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Sarah F Rose

Name

[Rose, Sarah F]
  • Associate Professor, History

Professional Preparation

    • 2008 Ph.D. in HistoryUniversity of Illinois at Chicago
    • 2001 M.A. in Social SciencesUniversity of Chicago
    • 1997 B.A. with honors in East Asian Languages & CivilizationsUniversity of Chicago

Appointments

    • Sept 2015 to Present Associate Professor of History
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2015 to Present Director, MInor in Disability Studies
      Minor in Disability Studies   University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2009 to Aug 2015 Assistant Professor of History
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2008 to July 2009 Educational Materials Content Developer
      Disability History Museum
    • Aug 2008 to Dec 2008 Lecturer
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2003 to Jan 2004 Teaching Assistant
      University of Texas at Arlington   Office of the President   Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs   College of Liberal Arts   History
    • Jan 2001 to Jan 2002 Teaching Assistant
      University of Texas at Arlington   Office of the President   Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs   College of Liberal Arts   History

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Aug 2010 to Present Disability History Association
    • Aug 2007 to Present American Historical Association
    • Aug 2003 to Present Labor and Working-Class History Association
    • Jan 2002 to Present Organization of American Historians
    • Dec 2000 to Present Society for Disability Studies

Research and Expertise

  • Research Interests

    My research focuses on how disabled people came to be defined as unproductive citizens during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries—a definition central to twentieth century disability policy.  My book manuscript, "No Right to Be Idle: The Invention of Disability, 1850-1930" (under contract with the University of North Carolina Press and forthcoming in 2016) traces how policymakers, employers, and the general public created disability as a policy problem, synonymous with public dependency.

    I am also co-authoring "Poverty and Social Policy in the United States: Social Citizenship in Historical, Comparative, and Transnational Perspective" with Sonya Michel, Richard Scotch, and Laura Frader (under contract with Routledge).

  • Teaching Fields
    U.S. History (specializing in late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries), Disability History, U.S. and Transatlantic Policy History, U.S. Labor History, History of Capitalism and Political Economy, History of the Body, Baseball History.

Publications

      Book In-progress
      • Sonya Michel, Sarah Rose, and Richard Scotch, with Laura Frader, Poverty and Social Policy in the United States: Social Citizenship in Historical, Comparative, and Transnational Perspective, under advance contract with Routledge.

        {Book }
      In-progress
      • Sarah F. Rose and Stephanie Cole, co-editors, Beyond Attics and Activists: Rethinking Family in Disability History (Walter Prescott Webb Memorial Lectures volume 49, University of Texas A&M Press)

        {Book }

      Book 2016
      • No Right to Be Idle: The Invention of Disability, 1850-1930, under contract with University of North Carolina Press (forthcoming in 2016).

        {Book }

      Book Chapter 2015
      • "Work," in Keywords in Disability Studies, edited by Rachel Adams, Benjamin Reiss, and David Serlin (New York: New York University Press) (invited submission).

        {Book Chapter }

      Journal Article 2014
      • Sarah F. Rose and Joshua A. T. Salzmann. "Bionic Ballplayers: Risk, Profit, and the Body as Commodity, 1964-2007," Labor: Studies in the Working-Class History of the Americas 11, no. 1 (invited submission).

        {Journal Article }

      Encyclopedia Entry 2013
      • "The Body," in Oxford Encyclopedia of American Cultural and Intellectual History, edited by Joan Rubin and Scott Casper (Oxford: Oxford University Press) (invited submission).

        {Encyclopedia Entry }

      Journal Article 2012
      • "The Right to a College Education? The GI Bil, Public Law 16, and Disabled Veterans," Journal of Policy History 24, no. 1 (Winter 2012): 26-52 (part of special issue on intersectional perspectives on policy history) (invited submission).

        {Review essay }

      Encyclopedia Entry 2009
      • "Charles Bernstein," "Ford Motor Company," "Hervey B. Wilbur," "Workmen's Compensation," and "World War II," in Encyclopedia of American Disability History, edited by Susan Burch (New York: Facts on File, 2009).
        {Encyclopedia Entry }

      Essay 2008
      • "Disability and the Academic Job Market," Disability Studies Quarterly 28, no. 3 (2008).
        {Essay }

      Encyclopedia Entry 2007
      • "Workplace Hazards, Disability, and Injury" and "Occupational Health and Safety Act," in Encyclopedia of U.S. Labor and Working-Class History, edited by Eric Arnesen (New York: Routledge, 2007).
        {Encyclopedia Entry }

      Book Review 2006
      • "The Moral Economy of Work," review essay on The Accidental Republic by John Fabian Witt and Crippled Justice by Ruth O' Brien, Journal of Policy History 18, no. 4 (October 2006): 477-82.
        {Book Review }

      Encyclopedia Entry 2005
      • "Child Care," with Sonya Michel, in Encyclopedia of Disability Studies, edited by Gary L. Albrecht (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2005).
        {Encyclopedia Entry }

      Journal Article 2005
      • "Crippled' Hands: Disability in Labor and Working-Class History." Labor: Studies in the Working-Class History of the Americas 2, no. 1 (Spring 2005): 27-54 (invited submission).

        {Journal Article }

Presentations

    • October  2015
      "Disability Rights at the University of Texas at Arlington"

      Part of UT Arlington Library’s Focus on Faculty series in conjunction with the opening of an exhibit on disability history at UT Arlington in the Central Library Sixth Floor Parlor

    • July  2015
      Disability, Work, and the Industrial Revolution

      ‘Disability and Industrial Society’ is a five year project examining the impact of industrialisation on experiences of disability, using the British coal industry as a case study. Led by Swansea University, in collaboration with Aberystwyth, Strathclyde and Glasgow Caledonian Universities, the project focuses on disability in the South Wales, North East England and Scottish coalfields. The symposium will be held at the National Waterfront Museum to coincide with the opening of an exhibition, ‘From Pithead to Sick Bed and Beyond: the Buried History of Disability in the Coal Industry before the NHS’. The symposium presents findings from the project and invites delegates to contribute to a discussion about intersections between disability history, labour history and literary and cultural disability studies.

    • June  2015
      Roundtable on "Disability Studies Programs, Inclusivity, and Ableism on Campus"

      This discussion panel brings together program directors, current students, and graduates from three disability studies programs—the University of Toledo, University of Wyoming, and University of Texas at Arlington—to consider issues such as inclusivity and outing, addressing ableism in the classroom, disability identities and mentoring, working with disability services offices, and marketing programs on campus. 

      Moderator:  Susan Burch (Middlebury College)

      Participants: Sarah Rose (organizer), Michelle Jarman, Jim Ferris, Trevor Engel, Lindsey Anderson, Lindsey Haines, Garrett Cruzan, Sarah Millimen, and Douglas Kidd

      Organizer: Sarah Rose

    • June  2015
      "Rethinking Religious Histories of Madness"

      Chair and organizer of session.  This panel offers three presentations that illustrate the deeply intertwined histories of madness and religion.  Traveling from medieval Europe to the Ottoman empire and then to Enlightenment-era North Atlantic, these papers explore the ways in which religiously-inflected notions of acceptable behavior, cures, heresy, and humane treatment shaped concepts of madness, as well as the lives of those deemed mad.

    • October  2014
      Fighting to Get on the Bus: Disability Rights as Civil Rights

      Put the disability rights perspective in the context of the broader civil rights movement.

    • June  2014
      Creating the ‘Idiot’ Who Couldn't Go Home: Disability, Family, and the Political Construction of Feeble-Mindedness, 1851-1890

      Social welfare historians and disability studies scholars have variously explained the late-nineteenth century emergence of vast custodial asylums for the “feeble-minded” as the results of institutions doomed from the outset, an increasingly impaired pupil population, or the influence of the burgeoning eugenics movement. Drawing on pupils’ case files, census records, and poor law publications, this paper, in contrast, reaches beyond the walls of the asylum to explore the role of factors external to institutions.  I argue that that the interaction between state charity policies, shifting family structures, and rapid industrialization and urbanization made it far more challenging to reintegrate pupils in their home communities. 

    • April  2012
      Roundtable on "A Right to Work? New Perspectives on Capitalism and the Construction of Disability"

      Panel co-organizer.

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • May 2014 to Present Faculty Fellow sponsored by  - $12000
    • Aug 2009 to Aug 2011 Larry J. Hackman Research Residency Fellowship sponsored by  - $4000
    • Aug 2009 to May 2011 Postdoctoral Fellowship sponsored by  - $55000

Students Supervised

  • Doctoral
    • Present
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      Working on dissertation entitled "Quaker Humanitarians, Disability, and the Quest for Transatlantic Legitimacy, 1730-1848"

  • Master's
    • Present
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      Advising on MA thesis that focuses on representations of rape victims' and rapists' bodies in the South during Jim Crow.

    • Aug 2014
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      Trained as research assistant for “No Right to Be Idle” book project (Summer 2011-Spring 2014).  Graduated with MA in History in May 2012 and started her PhD in History at Texas Christian University in August 2014.

    • Dec 2012
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      Chaired M.A. capstone committee and directed field in U.S. Disability History

    • May 2011
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      Chaired M.A. capstone committee and directed field in U.S. Disability History

  • Undergraduate
    • Present
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      Advising on “Disability and Community in Hardcore Music”: oral history project currently underway and which will be created as a digital exhibit for UT Arlington Libraries in fall 2015 for his Disability Studies Internship. Oral histories will be deposited in UTA Library’s new Texas Disability History Collection.  His proposal inspired the library to commit to supporting a series of digital exhibits on disability history and disability studies.

      Mentoring on “Visualizing Madness in Medieval Art and Pilgrimage"  research project that arose out of HIST 3300 “Introduction to Historical Research” (Fall 2013). Presented 2014 ACES symposium and will be presenting at the 2015 Cultural Constructions Conference at UTA and the 2015 Society for Disability Studies conference.  Project received the 2014-2015 Bede Lackner non-US History Award (Undergraduate) from the Department of History.

      Trained as research assistant on “No Right to Be Idle” book project (Summer 2014-present) and as assistant for the Minor in Disability Studies (Fall 2014-present; volunteered Spring-Summer 2014).  Received the Allan Saxe Disabled Student Award for Spring 2015 in part for his work on the Disability Studies Minor.

    • Present
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      Mentored on “The Insanity Defense and Mental Illness" research project presented at 2015 ACES symposium. Paper completed in DS 3331/HIST 3300 “Research in Disability Studies/Introduction to Historical Research” class that I taught in Fall 2014.

    • Present
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      Mentored on "Equal Access in Education and Sports for the Disabled Pushed by Jim Hayes" research project presented at 2014 ACES symposium. This arose out of the DS 3331/HIST 3300 "Research in Disability Studies/Introduction to Historical Research" course that I taught in Fall 2014.

    • Dec 2014
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      Mentored on “Braceros en el Norte: Stooped Over with a Strong Arm,” which received the Department of History’s 2014 George Wolfskill Award for best undergraduate paper in U.S. history. Paper completed in HIST 3300 “Introduction to Historical Research” class that I taught in Fall 2013.

    • Dec 2014
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      Mentored on “People of Tall Stature and Spatial Accommodation” research project presented at 2012 ACES symposium and 2013 Society for Disability Studies conference. Project arose out of HIST 3300 “Introduction to Historical Research” class that I taught in Fall 2011.

    • Aug 2014
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      Mentored on “Reproductively Disabled: An Examination of Infertility as a Disability, 1990-2008” research project presented at 2012 ACES and Women’s & Gender Studies Mini-Conference as well as at 2013 Society for Disability Studies conferences. Received Provost’s Award at ACES for Undergraduate Morning Presentation. Project arose out of HIST 3300 “Introduction to Historical Research” class that I taught in Fall 2011.

    • May 2014
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      Co-advised with Ray Jordan (AAST) on “Creating Black and Brown Female Disability: Historical Assumptions and Independent Realities” oral history project presented at 2014 ACES symposium, Women’s & Gender Studies Mini-Conference, North Texas Phi Alpha Theta conference, and the Society for Disability Studies conference. At ACES, she won the Women’s and Gender Studies Excellence Award and Provost’s Award for Undergraduate Morning Presentation. Oral histories deposited in UTA Library’s new Texas Disability History Collection.

      Mentored on “Uranium Mining and Nuclear Radiation: Poisoning of the Navajo People, 1940-2012” research project presented at 2012 ACES symposium and 2013 Society for Disability Studies conferences. Project arose out of HIST 3300 “Introduction to Historical Research” course that I taught in Fall 2011.

      Currently editing Corbett Joan O'Toole's Fading Scars: My Queer Disability History (Autonomous Press, forthcoming June 2015) and working as a promoter for Making Change Media.

Courses

      • DS 3307-001 HISTORY OF DISABILITY

        Twenty percent of Americans have a disability, but the experiences of most disabled people remain invisible to us. This course will explore the changing lives of people with disabilities—from railroad workers and rights activists to wheelchair athletes and participants in freak shows—as well as the history of disability policy and conceptions of disability. Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, we will investigate the historical and cultural variability of disability during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our explorations in disability history will also offer a new way of looking at classic topics in American history, such as citizenship, work, gender, education, and the civil rights movement.

        This course will be taught as a seminar-style, discussion-focused course with limited lectures and is accessible to non-majors. We will spend most of our time in class talking about the readings, films, or historical documents.  Therefore, it is crucial that students do the readings in advance, take notes on them, and come to class prepared for discussion.  Specific topics will include the eugenics movement, cyborgs, slavery and disability, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and other disability celebrities, freak shows, disabled veterans, and the Deaf community.  This class also counts towards UT Arlington’s Minor in Disability Studies, for which it is a core requirement.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 4395-001 Disability Studies Internship

        Supervised internship in which students apply the academic skills they have acquired in Disability Studies courses.  Interns work at an approved business, academic, or non-profit site that focuses on adapted sports, disability history, assistive technology, disability rights and policy, or universal design and accessibility.  Students should complete DS 4395 as one of their final courses for the minor and must have already taken or be taking DS 3307/HIST 3307. 

        The student intern commits to working for the designated organization for approximately 9 hours a week for 13 weeks of the semester in an unpaid position (~117 hours total). During that time, s/he will be trained and supervised by an employee of the organization who will keep track of his/her hours and evaluate his/her work.

        The student will also meet several times with the Disability Studies Minor’s Director and and Assistant for the to report on his/her progress and will turn in a written capstone essay as well as self and site evaluations at the end of the semester.  This essay asks students to analyze your experiences in the internship through a critical lens. The internship experience is intended to provide students with an opportunity to apply the concepts they have learned in the classroom to real-life, real-world situations and thereby gain an appreciation of how theory and practice intersect. In this essay, students should evaluate to what extent Disability Studies concepts they learned taking DS courses were relevant, useful, or enhanced by the internship.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 3307-001 HISTORY OF DISABILITY

        Twenty percent of Americans have a disability, but the experiences of most disabled people remain invisible to us. This course will explore the changing lives of people with disabilities—from railroad workers and rights activists to wheelchair athletes and participants in freak shows—as well as the history of disability policy and conceptions of disability. Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, we will investigate the historical and cultural variability of disability during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our explorations in disability history will also offer a new way of looking at classic topics in American history, such as citizenship, work, gender, education, and the civil rights movement.

        This course will be taught as a seminar-style, discussion-focused course with limited lectures and is accessible to non-majors. We will spend most of our time in class talking about the readings, films, or historical documents.  Therefore, it is crucial that students do the readings in advance, take notes on them, and come to class prepared for discussion.  Specific topics will include the eugenics movement, cyborgs, slavery and disability, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and other disability celebrities, freak shows, disabled veterans, and the Deaf community.  This class also counts towards UT Arlington’s Minor in Disability Studies, for which it is a core requirement.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 4395-001 Disability Studies Internship

        Supervised internship in which students apply the academic skills they have acquired in Disability Studies courses.  Interns work at an approved business, academic, or non-profit site that focuses on adapted sports, disability history, assistive technology, disability rights and policy, or universal design and accessibility.  Students should complete DS 4395 as one of their final courses for the minor and must have already taken or be taking DS 3307/HIST 3307. 

        The student intern commits to working for the designated organization for approximately 9 hours a week for 13 weeks of the semester in an unpaid position (~117 hours total). During that time, s/he will be trained and supervised by an employee of the organization who will keep track of his/her hours and evaluate his/her work.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 3307-001 History of Disability

        Twenty percent of Americans have a disability, but the experiences of most disabled people remain invisible to us. This course will explore the changing lives of people with disabilities—from railroad workers and rights activists to wheelchair athletes and participants in freak shows—as well as the history of disability policy and conceptions of disability. Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, we will investigate the historical and cultural variability of disability during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our explorations in disability history will also offer a new way of looking at classic topics in American history, such as citizenship, work, gender, education, and the civil rights movement.

        This course will be taught as a seminar-style, discussion-focused course with limited lectures and is accessible to non-majors. We will spend most of our time in class talking about the readings, films, or historical documents.  Therefore, it is crucial that students do the readings in advance, take notes on them, and come to class prepared for discussion.  Specific topics will include the eugenics movement, cyborgs, slavery and disability, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and other disability celebrities, freak shows, disabled veterans, and the Deaf community.  This class also counts towards UT Arlington’s Minor in Disability Studies, for which it is a core requirement.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3307-001 History of Disability

        Twenty percent of Americans have a disability, but the experiences of most disabled people remain invisible to us. This course will explore the changing lives of people with disabilities—from railroad workers and rights activists to wheelchair athletes and participants in freak shows—as well as the history of disability policy and conceptions of disability. Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, we will investigate the historical and cultural variability of disability during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our explorations in disability history will also offer a new way of looking at classic topics in American history, such as citizenship, work, gender, education, and the civil rights movement.

        This course will be taught as a seminar-style, discussion-focused course with limited lectures and is accessible to non-majors. We will spend most of our time in class talking about the readings, films, or historical documents.  Therefore, it is crucial that students do the readings in advance, take notes on them, and come to class prepared for discussion.  Specific topics will include the eugenics movement, cyborgs, slavery and disability, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and other disability celebrities, freak shows, disabled veterans, and the Deaf community.  This class also counts towards UT Arlington’s Minor in Disability Studies, for which it is a core requirement.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 4395-001 DISABILITY STUDIES INTERNSHIP

        Supervised internship in which students apply the academic skills they have acquired in Disability Studies courses by working in a related non-profit or business environment. The student intern commits to working for the designated organization for approximately 9 hours a week for 13 weeks of the semester in an unpaid position (~117 hours total). During that time, s/he will be trained and supervised by an employee of the organization who will keep track of his/her hours and evaluate his/her work.

        The student will also meet several times with the Disability Studies Minor’s Director and and Assistant for the to report on his/her progress and will turn in a written capstone essay as well as self and site evaluations at the end of the semester.  This essay asks students to analyze your experiences in the internship through a critical lens. The internship experience is intended to provide students with an opportunity to apply the concepts they have learned in the classroom to real-life, real-world situations and thereby gain an appreciation of how theory and practice intersect. In this essay, students should evaluate to what extent Disability Studies concepts they learned taking DS courses were relevant, useful, or enhanced by the internship.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-006 Introduction to Historical Research/Research in Disability Studies

        This course will introduce students to the craft of history in a hands-on manner. Students will explore the nature of history, the standards historians seek to follow, different ways of writing history, methods for evaluating evidence, and how to structure a narrative. To better focus our investigations, this class will concentrate on the history of disability: a field that ranges from madness, prosthetics, and freak shows to wheelchair sports, and injured veterans, among many other topics. 

        This course is designed to break the process of research and writing into a series of manageable steps and to help students build the analytical, research, and writing skills crucial for upper-level history classes.  We will begin by exploring major perspectives on the writing of disability history with a focus on U.S. disability history.  Students will then frame their own essay-length studies on a topic within the history of disability (with no geographic or chronological restrictions) that can be written using ample online primary sources as well as oral histories and other locally-available sources.  Past topics have included the history of accessibility in video games, masculinity and injuries in professional football, artistic representations of medieval madness, and uranium mining on the Navajo reservation, among many others.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 3331-001 Introduction to Historical Research/Research in Disability Studies

        This course will introduce students to the craft of history in a hands-on manner. Students will explore the nature of history, the standards historians seek to follow, different ways of writing history, methods for evaluating evidence, and how to structure a narrative. To better focus our investigations, this class will concentrate on the history of disability: a field that ranges from madness, prosthetics, and freak shows to wheelchair sports, and injured veterans, among many other topics. 

        This course is designed to break the process of research and writing into a series of manageable steps and to help students build the analytical, research, and writing skills crucial for upper-level history classes.  We will begin by exploring major perspectives on the writing of disability history with a focus on U.S. disability history.  Students will then frame their own essay-length studies on a topic within the history of disability (with no geographic or chronological restrictions) that can be written using ample online primary sources as well as oral histories and other locally-available sources.  Past topics have included the history of accessibility in video games, masculinity and injuries in professional football, artistic representations of medieval madness, and uranium mining on the Navajo reservation, among many others.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 3307-001 History of Disability

        Twenty percent of Americans have a disability, but the experiences of most disabled people remain invisible to us. This course will explore the changing lives of people with disabilities—from railroad workers and rights activists to wheelchair athletes and participants in freak shows—as well as the history of disability policy and conceptions of disability. Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, we will investigate the historical and cultural variability of disability during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our explorations in disability history will also offer a new way of looking at classic topics in American history, such as citizenship, work, gender, education, and the civil rights movement.

        This course will be taught as a seminar-style, discussion-focused course with limited lectures and is accessible to non-majors. We will spend most of our time in class talking about the readings, films, or historical documents.  Therefore, it is crucial that students do the readings in advance, take notes on them, and come to class prepared for discussion.  Specific topics will include the eugenics movement, cyborgs, slavery and disability, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and other disability celebrities, freak shows, disabled veterans, and the Deaf community.  This class also counts towards UT Arlington’s Minor in Disability Studies, for which it is a core requirement.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3307-001 History of Disability

        Twenty percent of Americans have a disability, but the experiences of most disabled people remain invisible to us. This course will explore the changing lives of people with disabilities—from railroad workers and rights activists to wheelchair athletes and participants in freak shows—as well as the history of disability policy and conceptions of disability. Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, we will investigate the historical and cultural variability of disability during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our explorations in disability history will also offer a new way of looking at classic topics in American history, such as citizenship, work, gender, education, and the civil rights movement.

        This course will be taught as a seminar-style, discussion-focused course with limited lectures and is accessible to non-majors. We will spend most of our time in class talking about the readings, films, or historical documents.  Therefore, it is crucial that students do the readings in advance, take notes on them, and come to class prepared for discussion.  Specific topics will include the eugenics movement, cyborgs, slavery and disability, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and other disability celebrities, freak shows, disabled veterans, and the Deaf community.  This class also counts towards UT Arlington’s Minor in Disability Studies, for which it is a core requirement.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 3307-002 HISTORY OF DISABILITY

        Twenty percent of Americans have a disability, but the experiences of most disabled people remain invisible to us. This course will explore the changing lives of people with disabilities—from railroad workers and rights activists to wheelchair athletes and participants in freak shows—as well as the history of disability policy and conceptions of disability. Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, we will investigate the historical and cultural variability of disability during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our explorations in disability history will also offer a new way of looking at classic topics in American history, such as citizenship, work, gender, education, and the civil rights movement.

        This course will be taught as a seminar-style, discussion-focused course with limited lectures and is accessible to non-majors. We will spend most of our time in class talking about the readings, films, or historical documents.  Therefore, it is crucial that students do the readings in advance, take notes on them, and come to class prepared for discussion.  Specific topics will include the eugenics movement, cyborgs, slavery and disability, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and other disability celebrities, freak shows, disabled veterans, and the Deaf community.  This class also counts towards UT Arlington’s Minor in Disability Studies, for which it is a core requirement.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3307-002 HISTORY OF DISABILITY

        Twenty percent of Americans have a disability, but the experiences of most disabled people remain invisible to us. This course will explore the changing lives of people with disabilities—from railroad workers and rights activists to wheelchair athletes and participants in freak shows—as well as the history of disability policy and conceptions of disability. Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, we will investigate the historical and cultural variability of disability during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our explorations in disability history will also offer a new way of looking at classic topics in American history, such as citizenship, work, gender, education, and the civil rights movement.

        This course will be taught as a seminar-style, discussion-focused course with limited lectures and is accessible to non-majors. We will spend most of our time in class talking about the readings, films, or historical documents.  Therefore, it is crucial that students do the readings in advance, take notes on them, and come to class prepared for discussion.  Specific topics will include the eugenics movement, cyborgs, slavery and disability, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and other disability celebrities, freak shows, disabled veterans, and the Deaf community.  This class also counts towards UT Arlington’s Minor in Disability Studies, for which it is a core requirement.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 4395-001 DISABILITY STUDIES INTERNSHIP

        Supervised internship in which students apply the academic skills they have acquired in Disability Studies courses by working in a related non-profit or business environment.

        The student intern commits to working for the designated organization for approximately 11 hours a week for 10 weeks of the semester in an unpaid position. During that time, s/he will be trained and supervised by an employee of the organization who will keep track of his/her hours and evaluate his/her work. The student will also meet regularly with the Director of the Minor in Disability Studies to report on his/her progress, and will turn in a written report on his/her experiences at the end of the semester.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-005 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL RESEARCH & RESEARCH IN DISABILITY STUDIES

        This course will introduce students to the craft of history in a hands-on manner. Students will explore the nature of history, the standards historians seek to follow, different ways of writing history, methods for evaluating evidence, and how to structure a narrative. To better focus our investigations, this class will concentrate on the history of disability: a field that ranges from madness, prosthetics, and freak shows to wheelchair sports, and injured veterans, among many other topics. 

        This course is designed to break the process of research and writing into a series of manageable steps and to help students build the analytical, research, and writing skills crucial for upper-level history classes.  We will begin by exploring major perspectives on the writing of disability history; our primary focus will be on the United States but with some excursions elsewhere.  Students will then frame their own essay-length studies on a topic within the history of disability that can be written using ample online primary sources as well as oral histories and other locally-available sources.  Past topics have included the history of accessibility in video games, masculinity and injuries in professional football, artistic representations of medieval madness, and uranium mining on the Navajo reservation, among others.

        This course counts towards the B.A. in History and the Minor in Disability Studies (http://disabilitystudies.uta.edu), the Leadership Studies Minor, and the culture course requirement for Interdisciplinary Studies, among other programs.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 3331-001 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL RESEARCH & RESEARCH IN DISABILITY STUDIES

        This course will introduce students to the craft of history in a hands-on manner. Students will explore the nature of history, the standards historians seek to follow, different ways of writing history, methods for evaluating evidence, and how to structure a narrative. To better focus our investigations, this class will concentrate on the history of disability: a field that ranges from madness, prosthetics, and freak shows to wheelchair sports, and injured veterans, among many other topics. 

        This course is designed to break the process of research and writing into a series of manageable steps and to help students build the analytical, research, and writing skills crucial for upper-level history classes.  We will begin by exploring major perspectives on the writing of disability history; our primary focus will be on the United States but with some excursions elsewhere.  Students will then frame their own essay-length studies on a topic within the history of disability that can be written using ample online primary sources as well as oral histories and other locally-available sources.  Past topics have included the history of accessibility in video games, masculinity and injuries in professional football, artistic representations of medieval madness, and uranium mining on the Navajo reservation, among others.

        This course counts towards the B.A. in History and the Minor in Disability Studies (http://disabilitystudies.uta.edu), the Leadership Studies Minor, and the culture course requirement for Interdisciplinary Studies, among other programs.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 3307 History of Disability

        Twenty percent of Americans have a disability, but the experiences of most disabled people remain invisible to us. This course will explore the changing lives of people with disabilities—from railroad workers and rights activists to wheelchair athletes and participants in freak shows—as well as the history of disability policy and conceptions of disability. Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, we will investigate the historical and cultural variability of disability during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our explorations in disability history will also offer a new way of looking at classic topics in American history, such as citizenship, work, gender, education, and the civil rights movement.

        This course will be taught as a seminar-style, discussion-focused course with limited lectures and is accessible to non-majors. We will spend most of our time in class talking about the readings, films, or historical documents.  Therefore, it is crucial that students do the readings in advance, take notes on them, and come to class prepared for discussion.  Specific topics will include the eugenics movement, cyborgs, slavery and disability, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and other disability celebrities, freak shows, disabled veterans, and the Deaf community.  This class also counts towards UT Arlington’s Minor in Disability Studies, for which it is a core requirement.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3307-001 History of Disability

        Twenty percent of Americans have a disability, but the experiences of most disabled people remain invisible to us. This course will explore the changing lives of people with disabilities—from railroad workers and rights activists to wheelchair athletes and participants in freak shows—as well as the history of disability policy and conceptions of disability. Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, we will investigate the historical and cultural variability of disability during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our explorations in disability history will also offer a new way of looking at classic topics in American history, such as citizenship, work, gender, education, and the civil rights movement.

        This course will be taught as a seminar-style, discussion-focused course with limited lectures and is accessible to non-majors. We will spend most of our time in class talking about the readings, films, or historical documents.  Therefore, it is crucial that students do the readings in advance, take notes on them, and come to class prepared for discussion.  Specific topics will include the eugenics movement, cyborgs, slavery and disability, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and other disability celebrities, freak shows, disabled veterans, and the Deaf community.  This class also counts towards UT Arlington’s Minor in Disability Studies, for which it is a core requirement.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3328-001 The Age of Industry and Reform, 1876-1920

        Thanks in part to Mark Twain, “The Gilded Age” has long been denigrated as an age of excess. The Progressive Era, in contrast, has been celebrated as an era of enlightened social policy. But there was much more to the years between 1876 and 1920 than robber barons and moralistic reformers. Indeed, those decades established economic and social patterns that still resonate today. For many Americans, these decades were a time of optimism, of advances in science, economic opportunities, and social policy. Others found their citizenship rights limited or their fortunes crushed.

        This course will be taught as a seminar-style class with limited lectures. Instead of my presenting a single historical narrative for you to memorize, we will evaluate competing historical interpretations and examine the primary sources used to create these narratives. Most of our time will be spent discussing the readings, films, or historical documents.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 6365-001 Seminar: Topics in Disability History

        “Disability is everywhere in history, once you begin looking for it, but conspicuously absent in the histories we write.”*  Indeed, twenty percent of the population worldwide has a disability, but the experiences of most people with disabilities remain invisible to us.  Traditionally, scholars treated disability as simply a medical impairment, rather than exploring its cultural and historical variability.  Historians of disability, in turn, have argued that notions of ability and disability play a crucial role in how we think about the world—a role on par with ideas about race, class, and gender.

        The most important goal of this course is to help beginning students learn (and more advanced students to improve) skills in historical research and writing.  Using appropriate primary and secondary sources, students will write a 18-20 page research paper on a topic pertaining to disability history: a field that ranges from madness, freak shows, and justifications for colonialism and slavery to prosthetics, eugenics, and the treatment of injured veterans, among many other topics.

        Topics are not geographically limited, provided that they are narrow enough to be analyzed cogently in one semester’s time and that appropriate sources are accessible via local archives (including UTA Libraries’ new Texas Disability History Collection), ample online disability history source sites, or inter-library loan.

        *Douglas C. Baynton, “Disability and the Justification of Inequality in American History,” in The New Disability History, eds. Paul K. Longmore and Lauri Umansky (NYU Press, 2001), p. 52.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 3331-001 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL RESEARCH/RESEARCH IN DISABILITY STUDIES

        This course will introduce students to the craft of history in a hands-on manner. Students will explore the nature of history, the standards historians seek to follow, different ways of writing history, methods for evaluating evidence, and how to structure a narrative. To better focus our investigations, this class will concentrate on the history of disability: a field that ranges from madness, prosthetics, and freak shows to wheelchair sports, and injured veterans, among many other topics.  

        This course is designed to break the process of research and writing into a series of manageable steps and to help students build the analytical, research, and writing skills crucial for upper-level history classes.  We will begin by exploring major perspectives on the writing of disability history; our primary focus will be on the United States but with some excursions elsewhere.  Students will then frame their own essay-length studies on a topic within the history of disability that can be written using ample online primary sources as well as oral histories and other locally-available sources.  Past topics have included the history of accessibility in video games, masculinity and injuries in professional football, artistic representations of medieval madness, and uranium mining on the Navajo reservation, among others.

        This course counts towards Minor in Disability Studies (http://disabilitystudies.uta.edu), a B.A. in History, the Leadership Studies Minor, the Health Studies Minor, and the University Studies major.  It also fulfills the culture course requirement for Interdisciplinary Studies.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-002 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL RESEARCH/RESEARCH IN DISABILITY STUDIES

        This course will introduce students to the craft of history in a hands-on manner. Students will explore the nature of history, the standards historians seek to follow, different ways of writing history, methods for evaluating evidence, and how to structure a narrative. To better focus our investigations, this class will concentrate on the history of disability: a field that ranges from madness, prosthetics, and freak shows to wheelchair sports, and injured veterans, among many other topics.  

        This course is designed to break the process of research and writing into a series of manageable steps and to help students build the analytical, research, and writing skills crucial for upper-level history classes.  We will begin by exploring major perspectives on the writing of disability history; our primary focus will be on the United States but with some excursions elsewhere.  Students will then frame their own essay-length studies on a topic within the history of disability that can be written using ample online primary sources as well as oral histories and other locally-available sources.  Past topics have included the history of accessibility in video games, masculinity and injuries in professional football, artistic representations of medieval madness, and uranium mining on the Navajo reservation, among others.

        This course counts towards Minor in Disability Studies (http://disabilitystudies.uta.edu), a B.A. in History, the Leadership Studies Minor, the Health Studies Minor, and the University Studies major.  It also fulfills the culture course requirement for Interdisciplinary Studies.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 1312-014 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, 1865 TO PRESENT

        This course will explore U.S. political, social, economic, and cultural history from 1865 to the present. The class will be structured around several overlapping themes: the ways in which U.S.  citizenship has contracted and expanded, the rise of large-scale industrial capitalism, the development of the modern American state, the technological innovations that allowed massive population expansion in the West and South, and the civil rights movement, and the rise of conservatism.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3307-001 History of Disability

        Twenty percent of Americans have a disability, but the experiences of most disabled people remain invisible to us. This course will explore the changing lives of people with disabilities—from railroad workers and rights activists to wheelchair athletes and participants in freak shows—as well as the history of disability policy and conceptions of disability. Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, we will investigate the historical and cultural variability of disability during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our explorations in disability history will also offer a new way of looking at classic topics in American history, such as citizenship, work, gender, education, and the civil rights movement.

        This course will be taught as a seminar-style, discussion-focused course with limited lectures and is accessible to non-majors. We will spend most of our time in class talking about the readings, films, or historical documents.  Therefore, it is crucial that students do the readings in advance, take notes on them, and come to class prepared for discussion.  Specific topics will include the eugenics movement, cyborgs, slavery and disability, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and other disability celebrities, freak shows, disabled veterans, and the Deaf community.  This class also counts towards UT Arlington’s Minor in Disability Studies, for which it is a core requirement (http://disabilitystudies.uta.edu).

        Cross-listed as DS 3307.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5304-001 History of the Body

        This course will explore the history of the body: crippled, adolescent, dead, athletic, middle-class, slave, and migrant bodies, among others. Focusing on the intertwined themes of gender, race, class, disability, and the senses—and their intersections with social policy, medicine, and technology—we will approach the body as a historical text. We will examine how studying the history of the body can shed new light on the lived experiences of ordinary people, such as how the scarred and maimed bodies of slave and sailors in the early Atlantic world helped to inspire both slave revolts and pirate ships. We will also investigate how representations of bodies can illuminate political and cultural history—for instance, how cartoons that presented President McKinley as an effeminate weakling helped to push the United States into the Spanish-American war. Finally, we will explore how these two realms—experience and representation—have interacted to shape how individuals have perceived and understood their own bodies. Readings will focus primarily on the history of the body in the United States but will also include some transatlantic and British studies.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-005 Introduction to Historical Research/Research in Disability Studies

        This course will introduce students to the craft of history in a hands-on manner. Students will explore the nature of history, the standards historians seek to follow, different ways of writing history, methods for evaluating evidence, and how to structure a narrative. To better focus our investigations, this class will concentrate on the history of disability—a field that ranges from madness, prosthetics, and idiocy to freak shows, wheelchair sports, and injured veterans, among many other topics.  

        This course is designed to break the process of research and writing into a series of manageable steps and to help students build the analytical, research, and writing skills crucial for upper-level history classes.  We will begin by exploring major perspectives on the writing of disability history; our primary focus will be on the United States but with some excursions elsewhere.  Students will then frame their own essay-length studies on a topic within the history of disability that can be written using ample online primary sources, as well as locally-available sources.  Past topics have included the history of accessibility in video games, masculinity and injuries in professional football, artistic representations of medieval madness, and uranium mining on the Navajo reservation, among others.

        This course counts toward the Minor in Disability Studies (http://disabilitystudies.uta.edu)

        Cross-listed as DS 3331-001.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 3331-001 Research in Disability Studies

        This course will introduce students to the craft of history in a hands-on manner. Students will explore the nature of history, the standards historians seek to follow, different ways of writing history, methods for evaluating evidence, and how to structure a narrative. To better focus our investigations, this class will concentrate on the history of disability—a field that ranges from madness, prosthetics, and idiocy to freak shows, wheelchair sports, and injured veterans, among many other topics.  

        This course is designed to break the process of research and writing into a series of manageable steps and to help students build the analytical, research, and writing skills crucial for upper-level history classes.  We will begin by exploring major perspectives on the writing of disability history; our primary focus will be on the United States but with some excursions elsewhere.  Students will then frame their own essay-length studies on a topic within the history of disability that can be written using ample online primary sources, as well as locally-available sources.  Past topics have included the history of accessibility in video games, masculinity and injuries in professional football, artistic representations of medieval madness, and uranium mining on the Navajo reservation, among others.

        This course counts toward the Minor in Disability Studies (http://disabilitystudies.uta.edu)

        Cross-listed as HIST 3300-005.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3307-001 Hist 3307-001

        Twenty percent of Americans have a disability, but the experiences of most disabled people remain invisible to us. This course will explore the changing lives of people with disabilities—from railroad workers and rights activists to wheelchair athletes and participants in freak shows—as well as the history of disability policy and conceptions of disability. Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, we will investigate the historical and cultural variability of disability during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our explorations in disability history will also offer a new way of looking at classic topics in American history, such as citizenship, work, gender, education, and the civil rights movement.

        This course will be taught as a seminar-style, discussion-focused course with limited lectures and is accessible to non-majors. We will spend most of our time in class talking about the readings, films, or historical documents.  Therefore, it is crucial that students do the readings in advance, take notes on them, and come to class prepared for discussion.  Specific topics will include the eugenics movement, cyborgs, slavery and disability, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and other disability celebrities, freak shows, disabled veterans, and the Deaf community.  This class also counts towards UT Arlington’s minor in disability studies, for which it is the core requirement.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3328-001 The Age of Industry and Reform, 1876-1920

        Thanks in part to Mark Twain, “The Gilded Age” has long been denigrated as an age of excess. The Progressive Era, in contrast, has been celebrated as an era of enlightened social policy. But there was much more to the years between 1876 and 1920 than robber barons and moralistic reformers. Indeed, those decades established economic and social patterns that still resonate today. For many Americans, these decades were a time of optimism, of advances in science, economic opportunities, and social policy. Others found their citizenship rights limited or their fortunes crushed.

        This course will be taught as a seminar-style class with limited lectures. Instead of my presenting a single historical narrative for you to memorize, we will evaluate competing historical interpretations and examine the primary sources used to create these narratives. Most of our time will be spent discussing the readings, films, or historical documents. Therefore, it is crucial that students do the readings in advance, take notes on them, and come to class prepared for discussion. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 6304-001 Identities & Encounters: Disability in the Atlantic Basin

        “Disability is everywhere in history, once you begin looking for it, but conspicuously absent in the histories we write.”*  Indeed, twenty percent of the population worldwide has a disability, but the experiences of most people with disabilities remain invisible to us.  Scholars of disability, in turn, have argued that notions of ability and disability play a crucial role in how we think about the world—a role on par with ideas about race, class, and gender. 

        This course will explore the conceptual role played by disability in creating identities on both sides of the Atlantic, as well as how transatlantic encounters shaped both social policies and the lived experiences of disabled people from railroad workers, rights activists, and colonial subjects to cyborgs, slaves, and participants in freak shows.  Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, we will investigate the historical and cultural variability of disability between the seventeenth and twentieth centuries.

        Our explorations in disability history (and, to a lesser extent, disability studies) will also offer a new way of engaging with major topics in transatlantic history such as colonialism, migration, slavery, policy transfers, identity formation, the rise of industrial capitalism, and problematizing the nation-state. Units will include: early modern religious and legal conceptions of disability; the asylum movement; eugenics, citizenship, and work; disabled veterans and rehabilitation; disability rights and disability culture; and contemporary disability issues in historical perspective.

        *Douglas C. Baynton, “Disability and the Justification of Inequality in American History,” in The New Disability History, eds. Paul K. Longmore and Lauri Umansky (NYU Press, 2001), p. 52.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-006 Introduction to Historical Research

        This course will introduce students to the craft of history in a hands-on manner. Students will explore the nature of history, the standards historians seek to follow, different ways of writing history, methods for evaluating evidence, and how to structure a narrative. To better focus our investigations, this class will concentrate on the history of disability in the United States—a field that ranges from Franklin Roosevelt, injured veterans, and freak shows to wheelchair sports, insane asylums, and telethons, among many other topics.

        This course is designed to break the process of research and writing into a series of manageable steps and to help students build the analytical, research, and writing skills crucial for upper-level history classes.  We will begin by exploring major and unique perspectives on the writing of U.S. disability history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  Students will then frame their own essay-length studies of a topic on the history of disability that can be written using the ample online and local collections of primary sources.  Topics are not limited, but might include the role of presidential disabilities and chronic illnesses, experiences of workers in dangerous industries, the reintegration of disabled veterans, the Paralympics, and the role of ideas about disability in determining access to citizenship, among many other topics.

        This course counts toward the Minor in Disability Studies.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 5340-001 Issues and Interpretations in U.S. History

        No Description Provided.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3307-001 History of Disability
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • HIST 1312-005 HIST 1312, The United States, 1865-Present
        This course will explore American political, social, economic, and cultural history from 1865 to the present. The class will be structured around several overlapping themes: the ways in which American citizenship has contracted and expanded, the rise of large-scale industrial capitalism, the development of the modern American state, the technological innovations that allowed massive population expansion in the West and South, and the civil rights movement, and the rise of conservatism.  This course will also teach students how to think in a historical manner: how to analyze historical arguments and historical documents. Accordingly, students will read and write about a wide array of sources ranging from primary documents to articles by historians.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • HIST 3328-001 The Age of Industry and Reform, 1876-1920

        Thanks in part to Mark Twain, "The Gilded Age" has long been denigrated as an age of excess. The Progressive Era, in contrast, has been celebrated as an era of enlightened social policy. But there was much more to the years between 1876 and 1920 than robber barons and moralistic reformers. Indeed, those decades established economic and social patterns that still resonate today. For many Americans, these decades were a time of optimism, of advances in science, economic opportunities, and social policy. Others found their citizenship rights limited or their fortunes crushed. This course will be taught as a seminar-style class with limited lectures.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011Contact info & Office Hours
      • HIST 3300-005 Introduction to Historical Research
        This course will introduce students to the craft of history in a hands-on manner. Students will explore the nature of history, the standards historians seek to follow, different ways of writing history, methods for evaluating evidence, and how to structure a narrative. To better focus our investigations, this class will concentrate on the history of disability in the United States—a field that ranges from Franklin Roosevelt, injured veterans, and freak shows to wheelchair sports, insane asylums, and telethons, among many other topics.

        This course is designed to break the process of research and writing into a series of manageable steps and to help students build the analytical, research, and writing skills crucial for upper-level history classes. We will begin by exploring major and unique perspectives on the writing of U.S. disability history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students will then frame their own essay-length studies of a topic on the history of disability that can be written using the ample online and local collections of primary sources. Topics are not limited, but might include the role of presidential disabilities and chronic illnesses, experiences of workers in dangerous industries, the reintegration of disabled veterans, the Paralympics, and the role of ideas about disability in determining access to citizenship, among many other topics.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011
      • HIST 5302-001 Colloquium on the Body in American Culture
        This course will explore the history of the body in American culture: crippled, adolescent, athletic, middle-class, slave, and migrant bodies, among others. Focusing on the intertwined themes of gender, race, class, and disability—and their intersections with social policy, medicine, and technology—we will approach the body as a historical text. We will examine how studying the history of the body can shed new light on the lived experiences of ordinary people, such as how the scarred and maimed bodies of slaves and sailors in the early Atlantic world helped to inspire both slave revolts and pirate ships. We will also investigate how representations of bodies can illuminate political and cultural history—for instance, how cartoons that presented President McKinley as an effeminate weakling helped to push the United States into the Spanish-American war. Finally, we will explore how these two realms—experience and representation—have interacted to shape how individuals have perceived and understood their own bodies.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • HIST 4388-008 U.S. Disability History
        Twenty percent of Americans have a disability, but the experiences of most disabled people remain invisible to us. This course will explore the changing lives of people with disabilities—from railroad workers and rights activists to cyborgs and participants in freak shows—as well as the history of disability policy and conceptions of disability. Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, we will investigate the historical and cultural variability of disability during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our explorations in disability history will also offer a new way of looking at classic topics in U.S. history, such as citizenship, work, gender, education, and the civil rights movement. This course will be taught as a seminar-style course with limited lectures. We will spend most of our time in class discussing the readings, films, or historical documents.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • HIST 4388-008 U.S. Disability History
        Twenty percent of Americans have a disability, but the experiences of most disabled people remain invisible to us. This course will explore the changing lives of people with disabilities—from railroad workers and rights activists to cyborgs and participants in freak shows—as well as the history of disability policy and conceptions of disability. Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, we will investigate the historical and cultural variability of disability during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our explorations in disability history will also offer a new way of looking at classic topics in U.S. history, such as citizenship, work, gender, education, and the civil rights movement. This course will be taught as a seminar-style course with limited lectures. We will spend most of our time in class discussing the readings, films, or historical documents.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • HIST 1312-005 HIST 1312, The United States, 1865-Present
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2009

Other Teaching Activities

  • 2015
    • Dissertation Committee Member
      • Apr 2015 n/a

        Kristen Burton (Ph.D. candidate in Transatlantic History at UT Arlington, dissertation in progress): “John Barleycorn vs. Sir Richard Rum: Alcohol, the Atlantic, and the Distilling of Colonial Identity, 1650-1800”

        Bryan Garrett (Ph.D. candidate in Transatlantic History at UT Arlington, dissertation in progress): “Otherness in ‘Democratic’ Empires: The Arab Diaspora and Transatlantic Discourses of Identity, 1880s-1930s”

        Michael Green (Ph.D. student in U.S. History at Texas Christian University): Deinstitutionalization, Age, and Cognitive Disability in Post-World War II Texas

    • MFA Committee Member
      • Apr 2015 n/a

        Emily Nicastro (M.F.A. in Intermedia, UT Arlington, graduating May 2015): focus on disability, deafness, hearing loss, and art

        Janet Morrow (M.F.A. in Intermedia, UT Arlington, graduated May 2012): focus on disability art and cyborgism

    • MA Committee Member
      • Apr 2015 n/a

        Dalton Boyd (M.A. student at University of North Texas, thesis in progress):  “Progressive Insanity in Texas”

        Edward Bart (M.A. in English at UT Arlington, thesis in progress): American Sign Language literature, colonization of Deaf culture, and Deaf resistance

        Samantha Putman (M.A. thesis in English at UT Arlington, graduated May 2012): “‘The Best and the Brightest:’ The Overachievement Rhetoric during America’s Polio Epidemics”

        Allison Osborn (M.A. capstone in History with field in U.S. Disability History at UT Arlington, graduated May 2011)

Service to the Community

  • Appointed
    • Oct 2014 to  Present Advisory Board, Helping Restore Ability

      Member

    • May 2015 to  May 2015 Presentation on UT Arlington's Disability Studies Minor (with Trevor Engel)

      Arlington Mayor's Committee on People with Disabilities
       

    • Nov 2006 to  May 2014 2009-2014 service to the community

      2013    “Not Just for Students with Disabilities: Using Universal Design to Help All Students Learn,” virtual coffee hour presentation with Penny Acrey for CIRTL ON-TRAC Network (also presented in UTA Department of History Brownbag Series in 2014)

      2012    “The Origins of the Cold War,” presented at Teaching American History Seminar, Fort Worth Independent School District

      2012    “Historicizing the ‘R’ Word” presented at “Mavericks Spread the Word (To End the ‘R’ Word)” panel, Leadership Center and UTA Volunteers, UT Arlington

      2011    “Presidential Bodies” and “Teaching with Online Archival and Primary Sources” presented at Teaching American History Summer Institute, Dallas Independent School District

      2010    “Creating the Disabled,” presentation to Arlington Mayor’s Committee on People with Disabilities

      2010    “Industrialization and the West,” “Immigration and Urban Life,” and “Remaking Americans: A New Look at Progressive Reform,” presented at Teaching American History Summer Institute, Dallas Independent School District

      2006     Historical consultant, Chicago Disability History Exhibit, National Vietnam Veterans Art Museum

Service to the Profession

  • Appointed
    • Apr 2013 to  Present Member, Organization of American Historians Committee on Disability and Disability History

      Term is 2013-2018

    • Dec 2011 to  Present Advisory Board Member, "Disabilty and Industrial Society: A Comparative Cultural History of British Coalfields, 1780-1948"

      Funded by the Wellcome Trust Programme for 2011-2016

    • Sept 2011 to  Sept 2011 Manuscript Review for "Annals of Iowa"

      n/a

    • Feb 2006 to  Feb 2006 Manuscript review for "Enterprise and Society"

      n/a

    • Dec 2013 to  Present Advisor, "Poverty, Place, Disability, and Mutual Aid, 1875-1935" digital exhibit

      Produced by the Disability History Museum and funded by the Massachusetts Humanities Foundation

  • Volunteered
    • Oct 2010 to  Oct 2010 Textbook review, "America Firsthand, volume 2"

      completed for Bedford/St. Martin's Press

    • Feb 2004 to  Apr 2004 Co-organizer, Midwest Labor and Working-Class History Colloquium

      Helped to organize graduate student conference.

    • Jan 2003 to  Feb 2003 Member of Steering Committee for University of Illinois at Chicago Graduate Student Conference

      Read abstracts, selected presenters, and created panels for conference.

Service to the University

  • Volunteered
    • Mar 2015 to  Apr 2015 Organized 50th Annual Walter Prescott Webb Lectures on "Beyond Attics and Activists: Rethinking Family in Disability History"

      Included:

      • Screening of Invitation to Dance and Q&A with filmmakers Simi Linton and Christian von Tippelskirch

      Subject: Disability exhibit guest-curated by Stephen Lapthisophon with works by Gary Cannone, Sally Glass, Joseph Grigely, Olga Koumoundouros, Pierre Krause, Michelle Rawlings, Sunaura Taylor, Lauren Woods, Michael Wynne, as well gallery talks by Stephen Lapthisophon and Sara-Jayne Parsons

      Lectures:

      • “Disability and Slave Motherhood in the Antebellum South” by Dr. Dea H. Boster, Columbus State Community College

      • “‘She Played Like Any Ordinary Child’: Idiocy, Disability, and Family,” by Dr. Sarah F. Rose, UT Arlington

      • “Personal Politics, Disability Rights, and the Deinstitutionalization of Psychiatric Hospitals,” by Dr. Anne E. Parsons, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

      • “Commentary,” by Dr. Sonya Michel, University of College Park at Maryland

      • “Disorderly Pasts: Kinship, Diagnoses, and Native American-U.S. Histories,” by Dr. Susan Burch, Middlebury College

  • Appointed
    • May 2010 to  Present Faculty Co-Advisor, Delta Alpha Pi Honor Society
    • Aug 2014 to  Present Standing Member, Committee on Diversity and Inclusion
    • June 2014 to  July 2014 Member, Neilsen Scholarship Committee
    • Aug 2009 to  May 2014 2009-2014 Service to the University

      2013-2014       Search Committee member, internal search for Director of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program

      2011-2014       Chair, Allan Saxe Disabled Student Scholarship Committee

      2011-2014       Advisory Board member, Women’s and Gender Studies program

      2013                Co-designed Core Curriculum Assessment Plan for HIST 1311 & HIST 1312

      2012-2013       Member, College of Liberal Arts Undergraduate Curriculum Committee

      2012-2013       Chair, Department of History Curriculum Committee

      2012-2013       Member, Department of History Advisory Committee

      2011-2012       Member, Mexican American History Search Committee

      2010-2011       Member, E. C. Barksdale Essay Prize Committee (Department of History)

      2010    Search committee member, internal search for Director of the Office for Students with Disabilities

      2010    Member, Graduate Studies Executive Committee

      2010    Faculty judge, Annual Celebration of Excellence Symposium

      2009-2011       Member, Phi Alpha Theta Committee (Department of History)

      2009-2010       Member, Migration Search Committee

      2009                 Library Committee (Department of History)

    • Aug 2013 to  Present Chair, Professional Development/Brownbag Committee (Department of History)

      Co-founded Department of History Brownbag Series in 2011

      Chair, 2013-present
       

    • Aug 2010 to  Present Member, Webb Lectures Planning Committee

      Department of History committee

    • Aug 2013 to  Present Activities as Director of the Minor in Disability Studies

      2015-2016

      Curating exhibit on UTA in disability history for the Central Library Sixth Floor Parlor (opening in October 2015)

      2014-2015

      Second cohort of two minors graduating in May 2015; 22 students continuing in 2015-2016

      Internship program expanded to UTARI and the Arlington Mayor's Committee on People with Disabilities

      Texas Disability History Collection at UT Arlington Libraries now holds 22 oral histories of local disability rights activists; we are working to locate and transfer local disability history records to UT Arlington. In March 2015, we applied for a TexTreasures grant with UTA Libraries to fund “Digitizing for Accessibility: The Texas Disability History Collection Project," which would fund accessible website with digitized oral histories and archival documents, photographs, and videos on disability history from UTA Special Collections, along with digital exhibits on disability studies and disability history.

      The Minor is also now part of a new Disability History/Archives Consortium along with UTA Libraries.  This is a national collaboration between educational institutions, libraries, and cultural heritage organizations that promotes the integration of collections, preservation, access, and the development of educational resources about disability history and which will develop an online portal to disability history resources.  We are applying for NEH funding for a small conference at UTA in summer 2016.

      Organized 50th Annual Walter Prescott Webb Memorial Lectures on “Beyond Attics and Activists: Rethinking Family in Disability History

      Organized film screenings:

      1) Fixed: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement with the Women’s and Gender Studies Program and Office for Students with Disabilities, featuring John Bricout, Julienne Greer, and Janet Morrow (all UTA faculty)

      2) Working Like Crazy with the Delta Alpha Pi Honor Society and Office for Students with Disabilities, featuring Dr. Richard Scotch (UT Dallas) and Dr. Elisabeth Cawthon (UT Arlington)

      3) Endless Abilities and discussion with Paralympians and national team members with Movin’ Mavs Adapted Sports and Recreation and Office for Students with Disabilities

      4) Vital Signs: Crip Culture Talks Back with the Delta Alpha Pi Honor Society and Office for Students with Disabilities, discussion led by Delta Alpha Pi officers/minors in Disability Studies

      2013-2014

      First cohort of 3 minors graduated in May 2014; 12 students continued in 2014-2015

      Internships established with Movin' Mavs Adapted Sports & Recreation, Helping Restore Ability, Disability History Museum, and Texas Disability History Collection/UTA Special Collections

      Initiated Texas Disability History collections program and Disability Oral History project in conjunction with UTA Library and Department of History’s Public History M.A. program

      Organized “Enabling Disability: Disability Studies at UT Arlington” conference (October 2013) as part of Festival of Ideas Global Research Institute series; drew 85 attendees from across UTA, plus TCU, UT Dallas, UT Tyler, and local disability rights organizations and government agencies

      Co-organized lecture by Prof. Kim E. Nielsen (University of Toledo) for Women’s History Month with the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies: “Saints, Sinners, and BFFs: Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan Macy”

      Co-organized film screenings and co-led discussions:

      1) Jerry’s Orphans: The Kids Are All Right with the Delta Alpha Pi Honor Society and Office for Students with Disabilities

      2) Austin Unbound with the LGBTQA Program, Office for Students with Disabilities, Center for Women’s and Gender Studies, and Multicultural Affairs

      3) The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia with the Department of Curriculum & Instruction and the Office for Students with Disabilities

      Co-sponsored “Exquisite Variation: VSA Disability Art Exhibit” at UT Arlington

      2010-2013 Leadup Activities

      Organized film screenings and discussions of NoBody’s Perfect and Lives Worth Living, as well as a talk by Paralympic medalist and Prof. Abu Yilla (Kinesiology) in conjunction with the Office for Students with Disabilities and Delta Alpha Pi H onor Society

      Organized lecture by Lindsey Anderson of the NeuroQueer Project (graduated from UTA with Minor in Disability Studies in May 2014) with the Diversity Certificate Program, Women’s and Gender Studies, and Office for Students with Disabilities: “Moving Beyond ‘the Spectrum’: A Conversation with NeuroQueer Activist Lindsey Anderson”

Other Service Activities

  • Uncategorized
    • Dec  Consulting
      UT Arlington AP Institute, 2011
      Disability History Museum, 2008-2009
    • Dec  Professional Memberships
      American Association for the History of Medicine
      American Historical Association
      Disability History Association
      Labor and Working-Class History Association
      Organization of American Historians
      Society for Disability Studies
    • Dec  Editorial Service
      Article referee, Annals of Iowa, 2011; Enterprise & Society, 2006
      Textbook reviewer, Bedford/St. Martin's, 2010