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Ronald Eugene Cross

Name

[Cross, Ronald Eugene]
  • Senior Lecturer, Department of Computer Science & Engineering
  • Lecturer

Biography

    Ron Cross holds an BS degree in Engineering Physics from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, a MS in Engineering Management from the Florida Institute of Technology, a Masters of Arts degree in Theological Studies from Liberty University, and a Doctor of Theology Degree from Newburgh Theological Seminary. He has 38 years of experience in engineering design, management, and teaching with 25 years in the Aerospace/Defense Industry working for Lockheed Martin (Orlando, Florida) and L-3 Com (Arlington, Texas). His program Experience also includes the management of hardware, software and systems engineering personnel through the use of Integrated Product Development Teams in the design and development of telecommunication shelters (CNCE), LANTIRN Test Equipment, Simulators, and other device specific processor driven products. Development experience spans the design and implementation of processor boards, memory boards, LRU’s, subsystems, and systems through the entire life cycle (pursuit and capture, Program Kickoff, SRR, SDR, PDR, CDR, I&T, formal test, program closeout and product retirement).

     Ron has led both large and small engineering organization with the last being at L-3Com as a Director of Engineering where he led the FMT organization with as many as 600 engineers in its core group. He has significant experience in architecting and managing organizations with associated metrics, achieving SEI CMMI Level 4 certification, improving and standing up engineering processes through Kaizen Events while leveraging Lessons Learned. He also has jointly led efforts that resulted in achieving ASE 9100C certifications.

     Ron has been an active supporter of the colleges and universities in the community participating as an Adjunct Professor since 1994 (Seminole State College, UCF – Florida, and recently at UTA in Arlington Texas). He has been an active member of UTA’s College of Engineering Board of Advisors since 2006. Ron believes that giving back to the community through an active participation in the development of our next generation of engineers and engineering management will ensure that America will always be able to rise to meet that next great challenge.

     Ron presently lives in Fort Worth, Texas with his wife of 42 years, Lucinda. She is a graduate of UTA holding a master’s degree in Education.  

Courses

      • CSE 4314-001 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES

        Description of Course

        COURSE OBJECTIVES

        You will study various topics related to the ethical and social impact of computing technology and the responsibilities that engineers and computer scientists have in shaping this technology and its applications.  More specifically, you will explore contemporary issues such as privacy, freedom of speech, intellectual property, crime, safety, human needs, and career planning.  You will enhance your written and oral communications skills by completing assignments on these and other issues.

        STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES – By the end of the course, you will have demonstrated the following.

        Knowledge of the principles of ethics and professional ethics and how they guide the practice of computer engineering, computer science, and software engineering.

        Understanding of social and career issues that stem from applications of computing technology.

        Ability to write and speak informatively on these issues in a professional environment.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • CSE 2315-003 DISCRETE STRUCTURES

        This course covers Propositional and predicate logic, mathematical proof techniques, sets, combinatorics, functions and relations, graphs, and graph algorithms.

        Student Learning Outcomes:

        Students successfully completing this course will:

        Have a clear understanding of selected fundamental formal theoretics and discrete mathematical concepts employed in problem abstraction and representation needed in the study of modern computer science, computer engineering and software engineering.

        Achieve familiarity and ease in working with mathematical notation and concepts.

        Be able to understand and employ proof techniques, including domain-specific, mathematical induction and proof by contradiction, and be able to decide what the appropriate technique in a given situation is

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 2440-001 CIRCUITS AND SIGNALS FOR COMPUTER ENGINEERS

        Objectives:

         This course covers the basic concepts of electric circuits and signals. Electric potential, current, power, energy will be discussed. Circuits will be introduced with Kirchoff’s laws; resistive circuits will be investigated. Circuits containing linear energy storage components (capacitors, inductors) will be investigated and their applications to filtering signals will be discussed. DC, AC, and general signals will be discussed. Semiconductors will be introduced (diodes and transistors). Operational amplifiers will be introduced and their properties and applications discussed.

        An accompanying lab will be used to introduce students to instruments and measurement techniques. Labs will be used to explain hands-on circuits and to deepen students’ understanding of electric signal and circuits concepts.

        Outcomes:

        Students successfully completing this course will have gained a solid understanding of basic electronic circuit theory and application. They will gain a basic understanding of filtering principles and a basic understanding of electrical signals. This class provides the basics to a more advanced electronics class and thus forming and important basis for senior design projects and students’ acceptance in industry as computer engineers.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 2440-001 Circuits & Signals

        Objectives:
         This course covers the basic concepts of electric circuits and signals. Electric potential, current, power, energy will be discussed. Circuits will be introduced with Kirchoff’s laws; resistive circuits will be investigated. Circuits containing linear energy storage components (capacitors, inductors) will be investigated and their applications to filtering signals will be discussed. DC, AC, and general signals will be discussed. Semiconductors will be introduced (diodes and transistors). Operational amplifiers will be introduced and their properties and applications discussed.

        An accompanying lab will be used to introduce students to instruments and measurement techniques. Labs will be used to explain hands-on circuits and to deepen students’ understanding of electric signal and circuits concepts.
        Outcomes:
        Students successfully completing this course will have gained a solid understanding of basic electronic circuit theory and application. They will gain a basic understanding of filtering principles and a basic understanding of electrical signals. This class provides the basics to a more advanced electronics class and thus forming and important basis for senior design projects and students’ acceptance in industry as computer engineers.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 2315-005 DISCRETE STRUCTURES

        Description of Course Content:

        This course covers Propositional and predicate logic, mathematical proof techniques, sets, combinatorics, functions and relations, graphs, and graph algorithms.

        Student Learning Outcomes:

        Students successfully completing this course will:

        Have a clear understanding of selected fundamental formal theoretics and discrete mathematical concepts employed in problem abstraction and representation needed in the study of modern computer science, computer engineering and software engineering.

        Achieve familiarity and ease in working with mathematical notation and concepts.

        Be able to understand and employ proof techniques, including domain-specific, mathematical induction and proof by contradiction, and be able to decide what the appropriate technique in a given situation is

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 4314-002 Professional Practices

        Description of Course

        COURSE OBJECTIVES

        You will study various topics related to the ethical and social impact of computing technology and the responsibilities that engineers and computer scientists have in shaping this technology and its applications.  More specifically, you will explore contemporary issues such as privacy, freedom of speech, intellectual property, crime, safety, human needs, and career planning.  You will enhance your written and oral communications skills by completing assignments on these and other issues.

        STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES – By the end of the course, you will have demonstrated the following.

        Knowledge of the principles of ethics and professional ethics and how they guide the practice of computer engineering, computer science, and software engineering.

        Understanding of social and career issues that stem from applications of computing technology.

        Ability to write and speak informatively on these issues in a professional environment.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • EN 1131-005 Student Success

        Student Success is a learning community course that will teach new students academic success skills to aid their transition to college. The goal of the course is to help students identify their individual needs, determine what resources are appropriate, recognize the faculty role in their development, and formulate a plan for an actively engaged and enriched experience from campus to career. The course will be taught by Peer Academic Leaders (PALS) and faculty, staff and/or graduate students to provide guidance, raise awareness and understanding of students' majors and help support collaborative and co-curricular opportunities available within the School/College.  

        Student Learning Outcomes

        Recognize and utilize the various academic and personal student resources available at UTA, including those related to financial literacy and wellness.

        Apply various learning and study strategies to their college classes.

        Recognize the unique characteristics of their major, including relevant co- and extra-curricular opportunities, and understand the significance of that discipline in today’s world.

        Identify the role of faculty as experts in providing guidance in academic planning, experiential learning and career goals related to the student’s major.

        Describe career types in different engineering professions that they might enter after completing their degree in engineering at UTA.

        Develop a sense of self-awareness through teamwork and collaborative efforts.

        Recognize and utilize the various academic and personal student resources available at UTA, including those related to financial literacy and wellness.

        Apply various learning and study strategies to their college classes.

        Recognize the unique characteristics of their major, including relevant co- and extra-curricular opportunities, and understand the significance of that discipline in today’s world.

        Identify the role of faculty as experts in providing guidance in academic planning, experiential learning and career goals related to the student’s major.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • EN 1131-012 Student Success

        Student Success is a learning community course that will teach new students academic success skills to aid their transition to college. The goal of the course is to help students identify their individual needs, determine what resources are appropriate, recognize the faculty role in their development, and formulate a plan for an actively engaged and enriched experience from campus to career. The course will be taught by Peer Academic Leaders (PALS) and faculty, staff and/or graduate students to provide guidance, raise awareness and understanding of students' majors and help support collaborative and co-curricular opportunities available within the School/College.  

        Student Learning Outcomes

        Recognize and utilize the various academic and personal student resources available at UTA, including those related to financial literacy and wellness.

        Apply various learning and study strategies to their college classes.

        Recognize the unique characteristics of their major, including relevant co- and extra-curricular opportunities, and understand the significance of that discipline in today’s world.

        Identify the role of faculty as experts in providing guidance in academic planning, experiential learning and career goals related to the student’s major.

        Describe career types in different engineering professions that they might enter after completing their degree in engineering at UTA.

        Develop a sense of self-awareness through teamwork and collaborative efforts.

        Recognize and utilize the various academic and personal student resources available at UTA, including those related to financial literacy and wellness.

        Apply various learning and study strategies to their college classes.

        Recognize the unique characteristics of their major, including relevant co- and extra-curricular opportunities, and understand the significance of that discipline in today’s world.

        Identify the role of faculty as experts in providing guidance in academic planning, experiential learning and career goals related to the student’s major.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • EN 1331-017 Student Success

        Student Success is a learning community course that will teach new students academic success skills to aid their transition to college. The goal of the course is to help students identify their individual needs, determine what resources are appropriate, recognize the faculty role in their development, and formulate a plan for an actively engaged and enriched experience from campus to career. The course will be taught by Peer Academic Leaders (PALS) and faculty, staff and/or graduate students to provide guidance, raise awareness and understanding of students' majors and help support collaborative and co-curricular opportunities available within the School/College.  

        Student Learning Outcomes

        Recognize and utilize the various academic and personal student resources available at UTA, including those related to financial literacy and wellness.

        Apply various learning and study strategies to their college classes.

        Recognize the unique characteristics of their major, including relevant co- and extra-curricular opportunities, and understand the significance of that discipline in today’s world.

        Identify the role of faculty as experts in providing guidance in academic planning, experiential learning and career goals related to the student’s major.

        Describe career types in different engineering professions that they might enter after completing their degree in engineering at UTA.

        Develop a sense of self-awareness through teamwork and collaborative efforts.

        Recognize and utilize the various academic and personal student resources available at UTA, including those related to financial literacy and wellness.

        Apply various learning and study strategies to their college classes.

        Recognize the unique characteristics of their major, including relevant co- and extra-curricular opportunities, and understand the significance of that discipline in today’s world.

        Identify the role of faculty as experts in providing guidance in academic planning, experiential learning and career goals related to the student’s major.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 4322-001 Software Project Management

        Course Description from University Catalog: Issues and principles for software management; managerial and support aspects of software projects, including: processes, estimation techniques, planning and scheduling, risk analysis, metrics, and quality assurance. Other topics include: configuration management, verification and validation, and maintenance; team project.

        Course Objective: This course will cover various software engineering principles and techniques from a project management point of view. The course coverage will include, but not be limited to, the following topics:

        Software Engineering: Definitions and Life Cycles

        Project Management: Definitions, Issues and Challenges

        Software Cost estimation

        Project Planning and Scheduling

        Risk Analysis

        Metrics

        SW Architecture

        Quality Assurance

        Project Maintenance

        Student Learning Outcomes: For each of the above topics, students will learn the basics and practice them via assignments/project. Students' knowledge will be tested via appropriate exam and/or assignment questions. Team Presentations to the class are a required assignments and used to prepare the students to present in a formal engineering business environment, see Grading Policy below.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 2315-001 DISCRETE STRUCTURES

        Description of Course Content:

        This course covers Propositional and predicate logic, mathematical proof techniques, sets, combinatorics, functions and relations, graphs, and graph algorithms.

        Student Learning Outcomes:

        Students successfully completing this course will:

        Have a clear understanding of selected fundamental formal theoretics and discrete mathematical concepts employed in problem abstraction and representation needed in the study of modern computer science, computer engineering and software engineering.

        Achieve familiarity and ease in working with mathematical notation and concepts.

        Be able to understand and employ proof techniques, including domain-specific, mathematical induction and proof by contradiction, and be able to decide what the appropriate technique in a given situation is.

      • CSE 4314-001 Professional Practices

        Description of Course

        COURSE OBJECTIVES

        You will study various topics related to the ethical and social impact of computing technology and the responsibilities that engineers and computer scientists have in shaping this technology and its applications.  More specifically, you will explore contemporary issues such as privacy, freedom of speech, intellectual property, crime, safety, human needs, and career planning.  You will enhance your written and oral communications skills by completing assignments on these and other issues.

        STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES – By the end of the course, you will have demonstrated the following. Knowledge of the principles of ethics and professional ethics and how they guide the practice of computer engineering, computer science, and software engineering. Understanding of social and career issues that stem from applications of computing technology. Ability to write and speak informatively on these issues.

      • CSE 2440-001 CIRCUITS AND SIGNALS FOR COMPUTER ENGINEERS

        Objectives:

         This course covers the basic concepts of electric circuits and signals. Electric potential, current, power, energy will be discussed. Circuits will be introduced with Kirchoff’s laws; resistive circuits will be investigated. Circuits containing linear energy storage components (capacitors, inductors) will be investigated and their applications to filtering signals will be discussed. DC, AC, and general signals will be discussed. Semiconductors will be introduced (diodes and transistors). Operational amplifiers will be introduced and their properties and applications discussed.

        An accompanying lab will be used to introduce students to instruments and measurement techniques. Labs will be used to explain hands-on circuits and to deepen students’ understanding of electric signal and circuits concepts.

        Outcomes:

        Students successfully completing this course will have gained a solid understanding of basic electronic circuit theory and application. They will gain a basic understanding of filtering principles and a basic understanding of electrical signals. This class provides the basics to a more advanced electronics class and thus forming and important basis for senior design projects and students’ acceptance in industry as computer engineers.

        Details of Curriculum:

        Class meets Tuesday and Thursday 12:30 pm to 1:50pm in WH 210 (Woolf Hall)

        Accompanying labs are held Tuesday (section 002) or Thursday (section 003) 7pm-9:50pm in ERB 126 and 127 (Engineering Research Building)

        Class Site is solely located on Blackboard 

        We are using Blackboard for announcements and communications. (check it several times per week)

        Text Books:

        Required text book: P. Scherz and S. Monk, “Practical Electronics for Inventors,” Fourth Edition, McGraw Hill, ISBN:978-1259587542, 2016.

        Recommended reference: G. Rizzoni, “Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering,” McGraw Hill Education, ISBN: 978-0073380377, 2008. 

        There are a wide range of books on this topic, all of which cover many of the topics covered in the course and can be used as references for the course.

        Required software:

        Students should have an account on http://everycircuit.com  (cost is approximately $15)

        Lecture slides and notes will be placed Blackboard

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 4314-001 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES

        You will study various topics related to the ethical and social impact of computing technology and the responsibilities that engineers and computer scientists have in shaping this technology and its applications.  More specifically, you will explore contemporary issues such as privacy, freedom of speech, intellectual property, crime, safety, human needs, and career planning.  You will enhance your written and oral communications skills by completing assignments on these and other issues.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • CSE 2440-001 CIRCUITS AND SIGNALS FOR COMPUTER ENGINEERS

        Basic principles of electrical circuits using resistors, capacitors and inductors. Filter analysis and synthesis using complex algebra. Introduction to operational amplifiers. Time domain and frequency domain analysis and taxonomy of signals. Concurrent laboratory experiments complement lecture topics.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 2315-003 DISCRETE STRUCTURES

        This course covers Propositional and predicate logic, mathematical proof techniques, sets, combinatorics, functions and relations, graphs, and graph algorithms.

        Student Learning Outcomes:

        Students successfully completing this course will:

        Have a clear understanding of selected fundamental formal theoretics and discrete mathematical concepts employed in problem abstraction and representation needed in the study of modern computer science, computer engineering and software engineering.

        Achieve familiarity and ease in working with mathematical notation and concepts.

        Be able to understand and employ proof techniques, including domain-specific, mathematical induction and proof by contradiction, and be able to decide what the appropriate technique in a given situation is

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 2315-005 DISCRETE STRUCTURES

        Description of Course Content:

        This course covers Propositional and predicate logic, mathematical proof techniques, sets, combinatorics, functions and relations, graphs, and graph algorithms.

        Student Learning Outcomes:

        Students successfully completing this course will:

        Have a clear understanding of selected fundamental formal theoretics and discrete mathematical concepts employed in problem abstraction and representation needed in the study of modern computer science, computer engineering and software engineering.

        Achieve familiarity and ease in working with mathematical notation and concepts.

        Be able to understand and employ proof techniques, including domain-specific, mathematical induction and proof by contradiction, and be able to decide what the appropriate technique in a given situation is

        Required Textbooks and Other Course Materials: Judith L. Gersting. Mathematical Structures for Computer Science. W.H. Freeman and Company, New York, NY, 7 th edition, 2014. Note that if you choose to use an earlier edition, it’s your responsibility to identify any differences in the editions.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 4322-001 SOFTWARE PROJECT MANAGEMENT

        Course Description from University Catalog: Issues and principles for software management; managerial and support aspects of software projects, including: processes, estimation techniques, planning and scheduling, risk analysis, metrics, and quality assurance. Other topics include: configuration management, verification and validation, and maintenance; team project.

        Course Objective: This course will cover various software engineering principles and techniques from a project management point of view. The course coverage will include, but not be limited to, the following topics:

        Software Engineering: Definitions and Life Cycles

        Project Management: Definitions, Issues and Challenges

        Software Cost estimation

        Project Planning and Scheduling

        Risk Analysis

        Metrics

        SW Architecture

        Quality Assurance

        Project Maintenance

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 4314-001 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES

        Professional Practices - Description of Course

        COURSE OBJECTIVES

        You will study various topics related to the ethical and social impact of computing technology and the responsibilities that engineers and computer scientists have in shaping this technology and its applications.  More specifically, you will explore contemporary issues such as privacy, freedom of speech, intellectual property, crime, safety, human needs, and career planning.  You will enhance your written and oral communications skills by completing assignments on these and other issues.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 4314-001 Professional Practices

        COURSE OBJECTIVES

        You will study various topics related to the ethical and social impact of computing technology and the responsibilities that engineers and computer scientists have in shaping this technology and its applications.  More specifically, you will explore contemporary issues such as privacy, freedom of speech, intellectual property, crime, safety, human needs, and career planning.  You will enhance your written and oral communications skills by completing assignments on these and other issues.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 4314-002 Professional Practices

        COURSE OBJECTIVES

        You will study various topics related to the ethical and social impact of computing technology and the responsibilities that engineers and computer scientists have in shaping this technology and its applications.  More specifically, you will explore contemporary issues such as privacy, freedom of speech, intellectual property, crime, safety, human needs, and career planning.  You will enhance your written and oral communications skills by completing assignments on these and other issues.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 4322-001 SOFTWARE PROJECT MANAGEMENT

        Course Description from University Catalog: Issues and principles for software management; managerial and support aspects of software projects, including: processes, estimation techniques, planning and scheduling, risk analysis, metrics, and quality assurance. Other topics include: configuration management, verification and validation, and maintenance; team project.

        Course Objective: This course will cover various software engineering principles and techniques from a project management point of view. The course coverage will include, but not be limited to, the following topics:

        Software Engineering: Definitions and Life Cycles

        Project Management: Definitions, Issues and Challenges

        Software Cost estimation

        Project Planning and Scheduling

        Risk Analysis

        Metrics

        SW Architecture

        Quality Assurance

        Project Maintenance

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 2308-003 ENGINEERING ECONOMICS

        Description of Course Content: Methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. Provides the student with the basic tools required to analyze engineering alternatives in terms of their worth and cost, an essential element of engineering practice. The student is introduced to the concept of the time value of money and the methodology of basic engineering economy techniques. The course will address some aspects of sustainability and will provide the student with the background to enable them to pass the Engineering Economy portion of the Fundamentals of Engineering exam.

        Student Learning Outcomes:

        Critical Thinking Skills:  to include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information.

        Communication Skills:  to include effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication.

        Empirical and Quantitative Skills: to include the manipulation and analysis of numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions.

        Social Responsibility:  to include intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national and global communities.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5304-005 Advanced Engineering Economy

        Course Description from University Catalog: 

        The course focuses on methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. The student is introduced to the concept of the time value of money and basic engineering economy techniques.

        Course Objective: The course coverage will include, but not be limited to, the following topics:

        Introduction to engineering economy

        Interest factors and equivalence

        Depreciation and depreciation models

        Tax considerations

        Evaluation of a single investment (including internal rate of return, net present value, cash flows)

        Revenue requirements

        Depreciation

        Break-even models (linear and nonlinear)

        Cost comparisons

        Replacement analysis, Inflation (may or may not cover depending on available time)

        Student Learning Outcomes:

        Students will be able to determine the equivalent value of money at a specified time given the timing of deposits and interest value.

        Students will be able to select the most attractive interest rate in various compound and simple interest forms.

        Students will be able to determine if an independent investment opportunity is economically attractive.

        Students will be able to determine the least-cost alternative of multiple solutions in a cost comparison scenario.

        Students will be able to identify the best project(s) to perform from a set of potential projects that are independently economically attractive.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 4314-001 Professional Practices

        Description of Course

        COURSE OBJECTIVES

        You will study various topics related to the ethical and social impact of computing technology and the responsibilities that engineers and computer scientists have in shaping this technology and its applications.  More specifically, you will explore contemporary issues such as privacy, freedom of speech, intellectual property, crime, safety, human needs, and career planning.  You will enhance your written and oral communications skills by completing assignments on these and other issues.

        STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES – By the end of the course, you will have demonstrated the following.

        Knowledge of the principles of ethics and professional ethics and how they guide the practice of computer engineering, computer science, and software engineering.

        Understanding of social and career issues that stem from applications of computing technology.

        Ability to write and speak informatively on these

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • CSE 4314-002 Professional Practices

        Description of Course

        COURSE OBJECTIVES

        You will study various topics related to the ethical and social impact of computing technology and the responsibilities that engineers and computer scientists have in shaping this technology and its applications.  More specifically, you will explore contemporary issues such as privacy, freedom of speech, intellectual property, crime, safety, human needs, and career planning.  You will enhance your written and oral communications skills by completing assignments on these and other issues.

        STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES – By the end of the course, you will have demonstrated the following.

        Knowledge of the principles of ethics and professional ethics and how they guide the practice of computer engineering, computer science, and software engineering.

        Understanding of social and career issues that stem from applications of computing technology.

        Ability to write and speak informatively on these

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5304-001 ADVANCED ENGINEERING ECONOMY

        Course Description from University Catalog: 

        The course focuses on methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. The student is introduced to the concept of the time value of money and basic engineering economy techniques.

        Course Objective: The course coverage will include, but not be limited to, the following topics:

        Introduction to engineering economy

        Interest factors and equivalence

        Depreciation and depreciation models

        Tax considerations

        Evaluation of a single investment (including internal rate of return, net present value, cash flows)

        Revenue requirements

        Depreciation

        Break-even models (linear and nonlinear)

        Cost comparisons

        Replacement analysis, Inflation (may or may not cover depending on available time)

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • CSE 4314-001 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES

        You will study various topics related to the ethical and social impact of computing technology and the responsibilities that engineers and computer scientists have in shaping this technology and its applications.  More specifically, you will explore contemporary issues such as privacy, freedom of speech, intellectual property, crime, safety, human needs, and career planning.  You will enhance your written and oral communications skills by completing assignments on these and other issues.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 4314-002 Professional Practices

        You will study various topics related to the ethical and social impact of computing technology and the responsibilities that engineers and computer scientists have in shaping this technology and its applications.  More specifically, you will explore contemporary issues such as privacy, freedom of speech, intellectual property, crime, safety, human needs, and career planning.  You will enhance your written and oral communications skills by completing assignments on these and other issues.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 4322-002 Software Project Management

        Issues and principles for software management; managerial and support aspects of software projects, including: processes, estimation techniques, planning and scheduling, risk analysis, metrics, and quality assurance. Other topics include: configuration management, verification and validation, and maintenance; team project.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5304-001 ADVANCED ENGINEERING ECONOMY

        The course focuses on methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. The student is introduced to the concept of the time value of money and basic engineering economy techniques.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5304-002 Advanced Engineering Economy - Distant Learning

        The course focuses on methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. The student is introduced to the concept of the time value of money and basic engineering economy techniques.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5304-003 ADVANCED ENGINEERING ECONOMY - Distant Learning

        The course focuses on methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. The student is introduced to the concept of the time value of money and basic engineering economy techniques.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 2308-003 ENGINEERING ECONOMICS

        Methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. Provides the student with the basic tools required to analyze engineering alternatives in terms of their worth and cost, an essential element of engineering practice. The student is introduced to the concept of the time value of money and the methodology of basic engineering economy techniques. The course will address some aspects of sustainability and will provide the student with the background to enable them to pass the Engineering Economy portion of the Fundamentals of Engineering exam.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 4340-001 Engineering Project Management

        Develop and manage cross-disciplinary engineering design teams.  Topics include: Understanding R&D organizations, teams and workgroups, job design, organizational effectiveness, and leading technical professionals. Prerequisites: Enrolled in the engineering professional program.

        Topics:

        Project management tools, including requirements, work breakdown structures, schedules, task responsibility matrix, budgets, risk analysis, performance metrics.

        Working as an engineering professional in a knowledge driven organization, including linking engineering projects with organizational strategy, new approaches to project management such as agile, forming and managing knowledge driven teams, and engineering ethics.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 5325-003 Software Management, Maintenance, and Quality Assurance

        Issues and principles for software management; managerial and support aspects of software projects, including: processes, estimation techniques, planning and scheduling, risk analysis, metrics, and quality assurance. Other topics include: configuration management, verification and validation, and maintenance; team project.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 4322-002 Software Project Management

        Issues and principles for software management; managerial and support aspects of software projects, including: processes, estimation techniques, planning and scheduling, risk analysis, metrics, and quality assurance. Other topics include: configuration management, verification and validation, and maintenance; team project.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 4314-001 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES

        You will study various topics related to the ethical and social impact of computing technology and the responsibilities that engineers and computer scientists have in shaping this technology and its applications.  More specifically, you will explore contemporary issues such as privacy, freedom of speech, intellectual property, crime, safety, human needs, and career planning.  You will enhance your written and oral communications skills by completing assignments on these and other issues.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5304-001 Advanced Engineering Economy

        The course focuses on methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. The student is introduced to the concept of the time value of money and basic engineering economy techniques.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5304-002 Advanced Engineering Economy

        The course focuses on methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. The student is introduced to the concept of the time value of money and basic engineering economy techniques.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5304-003 Advanced Engineering Economy

        The course focuses on methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. The student is introduced to the concept of the time value of money and basic engineering economy techniques.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5304-004 Advanced Engineering Economy

        The course focuses on methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. The student is introduced to the concept of the time value of money and basic engineering economy techniques.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 5304-005 Advanced Engineering Economy

        The course focuses on methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. The student is introduced to the concept of the time value of money and basic engineering economy techniques.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 5325-002 Software Engineering Management, Maintenance, and Quality Assurance

        Issues and principles for software management; managerial and support aspects of software projects, including: processes, estimation techniques, planning and scheduling, risk analysis, metrics, and quality assurance. Other topics include: configuration management, verification and validation, and maintenance; team project.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 4322-001 Software Project Management

        Introduction to software project management. Issues include estimation and costing, project planning and scheduling, option analysis, software quality assurance, and formal technical reviews. Prerequisite: CSE 3310.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • CSE 4314-002 Professional Practices

        You will study various topics related to the ethical and social impact of computing technology and the responsibilities that engineers and computer scientists have in shaping this technology and its applications.  More specifically, you will explore contemporary issues such as privacy, freedom of speech, intellectual property, crime, safety, human needs, and career planning.  You will enhance your written and oral communications skills by completing assignments on these and other issues.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 2308-002 Economics for Engineers

        Methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. Provides the student with the basic tools required to analyze engineering alternatives in terms of their worth and cost, an essential element of engineering practice. The student is introduced to the concept of the time value of money and the methodology of basic engineering economy techniques. The course will address some aspects of sustainability and will provide the student with the background to enable them to pass the Engineering Economy portion of the Fundamentals of Engineering exam.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • IE 2308-003 Economics for Engineers

        Methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. Provides the student with the basic tools required to analyze engineering alternatives in terms of their worth and cost, an essential element of engineering practice. The student is introduced to the concept of the time value of money and the methodology of basic engineering economy techniques. The course will address some aspects of sustainability and will provide the student with the background to enable them to pass the Engineering Economy portion of the Fundamentals of Engineering exam.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours