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Biography

Oliver Bateman began teaching at the University of Texas at Arlington in fall 2012.  He has taught both parts of the US History survey, both parts of the American Legal History survey, and a graduate course in US/Transatlantic Legal History.  He also serves as the university’s Moot Court advisor and offers a specialized practicum course in that subject.  Prior to coming to UTA, he was a Mellon Fellow, a Lawler Fellow (declined), and a Littleton-Griswold Summer Fellow.  Bateman’s primary area of expertise is in modern American Legal History, but he is also interested in sports history, digital humanities, alt-academia, and postmodern critical theory. 

Professional Preparation

    • 2012 PhD in HistoryUniversity of Pittsburgh
    • 2010 MA in HistoryUniversity of Pittsburgh
    • 2007 JD in LawValparaiso University School of Law
    • 2001 BA in HistoryThe University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Appointments

    • Jan 2012 to Jan 2013 Assist Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2011 to Jan 2012 Andrew Mellon Fellow
      University of Pittsburgh
    • Jan 2007 to Jan 2011 Teaching Fellow
      University of Pittsburgh

Memberships

  • Professional
    • June 2013 to Present Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
    • Jan 2011 to Present American Historical Association
    • Nov 2007 to Present Bar of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

Research and Expertise

  • About Oliver Bateman

    Bateman is in the process of adapting his dissertation “Law, Society, and Judicial Politics: State Supreme Courts and the Pursuit of Educational Equity” into a book manuscript.  His article “When Bad Judging is Good Lawmaking” is forthcoming in the Journal of Education Finance and will serve as one of eight featured presentations at the 2014 Symposium on the Economics and Financing of Education.  Bateman is also chairing the long-running “American Humor” panel at the 2014 Rocky Mountain Modern Language Arts Convention, where he will present a paper on “The Daily Show and the End of Humor.”  He is a regular columnist for Al-Jazeera America, The Atlantic, and Mic.com, the editor of the “Reviews and Commentary” section of The Good Men Project, and a contributor to the US Intellectual History Blog and many other online publications.  

Publications

      Book Review 2012
      • Review of James Mellon’s The Judge:  The Life of Thomas Mellon, Founder of a Fortune in The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 136, no. 3: 314-315 (invited).
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2011
      • Review of Catherine Fisk’s Working Knowledge:  Employee Innovation and the Rise of Big Corporate Intellectual Property, 1800-1930 in Essays in History, Fall 2011.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Journal Article 2011
      • Review of Gerald Moran’s John Chipman Gray:  The Harvard Brahmin of Property Law in American Association of Law Libraries Newsletter, Fall 2011.
        {Journal Article} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

      Book Review 2010
      • Review of Hoffer, Hull Hoffer, and Hull’s The Supreme Court:  An Essential History in Law and History Review 28, no. 3:  885-886.
        {Book Review} [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Courses

      • HIST 3318-001 U.S. LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY, 1877 TO PRESENT

        HIST 3318 traces the adaptation of laws to changing social and economic needs with emphasis on the interrelations of law, public opinion, the legal profession, judiciary, and the political process. Topics include the transatlantic nature of American law, the failure of Reconstruction, developments in criminal and civil law, and the rise of constitutional law as a form of government policymaking.  Special attention will be paid to subjects such as race, gender, sexual orientation, disability, and critical legal studies.  

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • HIST 1312-005 HIST 1312, The United States, 1865-Present

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States since 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical thinking skills. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3317-001 U.S. LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY, COLONIAL TO 1877

        HIST 3317 traces the adaptation of laws to changing social and economic needs with emphasis on the interrelations of law, public opinion, the legal profession, judiciary, and the political process. Topics include the transatlantic origins of American law, slavery and indentured servitude, poor laws and dependency, family law and gender, disability, developments in criminal and civil law, and the failure of Reconstruction.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5312-001 READING COLLOQUIUM IN POST-1800 EUROPEAN / LATIN AMERICAN / AFRICAN HISTORY

        Law and popular culture are the thematic subjects of HIST 5312 as well as my areas of professional expertise, and our shared readings reflect this.  However, my goal in assembling these materials was not so that we can spend three hours per week poring over the minute and often quite trivial details of Plessy v. Ferguson and Everson v. Board of Education or discussing the biased refereeing that enabled France to win the 1998 World Cup.  Instead, we will work through this body of material to learn how historians and other academics develop and apply various theories and methodologies in order to craft exciting interdisciplinary or transnational projects.  As corny as it sounds, the sort of work we do is limited only by our imaginations; my chief aim here is to inspire you pursue the research topics that interest you, going as far as the sources (and your interpretations thereof) allow.   

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3318-001 American Legal and Constitutional History, 1877 to the Present

        HIST 3318 traces the adaptation of laws to changing social and economic needs with emphasis on the interrelations of law, public opinion, the legal profession, judiciary, and the political process. Topics include the transatlantic nature of American law, the failure of Reconstruction, developments in criminal and civil law, and the rise of constitutional law as a form of government policymaking.  Special attention will be paid to subjects such as race, gender, sexual orientation, disability, and critical legal studies.  

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 4101-001 Moot Court

        This course will prepare students to participate in moot court competitions, which simulate the experience of arguing a constitutional case before the Supreme Court. Teams from UTA will compete in local, regional and national competitions. Moot court is a highly profitable exercise that acquaints students with existing case law, hones their forensic and analytical skills, and puts them in contact with legal scholars and practicing members of the legal community. Even students who do not travel to competitions will derive many advantages from their participation in this course.  Local attorneys An Lee Hsu and Michael Martinez, who were both accomplished members of the Texas Tech University School of Law Moot Court program, will be assisting the team this semester.  

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-010 History of the United States Since 1865

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States since 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical thinking skills. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-001 Undergraduate Research Methods

        Introduces undergraduate students to discipline-specific issues in research, writing, and argumentation.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-001 HIST 1312, The United States, 1865-Present
        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States from 1860 to the present. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical skills.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1311-001 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865
        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States prior to 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical skills.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 3317-001 U.S. LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY, COLONIAL TO 1877
        In this course, we will examine the Transatlantic origins of American law; the evolution of colonial and state laws regulating slavery and indentured servitude; the operation of colonial governments and the early national government under the Articles of Confederation; the arguments that accompanied the drafting of the federal Constitution and postwar state constitutions; the arrogation of power by the federal judiciary undertaken by Chief Justice John Marshall; and the impact of “state’s rights” jurisprudence in the years leading up to the Civil War. Developments in civil and criminal law will be discussed as well, with reference made—where applicable—to the pioneering historical work of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., John Chipman Gray, F. W. Maitland, J. Willard Hurst, and Morton Horwitz.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 1311-001 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865
        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States prior to 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical skills.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • HIST 3318-001 U.S. LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY, 1877 TO PRESENT
        Traces the adaptation of laws to changing social and economic needs with emphasis on the interrelations of law, public opinion, the legal profession, judiciary, and the political process.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus

Other Service Activities

  • Uncategorized
    • Dec  Editor-at-large, The Good Men Project
      From December 2011 to October 2012, I was an editor for The Good Men Project Magazine, where I wrote about issues related to law, sports, and society.
    • Dec  Moot Court Team Faculty Advisor
      For 2012-2013, I am serving as the faculty advisor for Texas-Arlington's undergraduate Moot Court team.
    • Dec  Phi Alpha Theta Faculty Advisor
      For 2012-2013, I am serving as the faculty advisor for the Texas-Arlington chapter of the Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society.