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Paul Conrad

Name

[Conrad, Paul]
  • Assistant Professor, History

Biography

Dr. Conrad received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin, after completing a bachelor's degree at Stony Brook State University of New York. His research interests center on Native American studies, the history of slavery, and Borderlands history. He is particularly interested in the lives of ordinary people as they crossed borders, encountered newcomers, and negotiated colonialism and empire in the past and present. 

He is currently working on a book project titled, “Captive Fates: Displaced Apache Indians in Colonial North America and the Caribbean,” which examines the capture, enslavement, and displacement of Apache groups from the North American West from early Spanish colonization through U.S. colonial settlement. His research has been supported by grants and fellowships from such organizations as the Mellon Foundation, the American Philosophical Association, the McNeil Center for Early American Studies, and the Clements Center for Southwest Studies.

Professional Preparation

    • 2011 Ph.D. in HistoryUniversity of Texas at Austin
    • 2007 M.A. in HistoryUniversity of Texas at Austin
    • 2004 B.A. in History (Spanish),  SUNY at Stony Brook

Appointments

    • Aug 2011 to May 2015 Assistant Professor of History
      Colorado State University - Pueblo
    • Aug 2012 to May 2013 David J. Weber Research Fellow
      Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University
    • Aug 2009 to May 2010 Richard S. Dunn Dissertation Fellow
      McNeil Center for Early American Studies, University of Pennsylvania

Research and Expertise

  • Native American Studies

    My focus is on interactions between Indigenous peoples and newcomers to the North American West before the nineteenth century, with a particular interest in captivity and slavery. 

  • Early American History

    An additional area of expertise is "Early American History" broadly conceived, including the formation of colonial societies in the Americas in the early modern period. 

  • Borderlands History

    Both a teaching and research speciality of mine is Borderlands history--the history of spaces characterized by contested or plural sovereignty. I am particularly interested in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, but consider other global borderlands in my research and teaching as well. 

  • Race and Slavery

    The relationship between ideas about race, ethnicity, and slavery is another focus of my research. 

Publications

      Book In-progress
      • “Captive Fates: Displaced Apache Indians in Colonial North America and the Caribbean, 1600-1830,” under contract for publication with the University of Pennsylvania Press in the Early Modern Americas series edited by Peter Mancall

        {Peer Reviewed }

      Journal Article 2016
      • "Empire Through Kinship: Rethinking Spanish-Apache Relations in Southwestern North America in the Late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries," Early American Studies (Fall 2016) 

        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2015
      •  “Indians, Convicts, and Slaves: An Apache Diaspora to Cuba at the Turn of the Nineteenth-Century,” in Linking the Histories of Slavery in North America and its Borderlands, ed. James F. Brooks and Bonnie Martin (Santa Fe: SAR Press, Fall 2015)

        {Peer Reviewed }
      2015
      • “Why You Can’t Teach the History of Slavery Without American Indians,” in Why You Can’t Teach U.S. History without American Indians, ed. Susan Sleeper Smith et al. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2015)

        {Peer Reviewed }

      Book Review 2015
      • Paul Conrad, Review of Clay Mathers, Jeffrey M. Mitchem, and Charles M. Haecker, eds., Native and Spanish New Worlds: Sixteenth-Century Entradas in the American Southwest and Southeast in Ethnohistory 

        {Book Review }
      2015
      • Paul Conrad, Review of William K. Hartmann, Searching For Golden Empires: Epic Cultural Collisions in Sixteenth-Century America, in the Western Historical Quarterly 

        {Book Review }
      2015
      • Paul Conrad, Review of Natale A. Zappia, Traders and Raiders: The Indigenous World of the Colorado Basin, 1540-1859, Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies 46, 1 (May 2015) 

        {Book Review }
      2015
      • Paul Conrad, Review of Jace Weaver, The Red Atlantic: American Indigenes and the Making of the Modern World, 1000-1927, Journal of Southern History 81, 2 (May 2015) 

        {Book Review }

      Book Review 2013
      • Paul Conrad, Review of Lance R. Blyth, Chiricahua and Janos: Communities of Violence in the Southwestern Borderlands, 1680-1880, Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies (Spring 2013)

        {Book Review }
      2013
      • Paul Conrad, Review of Brett Rushforth, Bonds of Alliance: Indigenous and Atlantic Slaveries in New France, The William & Mary Quarterly (July 2013) 

        {Book Review }

      Book Review 2012
      • Paul Conrad, Review of Mark Santiago, The Jar of Severed Hands: Spanish Deportation of Apache Prisoners of War, 1770-1810, The Western Historical Quarterly (Spring 2012)

        {Book Review }
      2012
      • Paul Conrad, Review of Alan Gallay, ed., Indian Slavery in Colonial America, Ethnohistory (Spring 2012)

        {Book Review }

      Encyclopedia Entry 2012
      • "Slavery: Native Americans by Spanish," in Oxford Encyclopedia of American Social History (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012), 336-338. 

        {Encyclopedia Entry }

      Book Review 2010
      • Paul Conrad, Review of Ian W. Record, Big Sycamore Stands Alone: The Western Apaches, Aravaipa, and the Struggle for Place, The Western Historical Quarterly (Spring 2010)

        {Book Review }

Presentations

    • October  2016
      “From Mission Seeking to Apache Tracking: The Tawakoni Wichita Visit from the South Plains to Mexico City in 1797"

       Paper accepted for presentation at the Western Historical Association annual meeting in St. Paul, Minnesota, October 2016

    • April  2016
      “Enslaved Africans and the Incorporation of Native Captives in Seventeenth Century Northern New Spain"

       Paper accepted for presentation at the Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies Annual Meeting in Santa Fe, New Mexico, April 2016

    • April  2016
      Invited Presentation on Symposium Roundtable, “Bodies at Work: Reimagining the Lines of (Re)production"

      University of Texas at Arlington English Graduate Conference, April 2016

    • November  2015
      “The Worst Enemies”: Runaway War Captives and the Politics of the Southwest Borderlands in the Late-Eighteenth Century

      Presentation accepted for the American Society of Ethnohistory Annual Meeting

    • October  2015
      “Visions and Practices of Forced Removal on the Northern Frontier of New Spain in the 18th Century”

      Presentation accepted for the Western Historical Association annual meeting in Portland, Oregon, October 2015

  • Past
    •  
      “‘He asked to be named capitán of the Apache nation’: The Life Trajectory of a Former Slave turned Trickster in New Spain in the early 19th century”

      Presentation at the Rocky Mountain Conference on Latin American Studies annual meeting in Tucson, Arizona, April 2015

  • Past
    •  
      “The Forced Removal of Indigenous Groups from Southwestern America in Theory and Practice in the Eighteenth Century”

      Presentation at the Human Trafficking in Early America International Conference, McNeil Center for Early American Studies, Philadelphia, PA, April 2015

  • Past
    •  
      “‘Until Indians are permitted to be enslaved’: Forced Migration on the Northern Frontier of New Spain in the 18th Century”

      Presentation at the Organization of American Historians annual meeting, Atlanta, GA, April 2014

  • Past
    •  
      “An Apache Diaspora and the history of the North American West"

      Invited Presentation at El Pueblo Museum, Pueblo, CO, February 2014

  • Past
    •  
      “Surviving the First Years of Teaching"

      Organizer and panel chair, American Historical Association annual meeting, Washington, DC, January 2014

  • Past
    •  
      “'They ask about their relatives in Mexico': Apache Efforts to Reunite Families in an Era of Displacement, 1780-1810”

      Presentation at the Western Historical Association annual meeting, Tucson, AZ, October 2013

  • Past
    •  
      “Forced Incorporation: The Experience of Native Captives from New Mexico in 17th Century New Spain”

      Presentation at The Mid-America Conference at the University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, September 2013

  • Past
    •  
      “Why You Can’t Teach the History of Slavery Without American Indians”

      Presentation in conjunction with the Newberry Consortium in American Indian Studies Seminar, Newberry Library, Chicago, IL, May 2013

  • Past
    •  
      “Indians, Convicts, and Slaves: An Apache Diaspora to Colonial Cuba”

      Public presentation in conjunction with the Uniting the Histories of Slavery Symposium at Southern Methodist     University, Dallas, TX, April 2013

  • Past
    •  
      "The Dilemma of Displacement: Indian Captivity in Cuba in Comparative Context"

      Presentation at the Southern Historical Association Conference, Baltimore, MD, October 2011

  • Past
    •  
      “Rethinking Columbus"

      Invited Public Presentation at the Robert Hoag Rawlings Public Library, Pueblo, CO, 24 September 2011

  • Past
    •  
      “Enslaved Africans and the Incorporation of Native Captives in Seventeenth Century Northern New Spain"

      Presentation at the Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies Annual Meeting in Santa Fe, New Mexico, April 2016

Courses

      • HIST 1311-014 History of the United States to 1865

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States to 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical thinking skills.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-015 History of the United States to 1865

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States to 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical thinking skills.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-002 The United States, 1607-1865

        William Faulkner once said that “the past is never dead, it’s not even past.” Inspired by Faulkner’s sentiment, this course explores U.S. history with its relevance to the present-day front and center. How did the United States come to be and why do its origins matter? Why is “race” such an important factor in American society? What is an “American” anyway? How polarized is United States society today and what does history have to teach us about it? 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-004 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865

        William Faulkner once said that “the past is never dead, it’s not even past.” Inspired by Faulkner’s sentiment, this course explores U.S. history with its relevance to the present-day front and center. How did the United States come to be and why do its origins matter? Why is “race” such an important factor in American society? What is an “American” anyway? How polarized is United States society today and what does history have to teach us about it? 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-005 Introduction to Historical Research

        This course provides an introduction to the methods that historians use to conduct research and present their findings in written and oral form. We will begin by considering what “history” is and the methods that historians use to produce it, drawing especially upon the field of Native American history for examples. You will then pursue a research project exploring in greater depth one aspect of the history of Native Americans in North America or the Caribbean by using primary sources resources available from UTA library databases. This project will culminate in an essay of 14-20 pages. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-005 Introduction to Historical Research

        This course provides an introduction to the methods that historians use to conduct research and present their findings in written and oral form. We will begin by considering what “history” is and the methods that historians use to produce it, drawing especially upon the field of Native American history for examples. You will then pursue a research project exploring in greater depth one aspect of the history of Native Americans in North America or the Caribbean by using primary sources resources available from UTA library databases. This project will culminate in an essay of 14-20 pages. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3367-001 American Indian History

        This course provides an introduction to the history of the original inhabitants of North America and their descendants. We will begin broadly, by considering the varied societies Native Americans built before Europeans arrived and the challenges that the arrival of Europeans posed to them. Later, we will focus on Native Americans’ relationship with the United States and their struggles for land, sovereignty, and identity. Throughout the semester, we will use the stories of particular American Indians’ lives as a lens through which to consider broader issues. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-007 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865

        William Faulkner once said that “the past is never dead, it’s not even past.” Inspired by Faulkner’s sentiment, this course explores U.S. history with its relevance to the present-day front and center. How did the United States come to be and why do its origins matter? Why is “race” such an important factor in American society? What is an “American” anyway? How polarized is United States society today and what does history have to teach us about it? 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5326-001 Topics in American Literature before 1900: Native American Literature

        This class focuses on Native American Literature, broadly conceived, before the emergence of the canonical American Indian authors of the mid-twentieth century. We will explore a range of texts authored by or credited to American Indians, ranging from origin stories, winter counts, and ledger narratives to nineteenth-century autobiography, poetry, and novels. What did literacy and writing mean to different Indian authors and for whom did they write? Particular themes we will consider include Native engagement with and resistance to colonialism, racism, and Christianity, while also considering questions of reception, such as how non-Indians used American Indian authored texts for their own purposes. Students will choose one text to explore in greater depth by developing a conference paper-length critical analysis of one of its major themes over the course of the semester.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-010 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1865

        William Faulkner once said that “the past is never dead, it’s not even past.” Inspired by Faulkner’s sentiment, this course explores U.S. history with its relevance to the present- day front and center. How did the United States come to be and why do its origins matter? Why is “race” such an important factor in American society? What is an “American” anyway? How polarized is United States society today and what does history have to teach us about it? 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3367-001 American Indian History

        This course provides an introduction to American Indian history. We will begin broadly, by considering the varied societies Native peoples built before Europeans arrived and the challenges that the arrival of Europeans posed to them. Later, we will focus on Native Americans’ relationship with the United States and their struggles for land, sovereignty, and identity. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 6365-001 Seminar: Native Americans and the World

        In this course we will examine new perspectives and new ways of thinking

        about both "Native American” and “Transatlantic” histories. The relationship between Native Americans

        and the "Atlantic World” has generated significant scholarly attention. Scholars have argued for a “Red

        Atlantic,” questioned whether there was any such thing, or even critiqued Atlantic history as unacceptably

        prone to marginalizing Native histories. More than ever before, however, new scholarship on Indigenous

        peoples' engagement with global processes, including through mobility into and across the Atlantic and

        Pacific, is likely to push this debate in new directions. This research seminar will expose students to the latest

        scholarship in the field. Over the course of the semester, students will prepare a conference paper on a topic

        related to the theme of trans-oceanic histories of Indigenous peoples.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-006 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1865

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States, especially before 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical thinking skills.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1311-007 HIST 1311, The United States, 1607-1865

        An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States, especially before 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical thinking skills. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5363-001 Colloquium National Histories: Native American History

        This course provides an introduction to the field of Native American history and important questions and debates within it. There are a number of different approaches we could take—we could focus on comparing the history of Indigenous peoples in North America to selected other places around the globe, for example, or we could examine different approaches to Native American history by focusing on specific tribal histories. While we will discuss these and other possibilities, the major approach of this class will be to consider the relationship between Indigenous peoples and U.S. history. In this vein, we will focus on both historical and historiographical questions, such as: To what extent have historians of the United States included Native Americans in national histories and why? How are understandings of major events or themes in U.S. history changed when explored from the vantage point of American Indian history? How have Indigenous communities grappled with the United States in their efforts to maintain cultural identities and political sovereignty over time? Throughout the semester, we will consider scholarly monographs by Native and non-Native authors that shed light on these questions, and also the perspectives and voices of Native historical actors through primary source documents and literature. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3367-001 American Indian History

        This course provides an introduction to Native American history in North America and the Caribbean. We will begin broadly, by considering the varied societies Native peoples built before Europeans arrived and the challenges that the arrival of Europeans posed to them. Later, we will focus on the relationship between the United States and Native Americans, especially as it has been understood by Native Americans themselves in their struggles for land, sovereignty, and identity. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours