, hopeless and distressed individuals

      Possibility Ministry - provide spiritual growth programs, basic needs for homeless, hopeless and distressed individuals

    • June 2013 to  Present Metroplex Black Nurses Association {Dallas}, banquet/Marketing sub-committee

      Metroplex Black Nurses Association {Dallas}, banquet/Marketing sub-committee

    • June 2010 to  Present Sickle Cell Disease Association, Tarrant County, Board membet and Board member of National Sickle Cell Disease Association

      Sickle Cell Disease Association, Tarrant County, Board membet and Board member of National Sickle Cell Disease Association

Service to the Profession

  • Appointed
    • July 2011 to  Present Association of Black Nursing Faculty {ABNF} executive board

      Association of Black Nursing Faculty {ABNF} executive board, and awards committee, chair, 25th silver anniversary

    • Aug 2007 to  Dec 2012 Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS) International Examination Committee, appointment

      commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS) International Examination Committee, appointment

  • Elected
    • June 2013 to  Present Association of Black Nursing Faculty {ABNF} executive board

      Association of Black Nursing Faculty {ABNF} executive board, chair of awards committee-appointed, appointed co-chair policy committee

    • July 2011 to  Present Sigma Theta Tau International , Delta Chapter, governance committee

      Sigma Theta Tau International , Delta Chapter, governance committee

    • Dec 2009 to  Present Member of Board of Sickle Cell Disease Association of Tarrant County, Texas

      Member of Board of Sickle Cell Disease Association of Tarrant County, Texas

    • June 2012 to  Present Co-editor of Association of Black Nursing Faculty Journal

      Co-editor of Association of Black Nursing Faculty Journal

    • June 2013 to  Present Metroplex Black Nurses Association {Dallas}, banquet/Marketing sub-committee

      Metroplex Black Nurses Association {Dallas}, banquet/Marketing sub-committee

    • June 2013 to  Present Sickle Cell Disease Association, Tarrant County, Board membet and Board member of National Sickle Cell Disease Association

      Sickle Cell Disease Association, Tarrant County, Board membet and Board member of National Sickle Cell Disease Association

  • Volunteered
    • Dec 2011 to  Present Sickle cell Diease Symposium Abstract Reviewer

      Suickle cell Diease Symposium Abstract Reviewer

    • July 2012 to  Present Association of Black Nursing Faculty {ABNF} co-editor Association of Black Nursing Faculty Journal

      Association of Black Nursing Faculty {ABNF} co-editor ABNF journal

    • Jan 2011 to  Present Editorial Reviewe for numerous Nursing Professional Journals

      Editorial review board for Journals: Journal of Cultural Diversity, Journal of Nursing Education and Practice [JNEP], Journal of Theory Construction & Testing, Nursing Education Perspectives

Service to the University

  • Appointed
    • Aug 2011 to  Aug 2012 UTA College of Nursing search committee for Associate Dean of Research

      search committee for Associate Dean of Research

    • Jan 2012 to  Present UTA College of Nursing search committee for Moribtz Gerontology Chair

      search committee for Moribtz Gerontology Chair

  • Elected
    • Aug 2010 to  Present Nominations committee

      Member of nominations committee in the college of nursing fall 2010 to present

  • Volunteered
    • May 2009 to  Present University Hearing Panel

      May 2009 to present

    • Aug 2009 to  Present Leading task force for Integration of Genetics/Genomics into BSNursing program

      Lead task force for Integration of Genetics/Genomics into BSNursing program

Other Service Activities

  • Uncategorized
    • May 2013 Fellowships
      Fall 2012 -spring 2013 Service-Learning Faculty Fellow 9/2012 National League for Nursing Academy of Nursing Education Fellow
      8/2010 - 7/2012     University of Iowa College of Nursing Postdoctoral Fellowship “Pain and Associated Symptoms: Nurse Research Training” (T32 NR11147), Pain- Postdoctoral Fellowship
      2009 & 2008, July    Summer Institute Program to Increase Diversity (SIPID) in Health-Related research- Functional Genomics of Blood Disorders,  sponsored by National Heart Lung and Blood  Institute (NHLBI), Dallas, Texas
      2007, September    Ferne Kyba endowed fellowship, Arlington, Texas
      2006 summer    NINR (National Institute of Nursing Research) Summer Genetics Institute fellowship, Bethesda, Maryland
      2006 spring    Minority Recruitment, Retention, and Opportunity for Researchers (MIRROR) fellowship, University of Texas at Dallas Sickle Cell Disease Research Center
      2006 spring     National Coalition of Ethnic Minority Nurse Associations (NCEMNA) mentee award