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Naomi Cleghorn

Name

[Cleghorn, Naomi]
  • Associate Professor, Sociology & Anthropology

Biography

I am an archaeologist with a research interest in human origins and the Paleolithic/Stone Age of Eurasia and Africa. My training is in both archaeology and biological anthropology. I teach courses in both sub-disciplines, including Introduction to Biological Anthropology, Principles of Archaeology, Zooarchaeology, Bioarchaeology, Human Osteology, African Archaeology, and Ice Age of Europe. I have active research projects in Russia and South Africa.

Website: http://naomicleghorn.weebly.com/

Professional Preparation

    • 2006 Ph.D. in Anthropological SciencesStony Brook University
    • 1996 M.A. in Physical AnthropologyUniversity of Texas at Austin
    • 1993 Plan II Honors ProgramUniversity of Texas at Austin

Appointments

    • Oct 2008 to Dec 2009 Postdoctoral Scholar
      University of California, Berkeley
    • Jan 2008 to May 2008 Postdoctoral Fellow
      Smithsonian Institution
    • Aug 2006 to Dec 2007 Visiting Assistant Professor
      University of California, Berkeley

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Aug 2012 to Present Register of Professional Archaeologists
    • Jan 1996 to Present Society for American Archaeology

Research and Expertise

  • Research Overview
    My ongoing research and archaeological fieldwork explores the behavior and cognitive evolution of early humans and their contemporaries. I am particularly interested in understanding human social and technological adaptation in the context of ecological stress, and the ways this may or may not have differed from closely related groups, like Neanderthals. For humans, the underlying adaptations set us on the road unprecedented population growth, the ability to live in almost any terrestrial context on the planet, and increasingly intense resource requirements, all of which may expose us to new stresses on par with the severity of those of the late Pleistocene. Understanding origins of modern human behavior gives us useful insight into our capabilities and propensities.

    Studying early modern humans as they become a global species requires a multiregional approach, and an inter-species comparison. As a result, my field and laboratory research includes human and Neanderthal-related projects in the Caucasus of Southern Russia, as well as field work in early human contexts of South Africa.

    My training is in archaeology (with an emphasis in Old World Paleolithic studies and zooarchaeology) and biological anthropology (with an emphasis on human skeletal anatomy). I have field and research experience in Eurasia, Africa, and North America, in time periods ranging from the historic through the Miocene.

Publications

      Journal Article Published
      • (Accepted - in Revision) Cleghorn, N., Shelton, C., & Fisher, E. Knysna Eastern Heads Cave 1: A New Stone Age locality in the Western Cape, South Africa. Submitted to PaleoAnthropology.

        {Journal Article }
      Published
      • (Submitted - Under Review) Smith, E., Jacobs, Z., Johnson, R., Ren, M., Fisher, E., Oestmo, S., Wilkins, J., Harris, J.A., Karkanas, P., Fitch, S., Ciravolo, A., Keenan, D., Cleghorn, N., Lane, C., Matthews, T., Marean, & C. W. Humans thrived in South Africa through the Toba super-volcanic eruption ~74,000 years ago. Submitted to Nature.

        {Journal Article }
      Published
      • (In preparation) Golovanova, L., Poplevko, G., Cleghorn, N., & Doronichev V.  On the Mousterian origin of bone-tipped projectile technology: archaeological, microscopic and faunal evidence from Mezmaiskaya Cave, Russia.

        {Journal Article }
      Published
      • (In preparation) Cleghorn, N. The taphonomy of the late Middle Paleolithic fauna of Myshtylagty Lagat (Northern Caucasus, Russia).

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2017
      • 2017  Thompson, J.C., Faith, J.T., Cleghorn, N., Hodgkins, J., 2017. Identifying the accumulator: Making the most of bone surface modification data. Journal of Archaeological Science. 85, 105–113.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2015
      • 2015 McGrath, J., Cleghorn, N., Gennari, B., Henderson, S., Kyriacou, K., Nelson-Viljoen, C., Nilssen, P., Richardson, L., Shelton, C., Wilkins, J., & Marean, C.W.  The Pinnacle Point Shell Midden Complex: A high resolution 2000 year record of Later Stone Age coastal foraging along the southern Cape coast of South Africa. South African Archaeological Bulletin 70 (202): 201-219.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2014
      • 2014  Golovanova L.V., Doronichev V.B., Cleghorn N., Kulkova M.A., Sapelko T.V., Shackley, M.S., & Spasovskiy Yu.N. The Epipaleolithic of the Caucasus after the Last Glacial Maximum. Quaternary International 337:189-224.

        {Journal Article }

      Poster Abstract 2011
      • 2011    Koetje, T., N. Cleghorn, N. Hidjrati, L. Kimball, and M. Kanukova.  The other last Neanderthal: Final Mousterian Occupation at Weasel Cave, Russia.  Poster presented at the at the 76th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Sacramento, CA, April 14 - 18, 2011.
        {Poster Abstract }

      Conference Paper 2010
      • 2010    Cleghorn, N., Adler, A., and Bar-Oz, G.  Faunal acquisition and processing behaviors in the Caucasus during the Late Middle and Early Upper Paleolithic.  Paper presented at the 11th ICAZ International Conference of ICAZ (International Council for Archaeozoology), Paris, 23 to 28 August 2010.
        {Conference Paper }

      Poster Abstract 2010
      • 2010    Janzen, A. and Cleghorn, N.  Hyena bone choice and destruction of large fauna.  Poster presented at the at the 75th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, St. Louis, Missouri, April 14 - 18, 2010.
        {Poster Abstract }

      Journal Article 2010
      • 2010   Golovanova L.V., Doronichev V.B., Kulkova M.A., Cleghorn N., Sapelko T.V.   The significance of ecological factors in the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition.  Current Anthropology 51(5): 655 – 691.
        {Journal Article }
      2010
      • 2010  Golovanova L., Doronichev V. & Cleghorn, N. The emergence of bone-working and ornamental art int the Caucasian Upper Paleolithic.  Antiquity 84:299-320.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2010
      • 2010  Hidjrati N., Kimball L., Koetje T., Cleghorn N.E., Coffey T., Kanukova M., Nesmeynov S., Voeykova O., and Sautiyeva-Maslennikova V. Some interdisciplinary results of research in the Pleistocene cultural layers of Myshtulagty-Lagat and Fynaigandzity-uat in North Ossetia.   In Questions of the history and culture of the peoples of Russia. pp. 221-244.
        {Book Chapter }

      Conference Paper 2009
      • 2009  Cleghorn, N.  The fauna of the terminal Middle Paleolithic at Mishtulagty Lagat (Weasel Cave), Russia.  Paper to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the Paleoanthropology Society, Chicago.
        {Conference Paper }

      Journal Article 2008
      • 2008  Golovanova, L.V., Doronichev, V.B & Cleghorn, N.   Getting back to basics: a response to Otte and Kozlowski’s Comments on Mezmaiskaya  Eurasian Prehistory 5(1):131-136.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2007
      • 2007   Cleghorn, N. & Marean, C.W.  The destruction of skeletal elements by carnivores: the growth of a general model for skeletal element destruction and survival in zooarchaeological assemblages.  In (T.R. Pickering, K. Schick & N. Toth, eds.)  Breathing Life into Fossils:  Taphonomic Studies in Honor of C.K. (Bob) Brain. Stone Age Institute Press, Bloomington.  Pages 38 – 66.
        {Book Chapter }

      Journal Article 2006
      • 2006   Golovanova, L.V., Cleghorn, N., Doronichev, V.B., Hoffecker, J.F., Burr, G.S., & Sulergizkiy, L.P.   The early Upper Paleolithic in the Northern Caucasus (new data from Mezmaiskaya Cave, 1997 expedition).  Eurasian Prehistory 4(1-2):45-81.
        {Journal Article }

      Conference Paper 2004
      • 2004   Cleghorn, N. & Marean C.W.  The destruction of human-discarded bones by carnivores: the growth of a general model for bone survival and destruction in zooarchaeological assemblages.  Paper presented by invitation at African Taphonomy:  a tribute to the career of C. K. “Bob” Brain, CRAFT Research Center, Bloomington, Indiana.
        {Conference Paper }
      2004
      • 2004   Cleghorn, N. & Marean, C.W.   Identifying the skeletal elements useful for behavioral analysis:  A comparison of high and low survival elements.  Paper presented at the invited symposium Ungulate body part representation and zooarchaeological research:  addressing issues of equifinality at the 2004 annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Montreal, Quebec. Abstract published in Society for American Archaeology:  Abstracts of the 69th Annual Meeting, p.84.
        {Conference Paper }

      Journal Article 2004
      • 2004   Cleghorn, N. & Marean, C.W.   Distinguishing selective transport and in situ attrition:  a critical review of analytical approaches.  Journal of Taphonomy, 2(2): 43-67.
        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2003
      • 2003   Marean, C.W. & Cleghorn, N.  Large mammal skeletal element transport:  Applying foraging theory in a complex taphonomic system.  Journal of Taphonomy, 1(1):15-42.
        {Journal Article }

      Conference Paper 2001
      • 2001   Cleghorn, N. & Golovanova, L.V.  Processes of bone accumulation at Mezmaiskaya Cave.  Paper presented at the 2001 annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Abstract published in Society for American Archaeology:  Abstracts of the 66th Annual Meeting.
        {Conference Paper }

      Journal Article 2000
      • 2000   Hoffecker, J. & Cleghorn, N. Mousterian Hunting Patterns in the Northwestern Caucasus and the ecology of the Neanderthals.  International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, 10: 368-378.
        {Journal Article }

      Conference Paper 1998
      • 1998   Hoffecker, J.F. & Cleghorn, N.  Mousterian hunting patterns in the Northwestern Caucasus and the Ecology of the Neanderthals.  Paper presented at the 8th International Congress of the International Council for Archaeozoology, Victoria, British Columbia. Abstract published in the ICAZ Final Program and Abstracts, p. 134-135.
        {Conference Paper }
      1998
      • 1998   Marean, C.W., Cleghorn, N. & Abe, Y.  Mousterian Hunters of the Zagros Mountains.  Paper presented at the 8th International Congress of the International Council for Archaeozoology, Victoria, British Columbia. Abstract published in the ICAZ Final Program and Abstracts, p.180.
        {Conference Paper }

      Poster Abstract 1997
      • 1997   Duncan, A., Podnos, E., Cleghorn, N. & Kappelman, J.  Development and analysis of 3D finite element models of human femoral diaphysis.  Poster presented at the 1997 annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropology, St. Louis, Missouri.  Abstract published in American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement 24, p. 103.
        {Poster Abstract }
      1997
      • 1997   Seiffert, E., Kappelman, J., Cleghorn, N. & Duncan, A.  Quantification of orbital aperture shape in living and extinct hominoid primates.  Paper presented at the 1997 annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropology, St. Louis, Missouri.  Abstract published in American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement 24, p. 208.
        {Poster Abstract }

      Poster Abstract 1996
      • 1996   Cleghorn, N.  Sexual dimorphism in femoral diaphyseal shape:  A comparison of prehistoric hunter-gatherers and horticulturalists in Texas.  Poster presented at the 1996 annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropology, Durham, North Carolina. Abstract published in American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement 22, p. 86.
        {Poster Abstract }

      Conference Paper 1995
      • 1995   Zeder, M. & Cleghorn, N.   A reconsideration of the evidence for animal domestication in the Zagros from the perspective of the Upper Paleolithic at Yafteh.  Paper presented at invited Fryxell Symposium on Interdisciplinary Research in Honor of Robert Braidwood at the 1995 annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Abstract published in Society for American Archaeology:  Abstracts of the 60th Annual Meeting.
        {Conference Paper }

Presentations

  • Past
    •  
      Symposium Co-Chair

      2015 Cleghorn, N. & Marean, C., Co-chairs. Building the Hunter-gatherer’s Paleoscape on the South African Coast: The Archaeological Record. Symposium at the 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, April 18th, 2015.

  • Past
    •  
      Invited Colloquium Lecture

      2015 Cleghorn, N. Shifting shorelines and changing landscapes: human strategies in the Late Pleistocene on the southern coast of South Africa. Invited Colloquium Presentation in the UTA Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Geosciences Program. March 19th, 2015.

  • Past
    •  
      Invited Lecture

      2014 Cleghorn, N. New Stone Age Localities in Knysna, Western Cape, South Africa. Invited presentation for the SACP4 archaeological project, Pinnacle Point, South Africa, May 21st, 2014.

  • Past
    •  
      Invited Lecture

      2014 Cleghorn, N. The Origin of the Human Mind and the Stone Age of South Africa. Invited Presentation to the Tarrant County Archaeological Society. March 13th, 2014.

  • Past
    •  
      Invited Lecture

      2012 Cleghorn, N. Neanderthals and Early Modern Humans in the Caucasus Mountains, Southern Russia. Invited presentation for the SACP4 archaeological project, Mossel Bay, South Africa, June 13th, 2012.

  • Past
    •  
      Invited Lecture

      2011 Cleghorn, N. Neanderthal and Early Modern Human Sites in the Caucasus. Invited Presentation to the Tarrant County Archaeological Society. January 13th, 2011.

  • Past
    •  
      Invited Lecture

      2011 Cleghorn, N. The Paleolithic Archaeological Record of the Caucasus. Invited presentation for the SACP4 archaeological project, in Rheebok, South Africa, June 24th, 2011.

  • Past
    •  
      Invited Lecture

      2010 Cleghorn, N. Crisis in the Caucasus: The Middle to Upper Paleolithic Transition, Invited Presentation at Tübingen University, Department of Scientific Archaeology, July 21st, 2010.

  • Past
    •  
      Conference Poster

      2016 Peart, D., Watson, S., Keller, H. and Cleghorn, N. Variation in Site Use through Time: Find distribution at Knysna Eastern Heads Cave 1, (Western Cape, South Africa), from Marine Isotope Stage 3 through the Last Glacial Maximum. Abstract submitted for the 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Orlando, April 6 – 10, 2016. 

  • Past
    •  
      Workshop Presentation

      2015 Cleghorn, N. The Future of the Knysna Archaeology Project. Paper presented at the meeting of the Paleoscape II Workshop, The California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, April 19th, 2015.

  • Past
    •  
      Conference Presentation

      2015 Cleghorn, N., Matthews, T., & Shelton, C. The Blind Spot: An Early Later Stone Age perspective on the Agulhas Bank from Knysna Eastern Heads Cave 1, South Africa. Paper presented at the 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, April 18th.

  • Past
    •  
      Conference Presentation

      2015 Smith, E., Ciravolo, A., Ren, M., Karkanas, P., Marean, C.W., Fisher, E.C., Cleghorn, N., & Lane, C. Cryptotephra Discovered at Pinnacle Point Site 5-6 May Correlate with the 74 ka Eruption of Toba in Indonesia: Implications for Resolving the Dating Controversy for Middle Stone Age Sites in Southern Africa. Paper presented at the 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, April 18th.

  • Past
    •  
      Conference Presentation

      2014 Cleghorn, N. & Shelton, C. A new Stone Age site near the Knysna Eastern Heads, Western Cape, South Africa Paper presented at the 79th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Austin, TX, April 23 – 27.

  • Past
    •  
      Conference Poster

      2014 Cleghorn, N., Wilkins, J., Shelton, C., Schoville, B., Richardson, L., & Phillips, L. New Stone Age localities near the Knysna Heads, Western Cape, South Africa. Poster presented at the 23rd Annual Meetings of the Paleoanthropology Society, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, April 8-9. Poster available on-line at: http://www.paleoanthro.org/meetings/2014/

  • Past
    •  
      Conference Presentation

      2014 Smith, E., Ciravolo, A., Karkanas, P., Marean, C.W., Fisher, E., Cleghorn, N., Lane, C., & Ren, M. Cryptotephra Possibly from the 74 ka Eruption of Toba Discovered at Pinnacle Point, South Africa: Implications for Resolving the Dating Controversy for Middle Stone Age Sites in Southern Africa. Paper presented at the 23rd Annual Meetings of the Paleoanthropology Society, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, April 8-9.

  • Past
    •  
      Conference Poster

      2014 Wilkins, J., Cleghorn, N., Shelton, C., Schoville, B., & Richardson, L. Stone Age archaeology on the Western Head at Knysna, Western Cape, South Africa. Poster presented at the 79th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Austin, TX, April 23 – 27.

  • Past
    •  
      Conference Poster

      2011 Koetje, T., Cleghorn, N. Hidjrati, L. Kimball, & M. Kanukova.  The other last Neanderthal: Final Mousterian Occupation at Weasel Cave, Russia.  Poster presented at the 76th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Sacramento, CA, April 14 - 18, 2011.

  • Past
    •  
      Conference Presentation

      2010 Cleghorn, N., Adler, A., & Bar-Oz, G.  Faunal acquisition and processing behaviors in the Caucasus during the Late Middle and Early Upper Paleolithic.  Paper presented at the 11th ICAZ International Conference of ICAZ (International Council for Archaeozoology), Paris, August 23rd – 28th, 2010.

  • Past
    •  
      Conference Poster

      2010 Janzen, A. & Cleghorn, N.  Hyena bone choice and destruction of large fauna.  Poster presented at the 75th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, St. Louis, Missouri, April 14th – 18th, 2010.

  • Past
    •  
      Conference Presentation

      2009 Cleghorn, N.  The fauna of the terminal Middle Paleolithic at Mishtulagty Lagat (Weasel Cave), Russia.  Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Paleoanthropology Society, Chicago.

Projects

  • 2012
    • June 2012 to Present Knysna Archaeology Project

      Excavation, survey, and analysis of Pleistocene archaeological localities on the southern coast of South Africa.

      Role: Principal Investigator PI: Naomi Cleghorn
  • 2011
    • May 2011 to July 2013 Pinnacle Point Archaeological Project

      Pinnacle Point Site 5/6 Middle Stone Age Site

      Role: Other PI: Curtis Marean

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • July 2015 to Present National Science Foundation Archaeology and Archaeometry Program Grant sponsored by  - $25948
    • Feb 2014 to Present Leakey Foundation Grant sponsored by  - $24886
    • Sept 2013 to Present Templeton Foundation Grant to Institute for Human Origins sponsored by  - $60000
    • June 2013 to June 2014 UTA Research Enhancement Program Grant sponsored by  - $9945
    • Jan 2009 to Jan 2010 Zooarchaeological Analysis of Middle and Upper Paleolithic fauna from Mezmaiskaya Cave sponsored by  - $18698
    • Jan 2008 to Jan 2009 Postdoctoral Fellowship sponsored by  - $34000
    • Jan 2008 to Jan 2008 Smithsonian Postdoctoral Fellowship sponsored by  - $15000
    • Jan 2007 to Jan 2007 Zooarchaeological Fieldwork and Resarch at Mezmaiskaya Cave sponsored by  - $1700
    • Jan 2001 to Jan 2003 Dissertation Research on Zooarchaeological Analysis of Middle and Upper Paleolithic fauna from Mezmaiskaya Cave sponsored by  - $8750
    • Jan 1996 to Jan 2002 Graduate Council Fellowship sponsored by  - $27000
    • Jan 1999 to Jan 2000 Fulbright Student Fellowship to Russia sponsored by  - $20000
    • Jan 1995 to Jan 1999 National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship sponsored by  - $43200

Courses

      • ANTH 4406-001 Human Osteology

        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields.  This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4406-002 Human Osteology

        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields.  This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4406-001 Human Osteology

        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields.  This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4406-002 Human Osteology

        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields.  This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 3301-001 Archaeological Method and Theory

        In this course, we dig deeper into how to interrogate and explain the past through archaeological data. We examine the history of archaeology and archaeological thought, with reference to specific sites and projects. This provides context for an examination of modern archaeological approaches.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4406-001 Human Osteology

        This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4406-002 Human Osteology

        This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 5406-001 Human Osteology

        This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 5406-002 Human Osteology

        This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4406-001 Human Osteology

        This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4406-002 Human Osteology

        This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 3375-001 NEANDERTHALS AND THE ICE AGE WORLD

        In this course, we explore the archaeological record and recent research on the physical and social environment of Neanderthals, early modern humans, and their contemporaries. We address topics ranging from new genetic and isotopic analyses, to the origins of art and symbolism.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 3352-001 African Archaeology

        The African continent has the longest archaeological record on earth, together with arguably the most complex population in terms of genetic composition and socio-political organization. This great time depth allows us to explore the evolution of human culture from the emergence of our genus, and to follow particular trajectories of social and economic strategies through to the foundations of modern African society. In this class, we will follow the African archaeological record from the earliest evidence for human behavior through to the beginnings of state society.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4459-001 Bioarchaeology

        Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological contexts. Bioarchaeologists attempt to reconstruct individual identity and life history (including growth and development, health, nutrition, work, migration, family affiliation, and cause of death). This is a method-oriented class that combines lecture and lab work.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4459-002 Bioarchaeology

        Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological contexts. Bioarchaeologists attempt to reconstruct individual identity and life history (including growth and development, health, nutrition, work, migration, family affiliation, and cause of death). This is a method-oriented class that combines lecture and lab work.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4459-001 Bioarchaeology

        Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological contexts. Bioarchaeologists attempt to reconstruct individual identity and life history (including growth and development, health, nutrition, work, migration, family affiliation, and cause of death). This is a method-oriented class that combines lecture and lab work.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4459-002 Bioarchaeology

        Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological contexts. Bioarchaeologists attempt to reconstruct individual identity and life history (including growth and development, health, nutrition, work, migration, family affiliation, and cause of death). This is a method-oriented class that combines lecture and lab work.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4406-001 Human Osteology

        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields.  This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4406-002 Human Osteology

        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields.  This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4406-001 Human Osteology

        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields.  This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4406-002 Human Osteology

        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields.  This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 3301-001 Archaeological Method and Theory

        In this course, we dig deeper into how to interrogate and explain the past through archaeological data. In this course, we examine the history of archaeology and archaeological thought, with reference to specific sites and projects. This provides context for an examination of modern archaeological approaches.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2339-001 PRINCIPLES OF ARCHAEOLOGY

        Welcome to the exciting field of archaeology!  Archaeologists learn about past societies by examining the material residues they leave behind. These residues can include anything affected by human behavior — from small disturbances in the soil to architectural remains, from sacred objects to the mundane refuse of daily life. In some cases this material adds to what we know from historical accounts, but most often, archaeology gives us a picture of the past that we would never otherwise see.  In this class, you will learn the basic concepts, methods, and analytical techniques archaeologists use to uncover past human behavior.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4460-001 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4460-002 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4460-001 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4460-002 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4460-002 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4460-001 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4460-001 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4460-002 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4460-001 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4460-002 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4460-001 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4460-002 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4460-002 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • BIOL 4460-001 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4460-001 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4460-002 Zooarchaeology

        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.  The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies.  Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4406-001 HUMAN OSTEOLOGY

        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields.  This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4406-002 HUMAN OSTEOLOGY

        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields.  This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 5406-001 Human Osteology (Graduate Level)

        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields.  This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 3375-001 NEANDERTHALS AND THE ICE AGE WORLD

        What was life like during the Pleistocene, and how do we know? In this course, we explore the archaeological record and recent research on the physical and social environment of Neanderthals, early modern humans, and their contemporaries. We address topics ranging from new genetic and isotopic analyses, to the origins of art and symbolism.

        Despite the esoteric nature of the evidence, Neanderthals and the Paleolithic era have long captured the imagination of the non-scientists, and have inspired artists, authors, and filmmakers. Our class also explores the ways in which art and science have informed and influenced each other, and how the Paleolithic is imagined and even used in modern society.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2339-002 PRINCIPLES OF ARCHAEOLOGY

        Archaeologists learn about past societies by examining the material residues they leave behind. These residues can include anything affected by human behavior — from small disturbances in the soil to architectural remains, from sacred objects to the mundane refuse of daily life. In some cases this material adds to what we know from historical accounts, but most often, archaeology gives us a picture of the past that we would never otherwise see.  In this class, you will learn the basic concepts, methods, and analytical techniques archaeologists use to uncover past human behavior.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4358-002 TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY: ARCHAEOLOGY OF AFRICA

        The African continent has the longest archaeological record on earth, together with arguably the most complex population in terms of genetic composition and socio-political organization. This great time depth allows us to explore the evolution of human culture from the emergence of our genus, and to follow particular trajectories of social and economic strategies through to the foundations of modern African society. In this class, we will follow the African archaeological record from the earliest evidence for human behavior through to the beginnings of state society. This is an upper division lecture and discussion course, in which students are expected to practice close reading of academic texts, synthesize a diversity of source information, and demonstrate creativity in independent research.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2307-002 Biological Anthropology Spring 2012

        Biological anthropologists study the biology of humans and other primates – together with their respective fossil records – in order to understand the evolutionary context for modern human behavior, anatomy, and genetics. In this course we will examine a wide range of evidence from the behavioral and natural sciences in order to better understand the place of humans in the world.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2307-001 Biological Anthropology

        Biological anthropologists study the biology of humans and other primates – together with their respective fossil records – in order to understand the evolutionary context for modern human behavior, anatomy, and genetics. In this course we will examine a wide range of evidence from the behavioral and natural sciences in order to better understand the place of humans in the world.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4406-001 Human Osteology

        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields.  This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton. The class also includes a substantial laboratory component during which students are expected to apply the anatomical information from lectures and the textbook to their own analyses of the skeleton. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2307-001 Introduction to Biological Anthropology

        Biological anthropologists study the biology of humans and other primates, together with their respective fossil records, in order to understand the evolutionary context for modern human behavior, anatomy, and genetics.

        In this course we will examine a wide range of evidence from the behavioral and natural sciences in order to better understand the place of humans in the world.

        The class will include lecture and discussion, as well as a few in-class laboratory exercises. During laboratory exercises, students will have an opportunity to examine casts of some of the most significant fossil hominins and primates. Students are expected to attend all lectures and read assigned text sections before coming to class. In addition, each student will choose at least one book from the “Additional Readings” list to read at their own pace over first half of the semester.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2307-002 Introduction to Biological Anthropology

        Biological anthropologists study the biology of humans and other primates, together with their respective fossil records, in order to understand the evolutionary context for modern human behavior, anatomy, and genetics.

        In this course we will examine a wide range of evidence from the behavioral and natural sciences in order to better understand the place of humans in the world.

        The class will include lecture and discussion, as well as a few in-class laboratory exercises. During laboratory exercises, students will have an opportunity to examine casts of some of the most significant fossil hominins and primates. Students are expected to attend all lectures and read assigned text sections before coming to class. In addition, each student will choose at least one book from the “Additional Readings” list to read at their own pace over first half of the semester.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4358-001 Advanced Topics in Archaeology: Bioarchaeology

        Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological contexts. Bioarchaeologists attempt to reconstruct individual identity and life history (including growth and development, health, nutrition, work, migration, family affiliation, and cause of death). This is a method-oriented class that combines lecture and lab work.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HONR 4303-001 ADVANCED SPECIAL TOPICS - AFRICAN ARCHAEOLOGY

        The African continent has the longest archaeological record on earth, together with arguably the most complex population in terms of genetic composition and socio-political organization. This great time depth allows us to explore the evolution of human culture from the emergence of our genus, and to follow particular trajectories of social and economic strategies through to the foundations of modern African society.  This is an upper division lecture and discussion course, in which students are expected to practice close reading of academic texts, synthesize a diversity of source information, and demonstrate creativity in independent research.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4358-002 TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY - AFRICAN ARCHAEOLOGY

        The African continent has the longest archaeological record on earth, together with arguably the most complex population in terms of genetic composition and socio-political organization. This great time depth allows us to explore the evolution of human culture from the emergence of our genus, and to follow particular trajectories of social and economic strategies through to the foundations of modern African society.  This is an upper division lecture and discussion course, in which students are expected to practice close reading of academic texts, synthesize a diversity of source information, and demonstrate creativity in independent research.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2307-001 BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
        Biological anthropologists study the biology of humans and other primates, together with their respective fossil records, in order to understand the evolutionary context for modern human behavior, anatomy, and genetics.

        In this course we will examine a wide range of evidence from the behavioral and natural sciences in order to better understand the place of humans in the world.

        The class will include lecture and discussion, as well as a few in-class laboratory exercises. During laboratory exercises, students will have an opportunity to examine casts of some of the most significant fossil hominins and primates. Students are expected to attend all lectures and read assigned text sections before coming to class. In addition, each student will choose at least one book from the “Additional Readings” list to read at their own pace over first half of the semester.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ANTH 4360-001 ZOOARCHAEOLOGY
        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts.The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies. Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis. This course introduces students to the important issues and analytical techniques of zooarchaeology, including taphonomic processes (that is, how faunal assemblages are formed and altered), quantification of skeletal elements, distinctions between major taxonomic groups, season of death, interpretation of mortality profiles, application of optimal foraging theory, and biometric data analysis.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ANTH 4406-001 HUMAN OSTEOLOGY

        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields. This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth. In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components. In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2307-001 BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
        Biological anthropologists study the biology of humans and other primates, together with their respective fossil records, in order to understand the evolutionary context for modern human behavior, anatomy, and genetics. In this course we will examine a wide range of evidence from the behavioral and natural sciences in order to better understand the place of humans in the world.The course is divided into three sections: 1: Genetics and modern human variation. 2: Non-human primate behavior and anatomy. 3: The fossil record and human origins. The class will include lecture and discussion, as well as a few in-class laboratory exercises. During laboratory exercises, students will have an opportunity to examine casts of some of the most significant fossil hominins and primates. Students are expected to attend all lectures and read assigned text sections before coming to class. In addition, each student will choose at least one book from the “Additional Readings” list to read at their own pace over first half of the semester. 
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ANTH 2307-001 BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
        Biological anthropologists study the biology of humans and other primates - together with their respective fossil records - in order to understand the evolutionary context for modern human behavior, anatomy, and genetics. In this course we will examine a wide range of evidence from the behavioral and natural sciences in order to better understand the place of humans in the world.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ANTH 2307-002 Biological Anthropology Spring 2012

        Biological anthropologists study the biology of humans and other primates - together with their respective fossil records - in order to understand the evolutionary context for modern human behavior, anatomy, and genetics. In this course we will examine a wide range of evidence from the behavioral and natural sciences in order to better understand the place of humans in the world.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4358-001 TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY
        What was life like during the Pleistocene, and how do we know? In this course, we explore the archaeological record and recent research on the physical and social environment of early modern humans, Neanderthals, and their contemporaries. We address topics ranging from new genetic and isotopic analyses, to the origins of art and symbolism. Despite the esoteric nature of the evidence, the Paleolithic has long captured the imagination of the non-scientists, and has inspired artists, authors, and filmmakers. Our class also explores the ways in which art and science have informed and influenced each other, and how the Paleolithic is imagined and even used in modern society.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ANTH 5406-001 Human Osteology (Graduate Level) Fall 2010
        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields. This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth. In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components. In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ANTH 4358-002 TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY
        Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains (primarily bones, teeth, and shells) from archaeological contexts. The goal of most zooarchaeological studies is to determine how animals fit into human economic and ecological strategies. Zooarchaeological research is therefore applicable in virtually all archaeological contexts (as long as animal remains are preserved) and is an integral component of archaeological analysis.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ANTH 4406-001 HUMAN OSTEOLOGY
        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields.  This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ANTH 5349-001 Bioarchaeology Spring 2011
        Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains in archaeological contexts.  In this course, we will discuss the practical, theoretical, and ethical issues of bioarchaeology.  In addition, students will gain hand-on experience in the analysis and interpretation of human skeletal remains.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ANTH 2339-001 PRINCIPLES OF ARCHAEOLOGY
        Archaeologists learn about past societies by examining the material residues they leave behind. These residues can include anything affected by human behavior from small disturbances in the soil to architectural remains, from sacred objects to the mundane refuse of daily life. In some cases this material adds to what we know from historical accounts, but most often, archaeology gives us a picture of the past that we would never otherwise see. In this class, you will learn the basic concepts, methods, and analytical techniques archaeologists use to uncover past human behavior.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ANTH 2307-001 BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

        Biological anthropologists study the biology of humans and other primates, together with their respective fossil records, in order to understand the evolutionary context for modern human behavior, anatomy, and genetics.  In this course we will examine a wide range of evidence from the behavioral and natural sciences in order to better understand the place of humans in the world. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4406-001 HUMAN OSTEOLOGY

        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields.  This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 5406-001 Human Osteology (Graduate Level) Fall 2010

        A complete understanding of the human skeleton is essential to the study of any sub-field of biological anthropology, including bioarchaeology, human anatomy, paleoanthropology, forensic analysis, and related fields.  This class is an intensive introduction to the human skeleton, in which students learn how to identify both whole and fragmented bones, and isolated teeth.  In lecture, we cover the anatomy of individual bones, with references to functional morphology, bone growth, individual variation, and the over-lying soft tissue components.  In addition, students are briefly introduced to bioarchaeological issues, including the analysis of sex, age and health, the ethics and legality of human skeletal analysis, the identification of trauma and pathology, and the use of histological, isotopic, and genetic analysis of the human skeleton.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2339-001 PRINCIPLES OF ARCHAEOLOGY

        Archaeologists learn about past societies by examining the material residues they leave behind. These residues can include anything affected by human behavior — from small disturbances in the soil to architectural remains, from sacred objects to the mundane refuse of daily life. In some cases this material adds to what we know from historical accounts, but most often, archaeology gives us a picture of the past that we would never otherwise see. In this class, you will learn the basic concepts, methods, and analytical techniques archaeologists use to uncover past human behavior.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2307-001 BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

        Biological anthropologists study the biology of humans and other primates, together with their respective fossil records, in order to understand the evolutionary context for modern human behavior, anatomy, and genetics.  In this course we will examine a wide range of evidence from the behavioral and natural sciences in order to better understand the place of humans in the world. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours