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Michael L Brittain

Name

[Brittain, Michael L]
  • Director*, English
  • Interim Director

Professional Preparation

    • 2002 B.A. in EnglishUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • 2006 M.A. in EnglishUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • 2017 Ph.D in EnglishUniversity of Texas at Arlington

Appointments

    • Aug 2018 to Present Director of UTA English Writing Center
      The University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2017 to Aug 2018 Interim Director of UTA English Writing Center
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2013 to Aug 2017 Adjunct Lecturer
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2011 to May 2013 Assistant Director of Writing Center
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2004 to Jan 2013 Graduate Teaching Assistant
      University of Texas at Arlington

Courses

      • ENGL 3385-001 TOPICS IN RHETORIC

        In Culture of Fear, Barry Glassner states that despite [currently] living in one of “the safest time[s] in human history,” we also live “in the most fearmongering time in human history.” Some scholars and cultural critics argue that a rising “rhetoric of fear,” created and distributed in part by the media, politicians, advertisers, magazines, social media, TV, filmmakers, video game designers, etc., continues to expand our current “culture of fear.” Yet, at the same time, many of us are also attracted to these outlets and the feelings of fear they create and project. In this course, we will examine the cultural, philosophical, and political impact of fear-driven rhetoric by focusing on examples of apocalyptic rhetoric, narratives of fear, trauma and narrative, rhetorical listening, and event theory in order to assess our current global decibel level of fear.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-002 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        ENGL 2350 is a foundational course for future English majors and scholars. In this course, we will delve into the corpus of literary theory to provide students a base for textual analysis and interpretation, which will also include the application of theoretical terms, methods, and strategies. These theoretical approaches will require not only close readings of fictional works, but we will also apply these methods to other genres (poetry, film, and music). Students will demonstrate their mastery of these theoretical approaches in their written work by not only applying critical theory, but also by researching and acknowledging gaps in scholarly arguments being made concerning a specific primary text. Discovering these gaps is the key to constructing original scholarship; thus, the “trajectory” of this course helps establish a secure direction for future English scholars and researchers. After completing this course, students will find their reading experience enriched by having learned the strategies for reading, thinking, and writing that make English Studies not a book club, but a profession.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-500 TECHNICAL WRITING

        Tech Writing 2338

        DESCRIPTION

        ENGLISH 2338.500: TECHNICAL WRITING

        In an information society, your ability to communicate effectively will be a big factor in determining your career success. This course is designed to prepare you for the writing-related communication tasks in your job. As a Registered Nurse, mastering the specifics of technical writing can help you communicate better with your patients as well as other healthcare professionals. In this five-week course, you will learn strategies for writing clear and concise technical documents, explore principles of good document design, and learn how to use visuals in documents. You will study common types of technical and professional writing: memo, resume, job application letter, instructions, and technical descriptions. As you complete each assignment, you will practice how to define your audience and purpose, determine appropriate document format and writing style, and improve the clarity and organization of your document. 

      • ENGL 3385-001 TOPICS IN RHETORIC

        The connections between rhetoric and music have been questioned by musicologists for centuries, with many focusing on the relations of text to music. With the recent rise in popularity of sound studies, the questioning of rhetorical concepts in regard to music has broadened – allowing for a more expansive approach to textual, musical, and film analysis – creating what Deborah Kapchan refers to as “genres of listening.” In this course, we will apply these expanded approaches not only in the act of listening to music (be it lyric-driven, instrumental, ambient, etc.) but also by participating in “close-listening” of both songs and texts, which will involve asking questions of space, acoustics, and temporality, and their rhetorical implications. We will apply these rhetorical strategies to examples of music memoir, film (in the genres of soundtrack and music documentaries), fiction, and, of course, song. Overall, we will explore the complex relation of sound and culture through multiple approaches and genres in hopes of answering the question: “Are any of us really listening?”

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2319-702 BRITISH LITERATURE

        Concentration on works of British literature with focus on how cultural, geographic, and political issues shape and reflect literature in a particular culture.  Topics may include the nature of empire, Romantic conceptions of heroism, or literary representations of the sciences. Examines at least three genres and six authors. Emphasis on critical thinking, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301

      • ENGL 1301-002 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course is an introduction to college reading and writing. It emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        By the end of ENGL 1301, students should be able to do the following things:

        Rhetorical Knowledge

        Use knowledge of the rhetorical situation—author, audience, exigence, constraints—to analyze and construct texts

        Compose texts in a variety of genres, expanding their repertoire beyond predictable forms

        Adjust voice, tone, diction, syntax, level of formality, and structure to meet the demands of different rhetorical situations

        Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing

        Use writing, reading, and discussion for inquiry, learning, communicating, and examining assumptions

        Employ critical reading strategies to identify an author’s position, main ideas, genre conventions, and rhetorical strategies

        Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts

        Find, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate sources to inform, support, and situate their own claims

        Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts

      • ENGL 100-002 Integrated Reading and Writing Workshop

        By the end of ENGL 0100,  students should be able to do the following things:

        College Level Writing: Develop long-term reading and writing strategies  for college level courses.

        Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing: Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts. Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts.

        Processes: Demonstrate knowledge of and ability to use the writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing— to write persuasively in multiple genres.

      • ENGL 100-007 Integrated Reading and Writing Workshop

        By the end of ENGL 0100,  students should be able to do the following things:

        College Level Writing: Develop long-term reading and writing strategies  for college level courses.

        Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing: Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts. Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts.

        Processes: Demonstrate knowledge of and ability to use the writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing— to write persuasively in multiple genres.

      • ENGR 1300-003 ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING

        The Engineering Communication writing component of the larger Engineering Problem Solving Class: Broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through the process of applying the principles of mathematics to solve real-life engineering problems and technical writing assignments. Math topics are presented within the context of engineering applications and reinforced through examples from engineering courses. Also introduces algorithm development through the use of the engineering analysis software MATLAB. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1421 (or concurrent enrollment), MATH 1426 (or concurrent enrollment) or MATH 2425 (or concurrent enrollment).

      • ENGL 2329-018 AMERICAN LITERATURE

        Concentration on works of American literature with focus on how cultural, geographic, and political issues shape and reflect literature in a particular culture.  Examines at least three genres and six authors. Emphasis on critical thinking, reading, and writing. This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirements in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. The required objectives of these core courses are the development of students’ critical thinking, communication skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-701 American Literature

        Concentration on works of American literature with focus on how cultural, geographic, and political issues shape and reflect literature in a particular culture.  Examines at least three genres and six authors. Emphasis on critical thinking, reading, and writing. This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirements in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. The required objectives of these core courses are the development of students’ critical thinking, communication skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.

      • ENGL 1302-702 Rhetoric and Composition II

        English 1302: Introduction to Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing II is a course that builds on the skills learned in English 1301 by providing a more extensive introduction to rhetorical and argument theories. Students learn to identify a controversial issue independently, research that issue by navigating library databases, compile a bibliography of relevant sources, map the conversation surrounding the issue, and advocate their own position by developing claims supported by good reasons and evidence.  Students continue to practice recursive reading and writing processes and develop a more sophisticated awareness of context and audience.

      • ENGR 1300-003 Writing for Engineers

        The Engineering Communication writing component of the larger Engineering Problem Solving Class: Broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through the process of applying the principles of mathematics to solve real-life engineering problems and technical writing assignments. Math topics are presented within the context of engineering applications and reinforced through examples from engineering courses. Also introduces algorithm development through the use of the engineering analysis software MATLAB. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1421 (or concurrent enrollment), MATH 1426 (or concurrent enrollment) or MATH 2425 (or concurrent enrollment).

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGR 1300-006 Engineering Problem Solving - Writing Instruction

        The Engineering Communication writing component of the larger Engineering Problem Solving Class: Broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through the process of applying the principles of mathematics to solve real-life engineering problems and technical writing assignments. Math topics are presented within the context of engineering applications and reinforced through examples from engineering courses. Also introduces algorithm development through the use of the engineering analysis software MATLAB. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1421 (or concurrent enrollment), MATH 1426 (or concurrent enrollment) or MATH 2425 (or concurrent enrollment).

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGR 1300-008 Writing for Engineers

        The Engineering Communication writing component of the larger Engineering Problem Solving Class: Broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through the process of applying the principles of mathematics to solve real-life engineering problems and technical writing assignments. Math topics are presented within the context of engineering applications and reinforced through examples from engineering courses. Also introduces algorithm development through the use of the engineering analysis software MATLAB. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1421 (or concurrent enrollment), MATH 1426 (or concurrent enrollment) or MATH 2425 (or concurrent enrollment).

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-009 Rhetoric and Composition I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies The University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-015 Rhetoric and Composition I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies The University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-030 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies The University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-038 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies The University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 100-002 Integrated Reading and Writing Workshop

        By the end of ENGL 0100,  students should be able to do the following things:

        College Level Writing: Develop long-term reading and writing strategies  for college level courses.

        Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing: Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts. Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts.

        Processes: Demonstrate knowledge of and ability to use the writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing— to write persuasively in multiple genres.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-016 AMERICAN LITERATURE

        Concentration on works of American literature with focus on how cultural, geographic, and political issues shape and reflect literature in a particular culture.  Examines at least three genres and six authors. Emphasis on critical thinking, reading, and writing. This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirements in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. The required objectives of these core courses are the development of students’ critical thinking, communication skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-700 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        English 1302: Introduction to Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing II is a course that builds on the skills learned in English 1301 by providing a more extensive introduction to rhetorical and argument theories. Students learn to identify a controversial issue independently, research that issue by navigating library databases, compile a bibliography of relevant sources, map the conversation surrounding the issue, and advocate their own position by developing claims supported by good reasons and evidence.  Students continue to practice recursive reading and writing processes and develop a more sophisticated awareness of context and audience.

      • ENGL 2329-700 American Literature

        Concentration on works of American literature with focus on how cultural, geographic, and political issues shape and reflect literature in a particular culture.  Examines at least three genres and six authors. Emphasis on critical thinking, reading, and writing. This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirements in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. The required objectives of these core courses are the development of students’ critical thinking, communication skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.

      • ENGL 2329-701 American Literature

        Concentration on works of American literature with focus on how cultural, geographic, and political issues shape and reflect literature in a particular culture.  Examines at least three genres and six authors. Emphasis on critical thinking, reading, and writing. This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirements in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. The required objectives of these core courses are the development of students’ critical thinking, communication skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.

      • ENGL 1302-013 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-062 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-009 American Literature

        In this course we will read a wide range of American fiction written during the last fifty years, supplemented by theoretical readings that explore related issues. A major issue we will try to wrap our minds around is the term "postmodern," that conceptual sponge which can refer to such diverse phenomena as: "high" vs. "low" forms of expression in art, literature, architecture, music, and (in the "popular" or "low" category) film, TV, comics, advertising; an historical period of cultural (literary, artistic, etc.) production. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-700 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        English 1302: Introduction to Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing II is a course that builds on the skills learned in English 1301 by providing a more extensive introduction to rhetorical and argument theories. Students learn to identify a controversial issue independently, research that issue by navigating library databases, compile a bibliography of relevant sources, map the conversation surrounding the issue, and advocate their own position by developing claims supported by good reasons and evidence.  Students continue to practice recursive reading and writing processes and develop a more sophisticated awareness of context and audience. 

      • ENGL 1301-015 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 100-002 Integrated Reading and Writing Workshop

        By the end of ENGL 0100,  students should be able to do the following things:

        College Level Writing: Develop long-term reading and writing strategies  for college level courses.

        Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing: Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts. Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts.

        Processes: Demonstrate knowledge of and ability to use the writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing— to write persuasively in multiple genres.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 100-003 English 0100-003: Integrated Reading and Writing Workshop

        By the end of ENGL 0100,  students should be able to do the following things:

        College Level Writing: Develop long-term reading and writing strategies  for college level courses.

        Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing: Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts. Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts.

        Processes: Demonstrate knowledge of and ability to use the writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing— to write persuasively in multiple genres.

      • ENGL 100-002 Integrated Reading and Writing Workshop

        ENGL 0100 Expected Learning Outcomes

        By the end of ENGL 0100,  students should be able to do the following things:

        College Level Writing: Develop long-term reading and writing strategies  for college level courses. 

        Processes: Demonstrate knowledge of and ability to use the writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing— to write persuasively in multiple genres.

        Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing: Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts. Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-019 Argumentative Writing

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-024 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-001 American Literature

        In this course we will read a wide range of American fiction written during the last fifty years, supplemented by theoretical readings that explore related issues. A major issue we will try to wrap our minds around is the term "postmodern," that conceptual sponge which can refer to such diverse phenomena as: "high" vs. "low" forms of expression in art, literature, architecture, music, and (in the "popular" or "low" category) film, TV, comics, advertising; an historical period of cultural (literary, artistic, etc.) production. Postmodern works may also draw upon a particular formal stylistic repertoire such as self-reflexivity, "new"-ness, and/or being consciously experimental or difficult. Whether we argue that the postmodern era was ushered in with the assassination of JFK in 1963, the opening of Disney World in 1971, or some other entirely arbitrary event, it is clear that Americans of the last several decades have witnessed a fundamental shift in our relationship to technology, mass media, and consumer culture. In this course we will consider texts, films, artwork, music, and other cultural artifacts that revel in, critique, or even resist these elements of postmodernism. Though we will try to get a handle on this admittedly slippery term, we will not limit ourselves to the "postmodern." We will also consider how fiction interacts -- or fails to interact -- with history, race, ethnicity, gender, class, politics, and the conditions of a work's production.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-040 Rhetoric and Composition I

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, and argument.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-051 Rhetoric and Composition I

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, and argument.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-072 Rhetoric and Composition I

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, and argument.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-079 Rhetoric and Composition I

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, and argument.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 100-001 Integrated Reading and Writing Workshop

        ENGL 0100 Expected Learning Outcomes

        By the end of ENGL 0100,  students should be able to do the following things:

        College Level Writing: Develop long-term reading and writing strategies  for college level courses. 

        Processes: Demonstrate knowledge of and ability to use the writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing— to write persuasively in multiple genres.

        Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing: Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts. Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 100-002 Integrated Reading and Writing Workshop

        ENGL 0100 Expected Learning Outcomes

        By the end of ENGL 0100,  students should be able to do the following things:

        College Level Writing: Develop long-term reading and writing strategies  for college level courses. 

        Processes: Demonstrate knowledge of and ability to use the writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing— to write persuasively in multiple genres.

        Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing: Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts. Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-051 Rhetoric and Composition II
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 1301-001 Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing I
         Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 1301-071 Reading, Writing, and Critical Thinking I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2303-004 TOPICS IN LITERATURE
        This course will examine literature and film produced in the wake of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. A conceptual framework for exploring these texts will be assembled from a range of significant theoretical interventions, which raise such key issues as the role of trauma and mourning in the response to September 11, and the ethical and representational challenges that the attacks pose to both writers and filmmakers.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus

Administrative Appointment

  • 2018
    • Sept 2018 to Present - Director of UTA Writing Center, The University of Texas at Arlington