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Miriam Renee Rowntree

Name

[Rowntree, Miriam Renee]
  • Enhanced GTA, English

Biography

Miriam Rowntree is a PhD student in the English department specializing in rhetoric and composition as well as cultural studies and theory. She is currently working on her dissertation which examines the rhetorical value of architectural ruins in terms of cultural production and natural processes. Other areas of interest are in the digital humanities, British Romantic literature and technical/professional writing. She also enjoys traveling the world and has participated in two study abroad trips (Tunisia, 2010 and France, 2014) where she studied ruins and their contexts. She recently served as editor for the English Graduate Student Association's literary journal {stet} and now serves as Co-President for the same organization.

Professional Preparation

    • 2009 BA in English (History),  The University of North Texas
    • 2012 Master of Arts in Creative Writing (Memoir)The University of North Texas

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Jan 2016 to Present MLA: Modern Language Association
    • Jan 2016 to Present South Central Modern Languages Association (SCMLA)
    • Jan 2016 to Present INCS

Research and Expertise

  • Critical theory, rhetoric, and pedagogy

    My work focuses on grappling with theories of subjectivity, new materialism, and literary analysis. I examine architectural ruin from a community and individual nexus to investigate the ways that matter acts rhetorically. I also conduct research in pedgogical practice related to the teaching of writing and strive to improve classroom praxis.

Courses

      • ENGL 3333-001 DYNAMIC TRADITIONS IN LITERATURE

        Dynamic Traditions is a new requirement for the English major that focuses on changes over time to a movement, genre, or motif. This course will study the literary trail of ruins left in the wake of the British Empire. Throughout Western history, literary and actual ruins make appearances as political and social regimes rise and fall. How do the ruins of empire change the landscape? How do people respond to the ruins of their nation, religion, or culture? We will read a variety of texts that trace shifts in the representation of ruins of empire as spiritual and political corruption, romantic and Gothic identity, and imagined futures.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-050 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 100-004 Integrated Reading and Writing

        College Level Writing: Develop long-term reading and writing strategies  for college level courses. 

        Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing: Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts. Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts. 

        Processes: Demonstrate knowledge of and ability to use the writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing— to write persuasively in multiple genres. 

      • ENGL 2319-005 BRITISH LITERATURE

        Early  definitions of nature refer primarily to human characteristics, particularly in the Middle Ages and Early Modern period. In the 17th century, the word begins to circulate more frequently when describing the earth as distinguished from (or even in opposition to) humans and human creations. This course traces scientific and literary descriptions of nature, beginning with early 17th century philosophies of the human body and ending with modern anxieties about climate change. We will attempt to answer the question: what is nature? A tall order but a necessary one in our current political, social, and individual environments.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2309-002 WORLD LITERATURE

        Students will read/watch, discuss, and write about significant works of world literature (poems, short stories, films, and novels) of the 20th and 21st Centuries with emphasis on ideas and the ways in which they reflect cultural and aesthetic values. 

      • ENGL 100-004 Integrated Reading and Writing

        College Level Writing: Develop long-term reading and writing strategies  for college level courses.

        Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing: Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts. Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts.

        Processes: Demonstrate knowledge of and ability to use the writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing— to write persuasively in multiple genres.

      • ENGL 2319-005 BRITISH LITERATURE

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirements in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. The required objectives of thse courses are the development of students' critical thinking, communication skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility. Many elements of this course foster development of these objectives, which are explicitly addressed in the "Signature Assignment." The Departmental guidelines for sophomore literature can be found by typing "sophomore literature" in the "Search UT Arlington" box on the university website.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-001 Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing I

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

      • ENGR 1300-103 Engineering Problem Solving

        This course is the technical writing and communications portion of the larger math course. Broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through the process of applying the principles of mathematics to solve real-life engineering problems and technical writing assignments. Math topics are presented within the context of engineering applications and reinforced through examples from engineering courses. Also introduces algorithm development through the use of the engineering analysis software MATLAB. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1421 (or concurrent enrollment), MATH 1426 (or concurrent enrollment) or MATH 2425 (or concurrent enrollment).

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-008 Incoxication, Perception, and the Making of Genius

        The production of literature (among other forms of art) often seems dependent upon substances that expand or loosen the mind. However, some writers and other creative geniuses struggle with addiction that ultimately destroys their careers and personal lives. This course will examine texts that admit an unreliable narrator due to mental illness and/or substance abuse--sometimes that narrator is a fictional character and sometimes the writer herself. We will read works of fiction, poetry and memoir that wrestle with the connection between writing, perception and intoxication.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGR 1300-102 Engineering Problem Solving

        This course is the technical writing and communications portion of the larger math course. Broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through the process of applying the principles of mathematics to solve real-life engineering problems and technical writing assignments. Math topics are presented within the context of engineering applications and reinforced through examples from engineering courses. Also introduces algorithm development through the use of the engineering analysis software MATLAB. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1421 (or concurrent enrollment), MATH 1426 (or concurrent enrollment) or MATH 2425 (or concurrent enrollment).

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGR 1300-103 Engineering Problem Solving

        This part of the course includes the technical writing and communications portion of the larger math course. Broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through the process of applying the principles of mathematics to solve real-life engineering problems and technical writing assignments. Math topics are presented within the context of engineering applications and reinforced through examples from engineering courses. Also introduces algorithm development through the use of the engineering analysis software MATLAB. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1421 (or concurrent enrollment), MATH 1426 (or concurrent enrollment) or MATH 2425 (or concurrent enrollment).

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-077 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of argument. Includes issue identification, independent library reserach, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with student's own claims, reasons, and evidence.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • ENGL 1302-010 Rhetoric and Composition II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-008 Rhetoric and Composition II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-006 Rhetoric and Composition I

        Introduction to college reading and writing emphasizes recursive
        writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-009 Rhetoric and Composition I

        Introduction to college reading and writing emphasizes recursive
        writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-025 Rhetoric and Composition I

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-001 Rhetoric and Composition I

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours

Service to the Profession

  • Elected
    • Apr 2016 to  Aug 2017 Vice President of INCS Graduate Caucus

      This position supports the president of the caucus in developing support and community for the Inter-disciplinary Nineteenth Century Studies organization.

Administrative Appointment

  • 2016
    • Aug 2016 to Present - Assistant Director of First Year Writing, University of Texas at Arlington